Sample records for technology current hydrokinetic

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  2. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  3. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and...

  4. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities.

  5. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  6. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  7. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help...

  10. Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pamphlet that describes the Office of EERE's Water Power Program in fiscal year 2009, including the fiscal year 2009 funding opportunities, the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, the U.S. hydrodynamic testing facilities, and the fiscal year 2008 Advanced Water Projects awards.

  11. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMA EnergyMagna1983: StrategicMarginalTechnologies

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMA EnergyMagna1983:Marine and Hydrokinetic

  13. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on...

  14. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

  15. MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point,ECO Auger < MHK Technologies Jump to:EximPower

  16. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  17. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  18. Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  1. Eos, Vol. 93, No. 10, 6 March 2012 Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    convert the kinetic energy of waves and water currents into power to generate electricity. Although of harnessing the natural power of water for renewable energy at a competitive cost and without harmingEos, Vol. 93, No. 10, 6 March 2012 Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy harvesting technologies

  2. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  3. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-CostManufacturingMarginal Energy Prices -PROGRAM C L

  4. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

  5. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  6. Hydrogen Delivery- Current Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen is transported from the point of production to the point of use via pipeline, over the road in cryogenic liquid trucks or gaseous tube trailers, or by rail or barge. Read on to learn more about current hydrogen delivery and storage technologies.

  7. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

  8. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  9. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  10. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  11. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Spain

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University�¢����s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

  12. Massachusetts: New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish Massachusetts: New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental...

  13. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United...

  14. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August...

  15. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinet...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems January 14, 2015 -...

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

  17. Fuel Cells - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells - Current Technology Fuel Cells - Current Technology Today, fuel cells are being developed to power passenger vehicles, commercial buildings, homes, and even small...

  18. Hydrogen Production - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Current Technology Hydrogen Production - Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processes is key to a viable future...

  19. Current Status of Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CPV) technology has recently entered the market as a utility- scale option for the generation of solar electricity. This report explores the current status of CPV technology...

  20. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  1. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokinetic Energy TechnologiesAugustTools |Department

  2. Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    proposes a similar approach to accelerate hydrokinetic marine energy technology in global energy markets. For each case study, we show the gaps to scaling up technology...

  3. Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLos AlamosExperiment

  5. THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

  6. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  7. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river...

  8. Current technologies and trends of aluminum design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Michael, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of current aluminum technology in the building and construction industry was carried out. Aluminum is an ideal material for building in corrosive environments and for building structures where small ...

  9. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  10. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  11. Current Status of Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philipps, S. P.; Bett, A. W.; Horowitz, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the current status of the market and technology for concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cells and modules. Significant progress in CPV has been achieved, including record efficiencies for modules (36.7%) and cells (46%), as well as growth of large field installations in recent years. CPV technology may also have the potential to be cost-competitive on a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) basis in regions of high direct normal irradiance (DNI). The study includes an overview of all installations larger than 1 MW, information on companies currently active in the CPV field, efficiency data, and estimates of the LCOE in different scenarios.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessments. Laboratory-scale testing will be done to investigate materials and coatings, hydrofoil performance, and small-scale array effects. Test and evaluation is initially...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Test Facility Central Receiver Test Facility Power Towers for Utilities Solar Furnace Dish Test Facility Optics Lab Parabolic Dishes Work For Others (WFO) User...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Market

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLos AlamosExperiment Process

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Reference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLos AlamosExperiment ProcessModel

  16. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  17. Current Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County,Curran, Illinois: EnergyCurrent Technologies

  18. Massachusetts: New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    EERE has released a report assessing likelihood of fish injury and mortality from the operation of hydrokinetic turbines.

  19. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

  20. Simulating environmental changes due to marine hydrokinetic energy installations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Craig A. (Sea Engineering Inc., Santa Cruz, CA); James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse Daniel (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Seetho, Eddy

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) projects will extract energy from ocean currents and tides, thereby altering water velocities and currents in the site's waterway. These hydrodynamics changes can potentially affect the ecosystem, both near the MHK installation and in surrounding (i.e., far field) regions. In both marine and freshwater environments, devices will remove energy (momentum) from the system, potentially altering water quality and sediment dynamics. In estuaries, tidal ranges and residence times could change (either increasing or decreasing depending on system flow properties and where the effects are being measured). Effects will be proportional to the number and size of structures installed, with large MHK projects having the greatest potential effects and requiring the most in-depth analyses. This work implements modification to an existing flow, sediment dynamics, and water-quality code (SNL-EFDC) to qualify, quantify, and visualize the influence of MHK-device momentum/energy extraction at a representative site. New algorithms simulate changes to system fluid dynamics due to removal of momentum and reflect commensurate changes in turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. A generic model is developed to demonstrate corresponding changes to erosion, sediment dynamics, and water quality. Also, bed-slope effects on sediment erosion and bedload velocity are incorporated to better understand scour potential.

  1. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Grubb, Kimberly R [ORNL; Lee, Russell [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  2. The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Andy Aden Feb. 5, 2009 The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy...

  3. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressor–receptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and biological consequences of different blade strike scenarios. Results of these analyses found the following: 1) a SRKW is not likely to experience significant tissue injury from impact by an OpenHydro turbine blade; and 2) if whale skin behaves similarly to the materials considered as surrogates for the upper dermal layers of whale skin, it would not be torn by an OpenHydro blade strike. The PNNL/SNL analyses could not provide insight into the potential for more subtle changes to SRKWs from an encounter with a turbine, such as changes in behavior, or inform turbine interactions for other whales or other turbines. These analyses were limited by the available time frame in which results were needed and focused on the mechanical response of whale tissues and bone to blade strike. PNNL proposes that analyses of additional turbine designs and interactions with other marine mammals that differ in size, body conformation, and mass be performed.

  4. Direct - drive permanent magnet synchronous generator design for hydrokinetic energy extraction .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashyap, Amshumaan Raghunatha

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??"Hydrokinetic turbines deliver lower shaft speeds when compared to both steam and wind turbines. Hence, a water wheel generator must operate at speeds as low… (more)

  5. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenterTri-PartyTechnologies |

  6. Direct current, closed furnace silicon technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosaj, V.D. [Dow Corning Corp., Midland, MI (United States); May, J.B. [Dow Corning Corp., Freeland, MI (United States); Arvidson, A.N. [Meadow Materials, Manitoba (Canada)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dc closed furnace technology for smelting silicon offers technical operating challenges, as well as, economic opportunities for off-gas recovery, reduced electrode consumption, reduced reductant oxidation losses, reduced energy consumption, and improved silicon recovery. The 10 mva dc closed furnace is located in East Selkirk, Manitoba. Construction of this pilot plant was started in September 1990. Following successful commissioning of the furnace in 1992, a number of smelting tests have been conducted aimed at optimization of the furnace operation and the raw material mix. The operation of a closed furnace is significantly different from an open furnace operation. The major difference being in the mechanical movement of the mix, off-gas recovery, and inability to observe the process. These differences made data collection and analysis critical in making operating decisions. This closed furnace was operated by computer control (state of the art in the smelling industry).

  7. Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award Transfer funding division. In the 2012/13 financial year Technology Transfer approved awards worth a total

  8. Module Technology: Current Practice and Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    PV modules must provide mechanical support for the cells, protect the world from the voltages inside, protect the cells, diodes and interconnects from the weather outside, couple as much light as possible into the PV cells and minimize the temperature increase of the cells. The package must continue to serve these functions for at least 25 years as that is the typical module warranty period today. Furthermore the package must do all this for as low a cost as possible since the key to large scale PV growth is a reduction in cost while retaining excellent module reliability and durability. This paper will review current module construction practices for both crystalline silicon and thin film PV with emphasis on explaining why the present designs and materials have been selected. Possible long term issues with today's designs and materials will be discussed. Several proposed solutions to these issues will be presented, highlighting the research efforts that will be necessary in order to verify that they can cost effectively solve the identified issues.

  9. Technology Brief: Analysis of Current-Day Commercial Electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This factsheet provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications and hydrogen production costs of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are compared.

  10. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  11. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12,Materials |Review of theeffects of hydrokinetic

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMA EnergyMagna1983:Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

  13. Marine Tidal Current Electric Power Generation Technology: State of the Art and Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    resurgence in development of renewable ocean energy technology. Therefore, several demonstration projects appreciated as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity

  14. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  15. Supplemental Material to Cryogenic Roadmap Current Commercial Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supplemental Material to Cryogenic Roadmap Current Commercial Technology Refrigeration Approximate,500 Brayton Turbine $800,000 $69.57 167 14.5 18.94% Liquid Air Plants Cosmodyne GF-1 80 N2 4 T/Day 8,400 Brayton Turbine $700,000 $83.33 372 44.3 6.21% Cosmodyne Aspen 1000 80 N2 1000 nM3 /Hr 64,969 Brayton

  16. APPLICATIONS OF CURRENT TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF SPENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drayer, R.

    2013-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancements in technology have opened many opportunities to improve upon the current infrastructure surrounding the nuclear fuel cycle. Embedded devices, very small sensors, and wireless technology can be applied to Security, Safety, and Nonproliferation of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Security, separate of current video monitoring systems, can be improved by integrating current wireless technology with a variety of sensors including motion detection, altimeter, accelerometer, and a tagging system. By continually monitoring these sensors, thresholds can be set to sense deviations from nominal values. Then alarms or notifications can be activated as needed. Safety can be improved in several ways. First, human exposure to ionizing radiation can be reduced by using a wireless sensor package on each spent fuel cask to monitor radiation, temperature, humidity, etc. Since the sensor data is monitored remotely operator stay-time is decreased and distance from the spent fuel increased, so the overall radiation exposure is reduced as compared to visual inspections. The second improvement is the ability to monitor continuously rather than periodically. If changes occur to the material, alarm thresholds could be set and notifications made to provide advanced notice of negative data trends. These sensor packages could also record data to be used for scientific evaluation and studies to improve transportation and storage safety. Nonproliferation can be improved for spent fuel transportation and storage by designing an integrated tag that uses current infrastructure for reporting and in an event; tracking can be accomplished using the Iridium satellite system. This technology is similar to GPS but with higher signal strength and penetration power, but lower accuracy. A sensor package can integrate all or some of the above depending on the transportation and storage requirements and regulations. A sensor package can be developed using off the shelf technology and applying it to each specific need. There are products on the market for smart meters, industrial lighting control and home automation that can be applied to the Back End Fuel Cycle. With a little integration and innovation a cost effective solution is achievable.

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1800-111-42436 POLAND 00-800-1213476 PORTUGAL 8008-14928 ROMANIA 40-31-630-01-38 RUSSIA 8-10-8002-5594011 SAUDI ARABIA 800-8-110062 SINGAPORE 65-6517-0502 800-120-5213 SLOVAK...

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADELAIDE 61-8-8121-5055 1-800-010717 AUSTRALIA BRISBANE 61-7-3102-2044 1-800-010717 AUSTRALIA CANBERRA 61-2-6100-0106 1-800-010717 AUSTRALIA MELBOURNE 61-3-9010-0855...

