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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

2

Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison This cost of ownership...

3

Aerogel commercialization: Technology, markets and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercialization of aerogels has been slow due to several factors including cost and manufacturability issues. The technology itself is well enough developed as a result of work over the past decade by an international-community of researchers. Several extensive substantial markets appear to exist for aerogels as thermal and sound insulators, if production costs can keep prices in line with competing established materials. The authors discuss here the elements which they have identified as key cost drivers, and they give a prognosis for the evolution of the technology leading to reduced cost aerogel production.

Carlson, G.; Lewis, D.; McKinley, K.; Richardson, J.; Tillotson, T.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

New technology for gas finding; How important has it been  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that finding costs for natural gas in the U.S. were more than halved in real terms from 94{cents}/Mcf in 1983 to 44{cents} in 1989. A number of industry analysts and oil company executives recently have suggested that technology improvements contributed significantly to this improvement. This claim is an especially important one because its proponents often use it to support the view that the gas glut in the U.S. will persist. In this view, new technology will push finding costs lower and help sustain deliverability, further prolonging the bubble. Managers who are convinced of this position will want to invest in the people, software, and equipment that is supposed to be behind this improved performance. But they also are more likely to defer drilling and acquisitions of companies or producing leases to avoid adding to the supply overhang.

Ellis, P.A. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, Dallas, TX (US))

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the economics of CO2 emission...

6

Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium Automotive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 - Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium Automotive Components edm2@chrysler.com February 28, 2008 Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium...

7

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

8

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...

9

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6476E 1 Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses, Lin, G, Piette, MA. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefits, and best practice

10

GTL technologies focus on lowering costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Difficulties in the development of major natural-gas production projects and the limitations imposed by saturated markets for LNG or pipeline gas have focused attention on alternative gas utilization approaches. At the same time, technology improvements have transformed the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) conversion of natural gas-to-liquid (GTL) hydrocarbons from a technically interesting but uneconomic option into an option worthy of serious consideration. This two-part series reviews GTL technology developments which have led to today`s situation (Part 1) and examines the economics of GTL conversion (Part 2). The economic viability of GTL projects mainly depends on feed-gas pricing, investment costs, and the potential to produce liquids with natural-gas production.

Corke, M.J. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., London (United Kingdom)

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar...

12

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

13

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and...

14

Emerging High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Cell Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with IIIEmerging High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Cell Technologies Mike McGehee Materials Science and Engineering Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium Precourt Institute

McGehee, Michael

15

Exploration of disruptive technologies for low cost RFID manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significant developments have taken place in defining technology standards and identifying avenues for technological innovations to reduce the cost of manufacturing RFID tags below the $0.05 price point. The Auto-ID center ...

Kommandur, Badarinath, 1968-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cost uncertainty for different levels of technology maturity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is difficult at best to apply a single methodology for estimating cost uncertainties related to technologies of differing maturity. While highly mature technologies may have significant performance and manufacturing cost data available, less well developed technologies may be defined in only conceptual terms. Regardless of the degree of technical maturity, often a cost estimate relating to application of the technology may be required to justify continued funding for development. Yet, a cost estimate without its associated uncertainty lacks the information required to assess the economic risk. For this reason, it is important for the developer to provide some type of uncertainty along with a cost estimate. This study demonstrates how different methodologies for estimating uncertainties can be applied to cost estimates for technologies of different maturities. For a less well developed technology an uncertainty analysis of the cost estimate can be based on a sensitivity analysis; whereas, an uncertainty analysis of the cost estimate for a well developed technology can be based on an error propagation technique from classical statistics. It was decided to demonstrate these uncertainty estimation techniques with (1) an investigation of the additional cost of remediation due to beyond baseline, nearly complete, waste heel retrieval from underground storage tanks (USTs) at Hanford; and (2) the cost related to the use of crystalline silico-titanate (CST) rather than the baseline CS100 ion exchange resin for cesium separation from UST waste at Hanford.

DeMuth, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Franklin, A.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 1 of 4 7 is that portion of the total cost of a research or other externally funded project that is not funded as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Goddard III, William A.

19

Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cost of ownership analysis identifies the factors impacting the value proposition for fuel cell backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator systems. The analysis compares three different backup power technologies (diesel, battery, and fuel cell) operating in similar circumstances in four run time scenarios (8, 52, 72, and 176 hours).

Kurtz, J.; Saur, G.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty Submitted in partial chapters. My conversations with Kurt Walzer at Clean Air Task Force and Rory McIlmoil at Coal Valley Wind Technology Laboratory. I did not complete this work alone. I had a lot of help along the way. I would like

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cost and Performance Report Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Industrial Sites Project Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) source group has limited budget and is constantly searching for new technologies to reduce programmatic costs. Partnering with the DOE Office of Science and Technology Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) reduces NNSA/NV programmatic risk and encourages accelerated deployment of potentially beneficial technologies to the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