  19. MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK<Tidal Turbines

  20. MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWECHelix <

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(HeldManhattan,and Characterization 2

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(HeldManhattan,and Characterization 2Information

  3. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket |21, 2015

  4. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-CostManufacturingMarginal Energy Prices -PROGRAM C

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-CostManufacturingMarginal Energy PricesMarine

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -ofMarc Morial - PresidentEnergy supports

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanos EnergyMMalawi:Manassas is ais a

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanos EnergyMMalawi:Manassas is ais a

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident Tolerant Fuel: FeCrAl CladdingandPROGRAM C

  10. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark Jump to: navigation,TelluricTODO: Would be nice ifMarine and

  11. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil'sof EnergyReserveDepartment ofEnvironmental Issues

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town inRiver EnergyMarinAttenuator) Jump to:

  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town inRiver EnergyMarinAttenuator) Jump

  14. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlixMapFile Jump to: navigation, search Input your

  15. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlixMapFile Jump to: navigation, search Input yourEdit

  16. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlixMapFile Jump to: navigation, search Input

  17. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJump to:Lists Jump to: navigation,Image

  18. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJump to:Lists Jump to:

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps More Documents &Small ModularDepartment ofMarie MapesMarine andLearn

  20. NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and EvaluationManagement Image ofInstrumentation,

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA: CommentsEnergy 13, 1968:Camp Pendleton

  2. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  3. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  4. Summary of multiterminal high-voltage direct current transmission technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, R.B.; Jewell, W.T.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the present state of multiterminal (MT) high-voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. The purpose is to reassess the need for HVDC circuit breakers and to identify needed research for MT HVDC. The fundamentals of this technology are presented, and previous research and development is reviewed. Although no MT HVDC systems have yet been built, many concepts have been proposed. Some require a dc breaker, and others do not. Both options have advantages and disadvantages for various applications, so the selection will depend on the proposed application. Research is needed to define operating characteristics of various MT HVDC systems. In some applications, dc breakers will be useful, so research into HVDC interruption should continue. Also, dc fault detection and control algorithms for MT systems should be studied.

  5. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

  6. A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems 1 A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems Z. Zhoua,b,c , M.E.H. Benbouzida,* , J of fossil resources and the issue of environment lead to a global need for producing more clean energy from

  7. A preliminary study of current multimedia information technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.C.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper surveys more than 70 articles published in the IEEE Multimedia journal and other journals. The survey summarizes aspects of multimedia information technology and categorizes application areas of multimedia information technology and interesting research areas related to it.

  8. Automotive and fuel technologies: current and future options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.; Stamets, L.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to assess the likely commercial timeframe of a broad range of automotive and fuel technologies. The report assesses the status of existing and alternative engine technologies, associated fuels, and problems which may retard their introduction and use. It estimates, where possible, the earliest time of general commercial use for each developing automotive technology and fuel.

  9. Reflecting the Current Practices of Technology Use in Volunteer Data Collection Activities on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and usage rate of mobile technologies in volunteer activities has been low. Nonprofit organizations, which is no different. Currently, the common usage pattern of mobile technology in nonprofits' volunteer activitiesReflecting the Current Practices of Technology Use in Volunteer Data Collection Activities

  10. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  11. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  12. Energy Storage Technologies for Smoothing Power Fluctuations in Marine Current Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy Storage Technologies for Smoothing Power Fluctuations in Marine Current Turbines Zhibin Zhou the marine current generation system more reliable, energy storage systems will play a crucial role. In this paper, the power fluctuation phenomenon is described and the state of art of energy storage technologies

  13. MHK Technologies/Ocean Current Linear Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC < MHK Technologies Jump to:

  14. MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK< MHKResource ClickCurrent

  15. MHK Technologies/CurrentStar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK< MHKResourceCurrentStar

  16. MHK Technologies/Tide Current Converter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWECSails <Tide Current Converter

  17. The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOfficeThe 21stCELLS THEEnergy The Current

  18. Low Temperature Heat Source Utilization Current and Advanced Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, James H. Jr.; Dambly, Benjamin W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Once a geothermal heat source has been identified as having the potential for development, and its thermal, physical, and chemical characteristics have been determined, a method of utilization must be decided upon. This compendium will touch upon some of these concerns, and hopefully will provide the reader with a better understanding of technologies being developed that will be applicable to geothermal development in East Africa, as well as other parts of the world. The appendices contain detailed reports on Down-the-Well Turbo Pump, The Vapor-Turbine Cycle for Geothermal Power Generation, Heat Exchanger Design for Geothermal Power Plants, and a Feasibility Study of Combined Power and Water Desalting Plant Using Hot Geothermal Water. [DJE-2005

  19. Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

  20. Overview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1519 6.2. Compressed air energy storageOverview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications Ioannis September 2008 Keywords: Power generation Distributed generation Energy storage Electricity storage A B

  1. High Current Effects in Silicide Films for Sub-0.25 pm VLSI Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the increased use of silicided metalization schemes for low-resistivity gates, interconnections and contacts between the metal and Si. Currently, self aligned silicide (salicide) processes are widely usedHigh Current Effects in Silicide Films for Sub-0.25 pm VLSI Technologies Kaustav Banerjee

  2. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nom

  3. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  4. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

  5. 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

  6. Kaon and pion femtoscopy at top RHIC energy in hydrokinetic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2011-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrokinetic model is applied to restore the initial conditions and space-time picture of the matter evolution in central Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy. The analysis is based on the detailed reproduction of the pion and kaon momentum spectra and femtoscopic data in whole interval of the transverse momenta studied by both STAR and PHENIX collaborations. A good description of the pion and kaon transverse momentum spectra and interferometry radii is reached with both initial energy density profiles motivated by the Glauber and Color Glass Condensate (CGC) models, however, at different energy densities.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower Conference, 10 June 2010, rev 1.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland OperationsU.S. CommercialIn this paper,Hydrokinetic

  8. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does...

  9. CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the most likely features, events and processes that affect well integrity after initial CO2 injection. As long as the #12;integrity of the cap rock is not compromised by permeable conduits like wellsCO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1 , S. Julio

  10. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  11. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to 1) evaluate the...

  12. Energy Department Announces $7.25 Million for Projects to Advance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    America's clean energy portfolio. Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, rivers, and ocean currents into electricity that can be used by...

  13. Geospatial Information Science and Technology Minor The Geospatial Information Science and Technology Minor is available to any current UC Berkeley student in good academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Seminar: Mobile City Chronicles: Gaming with New Technologies of Detection and Security (Note: There mayGeospatial Information Science and Technology Minor The Geospatial Information Science and Technology Minor is available to any current UC Berkeley student in good academic standing. The deadline

  14. MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to: navigation,5.59°Information

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStation TechnologyWind and Water Power Program andMercedFoil

  16. Abstract--Environmentally friendly technologies such as photovoltaics and fuel cells are DC sources. In the current power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Abstract--Environmentally friendly technologies such as photovoltaics and fuel cells are DC sources in pollution [1]. The most well-known green technologies include photovoltaics and wind turbines. Although fuel, fuel cells and photovoltaics, produce direct current (DC). Currently, power system infrastructures

  17. Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rovey

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

  18. Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The world’s oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nation’s growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40° and 70° north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

  19. Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

  20. An Overview of Current and Past W-UO[2] CERMET Fuel Fabrication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas E. Burkes; Daniel M. Wachs; James E. Werner; Steven D. Howe

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies dating back to the late 1940s performed by a number of different organizations and laboratories have established the major advantages of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems, particularly for manned missions. A number of NTP projects have been initiated since this time; none have had any sustained fuel development work that appreciably contributed to fuel fabrication or performance data from this era. As interest in these missions returns and previous space nuclear power researchers begin to retire, fuel fabrication technologies must be revisited, so that established technologies can be transferred to young researchers seamlessly and updated, more advanced processes can be employed to develop successful NTP fuels. CERMET fuels, specifically W-UO2, are of particular interest to the next generation NTP plans since these fuels have shown significant advantages over other fuel types, such as relatively high burnup, no significant failures under severe transient conditions, capability of accommodating a large fission product inventory during irradiation and compatibility with flowing hot hydrogen. Examples of previous fabrication routes involved with CERMET fuels include hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and press and sinter, whereas newer technologies, such as spark plasma sintering, combustion synthesis and microsphere fabrication might be well suited to produce high quality, effective fuel elements. These advanced technologies may address common issues with CERMET fuels, such as grain growth, ductile to brittle transition temperature and UO2 stoichiometry, more effectively than the commonly accepted ‘traditional’ fabrication routes. Bonding of fuel elements, especially if the fabrication process demands production of smaller element segments, must be investigated. Advanced brazing techniques and compounds are now available that could produce a higher quality bond segment with increased ease in joining. This paper will briefly address the history of CERMET fuel fabrication technology as related to the GE 710 and ANL Nuclear Rocket Programs, in addition to discussing future plans, viable alternatives and preliminary investigations for W-UO2 CERMET fuel fabrication. The intention of the talk is to provide the brief history and tie in an overview of current programs and investigations as related to NTP based W-UO2 CERMET fuel fabrication, and hopefully peak interest in advanced fuel fabrication technologies.

  1. A version of this appeared in Current Science 75(6) 1998 India's Nuclear Breeders: Technology, Viability, and Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A version of this appeared in Current Science 75(6) 1998 India's Nuclear Breeders: Technology tongia@andrew.cmu.edu; vsa@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract: India's nuclear power program is based on indigenous materials and technology, with the potential for providing energy security for many centuries. This paper

  2. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

  3. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket |21,-Committee Meeting425ofAugust 19,

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-CostManufacturingMarginal Energy PricesMarine and

  5. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident Tolerant Fuel: FeCrAl CladdingandPROGRAM C L

  6. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident Tolerant Fuel: FeCrAl CladdingandPROGRAM C L to

  7. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer SomersKnownLaborSeptemberofthe Interior Bureau of

  8. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309 Reviewers | DepartmentSiteMaryland | DepartmentFuels: A

  9. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FORRemarksHEATINGI _

  10. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashesEnergy byNuclear Reactor OFFICE6 Report

  11. Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

  12. Detection and location of leaks in district heating steam systems: Survey and review of current technology and practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Lanham, R.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a survey undertaken to identify and characterize current practices for detecting and locating leaks in district heating systems, particular steam systems. Currently used technology and practices are reviewed. In addition, the survey was used to gather information that may be important for the application of acoustic leak detection. A few examples of attempts to locate leaks in steam and hot water pipes by correlation of acoustic signals generated by the leaks are also discussed.

  13. Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, D.E.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

  14. POSITION ESTIMATOR AND SIMPLIFIED CURRENT CONTROL STRATEGY FOR BRUSHLESS-DC MOTORS, USING DSP TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    motor (PMSM), with sinusoidal back emf. This machine has been tested with quasi-square current waveforms

  15. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

  16. Technology and physics implications of oscillating-field current drive in reversed-field pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The property of reversed-field pinches (RFPs) to relax to a near- minimum-energy state is the basis of oscillating-field current drive (OFCD), wherein plasma current is driven by modulating in quadrature the external toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. Coupled plasma/circuit OFCD simulations of RFPs ranging from present experiments (ZT-P and ZT-40M) to the reactor (TITAN) indicate that the drive frequency and the amplitude of the plasma-current oscillations decrease with decreased plasma resistance so that minimum frequencies (/approximately/25 Hz) and plasma-current amplitudes (/approximately/1.6%) and maximum efficiencies (/approximately/0.3 A/W) are attained in the reactor regime. Methods for minimizing the reactive powers and for optimizing the current-drive efficiency for OFCD in RFPs have been identified. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  18. Economic valuation of energy storage coupled with photovoltaics : current technologies and future projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosher, Trannon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A practical framework for the economic valuation of current energy storage systems coupled with photovoltaic (PV) systems is presented. The solar-with-storage system's operation is optimized for two different rate schedules: ...

  19. FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, F.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

  20. MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWECSailsOWC.png TechnologyUFCAP

  1. Current Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion technologies at the Center for Space Nuclear Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. O'Brien; Steven K. Cook; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe; Ronald Samborsky; Daniel Brasuell

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power and propulsion has been considered for space applications since the 1950s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors / rocket engines in the Rover/NERVA programs1. The Aerojet Corporation was the prime contractor for the NERVA program. Modern changes in environmental laws present challenges for the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel composition that is significantly different from those of the NERVA project can be engineered; this may be needed to ensure public support and compliance with safety requirements. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing a number of technologies, modeling and testing processes to further the development of safe, practical and affordable nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

  2. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices are high-force, low-speed machines, similar to wind turbines that convert the kinetic energy of a moving fluid into electrical energy....

  3. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  4. Economic Impact of Large-Scale Deployment of Offshore Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology in Oregon Coastal Counties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1 Winners Announced!Tri Cities Economic

  5. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

  6. Effects on Freshwater Organisms of Magnetic Fields Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Turner, Julie W [ORNL

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underwater cables will be used to transmit electricity between turbines in an array (interturbine cables), between the array and a submerged step-up transformer (if part of the design), and from the transformer or array to shore. All types of electrical transmitting cables (as well as the generator itself) will emit EMF into the surrounding water. The electric current will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of animals. Because direct electrical field emissions can be prevented by shielding and armoring, we focused our studies on the magnetic fields that are unavoidably induced by electric current moving through a generator or transmission cable. These initial experiments were carried out to evaluate whether a static magnetic field, such as would be produced by a direct current (DC) transmitting cable, would affect the behavior of common freshwater fish and invertebrates.

  7. Report: U.S. Military Accelerates Deployment of Clean Energy Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokinetic Energy Technologies | REPORT TO|Department

  8. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

  9. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

  10. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClick here Current /TidalITRI WEC

  11. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  12. Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

  13. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

  14. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScience and InnovationexperimentsTechnology

  15. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Environmental Stewardship for Renewable Energy Technologies: MHK Environmental and Resource Characterization Instrumentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This FOA will support the development of instrumentation, associated signal processing algorithms or software, and integration of instrumentation packages for monitoring the environmental impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies. It will also support the development and testing of sensors, instrumentation, or processing techniques to collect physical data on ocean waves (e.g., height, period, directionality, steepness). Join us for an informational webinar on March 20, 2014. The purpose of this webinar will be to give applicants a chance to ask questions about the FOA process generally. Reserve your webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/553062432

  16. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  17. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOE FormerEnergy DataPlan Guidance2011 |

  18. Impact of quasi-dc currents on three-phase distribution transformer installations. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, B.W.; Barnes, P.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States); Schafer, D.A. [Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a series of tests designed to determine the response of quasi-dc currents on three-phase power distribution transformers for electric power systems. In general, if the dc injection is limited to the primary side of a step-down transformer, significant harmonic distortion is noted and an increase in the reactive power demand results. For dc injection on the secondary (load) side of the step-down transformer the harmonic content at the secondary side is quite high and saturation occurs with a relatively low level of dc injection; however, the reactive power demand is significantly lower. These tests produced no apparent damage to the transformers. Transformer damage is dependent on the duration of the dc excitation, the level of the excitation, and on thermal characteristics of the transfer. The transformer response time is found to be much shorter than seen in power transformer tests at lower dc injection levels. This shorter response time suggests that the response time is strongly dependent on the injected current levels, and that higher levels of dc injection for shorter durations could produce very high reactive power demands and harmonic distortion within a few tenths of a second. The added reactive power load could result in the blowing of fuses on the primary side of the transformer for even moderate dc injection levels, and neutral currents are quite large under even low-level dc injection. This ``smoking neutral`` results in high-level harmonic injection into equipment via the neutral and in possible equipment failure.

  19. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  20. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  1. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  2. An Overview of strategic measures to assess workforce needs and ensure technology transfer to meet current and future nuclear power operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincenti, J.R. [acuri.net, 1344 Curtin Street, State College, PA (United States); Stigers, R.A. [Senior Health Physicist-Radwaste, PPL Susquehanna, Berwick, PA (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1956 and 1989, the number of operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States increased from none to 109. With the exception of a few plants that were still in final construction, no new nuclear power plants were ordered in the United States as the new millennium began. In 2005, the federal government pronounced the need for new electric power generating systems during the first quarter of the 21. century. The need comes from a desire to curb our reliance on fossil fuels, as well as to provide for a cleaner environment. One of those fuel systems noted was nuclear energy. Given the time between the last active period of nuclear power plant development and construction, there is a need to supply a talented and well-prepared workforce to operate the new plants. It will also be necessary to assess the needs of our current fleet of operating nuclear power plants, of which many are in the process of re-licensing, yet also facing an aging plant workforce. This paper will review and discuss measures to assess diverse workforce needs and technology transfer to meet current licensing requirements as that of future nuclear power plant development in the United States. (authors)

  3. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

  4. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  5. Geothermal Energy: Current abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringe, A.C. (ed.)

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bulletin announces the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. (ACR)

  6. Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 -Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 09/12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meggitt, Dallas J.

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally conceded that the costs associated with current practices for the mooring, anchoring, or foundation systems of Marine HydroKinetic (MHK) and Deepwater Floating Wind systems are a disproportionate portion of the total cost of an installed system. Reducing the cost of the mooring and anchoring components for MHK systems can contribute substantially to reducing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Micropile anchors can reduce the LCOE both directly, because the anchors, associated mooring hardware and installation costs are less than conventional anchor and mooring systems, but also because micropile anchors require less extensive geotechnical surveys for confident design and proper implementation of an anchor or foundation system. This report presents the results of the development of critical elements of grouted marine micropile anchor (MMA) technology for application to MHK energy conversion systems and other ocean engineering applications that require fixing equipment to the seafloor. Specifically, this project identified grout formulations and developed designs for grout dispensing systems suitable for use in a seawater environment as a critical development need for successful implementation of practical MMA systems. The project conducted a thorough review of available information on the use of cement-based grouts in seawater. Based on this review and data available from commercial sources, the project selected a range of grout formulations for testing as part of a micropile system. The project also reviewed instrumentation for measuring grout density, pressure and flow rate, and integrated an instrumentation system suitable for use with micropile installation. The grout formulations and instrumentation system were tested successfully and demonstrated the suitability of MMA technology for implementation into anchor systems for MHK and other marine renewable energy systems. In addition, this project developed conceptual designs for micropile anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

  7. Electric Currents Electric Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jaehoon

    ;Problem 3: At $0.095/kWh, what does it cost to leave a 25W porch light on day and night for a year = 219000 Watt- hour = 219kWh. So, total cost = 219 x$0.095 = $20.8 #12;Problem 4: A 100 W light bulb has of charge per unit time: = . Unit of current: Ampere (A). The purpose of a battery is to produce

  8. IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY PREPARING SKILLED INDIVIDUALS, INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES, SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, SUSTAINABILITY AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY. #12;BE ONE to assess, implement, and utilize current technologies, and to learn how to manage industrial operations

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: Financial Opportunities - Active...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Financial Opportunities - Active Solicitations Vehicle Technologies Office: Financial Opportunities - Active Solicitations To explore current financial...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime is the cumulative time under loadmarginal

  11. Hydrokinetic Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIII WindHybridsCar CoHydrogen

  12. Current status, research needs, and opportunities in applications of surface processing to transportation and utilities technologies. Proceedings of a December 1991 workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A.W.; Landgrebe, A.R. [eds.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal of surface processing is to develop innovative methods of surface modification and characterization for optimum performance and environmental protection for cost-effective operational lifetimes of systems, materials, and components used in transportation and utilities. These proceedings document the principal discussions and conclusions reached at the workshop; they document chapters about the current status of surface characterization with focus on composition, structure, bonding, and atomic-scale topography of surfaces. Also documented are chapters on the current status of surface modification techniques: electrochemical, plasma-aided, reactive and nonreactive physical vapor deposition, sol-gel coatings, high-energy ion implantation, ion-assisted deposition, organized molecular assemblies, solar energy. Brief chapters in the appendices document basic research in surface science by NSF, Air Force, and DOE. Participants at the workshop were invited to serve on 10 working groups. Separate abstracts were prepared for the data base where appropriate.

  13. A survey of current technologies for production of oil from oil shale by in-situ retorting processes; their technical and economic readiness and requirements for further developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, C.Y.; Chazin, D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four in-situ oil shale processes; Vertical Modified In-Situ (VMIS), Horizontal Modified In-Situ (HMIS), Geokinetics, and Equity have been reviewed with respect to their developmental histories, major advantages and disadvantages, present activities, major technical problems, and present states of development. The various processes are described in detail, and up-to-date experimental data has been summarized. The preliminary designs for commercialization have been developed in order to estimate capital and operating costs. Required selling prices and sensitivities have been determined as they relate to various parameters, such as oil yields, capital costs, operating costs, and economic incentives. The technologies for the various processes have been analyzed for the purpose of identifying areas of further required research and development. Programs of technological development have been suggested for each in-situ process. The results of various process evaluations have been compared, and the best near-term solutions have been determined for producing oil from oil shale using in-situ methods.

  14. Geothermal drilling technology update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

  15. Current Rusume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Interest Rough paths theory, Stochastic differential equations, ... I am currently working on a problem about stochastic analysis on Riemannian folia-.

  16. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  17. Science &Technology Facilities Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Science & Technology Facilities Council invite you to The ESA Technology Transfer Network SpaceTech2012Science &Technology Facilities Council Innovations Issue 31 October 2012 This issue: 1 STFC International prize for `no needles' breast cancer diagnosis technique 6 CEOI Challenge Workshop ­ Current

  18. Current segmented gamma-ray scanner technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjork, C.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of segmented gamma-ray scanners has been developed at Los Alamos for scrap and waste measurements at the Savannah River Plant and the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The new designs are highly automated and exhibit special features such as good segmentation and thorough shielding to improve performance.

  19. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013DepartmentAgenda for the Hydrogen

  20. Current developments in DETER cybersecurity testbed technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sollins, Karen R.

    From its inception in 2004, the DETER testbed facility has provided effective, dedicated experimental resources and expertise to a broad range of academic, industrial and government researchers. Now, building on knowledge ...

  1. Current trends in the Advanced Bioindustry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry State of Technology—Michael McAdams, President, Advanced Biofuels Association

  2. Transportation technology R&D—Steve Ciatti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Ciatti

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne researcher Steve Ciatti talks about the emerging technologies in transportation, as well as the current technology being developed at the lab and placed on the market.

  3. Transportation technology R&D?Steve Ciatti

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Ciatti

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne researcher Steve Ciatti talks about the emerging technologies in transportation, as well as the current technology being developed at the lab and placed on the market.