P. S. Morris

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Technology commercialization cost model and component case study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cells seem poised to emerge as a clean, efficient, and cost competitive source of fossil fuel based electric power and thermal energy. Sponsors of fuel cell technology development need to determine the validity and the attractiveness of a technology to the market in terms of meeting requirements and providing value which exceeds the total cost of ownership. Sponsors of fuel cell development have addressed this issue by requiring the developers to prepare projections of the future production cost of their fuel cells in commercial quantities. These projected costs, together with performance and life projections, provide a preliminary measure of the total value and cost of the product to the customer. Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. and Michael A. Cobb & Company have been retained in several assignments over the years to audit these cost projections. The audits have gone well beyond a simple review of the numbers. They have probed the underlying technical and financial assumptions, the sources of data on material and equipment costs, and explored issues such as the realistic manufacturing yields which can be expected in various processes. Based on the experience gained from these audits, the DOE gave Booz-Allen and Michael A. Cobb & company the task to develop a criteria to be used in the execution of future fuel cell manufacturing cost studies. It was thought that such a criteria would make it easier to execute such studies in the future as well as to cause such studies to be more understandable and comparable.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Technology commercialization cost model and component case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cells seem poised to emerge as a clean, efficient, and cost competitive source of fossil fuel based electric power and thermal energy. Sponsors of fuel cell technology development need to determine the validity and the attractiveness of a technology to the market in terms of meeting requirements and providing value which exceeds the total cost of ownership. Sponsors of fuel cell development have addressed this issue by requiring the developers to prepare projections of the future production cost of their fuel cells in commercial quantities. These projected costs, together with performance and life projections, provide a preliminary measure of the total value and cost of the product to the customer. Booz-Allen Hamilton Inc. and Michael A. Cobb Company have been retained in several assignments over the years to audit these cost projections. The audits have gone well beyond a simple review of the numbers. They have probed the underlying technical and financial assumptions, the sources of data on material and equipment costs, and explored issues such as the realistic manufacturing yields which can be expected in various processes. Based on the experience gained from these audits, the DOE gave Booz-Allen and Michael A. Cobb company the task to develop a criteria to be used in the execution of future fuel cell manufacturing cost studies. It was thought that such a criteria would make it easier to execute such studies in the future as well as to cause such studies to be more understandable and comparable.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geothermal completion technology life-cycle cost model (GEOCOM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GEOCOM is a model developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of alternative technologies used in the completion, production, and maintenance of geothermal wells. The model calculates the ratio of life-cycle cost to life-cycle production or injection and thus is appropriate for evaluating the cost effectiveness of a geothermal well even when the most economically profitable well completion strategies do not result in lowest capital costs. The project to develop the GEOCOM model included the establishment of a data base for studying geothermal completions and preliminary case/sensitivity studies. The code has the data base built into its structure as default parameters. These parameters include geothermal resource characteristics; costs of geothermal wells, workovers, and equipment; and other data. The GEOCOM model has been written in ANSI (American National Standard Institute) FORTRAN 1966 version.

Mansure, A.J.; Carson, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of Utility Costs on the Economics of Energy Cost Reduction & Conservation Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF UTILITY COSTS ON THE ECONOMICS OF ENERGY COST REDUCTION & CONSERVATION TECHNOLOGIES Saidas M. Ranade Senior Process Engineer ARCO Chemical Company Channelview,Texas ABSTRACT This paper summarizes some key results obtained from... to ARCO Chemical Company for providing the time and space required to complete thi paper. REFERENCES 1. N. R. Friedman, Co eneration: Impacts on Utility Operations and Marketing. EPRI Conference on Placing Industrial Cogeneration in Perspective...

Ranade, S. M.; Chao, Y. T.

28

Wind Energy Technology Trends: Comparing and Contrasting Recent Cost and Performance Forecasts (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Poster depicts wind energy technology trends, comparing and contrasting recent cost and performance forecasts.

Lantz, E.; Hand, M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

New Technology Provides Cost-Effective Emissions Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Technology Provides Cost- Effective Emissions Control Solution for CHP Applications Renewable 2012 Emission controls installed in a 100 kW CHP unit Image credit: DE Solutions, Inc. The Issue of CHP applications through 2020. The inconsistent ability of engine emission control

30

Distributed utility technology cost, performance, and environmental characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed Utility (DU) is an emerging concept in which modular generation and storage technologies sited near customer loads in distribution systems and specifically targeted demand-side management programs are used to supplement conventional central station generation plants to meet customer energy service needs. Research has shown that implementation of the DU concept could provide substantial benefits to utilities. This report summarizes the cost, performance, and environmental and siting characteristics of existing and emerging modular generation and storage technologies that are applicable under the DU concept. It is intended to be a practical reference guide for utility planners and engineers seeking information on DU technology options. This work was funded by the Office of Utility Technologies of the US Department of Energy.

Wan, Y.; Adelman, S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ADJUSTMENT COSTS, LEARNING-BY-DOING, AND TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION UNDER UNCERTAINTY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a variety of vintage capital models of a firm's choice of technology under uncertainty in the presence of adjustment costs and technology-specific learning. ...

Pavlova, Anna

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

An Easy Way to Find Patents for Innovative Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Browse through thousands of U.S. patents for Energy Department-funded technologies with the new Visual Patent Finder tool for the Energy Innovation Portal.

35

Cost Effectiveness of CO2 Mitigation Technologies and Policies in the Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Cost Effectiveness of CO2 Mitigation Technologies and Policies in the Electricity Sector. The costs and benefits of low carbon technology options are unique and affect different market participants in different ways. In this thesis, we examine the cost effectiveness of carbon mitigation technologies

36

Review of PV Inverter Technology Cost and Performance Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a major responsibility in the implementation of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has a major role in supporting inverter development, characterization, standards, certifications, and verifications. The Solar Energy Technologies Program recently published a Multiyear Technical Plan, which establishes a goal of reducing the Levelized Energy Cost (LEC) for photovoltaic (PV) systems to $0.06/kWh by 2020. The Multiyear Technical Plan estimates that, in order to meet the PV system goal, PV inverter prices will need to decline to $0.25-0.30 Wp by 2020. DOE determined the need to conduct a rigorous review of the PV Program's technical and economic targets, including the target set for PV inverters. NREL requested that Navigant Consulting Inc.(NCI) conduct a review of historical and projected cost and performance improvements for PV inverters, including identification of critical barriers identified and the approaches government might use to address them.

Navigant Consulting Inc.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Case studies of energy information systems and related technology: Operational practices, costs, and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs, and benefits of EIS, many of these descriptions are idealized and often insufficient for potential users to evaluate cost, benefit and operational usefulness. LBNL has conducted a series of case studies of existing EIS and related technology installations. This study explored the following questions: (1) How is the EIS used in day-to-day operation? (2) What are the costs and benefits of an EIS? (3) Where do the energy savings come from? This paper reviews the process of these technologies from installation through energy management practice. The study is based on interviews with operators and energy managers who use EIS. Analysis of energy data trended by EIS and utility bills was also conducted to measure the benefit. This paper explores common uses and findings to identify energy savings attributable to EIS, and discusses non-energy benefits as well. This paper also addresses technologies related to EIS that have been demonstrated and evaluated by LBNL.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Dewey, Jim

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

NREL: News - NREL Report Finds Similar Value in Two CSP Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two CSP Technologies Findings demonstrate increasing importance for systems with thermal energy storage February 11, 2014 Parabolic troughs and dry-cooled towers deliver similar...

39

Technology, Language, and Public Decisions: Finding Common Ground for Experts and Citizens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology, Language, and Public Decisions: Finding Common Ground for Experts and Citizens David D@cs.umass.edu Todd M. La Porte School of Systems Engineering & Policy Analysis Delft University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands tlaporte@tmn.com Abstract---Many conflicts over specific technologies could be alleviated

Jensen, David

40

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Significant Cost...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies Presentation given by Johnson Controls at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Using Pinch Technology to Explore Trade-Offs Between Energy Cost, Capital Cost, Process Modifications, and Utility Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING PINCH TECHNOLOGY TO EXPLORE TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN ENERGY COST, CAPITAL COST, PROCESS MODIFICATIONS, AND UTILITY SELECTION A.S. McMullan, Consultant and H.D. Spriggs, President Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Virginia ABSTRACT Process... (3), predict payback targets in retrofit situations (4), and design flexible heat exchanger networks (5). The most recent developments enable the process designer to explore the interactions and trade-offs between design variables, prior...

McMullan, A. S.

42

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective.

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

44

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-analysis of the costs of mitigating global GHG emissions over the period to 2100, with and without the effects trading allowances at a regional or global level. It reports a wide range of costs with confusing-analyses done by the World Resources Institute for the US economy, 1997, and the IPCC post-SRES models

Watson, Andrew

45

Integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) authorized studies on alternative systems for treating contact-handled DOE mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW). The on-going Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems` (ITTS) and the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems` (INTS) studies satisfy this request. EM-50 further authorized supporting studies including this technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis. This analysis identifies areas where technology development could have the greatest impact on total life cycle system costs. These areas are determined by evaluating the sensitivity of system life cycle costs relative to changes in life cycle component or phase costs, subsystem costs, contingency allowance, facility capacity, operating life, and disposal costs. For all treatment systems, the most cost sensitive life cycle phase is the operations and maintenance phase and the most cost sensitive subsystem is the receiving and inspection/preparation subsystem. These conclusions were unchanged when the sensitivity analysis was repeated on a present value basis. Opportunity exists for technology development to reduce waste receiving and inspection/preparation costs by effectively minimizing labor costs, the major cost driver, within the maintenance and operations phase of the life cycle.

Harvego, L.A.; Schafer, J.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Accelerating Commercialization of Cost-Saving Health Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency, and lower the costs of care. Booz Allen Hamilton has been at the forefront of strategy-for-profit organizations. booz Allen offers clients deep functional knowledge spanning strategy and organization on booz Allen to help them be ready for what's next. the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) focuses

Hasty, Jeff

49

Estimating the Market Penetration of Residential Cool Storage Technology Using Economic Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study estimated the market penetration for residential cool storage technology using economic cost modeling. Residential cool storage units produce and store chill during off-peak periods of the day to be used during times of peak electric...