  4. Current Titles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Various

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

  5. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Source Inverters for HEVs and FCVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Wireless Charging Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

  6. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four: business administration, wind farm management, aircraft maintenance, tooling production, quality and safety or selected program track focus. Transfer students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses

  7. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : business administration, energy management, wind farm management, automation and controls, aircraft, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses over for WSU credit. Laboratory

  8. FIELD-BASED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: JUST IN TIME TECHNOLOGY TRAINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    FIELD-BASED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: JUST IN TIME TECHNOLOGY TRAINING Sarah Irvine Belson1 and Teresa, Audio Technology, and Physics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016, tlarkin@american.edu Abstract -- This paper outlines the current status of technology integration

  9. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, “consequence”, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

  10. Memorandum of Understanding between the Dept. of Interior and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Interior to support offshore wind and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. mouoffshorewindhydrokineticdeploym...

  11. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic...

  12. Current Contracts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporousTestimonyContact Us -SeparationsRelevantCurrent

  13. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  14. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCESJBEIMarine HydrokineticVAWT Sandia

  16. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. • The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. • Although the idea of cases representing the “best practices” was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as “cases”. There was also discomfort at the implication that “best practices” implied “lesser practices”; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. • Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  17. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  18. Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

  19. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water...

  20. Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Roll to Roll (R2R) Processing 1 Technology Assessment 2 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  1. Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy storage technologies and what the future may hold for multi-scale storage applications Presented by: Dave Lucero, Director Alternative Energy · Industry initiatives · Technology · Energy Storage Market · EaglePicher initiatives · Summary #12

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS On June 26, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Water Power...

  3. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType Jump to:CoStrategies(Redirected fromResource Atlas

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(HeldManhattan,and Characterization 2

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -ofMarc Morial - President

  6. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and ResponseStaffServices Services TheShale GasSignSites

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town inRiver EnergyMarin

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town inRiver EnergyMarinAttenuator)

  9. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOE FormerEnergy DataPlan Guidance2011

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic foils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime is the cumulative time under loadmarginalfoils

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic reference models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime is the cumulative time under

  12. As technology advances, the need for electricity increases, and as a result, more energy is being consumed on a daily basis. Consequently, the strain on energy and economic resources becomes more evident. Currently, the average energy consumer can see his

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    , Branton Horsley PowWow Energy Groups Users and companies will be able to create a sense of community amongOverview As technology advances, the need for electricity increases, and as a result, more energy is being consumed on a daily basis. Consequently, the strain on energy and economic resources becomes more

  13. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  14. Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Coloring Book | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coloring book of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies for kids. coloringbook2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Coloring Book...

  15. alternating current polarography: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  16. alternating current: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  17. alternating current calorimetry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  18. alternating current losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  19. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Energy: Current abstracts

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy: Current abstracts Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot...

  20. Recent and Current Research & Roadmapping Activities: Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darzins, A.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2008 DOE Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop plenary presentation: summarizes past and current algal biofuels activity, status of research funding, and recent roadmapping activities.

  1. Climate impact metrics for energy technology evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Morgan Rae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies depends on how their lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions compare to global climate stabilization goals. Current methods for comparing technologies, which assess ...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-oxidants current status Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxidants current status Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anti-oxidants current status Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Technology...

  3. [New technology for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  4. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN/EVENT ASSOCIATE to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current uniform

  5. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current department uniform policy supervision may be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants

  6. CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION & SOLUTIONS | GREENER VEHICLES Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate content...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road...

  8. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  9. Research Site Locations for Current EERE Postdoctoral Awards | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokinetic EnergyIssuesPowerof Energy Site

  10. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  11. Reference Inflow Characterization for River Resource Reference Model (RM2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) is leading an effort to develop reference models for marine and hydrokinetic technologies and wave and current energy resources. This effort will allow the refinement of technology design tools, accurate estimates of a baseline levelized cost of energy (LCoE), and the identification of the main cost drivers that need to be addressed to achieve a competitive LCoE. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was charged with examining and reporting reference river inflow characteristics for reference model 2 (RM2). Published turbulent flow data from large rivers, a water supply canal and laboratory flumes, are reviewed to determine the range of velocities, turbulence intensities and turbulent stresses acting on hydrokinetic technologies, and also to evaluate the validity of classical models that describe the depth variation of the time-mean velocity and turbulent normal Reynolds stresses. The classical models are found to generally perform well in describing river inflow characteristics. A potential challenge in river inflow characterization, however, is the high variability of depth and flow over the design life of a hydrokinetic device. This variation can have significant effects on the inflow mean velocity and turbulence intensity experienced by stationary and bottom mounted hydrokinetic energy conversion devices, which requires further investigation, but are expected to have minimal effects on surface mounted devices like the vertical axis turbine device designed for RM2. A simple methodology for obtaining an approximate inflow characterization for surface deployed devices is developed using the relation umax=(7/6)V where V is the bulk velocity and umax is assumed to be the near-surface velocity. The application of this expression is recommended for deriving the local inflow velocity acting on the energy extraction planes of the RM2 vertical axis rotors, where V=Q/A can be calculated given a USGS gage flow time-series and stage vs. cross-section area rating relationship.

  12. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

  13. Current measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods are provided for a system for measurement of a current in a conductor such that the conductor current may be momentarily directed to a current measurement element in order to maintain proper current without significantly increasing an amount of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element or adding resistance to assist in current measurement. The apparatus and methods described herein are useful in superconducting circuits where it is necessary to monitor current carried by the superconducting elements while minimizing the effects of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element.

  14. Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

  15. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  16. An analysis of current mobile services and enabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    An analysis of current mobile services and enabling technologies Ivar Jørstad, Schahram Dustdar This paper presents the major technology enablers for mobile services in a comprehensive way and in relation be incomplete, inconsistent and overlapping with other technology enablers. Keywords: mobile services, mobile

  17. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  18. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  19. Residential Cold Climate Heat Pump with Variable-Speed Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokineticClothes Washers (Appendix J2)

  20. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  1. Emission control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Fumihiko

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental protection is indispensable for preserving the earth for later generations. Indeed, industrial development has made our life rich; however, it also accelerates environmental pollution. Above all, such global problems as acid rain caused by SOx and NOx emissions and air pollution caused by particulates have become serious in recent years. Countermeasures currently in service or under development for these problems include: upgrading of fuel-burning systems; conversion of energy sources to clean fuels; pretreatment of fuels; and flue gas treatment. This chapter focuses on technologies that treat flue gases including the circumstances of the development of the technologies.

  2. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Hydropower Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Hydropower Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  3. Environmental technologies program, Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents details of the technology that is currently being demonstrated at the Hanford Site. The program is testing technology for cost and time savings in the following clean-up areas: detection and characterization; soil and ground water remediation; remote handling; waste minimization; and high-level, low-level, and mixed waste treatment. This document also contains a technology integration section.

  4. TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance This technology allows for CMV operators to have knowledge of their steer, drive, and tandem axle group weights setup is required. Current Safety/Enforcement Technologies EOBR (electronic on-board recorder) On

  5. GRID Technologies => `Education' = `Distance Michalis Xenos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    GRID Technologies => `Education' = `Distance Education' Michalis Xenos 1,2 , Bill Vassiliadis 1 possibilities that Grid technologies create in education, presents current learning paradigms and makes a prediction about the way in which Grid technologies may affect the future of education. The case

  6. Current Testbed Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Alex Sim (LBNL) (renewal) Project Summary To integrate massive climate change simulation datasets and the 100Gbps network transport and management technologies,...

  7. High-Current Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Ernest O.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F i g . 13 F i g . 14 A 48 ACCELERATOR F i g . 25 F i g . 16supply. Extrapolation of accelerator energy and current9 . A-48 high-current accelerator, low-velocity end. Fig.

  8. Supercapacitors specialities - Technology review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Münchgesang, Wolfram; Meisner, Patrick [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Yushin, Gleb [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30326 (United States)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial electrochemical capacitors (supercapacitors) are not limited to mobile electronics anymore, but have reached the field of large-scale applications, like smart grid, wind turbines, power for large scale ground, water and aerial transportation, energy-efficient industrial equipment and others. This review gives a short overview of the current state-of-the-art of electrochemical capacitors, their commercial applications and the impact of technological development on performance.

  9. Current to Current | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County,Curran, Illinois: EnergyCurrentCurrent to

  10. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  11. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  12. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  13. Available Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis,Technologies Available Technologies

  14. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division to them in California. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM MAY 2011, VOL. 3, NO. 1 California's Transition

  15. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  16. Electric current locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  17. Current Testbed Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Testbed Research Previous Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

  18. Current Research Portfolio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting accounts for 20 percent of all electricity use in the United States. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is revealing potential for high-efficiency lighting with low...

  19. technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic-Gasser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic for repellent - "easy to clean" properties ­ or vice versa for fluid retention properties as well, properties applications. Technology Electroplating is done at constant current density and structure formation is done

  20. A Sandia Technology Bulletin: Testing technology, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inside this issue various short articles on current testing technology research at Sandia National Laboratories. New techniques of imaging currents in integrated circuits are described. Geomaterials testing is improved with true axial loading under high pressure. Pyroshock simulation tests electronics for space and defense. Insulated cameras get pictures of extremely hot burning fuels. Solar cell testing is improved via spectral response and laser scanning. And missile launching accomplishments are presented.

  1. Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhel, G. J.

    transfer plus technology application. A&C Enercom has learned from experience that technology deployment will not occur unless utilities achieve both technology transfer (e.g, the dissemination of information) and technology application (e.g., the direct...

  2. Bioseparations- An Assessment of Current Technologies and Future Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitto, G. B.; Humphrey, J. L.

    effective production methods have to be established. Downstream processing, particularly the separation and purification of biotechnology products, presents special challenges because in many cases the new products are much more fragile, much more difficult...

  3. MHK Technologies/Current Catcher | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK< MHKResource Click

  4. MHK Technologies/Current Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC < MHK< MHKResource

  5. MHK Technologies/EnCurrent Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWEC <EPAM <

  6. MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC < MHKPulse-StreamwaveBarrage

  7. MHK Technologies/THOR Ocean Current Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWEC < MHKTETRON < MHKTHOR Ocean

  8. MHK Technologies/Water Current Generator Motor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC <SurgeWECSailsOWC.pngflowPOWERWEPTOSWAP

  9. MHK Technologies/Zero Impact Water Current Turbine | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWCCatcher.pngWavemill < MHKYOG <

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking WorkTransformationSitingMoltenTowerResearch Challenge

  11. Current to Current Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County,Curran, Illinois: EnergyCurrent

  12. Ultracapacitor current collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jerabek, Elihu Calfin (Glenmont, NY); Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultracapacitor having two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. At least one of the current collectors comprises a conductive metal substrate coated with a metal nitride, carbide or boride coating.

  13. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Is Hydrogen Delivered Today? Suppliers currently transport hydrogen by pipeline or over roadways using tube by pipeline is the least expensive way to deliver large amounts of hydrogen and several lines have been built, and along the Gulf Coast. However in comparison with the Suppliers currently transport hydrogen by pipeline

  14. Voltage controlled current source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casne, Gregory M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

  15. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

  16. Hydrodynamic analysis of a vertical axis tidal current turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gretton, Gareth I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal currents can be used as a predictable source of sustainable energy, and have the potential to make a useful contribution to the energy needs of the UK and other countries with such a resource. One of the technologies ...