Weijo, R. O.; and Brown, D. R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

Bernacki, Bruce E.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement, and abatement in this sector is a key determinant of economy-wide regulation costs. The complexity. It follows that assessing abatement potentials and price changes in the electricity sector with a partial

52

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety, Codes and StandardsFuelCellsatin the

53

EXPERT ELICITATION OF ACROSS-TECHNOLOGY CORRELATIONS FOR REACTOR CAPITAL COSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of the uncertainty in the Levelized Cost at Equilibrium (LCAE) of generating nuclear electricity typically assume that the costs of the system component, notably reactors, are uncorrelated. Partial cancellation of independent errors thus gives rise to unrealistically small cost uncertainties for fuel cycles that incorporate multiple reactor technologies. This summary describes an expert elicitation of correlations between overnight reactor construction costs. It also defines a method for combining the elicitations into a single, consistent correlation matrix suitable for use in Monte Carlo LCAE calculations. Both the elicitation and uncertainty propagation methods are demonstrated through a pilot study where cost correlations between eight reactor technologies were elicited from experts in the US DOE Fuel Cycle Research

Brent Dixon; Various

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography is a compilation of reports on the cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy applications throughout the United States. It is part of an overall effort to inform utilities of technological developments in conservation and renewable energy technologies and so aid utilities in their planning process to determine the most effective and economic combination of capital investments to meet customer needs. Department of Energy assessments of the applications, current costs and cost goals for the various technologies included in this bibliography are presented. These assessments are based on analyses performed by or for the respective DOE Program Offices. The results are sensitive to a number of variables and assumptions; however, the estimates presented are considered representative. These assessments are presented, followed by some conclusions regarding the potential role of the conservation and renewable energy alternative. The approach used to classify the bibliographic citations and abstracts is outlined.

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Significant Cost Improvement of Li-ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Johnson Controls at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about significant cost improvement...

59

Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel Use and Emissions from On policy harmonized Tax credits Anti-idling Low Carbon Fuel Standard #12;Lifecycle Emissions Modeled in TOP-HDV 5 Fuel production, refining, and distribution Material acquisition, processing, and vehicle assembly

California at Davis, University of

60

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rüsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products is carrying out a scope of work under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications.” The Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) includes a Task 4f in which a Decision Point shall be reached, necessitating a review of Tasks 2-5 with an emphasis on Task 4f. This Topical Report constitutes the Decision Point Application pertaining to Task 4f. The SOPO under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 is aimed at furthering the development of the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen production process toward a demonstration scale facility known as the Oxygen Development Facility (ODF). It is anticipated that the completion of the current SOPO will advance the technology significantly along a pathway towards enabling the design and construction of the ODF. Development progress on several fronts is critical before an ODF project can commence; this Topical Report serves as an early update on the progress in critical development areas. Progress was made under all tasks, including Materials Development, Ceramic Processing Development, Engineering Development, and Performance Testing. Under Task 4f, Air Products carried out a cost and performance study in which several process design and cost parameters were varied and assessed with a process model and budgetary costing exercise. The results show that the major variables include ceramic module reliability, ITM operating temperature, module production yield, and heat addition strategy. High-temperature compact heat exchangers are shown to contribute significant cost benefits, while directly firing into the feed stream to an ITM are even a mild improvement on the high-temperature recuperation approach. Based on the findings to-date, Air Products recommends no changes to the content or emphasis in the current SOPO and recommends its completion prior to another formal assessment of these factors.

Armstrong, Phillip

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. This study was conducted by implementing both top-down and bottom-up strategies. The top-down approach used prosperity gaming methodology to identify future health care delivery needs. This effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements. The bottom-up approach identified and ranked interventional therapies employed in existing care delivery systems for a host of health-related conditions. Economic analysis formed the basis for development of care pathway interaction models for two of the most pervasive, chronic disease/disability conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Societal cost-benefit relationships based on these analyses were used to evaluate the effect of emerging technology in these treatment areas. 17 figs., 48 tabs.

Sill, A.E.; Warren, S.; Dillinger, J.D.; Cloer, B.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

N:\\redesign\\guides\\Food Technology-Food Engineering.doc 1 A Beginning Finding Aid to Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, J. Henry Oxygen by the ton Oxygen ­ Manufacture 12:22 March 1947 Parker, Milton E. Food technologyN:\\redesign\\guides\\Food Technology-Food Engineering.doc 1 A Beginning Finding Aid to Materials in the IIT Archives Related to Food Technology Index of IIT Archives Acc. No. 1998.149/News (Press) Releases

Heller, Barbara

65

Technology and Cost of the Model Year (MY) 2007 Toyota Camry HEV Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

None

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Technology and Cost of the MY 2007 toyota Camry HEV -- A Subcontract Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

Marlino, Laura D [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Applying environmental externalities to US Clean Coal Technologies for Asia. [Including external environmental costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is well positioned to play an expanding role in meeting the energy technology demands of the Asian Pacific Basin, including Indonesia, Thailand, and the Republic of China (ROC-Taiwan). The US Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program provides a proving ground for innovative coal-related technologies that can be applied domestically and abroad. These innovative US CCTs are expected to satisfy increasingly stringent environmental requirements while substantially improving power generation efficiencies. They should also provide distinct advantages over conventional pulverized coal-fired combustors. Finally, they are expected to be competitive with other energy options currently being considered in the region. This paper presents potential technology scenarios for Indonesia, Thailand, and the ROC-Taiwan and considers an environmental cost-benefit approach employing a newly developed method of applying environmental externalities. Results suggest that the economic benefits from increased emission control can indeed be quantified and used in cost-benefit comparisons, and that US CCTs can be very cost effective in reducing emissions.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Standards and Technology (NIST). 2010. NIST Framework andof Standards and Technology (NIST). 2012. NIST Framework andOpportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:

Ghatikar, Girish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Reducing the cost of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases using membrane technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of CO{sub 2} capture using membrane technology from coal-fired power-plant flue gas typically assume compression of the feed to achieve a driving force across the membrane. The high CO{sub 2} capture cost of these systems reflects the need to compress the low-pressure feed gas (1 bar) and the low CO{sub 2} purity of the product stream. This article investigates how costs for CO{sub 2} capture using membranes can be reduced by operating under vacuum conditions. The flue gas is pressurized to 1.5 bar, whereas the permeate stream is at 0.08 bar. Under these operating conditions, the capture cost is U.S. $54/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided compared to U.S. $82/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided using membrane processes with a pressurized feed. This is a. reduction of 35%. The article also investigates the effect on the capture cost of improvements in CO{sub 2} permeability and selectivity. The results show that the capture cost can be reduced to less than U.S. $25/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided when the CO{sub 2} permeability is 300 bar, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity is 250, and the membrane cost is U.S. $10/m{sup 2}.

Ho, M.T.; Allinson, G.W.; Wiley, D.E. [University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (Australia)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other environmental benefits. In the first phase we worked in the U.S., Brazil, Belize, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile to develop and refine specific carbon inventory methods, pioneering a new remote-sensing method for cost-effectively measuring and monitoring terrestrial carbon sequestration and system for developing carbon baselines for both avoided deforestation and afforestation/reforestation projects. We evaluated the costs and carbon benefits of a number of specific terrestrial carbon sequestration activities throughout the U.S., including reforestation of abandoned mined lands in southwest Virginia, grassland restoration in Arizona and Indiana, and reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. The most cost-effective U.S. terrestrial sequestration opportunity we found through these studies was reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. In Phase II we conducted a more systematic assessment and comparison of several different measurement and monitoring approaches in the Northern Cascades of California, and a broad 11-state Northeast regional assessment, rather than pre-selected and targeted, analysis of terrestrial sequestration costs and benefits. Work was carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA. Partners include the Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, The Sampson Group, Programme for Belize, Society for Wildlife Conservation (SPVS), Universidad Austral de Chile, Michael Lefsky, Colorado State University, UC Berkeley, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, ProNaturaleza, Ohio State University, Stephen F. Austin University, Geographical Modeling Services, Inc., WestWater, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Century Ecosystem Services, Mirant Corporation, General Motors, American Electric Power, Salt River Project, Applied Energy Systems, KeySpan, NiSource, and PSEG. This project, 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration', has resulted in over 50 presentations and reports, available publicly through the Department of Energy or by visiting the links listed in Appendix 1. More

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Report on the planning workshop on cost-effective ceramic machining. Ceramic Technology Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop on ``Cost Effective Ceramic Machining`` (CECM) was held at Oak Ridge Associated Universities Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, May 1991. The purpose of this workshop was to present a preliminary project plan for industry critique and to identify specific components and cost-reduction targets for a new project on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining. The CECM project is an extension of the work on the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Materials. The workshop consisted of fifteen invited papers, discussions, a survey of the attendee`s opinions, and a tour of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory at ORNL. The total number of registrants was sixty-seven, including thirty-three from industry or private sector organizations, seven from universities, three from industry groups, fourteen from DOE laboratories (including ORNL, Y-12, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), three from trade associations, and three from other government organizations. Forty- one survey forms, which critiqued the proposed project plan, were completed by attendees, and the results are presented in this report. Valves, cam roller followers, water pump seals, and diesel engine head plates were rated highest fro application of ceramic machining concepts to reduce cost. Coarse grinding, abrasives and wheel technology, and fine grinding were most highly rated as regards their impact on cost reduction. Specific cost-reduction targets for given parts varied greatly in the survey results and were not felt to be useful for the purposes for the CECM plan development. A range of individual comments were obtained and are listed in an appendix. As a result of the workshop and subsequent discussions, a modified project plan, different in certain aspects from the original CECM plan, has been developed.

Blau, P.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Neil Sampson; Miguel Calmon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2007. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1--carbon inventory advancements; Task 2--emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3--baseline method development; Task 4--third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5--new project feasibility studies; and Task 6--development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Miguel Calmon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between October 1st and December 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Finding the Next Big Thing(s) in Building Energy Efficiency: HIT Catalyst and the Technology Demo Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn how the Department prioritizes high impact technologies (HITs) to advance energy efficiency. Hear from a Better Buildings program participant who is working with Department staff to test promising technologies in buildings. Learn what they are finding and how you can get involved.

82

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: remote sensing for carbon analysis; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Wilber Sabido; Ellen Hawes; Jenny Henman; Miguel Calmon; Michael Ebinger

2004-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Patrick Gonzalez; Brad Kreps; Gilberto Tiepolo

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

THE APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research projects is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Minimizing the Cost of Innovative Nuclear Technology Through Flexibility: The Case of a Demonstration Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented is a methodology to analyze the expected Levelised Cost Of Electricity (LCOE) in the face of technology uncertainty for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADSRs). It shows that flexibility in the design and deployment strategy...