  17. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temkin, Richard [MIT

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  18. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  19. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  20. Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drexlin, G; Mertens, S; Weinheimer, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments. These experiments investigate the kinematics of $\\beta$-decays of specific isotopes ($^3$H, $^{187}$Re, $^{163}$Ho) to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (anti-) neutrino mass, which is formed by the incoherent sum of the neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. We first review the kinematics of $\\beta$-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, before giving a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for $^3$H, cryo-bolometers for $^{187}$Re). We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment which is currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The large-scale setup will use the MAC-E-Filter principle pioneered earlier to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV(90% C.L.). KATRIN faces many technological challenges that have to be resolved with regar...

  1. An Assessment of Communication Technology Adoption in Texas Cooperatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murch, Matthew 1987-

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of communication technology from the background of cooperative managers to board management policy. The survey categorized 105 different cooperatives by current technology use and management practices. Once the data were collected, a factor analysis to understand...

  2. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  3. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  4. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  5. Current control circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taubman, Matthew S. (Richland, WA)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor (30), a servo device (40), and a current source (50). The servo device (40) is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor (30) by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base (32b). The current source (150) is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor (30). A first device (24) provides an input signal to an electrical node (70) positioned between the emitter (32e) of the transistor (30) and the current source (50). A second device (26) receives an output signal from the collector (32c) of the transistor (30).

  6. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For this study, we identified about 175 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of which we characterized 54 in detail. While many profiles of individual emerging technologies are available, few reports have attempted to impose a standardized approach to the evaluation of the technologies. This study provides a way to review technologies in an independent manner, based on information on energy savings, economic, non-energy benefits, major market barriers, likelihood of success, and suggested next steps to accelerate deployment of each of the analyzed technologies. There are many interesting lessons to be learned from further investigation of technologies identified in our preliminary screening analysis. The detailed assessments of the 54 technologies are useful to evaluate claims made by developers, as well as to evaluate market potentials for the United States or specific regions. In this report we show that many new technologies are ready to enter the market place, or are currently under development, demonstrating that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity. Several technologies have reduced capital costs compared to the current technology used by those industries. Non-energy benefits such as these are frequently a motivating factor in bringing technologies such as these to market. Further evaluation of the profiled technologies is still needed. In particular, further quantifying the non-energy benefits based on the experience from technology users in the field is important. Interactive effects and inter-technology competition have not been accounted for and ideally should be included in any type of integrated technology scenario, for it may help to better evaluate market opportunities.

  7. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  8. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  9. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @ $50/kW and H2 storage @ $15/kWh) #12;8 CASE 2: ICEV EFFICIENCY · Currently available and projected11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug Methodology and Scenarios · Market Penetration Rates · Oil and CO2 Savings · Fuel, Fuel Cell, Battery

  10. Savannah River Technology Center, monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the monthly report to detail the research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The areas of research are in Tritium, Seperation processes, Environmental Engineering, and Waste Management.

  11. Michigan Technological University Debt Service Obligations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Technological University Debt Service Obligations As of June 30, 2013 Current LT Series) Refunding of 2003 & 2004 Fixed Rate Bond Issues SDC Ice Plant and Partial Roof of SDC Total

  12. Wind Turbine Inspection Technology Reaches New Heights | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    week, we announced our advancement in technology that will make the inspection of wind turbines faster and more reliable for our customers. Currently, an inspector examines the...

  13. Cutting-Edge Building Technologies Offer Big Energy Savings Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vacuum insulation materials. This combines low thermal emissivity (or low-e) coated plastic films to boost the energy efficiency of current window retrofit technologies by as...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Merit Review Presentations by Date

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The database containing the 2013 Merit Review presentations is still in transition and is currently hosted on the Vehicle Technologies Office's previous website.  Users can view the searchable...

  15. alternative technology assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  16. HAIT Journal of Science and Engineering B, Volume 2, Issues 3-4, pp. 558-570 Copyright C 2005 Holon Academic Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holon Academic Institute of Technology Analysis of current-controlled inductors by new SPICE behavioral

  17. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities In Support Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment: Task 2.1.7 Permitting and Planning Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.; Judd, Chaeli R.; Blake, Kara M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2012 year-end report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the MHK industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, NGOs, and industry. Objectives for 2.1.7 are the following: • To work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process. • To work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development. • To communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders. • To engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which are described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning As the MHK industry works with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit and license MHK technologies they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under 2.1.7 is to understand these varied interests, explore mechanisms to reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately identify pathways to reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  18. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  19. Ryan Sun Chee Fore | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ryan Sun Chee Fore About Us Ryan Sun Chee Fore - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager Most Recent Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power...

  20. Comparison of PMSG and DFIG for Marine Current Turbine Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Comparison of PMSG and DFIG for Marine Current Turbine Applications S. Benelghali, M.E.H. Benbouzid and J.F. Charpentier Abstract--Emerging technologies for marine current turbine are mainly relevant to works that have been carried out on wind turbines and ship propellers. It is then obvious that many

  1. 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Session 5: Current &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    © 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Session 5: Current & Emerging Standards Session 5: Current & Emerging Standards Craig Lund, Chief Technology Officer Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) Conference September 2003 #12;© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Agenda

  2. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for technological development, repetitive pulse experiments also showed that many of the pulses gave smaller speeds or no movement at all, so that the current-driven motion...

  3. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  4. Economics of Current and Future Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Aden, A.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents detailed comparative analysis on the production economics of both current and future biofuels, including ethanol, biodiesel, and butanol. Our objectives include demonstrating the impact of key parameters on the overall process economics (e.g., plant capacity, raw material pricing, and yield) and comparing how next-generation technologies and fuels will differ from today's technologies. The commercialized processes and corresponding economics presented here include corn-based ethanol, sugarcane-based ethanol, and soy-based biodiesel. While actual full-scale economic data are available for these processes, they have also been modeled using detailed process simulation. For future biofuel technologies, detailed techno-economic data exist for cellulosic ethanol from both biochemical and thermochemical conversion. In addition, similar techno-economic models have been created for n-butanol production based on publicly available literature data. Key technical and economic challenges facing all of these biofuels are discussed.

  5. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  6. A Behavioral Model of a Built-in Current Sensor for IDDQ Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gharaibeh, Ammar

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    IDDQ testing is one of the most effective methods for detecting defects in integrated circuits. Higher leakage currents in more advanced semiconductor technologies have reduced the resolution of IDDQ test. One solution is to use built-in current...

  7. Quantum pumping of valley current in strain engineered graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China) [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Chan, K. S., E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Lin, Zijing, E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)] [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the generation of valley dependent current by adiabatic quantum pumping in monolayer graphene in the presence of electric potential barriers, ferromagnetic field and strain. The pumped currents in the two valleys have same magnitudes and opposite directions; thus, a pure valley current is generated. The oscillation of the pumped pure valley current is determined by the Fabry-Perot resonances formed in the structure. In our calculation, the pumped pure valley current can be as high as 50?nA, which is measurable using present technologies. The proposed device is useful for the development of graphene valleytronic devices.

  8. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of “Technology and the Box” emerged

  9. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  10. Current address: Samuel Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Samuel

    CV: E-mail : Homepage: Current address: Samuel Johnson samuel.johnson@imperial.ac.uk www. #12;Submitted work 1. The meaning of niche: Cause or consequence of food-web structure?, S. Johnson, V learning, S. Johnson, J. Marro, and J.J. Torres, PLoS ONE 8(1): e50276 (2013) 3. Enhancing neural network

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

  13. Dezincing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Service Div.; Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of the steel produced in the US is derived from scrap. With zinc-coated prompt scrap increasing fivefold since 1980, steel-makers are feeling the effect of increased contaminant loads on their operations. The greatest concern is the cost of treatment before disposal of waste dusts and water that arise from remelting zinc-coated scrap. An economic process is needed to strip and recover the zinc from scrap to provide a low residual scrap for steel- and iron-making. Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., with the assistance of Argonne National Laboratory, have been developing a caustic leach dezincing process for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tons/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

  14. Research and Development Roadmap for Emerging HVAC Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokinetic EnergyIssuesPowerof Energy

  15. Revitalizing American Competitiveness in Solar Technologies | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokineticClothes7,of Health, SafetyProgram

  16. Roadmap for Process Heating Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokineticClothes7,ofDiverse Ways ofDepartment

  17. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorne, Jennifer

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges. We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologies are characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics and environmental performance. This paper provides an overview of the results, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, and neither will we in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costs compared to current technologies.

  18. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  19. CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS - 2013 GUIDELINES & PROFORMAE FOR NOMINATIONS Planning and Performance 2013 #12;CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS BRIEF DETAILS ,,CSIR Technology Awards were instituted in 1990 to encourage multi-disciplinary in- house team efforts and external interaction for technology development

  20. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

  1. Integrating Human Performance and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald K. Farris; Heather Medema

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human error is a significant factor in the cause and/or complication of events that occur in the commercial nuclear industry. In recent years, great gains have been made using Human Performance (HU) tools focused on targeting individual behaviors. However, the cost of improving HU is growing and resistance to add yet another HU tool certainly exists, particularly for those tools that increase the paperwork for operations. Improvements in HU that are the result of leveraging existing technology, such as hand-held mobile technologies, have the potential to reduce human error in controlling system configurations, safety tag-outs, and other verifications. Operator rounds, valve line-up verifications, containment closure verifications, safety & equipment protection, and system tagging can be supported by field-deployable wireless technologies. These devices can also support the availability of critical component data in the main control room and other locations. This research pilot project reviewing wireless hand-held technology is part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The project is being performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing, and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRSP vision is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current nuclear reactor fleet.

  2. Aternating current photovoltaic building block

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bower, Ward Issac; Thomas, Michael G.; Ruby, Douglas S.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular apparatus for and method of alternating current photovoltaic power generation comprising via a photovoltaic module, generating power in the form of direct current; and converting direct current to alternating current and exporting power via one or more power conversion and transfer units attached to the module, each unit comprising a unitary housing extending a length or width of the module, which housing comprises: contact means for receiving direct current from the module; one or more direct current-to-alternating current inverters; an alternating current bus; and contact means for receiving alternating current from the one or more inverters.

  3. Current Annualized Request

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChiefAppropriation FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 Current

  4. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  5. INL Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Through collaboration with industry partners, INL's Technology Deployment office makes available to American agencies and international organizations unique...

  6. PROGRESS OF WIND ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar?? Özerdem

    This paper provides an overview of the progress of wind energy technology, along with the current status of wind power worldwide. Over the period of 2000-2012 grid-connected installed wind power has increased by a factor of more than 16. Due to the fast growth in wind market, wind turbine technology has developed different design approaches during this period. In addition to this, issues such as power grid integration, environmental impact, and economics are studied and discussed briefly in this paper, as well.