Cardin, Michel-Alexandre; Steer, Steven J.; Nuttall, William J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Gonçalves, Leonardo V.N.; de Neufville, Richard

86

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

Spencer, D.F. [SIMTECHE, Half Moon Bay, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

1994-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Market Concepts, Competing Technologies and Cost Challenges for Automotive and Stationary Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

term) due to high fuel cell stack costs, but it would alsoto refuel; cost reductions in fuel cell stacks, auxiliaries,

Lipman, Todd; Sperling, Daniel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Effectiveness Investment cost Demonstration in salad2015 Cost Effectiveness Investment cost Type of cost Change2015 Cost Effectiveness Investment cost Type of cost Change

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies for both IT equipment and site infrastructure. The Power Usagetechnologies. The survey included information such as: • Site name and contacts • Energy usage •

Ghatikar, Girish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

Jones, E.; Eto, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cost-effectiveness analysis of the SEAMIST{trademark} membrane system technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SEAMIST{trademark} is a new technology that consists of an airtight membrane liner that is pneumatically emplaced inside the borehole. The positive air pressure inside the liner maintains the integrity of the borehole structure. Sampling ports with attached tubing, absorbent collectors, or various in situ measuring devices can be fabricated into the liner and used for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, herbicides, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, or radioactive substances. In addition, small instruments can be guided through the lined borehole and measurements taken inside at specified intervals. The purpose of this study is to analyze the cost and performance effectiveness of this new technology. To do so, the authors constructed five hypothetical scenarios in which utilization of the SEAMIST{trademark} system can address various needs of the Department of Energy`s environmental remediation program. Two of the scenarios involve vertical boreholes (or vertical instrument configurations) and two involve horizontal boreholes (or horizontal instrument configurations). The four scenarios jointly address contamination by VOCS, SVOCS, various water-soluble toxic substances, and low-level radioactive waste. One of the scenarios involves towing an instrument through a borehole and taking measurements of moisture levels in the surrounding soil.

Henriksen, A.D.; Booth, S.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems: State of the technology and user case studies.Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices,Demonstrating how information technology can cut energy use

Granderson, Jessica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Stephens, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 20, NO. 13, JULY 1, 2008 1151 Low-Cost Optoelectronic Self-Injection-Locked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 20, NO. 13, JULY 1, 2008 1151 Low-Cost Optoelectronic Self by injecting 8-dBm optical signals without using any high-speed optoelectronic components. Index Terms--InP monolithic oscillator, optoelectronic oscillator (OEO), phase-noise reduction, self-injection locking (SIL

Choi, Woo-Young

100

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

103

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A cost modeling approach using learning curves to study the evolution of technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work looks into the concept of learning curves to decipher the underlying mechanism in cost evolution. The concept is not new and has been used since last seven decades to understand cost walk down in various ...

Kar, Ashish M. (Ashish Mohan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

An Evolutionary Path for Concentrating Thermal Solar Power Technologies: A New Approach for Modeling CSP Power Costs and Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) technology is a potentially competitive power generation option, particularly in arid regions where direct sunlight is abundant. We examine the potential role of CSP power plants and their contribution to carbon emissions reduction. The answers to these questions depend on the cost of electricity generated by CSP plants. Although a few studies have projected future CSP costs based on assumptions for technology advancement and the effect of economies of scale and learning curves, few studies have considered the combined effects of intermittency, solar irradiance changes by season, and diurnal and seasonal system load changes. Because the generation of a solar plant varies over a day and by season, the interactions between CSP generators and other generators in the electric system can play an important role in determining costs. In effect, CSP electricity generation cost will depend on the CSP market penetration. This paper examines this relationship and explores possible evolutionary paths for CSP technologies with and without thermal storage.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluating trade-offs between sustainability, performance, and cost of green machining technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact assessments Life cycle assessment (LCA) has beenLife Cycle Cost Analysis and LCA, in: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment,

Helu, Moneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Evaluating Trade-Offs Between Sustainability, Performance, and Cost of Green Machining Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact assessments Life cycle assessment (LCA) has beenLife Cycle Cost Analysis and LCA, in: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment,

Helu, Moneer; Rühl, Jan; Dornfeld, David; Werner, Patrick; Lanza, Gisela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013 More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Delivery Roadmap US...

111

Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Publications CX-010928: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation Improved Engine Control Strategies...

112

V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Policy 34 (2006) 16451658 Technological learning and renewable energy costs: implications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity cost estimates used in energy policy planning models. Sensitivities of the learning rates: Learning by doing; Renewable energy costs; Research expenditures 1. Introduction Changes in the electricity,000 MW by 2000 (McVeigh et al., 1999). Analysts in the private sector produced similar scenarios

Vermont, University of

114

Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

118

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of design & technology package for cost effective housing in Gujrat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose: Improve quality of life in rural areas through intervention of infrastructure and housing improvement. Provide methods of building better and cost-effective houses at a quicker pace. Devise strategies of withdrawing ...

Chaudhry, Rajive

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effective mineral exploration programs maximize the ben-efit of appropriate technologies in order to increase cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to help in the exploration process and to test the effectiveness of dif- ferent methods overEffective mineral exploration programs maximize the ben- efit of appropriate technologies in order of discovery. In other words, correct use of available tools can allow exploration programs to find more ore

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

122

Evaluating Trade-Offs Between Sustainability, Performance, and Cost of Green Machining Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

framework to incorporate green manufacturing principles intoGreen Machining Technologies Moneer Helu , Jan Rühl , David Dornfeld , Patrick Werner , Gisela Lanza Laboratory for Manufacturing

Helu, Moneer; Rühl, Jan; Dornfeld, David; Werner, Patrick; Lanza, Gisela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Evaluating trade-offs between sustainability, performance, and cost of green machining technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

framework to incorporate green manufacturing principles intoGreen Machining Technologies Moneer Helu , Jan Rühl , David Dornfeld , Patrick Werner , Gisela Lanza Laboratory for Manufacturing

Helu, Moneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act SECTION 1. FINDINGS in manufacturing technology, quality control, and techniques for ensuring product reliability and cost concerns compete strongly in world markets. (3) Improvements in manufacturing and product technology depend

Magee, Joseph W.

125

Technical and cost potential for lightweight, stretched-membrane heliostat technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the background and rationale and describes the development effort of a potentially low-cost, concentrating reflector design. The proposed reflector design is called the stretched-membrane concept. In this concept a reflector film - which can be metal, polymeric, or of a composite construction - is stretched on a hollow torroidal frame that offers a structurally efficient and optically accurate surface. Although the intent is to improve heliostat concentrator cost and performance for solar thermal applications, the collector design approach proposed here may well offer effective cost and performance opportunities for improving photovoltaic and solar daylighting applications as well. Some of the major advantages include a reflector, a support frame, and support structures that can be made extremely lightweight and low in cost because of the effective use of material with high average stress levels in the reflector and support frame; a 75% reduction in the weight of the reflector and support structure (down to the drive attachment) over the second-generation glass-and-metal heliostat concept; a better than 50% cost reduction for the reflector assembly and support structure compared to corresponding elements of the second-generation concept; and, finally, optical accuracies and an annual energy delivery potential close to those attainable with current glass-and-metal heliostats. In this paper results of initial design studies, performance predictions, and analysis are presented, as well as results corresponding to subscale testing. Also included are recommendations for further development and for resolving remaining issues.

Murphy, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cost-effective allocation of public funding to promote the commercialization of renewable energy technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The need for new Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) is growing with the challenge of providing affordable electricity under increasing environmental and public health constraints while promoting energy security and ...

Culver, Lauren C. (Lauren Claire)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric...

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Novel technologies and techniques for low-cost phased arrays and scanning antennas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Monolithic PIN diodes are a useful technology, especially suited for building miniaturized control components in microwave and millimeter-wave phased arrays. This dissertation demonstrates a new strategy for extracting bias-dependent small-signal models...

Rodenbeck, Christopher Timothy

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessment of a low-cost, point-of-use, ultraviolet water disinfection technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Waterborne illnesses associated with contaminated water sources, inadequate sanitation, and poor, Portland, OR, USA Rachel L. Peletz Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, Calgary, Canada are largely preventable through adequate hygiene, sanitation and safe drinking water; thus, one

Kammen, Daniel M.

132

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

133

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

135

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRICES The price forecasts for coal, fuel oil and natural gas are described in Appendix B. COAL-FIRED STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANTS Coal-fired steam-electric power plants are a mature technology, in use for over a century. Coal is the largest source of electric power in the United States as a whole, and the second

138

Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate policies and implementation plans that enable countries to advance sustainable, climate-resilient development and private sector growth while significantly reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions traditionally associated with economic growth. In creating a LEDS, policy makers often have access to information on abatement potential and costs for clean energy technologies, but there is a scarcity of economy-wide approaches for evaluating and presenting information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, this paper proposes a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS process. The purpose of this tool is two-fold: 1. Communicate development benefits associated with each clean energy-related intervention; 2. Facilitate decision-making on which combination of interventions best contributes to development goals. To pilot this tool, the authors created a visual using data on developmental impacts identified through the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project in Montenegro. The visual will then be revised to reflect new data established through the TNA that provides information on cost, GHG mitigation, as well as the range and magnitude of developmental impacts.

Cowlin, S.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.; Davison, C.; van der Gaast, Y.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, [approximately] 1 [times] 10[sup 5] cm[sup [minus]5], as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 [times]10[sup 7] cm[sup [minus]2]. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

Vernon, S.M. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Development of High Rate Coating Technology for Low Cost Electrochromic Dynamic Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives of the Project: The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of depositing critical electrochromic layers at high rate using new novel vacuum coating sources, to develop a full electrochromic process flow by combining conventional processes with new deposition sources, to characterize, test, evaluate, and optimize the resulting coatings and devices, and, to demonstrate an electrochromic device using the new process flow and sources. As addendum objectives, this project was to develop and demonstrate direct patterning methods with novel integration schemes. The long term objective, beyond this program, is to integrate these innovations to enable production of low-cost, high-performance electrochromic windows produced on highly reliable and high yielding manufacturing equipment and systems.