  7. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division of asphalt pavements. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM JULY 2010, VOL. 2, NO. 1 Warm Mix Asphalt Hits the Road, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer Program, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley

  8. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division solve the very serious problem of waste tire disposal. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2009, VOL, University of California Pavement Research Center, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer

  9. Current work in energy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed at Berkeley Lab most recently. One of the Labs accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of US Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. This analysis is described and played a key role in shaping the US position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. The Labs participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. Described also is a study of leaking electricity, which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of US residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the report summarize results of research activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national Energy Star{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China.

  10. Current Testbed Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014|Current Test Procedure

  11. Current Transmission Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014|Current Test

  12. APPLIED GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.agtc.med.wayne.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    APPLIED GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.agtc.med.wayne.edu CURRENT SERVICES CONTACT INFORMATION Dr. Susan J. Land, Ph.D. Laboratory Director ABOUT THE FACILITY The Applied Genomics Technology Center (AGTC-of-the-art, fee-for-service genomics center that provides a wide range of genomic technologies to the medical

  13. Technology Transfer Expansion Planned UTCA is conducting a major project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Technology Transfer Expansion Planned UTCA is conducting a major project to evaluate and extend its technology transfer activities (UTCA project 03217). Steven Jones and David Eckhoff of UAB are working to expand the current technology transfer program to showcase the successes of the UTCA projects. Samples

  14. 2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, J.; Freeman, J.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technology Program's (GTP's) involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

  15. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  16. REVIEW OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A.Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization and monitoring are important parts of environmental remediation of contaminated sites by the Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The actual remediation process often cannot begin or even be planned until characterization is complete. Monitoring is essential to verify the progress of remediation and of the waste stream. However, some contaminated sites are difficult, costly, or have a high exposure risk to personnel to characterize or monitor using the baseline technology or current practice. Therefore, development of new characterization and monitoring technologies is time-critical to remediate these sites. The main task of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to develop and deploy innovative characterization and monitoring technologies that improve performance and reduce personnel exposure, cost, and detection limits. However, to evaluate different proposals for new technologies to decide which ones to develop or deploy, it is necessary to compare their cost and performance to the baseline technology. The goal of this project is to facilitate the direct comparison of new technologies to the baseline technology by documenting the current practices for site characterization and monitoring at DOE sites and by presenting the information in an easy-to-use, concise database. The database will assist the CMST-CP and others in evaluating or designing new technologies by identifying the baseline technologies and describing their performance and cost. The purpose of this document is to report on the completion of this project and to describe the database. Section 2.0 describes the data assessment methodology. Section 3.0 presents the database and serves as a user manual. Section 4.0 lists the references used for each baseline technology in the database. The full references can be found in the Appendix.

  17. Electrolytes - Technology review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meutzner, Falk; Ureña de Vivanco, Mateo [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety, lifetime, energy density, and costs are the key factors for battery development. This generates the need for improved cell chemistries and new, advanced battery materials. The components of an electrolyte are the solvent, in which a conducting salt and additives are dissolved. Each of them plays a specific role in the overall mechanism of a cell: the solvent provides the host medium for ionic conductivity, which originates in the conductive salt. Furthermore, additives can be used to optimize safety, performance, and cyclability. By understanding the tasks of the individual components and their optimum conditions of operation, the functionality of cells can be improved from a holistic point of view. This paper will present the most important technological features and requirements for electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. The state-of-the-art chemistry of each component is presented, as well as different approaches for their modification. Finally, a comparison of Li-cells with lithium-based technologies currently under development is conducted.

  18. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  19. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  20. Fermilab | Users' Executive Committee | Current Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000TechnologyTune IT Up Message fromCurrent

  1. Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo Institute of Technology 231 #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology 2 IT #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof

  2. Circulating current battery heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashtiani, Cyrus N. (West Bloomfield, MI); Stuart, Thomas A. (Toledo, OH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit for heating energy storage devices such as batteries is provided. The circuit includes a pair of switches connected in a half-bridge configuration. Unidirectional current conduction devices are connected in parallel with each switch. A series resonant element for storing energy is connected from the energy storage device to the pair of switches. An energy storage device for intermediate storage of energy is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and one of the switches. The energy storage device which is being heated is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and the other switch. Energy from the heated energy storage device is transferred to the switched network and then recirculated back to the battery. The flow of energy through the battery causes internal power dissipation due to electrical to chemical conversion inefficiencies. The dissipated power causes the internal temperature of the battery to increase. Higher internal temperatures expand the cold temperature operating range and energy capacity utilization of the battery. As disclosed, either fixed frequency or variable frequency modulation schemes may be used to control the network.

  3. Northwestern University Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ... Integrated Technology Classrooms Online Lectures Collaborative Course Management Tools ...in any teaching environment Classroom Laptop Mobile Device www.it.northwestern.edu NUITAcademic&ResearchTechnologiesNorthwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) is committed to supporting faculty research

  4. The fundamental properties of current controlled current source amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Michael Buford

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis studies the fundamental properties of current controlled current source (CCCS) amplifiers for use in a wide bandwidth voltage gain application. Theoretical expressions are derived which describe the p'erformance of the CCCS in terms of circuit... of this research was to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the fundamental properties of Current Controlled Current Source (CCCS) amplifiers. Of particular interest was the bandwidth independence on the closed loop voltage gain of the CCCS used...

  5. Stray current interference control for HVDC earth currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III [PSG Corrosion Engineering/Corrpro Cos., Detroit, MI (United States); Kroon, D.H. [Corrpro Companies Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines exist around the world, with several in the US. When one conductor must be taken out of operation (in case of emergency), the earth may be used as an alternate conductor. The earth current may be accumulated on and discharged from underground metallic structures that cross the voltage gradient created by the current. Test results on two lines showed that stray current interference is not a major problem if mitigated properly.

  6. New initiatives for producing high current electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.; Pogue, E.W.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New classes of compact electron accelerators able to deliver multi-kiloamperes of pulsed 10-50 MeV electron beams are being studied. One class is based upon rf linac technology with dielectric-filled cavities. For materials with {epsilon}/{epsilon}{sub o}>>1, the greatly increased energy storage permits high current operation. The second type is a high energy injected betatron. Circulating current limits scale as {Beta}{sup 2}{gamma}{sup 3}.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Presentation given...

  8. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This...

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities Available Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report The Fuels Technologies subprogram supports fuels and...

  11. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review ? Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Integration 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review Technology Integration Technology integration merit review results 2010amr08.pdf More...

  12. Incorporation of Renewable Energy Technologies at Anheuser-Busch: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00225

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL will investigate technologies that will improve fuel economy while maintaining or improving emissions in comparison to those associated with currently implemented vehicle technology.

  13. Fritz Technologies is a small company based in Sebastopol, California, specializing in information assurance and data security. Fritz has completed several contracts with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Fritz Technologies is a small company based in Sebastopol, California, specializing in information office in Sebastopol, CA. Fritz Technologies is currently offering the following Internships for Sonoma

  14. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    operations and maintenance, and occupant impact, so not only trying to quantify building energy or technology energy performance, but also the impacts of that technology on users....

  15. Hydropower Program Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

  16. Technology Zones (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia’s 26 designated Technology Zones offer tax relief in the form of abatements, credits, deductions, deferrals, exemptions, or rebates. Local governments may designate technology zones to...

  17. Technology Transfer Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

  18. Green Purchasing & Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

  19. Technology To Realize

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Technology To Realize Fusion Energy in the International Context Kathryn A. McCarthy Deputy Associate Laboratory Director Nuclear Science & Technology Idaho National Laboratory...

  20. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DECEMBER 2012 Pathway for readying the next generation of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT...

  1. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Integration Overview Dennis A. Smith - Clean Cities Deployment Connie Bezanson - Vehicle Education June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE This presentation does not...

  2. Integrated Technology Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

  3. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 15, 2012 Kevin Stork, Team Lead VTP Annual Merit Review VTP Fuel & Lubricant Technologies eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Mission Enable advanced combustion...

  4. Technology Partnering Mechanisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expand a business with INL technologies, or require business support our Technology Transfer team is available to discuss the following contractual mechanisms: Cooperative...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

  6. Inverter Using Current Source Topology

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2011 U.S. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  7. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  8. MICROHOLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRESS ON BOREHOLE INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. ALBRIGHT

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microhole technology development is based on the premise that with advances in electronics and sensors, large conventional-diameter wells are no longer necessary for obtaining subsurface information. Furthermore, microholes offer an environment for improved substance measurement. The combination of deep microholes having diameters of 1-3/8 in. at their terminal depth and 7/8-in. diameter logging tools will comprise a very low cost alternative to currently available technology for deep subsurface characterization and monitoring.

  9. Effective Transfer of Industrial Energy Conservation Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, M.; Vallario, R. W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Various avenues exist for transferring energy conservation technologies to industry. Briefing documents, presentations at trade meetings and con ferences, or simple diffusion by word-of-mouth are a few methods. However, when left to chance, tech... of 444 ESL-IE-83-04-68 Proceedings from the Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 17-20, 1983 TABLE 1. Current Energy Impacts of Foam Processing of Textiles BROADWOVENS AND KNITS User Site (a) Average Production...

  10. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    necessary for enabling arrays: e.g. moorings and foundations, transmission, and other offshore grid components. * Array performance testing and evaluation. * In-water testing and...

  11. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    necessary for enabling arrays: e.g. moorings and foundations, transmission, and other offshore grid components. * Array performance testing and evaluation. * In-water testing and...

  12. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as the device performed as expected, with no discernible harm to river-dwelling fish. Free Flow has also completed preliminary designs of utility-scale installations at a...

  13. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bear, New Energy Corporation; Mary Ann Adonizio, Verdant Power; Sean Anderton, Ocean Renewable Power Company; Roger Bedard, EPRI (retired); Howard Hanson, Florida Atlantic...

  14. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and free-flowing rivers represent a promising energy source located close to centers of electricity demand. The Department of Energy is working with industry, universities,...

  15. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to full-scale in the ocean environment. * Phase I: Funding will be used for the optimization, designs, and planning for deployment and testing of a full-scale WEC system...

  16. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfDepartment ofFramework for SCADA Security PolicyCost

  17. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQualityAUGUSTPart 3 of 9

  18. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChiefAppropriation FY 2012 FYEnergy DOE Announces

  19. MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK Project City Tunica0,LA

  20. MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHKInformationInformation Yukon

  1. In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofThe full text of what is refered to

  2. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticles News(SC) CCIScatteringFacilitiesU.S. DOEFieldNorth

  3. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy SecondWellsWins R&DEnergy

  4. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2EnergyDepartment ofNewsNortheastB O N N E V

  5. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2EnergyDepartment ofNewsNortheastB O N N E

  6. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015Services »of(BENEFIT)Wind ProgramArubaB -Services

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Market Acceleration and Deployment | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-CostManufacturingMarginal Energy Prices

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -ofMarc Morial - President andEnergy

  9. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:Continental United States |

  10. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and LaunchesRelatedEnergy Request For Report Of

  11. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -DepartmentNovember 1, 2010 EA-1797:DepartmentThird Annual44-NO.

  12. MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClick hereInformationPaimpol

  13. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClick hereInformationPaimpol

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMA EnergyMagna1983:

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLSMolten-Salt StorageNo More GreenWorkshops NuclearandRoza Canal,

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolarCybernetics:2PIntroductionPublicStewardship SandiaTurbine

  17. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track|Solar Decathlon | DepartmentSTEMUpcomingUniversity

  18. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, OfficeDepartmentofThe4

  19. Technology Deployment List | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Technology Deployment Technology Deployment List Technology Deployment List The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Technology Deployment List features...

  20. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

  1. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  2. Current Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Current Awards Current Awards Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) Program Current Awards Under Construction...

  3. Current Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laser User Facilities Program Current Awards Current Awards National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Current Awards Under Construction...

  4. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

  5. The Technology & Innovation Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    The Technology & Innovation Centre #12;The Technology and Innovation Centre revolutionises the way in Scotland and further afield ­ including power and energy, renewable technologies, photonics and sensors, for industry, the Technology and Innovation Centre has already attracted major partners including Scottish

  6. Department of Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    Department of Information Technology Human-Computer Interaction http://www.it.uu.se/research/hci #12;InformationTechnology-HCI Department of Information Technology | www.it.uu.se Today's menu Who we and collaboration Teaching KoF 2007, effects? Vision and plans Challenges #12;InformationTechnology

  7. Predictive Maintenance Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

  8. Nonlinear alternating current responses of dipolar fluids J. P. Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ji-Ping

    Nonlinear alternating current responses of dipolar fluids J. P. Huang Max Planck Institute Mechanics Group, Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, P. O. Box 9203-dependent nonlinear dielectric increment of dipolar fluids in nonpolar fluids is often mea- sured by using

  9. RFID Implementation in Retail Industry: Current Status, Issues, and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Tracy

    RFID Implementation in Retail Industry: Current Status, Issues, and Challenges Mithu Bhattacharya aggressive supporters of the technology. Frost & Sullivan reported that the revenue in the RFID retail market have such a timeline (National petroleum News, 2006). This raises the question why the retail industry

  10. Alternative technologies to steam-methane reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tindall, B.M.; Crews, M.A. [Howe-Baker Engineers, Inc., Tyler, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam-methane reforming (SMR) has been the conventional route for hydrogen and carbon monoxide production from natural gas feedstocks. However, several alternative technologies are currently finding favor for an increasing number of applications. The competing technologies include: steam-methane reforming combined with oxygen secondary reforming (SMR/O2R); autothermal reforming (ATR); thermal partial oxidation (POX). Each of these alternative technologies uses oxygen as a feedstock. Accordingly, if low-cost oxygen is available, they can be an attractive alternate to SMR with natural gas feedstocks. These technologies are composed technically and economically. The following conclusions can be drawn: (1) the SMR/O2R, ATR and POX technologies can be attractive if low-cost oxygen is available; (2) for competing technologies, the H{sub 2}/CO product ratio is typically the most important process parameter; (3) for low methane slip, the SMR/O2R, ATR and POX technologies are favored; (4) for full CO{sub 2} recycle, POX is usually better than ATR; (5) relative to POX, the ATR is a nonlicensed technology that avoids third-party involvement; (6) economics of each technology are dependent on the conditions and requirements for each project and must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

  11. US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) international business development and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, S.T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). US/China Inst.; Atwood, T. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Qiu Daxiong [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Zhang Guocheng [State Science and Technology Commission, Beijing (China)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since January 1997, the US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) in Beijing has been jointly operated by Tulane University and Tsinghua University. EETC is established to encourage the adoption of technologies for energy production with improved environmental performance which are essential for supporting economic growth and managing the Global Warming and Climate Change issues. International cooperation is critical to insure the environmental and energy security on a global basis. For example, the US has acquired a great deal of useful experience in clean coal technology which has been demonstrated with major utilities in commercial operations. The adaption of, and the installation of, clean coal technology should be given high priority. Worldwide, the continuous exchange of information and technology between developed and developing nations relating to the current and future clean coal technologies is of great importance. Developed nations which possess environmental responsive technologies and financial resources should work closely with developing nations to facilitate technology transfer and trade of technologies. International cooperation will lower the cost of deploying clean coal technologies directed toward the clean production of energy. This paper presents the updated activities of EETC on facilitating technology transfer and promoting the clean use of coal to satisfy growing energy demand in China.

  12. Technology shapes every facet of modern life. Familiarity with the characteristics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Qiaode Jeff

    Technology shapes every facet of modern life. Familiarity with the characteristics, capabilities, and limitations of current and emerging technologies is indispen- sable to wise and effective decisions and address the problems that technology often presents. Technologi- cal developments are indeed re

  13. How to Proceed with the Thorium Nuclear Technology: a Real Options Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    technology that is clean, cost-effective, long-term sustainable, and safe. Currently undeveloped technologiesHow to Proceed with the Thorium Nuclear Technology: a Real Options Analysis Afzal Siddiqui Stein: +44 207 3834703 Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University

  14. Publications on maglev technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, J.L.; Coffey, H.T.; Rote, D.M.; Wang, Z.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically levitated passenger-transportation vehicles, using attractive and repulsive magnetic forces, are currently in the development or prototype-revenue stages in Japan and Germany. The basic principles of these technologies have been understood for several decades, but their practical applications awaited advances in high-power electronic devices, modern controls, superconducting magnets, and improvements in our transportation infrastructures. A considerable amount of work was devoted to magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation system in the late 1960s and the 1970s. Detailed development was sustained primarily in Germany and Japan. This listing of publications was begun as the initial phase of a design study for a maglev development facility sponsored by the State of Illinois. The listing has been continually updated under programs sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration and the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the National Maglev Initiative issued 27 contracts for the study of technical issues related to maglev and four contracts for the definition of maglev systems. In December 1991, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act was enacted, mandating the development of a US-designed maglev system in a six-year period. This listing is offered as an aid to those working on these projects, to help them locate technical papers on relevant technologies. The design and installation of a maglev transportation system will require the efforts of workers in many disciplines, from electronics to economics to safety. Accordingly, the references have been grouped in 14 different sections to expedite review of the listing. In many case, the references are annotated to indicate the general content of the papers. Abstracts are not available. A list of information services from which the listed documents might be obtained and an author index are provided.

  15. Pretreatment Technology Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US); Thornhill, C.K.; Holton, L.K. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology plan presents a strategy for the identification, evaluation, and development of technologies for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This strategy includes deployment of facilities and process development schedules to support the other program elements. This document also presents schedule information for alternative pretreatment systems: (1) the reference pretreatment technology development system, (2) an enhanced pretreatment technology development system, and (3) alternative pretreatment technology development systems.

  16. Bubble Radiation Detection: Current and Future Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AJ Peurrung; RA Craig

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a number of noteworthy achievements in other fields, superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) and bubble chambers (BCs) have not been used for nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. This report examines these two radiation-detection technologies in detail and answers the question of how they can be or should be ''adapted'' for use in national security applications. These technologies involve closely related approaches to radiation detection in which an energetic charged particle deposits sufficient energy to initiate the process of bubble nucleation in a superheated fluid. These detectors offer complete gamma-ray insensitivity when used to detect neutrons. They also provide controllable neutron-energy thresholds and excellent position resolution. SDDs are extraordinarily simple and inexpensive. BCs offer the promise of very high efficiency ({approximately}75%). A notable drawback for both technologies is temperature sensitivity. As a result of this problem, the temperature must be controlled whenever high accuracy is required, or harsh environmental conditions are encountered. The primary findings of this work are listed and briefly summarized below: (1) SDDs are ready to function as electronics-free neutron detectors on demand for arms-control applications. The elimination of electronics at the weapon's location greatly eases the negotiability of radiation-detection technologies in general. (2) As a result of their high efficiency and sharp energy threshold, current BCs are almost ready for use in the development of a next-generation active assay system. Development of an instrument based on appropriately safe materials is warranted. (3) Both kinds of bubble detectors are ready for use whenever very high gamma-ray fields must be confronted. Spent fuel MPC and A is a good example where this need presents itself. (4) Both kinds of bubble detectors have the potential to function as low-cost replacements for conventional neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He tubes. For SDDs, this requires finding some way to get boron into the detector. For BCs, this requires finding operating conditions permitting a high duty cycle.

  17. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  18. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alloy for the Manufacture of Improved Coronary Stents Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Partners A coronary stent is a small,...

  19. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Basic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the flue or...

  20. Fault current limiter and alternating current circuit breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, H.J.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid-state circuit breaker and current limiter are disclosed for a load served by an alternating current source having a source impedance, the solid-state circuit breaker and current limiter comprising a thyristor bridge interposed between the alternating current source and the load, the thyristor bridge having four thyristor legs and four nodes, with a first node connected to the alternating current source, and a second node connected to the load. A coil is connected from a third node to a fourth node, the coil having an impedance of a value calculated to limit the current flowing therethrough to a predetermined value. Control means are connected to the thyristor legs for limiting the alternating current flow to the load under fault conditions to a predetermined level, and for gating the thyristor bridge under fault conditions to quickly reduce alternating current flowing therethrough to zero and thereafter to maintain the thyristor bridge in an electrically open condition preventing the alternating current from flowing therethrough for a predetermined period of time. 9 figs.

  1. Soviet satellite communications science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, J.N.; Campanella, S.J.; Gordon, G.D.; McElroy, D.R.; Pritchard, W.L.; Stamminger, R.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report by six US scientists and engineers concerning the current state of the art and projections of future Soviet satellite communications technologies. The panel members are experts in satellite stabilization, spacecraft environments, space power generation, launch systems, spacecraft communications sciences and technologies, onboard processing, ground stations, and other technologies that impact communications. The panel assessed the Soviet ability to support high-data-rate space missions at 128 Mbps by evaluating current and projected Soviet satellite communications technologies. A variety of space missions were considered, including Earth-to-Earth communications via satellites in geostationary or highly elliptical orbits, those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a direct path and those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a relay satellite. Soviet satellite communications capability, in most cases, is 10 years behind that of the United States and other industrialized nations. However, based upon an analysis of communications links needed to support these missions using current Soviet capabilities, it is well within the current Soviet technology to support certain space missions outlined above at rates of 128 Mbps or higher, although published literature clearly shows that the Soviet Union has not exceeded 60 Mbps in its current space system. These analyses are necessary but not sufficient to determine mission data rates, and other technologies such as onboard processing and storage could limit the mission data rate well below that which could actually be supported via the communications links. Presently, the Soviet Union appears to be content with data rates in the low-Earth-orbit relay via geostationary mode of 12 Mbps. This limit is a direct result of power amplifier limits, spacecraft antenna size, and the utilization of K{sub u}-band frequencies. 91 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  3. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  4. 2012 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Center for Transportation Analysis developed and published the first Vehicle Technologies Market Report in 2008. Three editions of the report have been published since that time. This 2012 report details the major trends in U.S. light vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national scale. The following section examines light-duty vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of medium and heavy trucks offers information on truck sales and fuel use. The technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards.

  5. Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer Analysis December 8, 2009 Harold G. Kirk #12;ShotSignal,A.U. Proton Bunch Number Beam Current Transformer - 17011 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Integrated Transformer Pump 187829 (au) Probe 196504 (au) Ratios: Beam Current 1.046 SF 1.019 2.9% difference #12;Shot

  6. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  7. TidGen Power System Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, Christopher R. [President & CEO] [President & CEO; McEntee, Jarlath [VP Engineering & CTO] [VP Engineering & CTO

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen® Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPC’s tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen® Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen® Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric Company on January 1, 2013 for up to 5 megawatts at a price of $215/MWh, escalating at 2.0% per year.

  8. The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

  9. Underinvestment in Public Good Technologies Gregory Tassey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , R&D policy has not adequately modeled the relevant economic phe- nomena and thus is unable a ranking of technology areas with respect to expected net economic benefits from a government subsidy from current and proposed R&D portfolios. To this end, a three- stage process is proposed

  10. New Technologies in Airframe and Engine Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    5, 2011 #12;Current Aviation Era Highest level of technological innovation and change since advent Restrictions Emission of CO2 ­ directly proportional to fuel consumption. Carbon "taxes". Emission of NOx costs and CO2 and NOx emissions. Boeing estimate for 787 5% lower fuel consumption from composites

  11. Thermoelectric Development at Hi-Z Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushch, Aleksandr S.; Bass, John C.; Ghamaty, Saeid; Elsner, Norbert B.; Bergstrand, Richard A.; Furrow, David; Melvin, Mike

    2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) for the Heavy Duty Class Eight Diesel Trucks is under development at Hi-Z Technology. The current TEG is equipped with the improved HZ-14 Thermoelectric module, which features better mechanical properties as well as higher electric power output. Also, the modules are held in place more securely.

  12. Emerging information technology and the expanding role of technical communicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Richard Charles

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging information technology is expanding the role of technical communicators. Functionality present in software tools contributes to a re-definition of what tasks technical communicators currently perform and how they will use object management...

  13. Model for a web based medical technology assessment system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhu, Gopal

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will form the backbone of this system. Various queries can be run to produce the desired results. This system will provide a means for assessing the currently available medical technology. Based on the information present in the system clinical engineers...

  14. Hybrid & electric vehicle technology and its market feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Sang Yeob

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) technology and their sales forecasts are discussed. First, the current limitations and the future potential ...

  15. Technology and economics of gas utilization: Methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seddon, D.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the current and emerging technology for the conversion of natural gas into methanol and assesses its impact on the production economics. Technologies of potential use for offshore developments of large gas reserves or associated gas are discussed. New technologies for the production of methanol synthesis-gas, such as autothermal reforming and GHR technology, are described and the economic advantages over conventional steam reforming are quantified. New methanol synthesis technology, such as slurry phase reactors, are outlined but appear to offer little advantage over conventional technology for offshore gas utilization. The purification of methanol for fuel and chemical grade product is outlined and the cost of transport presented. The data presented gives an overview of the production costs for production of methanol from large gas reserves (> 1Tcf, 25--35PJ/a) and smaller scale reserves (10--20MMscfd, 4--10PJ/a). The variation of the production cost of methanol with gas price indicates that the gas price is the principal economic consideration. However, adoption of new technology will improve production economics by an amount equivalent to an incremental gas cost of about $0.5/GJ. For gas reserves of low development cost, the adoption of new technology is not a prerequisite to economic viability.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment energy technology Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 Ris Energy Report 2 Three growing concerns sustainability (particularly in Summary: bioenergy technologies are assessed to show their current status, future trends and...

  17. SunShot Initiative Researcher Wins National Medal of Technology and Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last week, President Obama recognized Dr. Rakesh Agrawal, who is currently a researcher with the Department's SunShot Initiative, with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.

  18. DOE's Hydrogen Fuel Cell Activities: Developing Technology and Validating it through Real-World Evaluation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation prepared for the May 12, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Conference that describes DOE's current hydrogen fuel cell technology validation projects.

  19. alternative central-station technologies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  20. Biomimicry using Nano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, Sara

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy-powered technologies for fresh water supply to replace current energy-intensive water desalination techniques, especially for arid, developing countries.

  1. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HP HP HP Current Annexes Transportation of Thermal Energy Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage Technology Optimised Power Generation with Thermal Energy Storage  Sustainable 

  2. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

  3. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  4. Commercialization of Coal-to-Liquids Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides an overview of the current status of coal-to-liquids (CTL) commercialization efforts, including an analysis of efforts to develop and implement large-scale, commercial coal-to-liquids projects to create transportation fuels. Topics covered include: an overview of the history of coal usage and the current market for coal; a detailed description of what coal-to-liquids technology is; the history of coal-to-liquids development and commercial application; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coal-to-liquids; an analysis of the issues and challenges that are hindering the commercialization of coal-to-liquids technology; a review of available coal-to-liquids technology; a discussion of the economic drivers of coal-to-liquids project success; profiles of key coal-to-liquids developers; and profiles of key coal-to-liquids projects under development.

  5. Voltage sensing based built-in current sensor for IDDQ test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Bin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Quiescent current leakage test of the VDD supply (IDDQ Test) has been proven an effective way to screen out defective chips in manufacturing of Integrated Circuits (IC). As technology advances, the traditional IDDQ test is facing more and more...

  6. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

  7. Producing methane from electrical current generated using renewable energy sources using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Producing methane from electrical current generated using renewable energy sources using power production (33% efficient power plants) (Does not include solar and geothermal energy sources) 3 #12;New Energy Sources Available using Microbial Electrochemical Technologies (METs) · Wastewater

  8. Future Carbon Regulations and Current Investments in Alternative Coal-Fired Power Plant Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, Ram C.

    This paper assesses the role of uncertainty over future U.S. carbon regulations in shaping the current choice of which type of power plant to build. The pulverized coal technology (PC) still offer the lowest cost power— ...

  9. Technology Readiness Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

  10. UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    electricity networks and distribution systems, through to using smart grid technologies for more effective of dynamic collaborations delivering productive outcomes. #12;#12;LOW CARBON POWER AND ENERGY FUTURE CITIES Advanced Manufacturing Future Cities Health Technologies Working collaboratively, programmes within

  11. Diversity and Technological Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a tractable model to study the equilibrium diversity of technological progress and shows that equilibrium technological progress may exhibit too little diversity (too much conformity), in particular ...

  12. Pinch Technology Without Tears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polley, G. T.

    In the mid-eighties engineers were rushing to hear about Pinch Technology. Conference rooms were full. Training courses were over-subscribed. Here was the technology that was going to provide the standard design tool for the energy management...

  13. Current status of the GLASS code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hootman, H.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Honeck, H.C. (Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970's. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

  14. Current status of the GLASS code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hootman, H.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Honeck, H.C. [Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970`s. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

  15. Current

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | Department ofHighly31, 2015 |Dollars in

  16. Current:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d!9Document/Qwner

  17. Current:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L*

  18. Current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.WinterCrystalApplicationsCumulusMars

  19. Membrane Technology Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Charles Page (Air Products & Chemicals, Inc.) for the Membrane Technology Workshop held July 24, 2012

  20. Deployment of Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the FUPWG Deployment of Emerging Technologies. Presented by Brad Gustafson, Department of Energy, held on November 1, 2006.

  1. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  2. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  3. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

  4. Upgrading through Preprocessing Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through Preprocessing Technologies The challenges of efficiently converting raw biomass into usable, affordable, customized bioenergy feedstdocks are many. The bioenergy...

  5. Advanced Modular Inverter Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Szczepanek

    2006-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric and hybrid-electric vehicle systems require an inverter to convert the direct current (DC) output of the energy generation/storage system (engine, fuel cells, or batteries) to the alternating current (AC) that vehicle propulsion motors use. Vehicle support systems, such as lights and air conditioning, also use the inverter AC output. Distributed energy systems require an inverter to provide the high quality AC output that energy system customers demand. Today's inverters are expensive due to the cost of the power electronics components, and system designers must also tailor the inverter for individual applications. Thus, the benefits of mass production are not available, resulting in high initial procurement costs as well as high inverter maintenance and repair costs. Electricore, Inc. (www.electricore.org) a public good 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit advanced technology development consortium assembled a highly qualified team consisting of AeroVironment Inc. (www.aerovironment.com) and Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), (www.delphi.com), as equal tiered technical leads, to develop an advanced, modular construction, inverter packaging technology that will offer a 30% cost reduction over conventional designs adding to the development of energy conversion technologies for crosscutting applications in the building, industry, transportation, and utility sectors. The proposed inverter allows for a reduction of weight and size of power electronics in the above-mentioned sectors and is scalable over the range of 15 to 500kW. The main objective of this program was to optimize existing AeroVironment inverter technology to improve power density, reliability and producibility as well as develop new topology to reduce line filter size. The newly developed inverter design will be used in automotive and distribution generation applications. In the first part of this program the high-density power stages were redesigned, optimized and fabricated. One of the main tasks was to design and validate new gate drive circuits to provide the capability of high temp operation. The new power stages and controls were later validated through extensive performance, durability and environmental tests. To further validate the design, two power stages and controls were integrated into a grid-tied load bank test fixture, a real application for field-testing. This fixture was designed to test motor drives with PWM output up to 50kW. In the second part of this program the new control topology based on sub-phases control and interphase transformer technology was successfully developed and validated. The main advantage of this technology is to reduce magnetic mass, loss and current ripple. This report summarizes the results of the advanced modular inverter technology development and details: (1) Power stage development and fabrication (2) Power stage validation testing (3) Grid-tied test fixture fabrication and initial testing (4) Interphase transformer technology development

  6. Does Doctrine Drive Technology or Does Technology Drive Doctrine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasko, Dennis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief No. 4 September 2010 Does Doctrine Drive Technology orDoes Technology Drive Doctrine? Dennis Blasko Summary Wthat emphasizes strategy over technology and may hold some

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1 Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1 Presentation given by...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report The Fuel & Lubricant...

  9. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology Validation 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 16. Technology...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Technology and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Technology and System Level...

  11. Science, technology and innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Science, technology and innovation Taught degrees MSc in Innovation and Sustainability technologies on individuals and their environment is highly dependent on the choices made by policy makers that science and technology policy choices for sustainable growth and well-being in developing countries need

  12. University Libraries Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Libraries Bowling Green State University #12;Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................19 Page 2 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University Libraries Bowling Green State University #12University Libraries Technology Plan 2003-2005 Page 1 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University

  13. New Technology Demonstration Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

  14. Technology Forecasting Scenario Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Forecasting and Scenario Development Newsletter No. 2 October 1998 Systems Analysis was initiated on the establishment of a new research programme entitled Technology Forecasting and Scenario and commercial applica- tion of new technology. An international Scientific Advisory Panel has been set up

  15. Department of Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reservoir Models 42 #12;Page 2.21. Energy Storage 43 2.22. Focusing Solar Collector 43 2.23. Digitizing technology towa^ls energy technology problems in general, at Risø and in the Depart- ment, was made manifestRisa-R-482 Department of Energy Technology Annual Progress Report 1 January - 31 December 1982 Ris

  16. Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

  17. Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2009 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2009 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress in accordance with 15 USC Sec 3710(g)(2) for an annual summary on the implementation of technology transfer

  18. Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2008 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2008 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress transfer authorities established by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106

  19. Web Technology (elective package)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Web Technology (elective package) Offered by: Department of Mathematics and Computer Science? Computer Science-based approaches and enabling technologies for the web. Course descriptions Human and efficient. Web Technology The web has become the major source of information retrieval and is playing

  20. Technology Advertising Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Overview #12;Technology Advertising Contact Information Alex Sheath 8596 4063 asheath Overview Our online Technology section is geared towards an IT professional environment, reaching a range of technology enthusiasts from every day gadget consumers to business decision makers where enterprise solutions