Kwak, B.; Joshi, Ajey

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Aqueous-stream uranium-removal technology cost/benefit and market analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this report is to present information that was gathered by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) in order to help the Department of Energy (DOE) determine the merit of continued biosorption research funding. However, in the event that funding is continued, it is also intended to help the researchers in their efforts to develop a better uranium-removal process. This report (1) provides a comparison of DOE sites that may utilize aqueous-stream, uranium-removal biosorption technology, (2) presents a comparison of the biosorption and ion exchange processes, and (3) establishes performance criteria by which the project can be measured. It also attempts to provide focus for biosorbent ground-water-remediation research and to ask questions that need to be answered. This report is primarily a study of the US market for technologies that remove uranium from aqueous streams, but it also addresses the international market-particularly for Germany. Because KEI`s access to international market information is extremely limited, the material presented in this report represents a best effort to obtain this data. Although uranium-contaminated aqueous streams are a problem in other countries as well, the scope of this report is primarily limited to the US and Germany for two reasons: (1) Germany is the country of the biosorbent-CRADA partner and (2) time constraints.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Steam turbine maintenance and repair technology: Reducing planned-outage costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North American Electric Reliability Council (NAERC) reported that the average loss of equivalent availability per outage for a major fossil turbine overhaul is 323,000 MW-HR. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation and Storage Division, is in the first phase of a major research project to reduce the duration and/or frequency of steam turbine maintenance outages. This project consists of an assessment of the current state-of-the-art turbine maintenance and repair techniques and technologies. It is based on a review of current turbine maintenance practices of the US, European, Japanese, and Australian utility industries. Emphasized are maintenance and repair activities that have the most significant impact on outage duration or frequency. Twenty-six key turbine maintenance activities and the current best techniques were identified for use by utility maintenance personnel. Overall outage durations could be reduced if the duration of these activities were shortened or if they were performed more effectively. Recommended projects for development of advanced steam turbine maintenance technology were identified. 29 refs., 46 figs., 9 tabs.

Grace, H.P.; McClintock, M. (General Physics Corp., Columbia, MD (USA)); Lamping, G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High Efficiency Low Cost CO2 Compression Using Supersonic Shock Wave Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development and testing results from a supersonic compressor are presented. The compressor achieved record pressure ratio for a fully-supersonic stage and successfully demonstrated the technology potential. Several tasks were performed in compliance with the DOE award objectives. A high-pressure ratio compressor was retrofitted to improve rotordynamics behavior and successfully tested. An outside review panel confirmed test results and design approach. A computational fluid dynamics code used to analyze the Ramgen supersonic flowpath was extensively and successfully modified to improve use on high-performance computing platforms. A comprehensive R&D implementation plan was developed and used to lay the groundwork for a future full-scale compressor demonstration. Conceptual design for a CO2 demonstration compressor was developed and reviewed.

Williams, J; Aarnio, M; Grosvenor, A; Taylor, D; Bucher, J

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

David B. Burnett

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

148

STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better when compared to other competitive technologies. After long discussions this decision for SCR has been made in Europe and is supported by all truck and engine manufacturers. The necessary logistic support will be in place when it will be needed commercially in 2005. For the US the decision has to be taken this year in order to have the infrastructure available in 2007. It will enable the global engine industry to focus their R & D resources in one direction not only for 2007, but for the years beyond 2010 with the best benefit for the environment, the customers and the industry.

Schittler, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells with Wafer Bonding and Plasmonic Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First of all, I would like to thank my thesis adviser Harry Atwater for his great mentorship and guidance over the years. While he is an extremely busy professor holding about twenty students in his research group and a lot of domestic and international travels for seminars and conferences, he never hesitated to discuss with me when I knocked on his office’s door. Our discussion often went over 1 hour in his tight schedule, but he did not stop until we reached clear conclusions and decided what to do next. While he always tries to find the most effective way for experimental scheme, Harry one day told me that we engineers should always assume possible to fabricate whatever structure possible when I showed a hesitation for doing a complicated process, which preach is still and will be in my mind. It was also a great pleasure for me to work with the excellent members in the Atwater

Katsuaki Tanabe; Katsuaki Tanabe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Study of progesterone for the prevention of preterm birth in twins (STOPPIT): findings from a trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBJECTIVES: Preterm birth contributes to a range of healthcare problems amongst infants surmounting to sizeable healthcare costs. Twin pregnancies are at particular risk of preterm birth. The objective of this study was ...

Eddama, O.; Petrou, S.; Regier, D.; Norrie, J.; MacLennan, G.; Mackenzie, F.; Norman, J. E.

151

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

COMPLEAT (Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies): A planning tool for publicly owned electric utilities. [Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies (Compleat)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COMPLEAT takes its name, as an acronym, from Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies. It is an electric utility planning model designed for use principally by publicly owned electric utilities and agencies serving such utilities. As a model, COMPLEAT is significantly more full-featured and complex than called out in APPA's original plan and proposal to DOE. The additional complexity grew out of a series of discussions early in the development schedule, in which it became clear to APPA staff and advisors that the simplicity characterizing the original plan, while highly desirable in terms of utility applications, was not achievable if practical utility problems were to be addressed. The project teams settled on Energy 20/20, an existing model developed by Dr. George Backus of Policy Assessment Associates, as the best candidate for the kinds of modifications and extensions that would be required. The remainder of the project effort was devoted to designing specific input data files, output files, and user screens and to writing and testing the compute programs that would properly implement the desired features around Energy 20/20 as a core program. This report presents in outline form, the features and user interface of COMPLEAT.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

light-to -electricity conversion efficiency in early implementations under AM1.5 solar light. EasyDye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light- to-electricity conversion in indoors low-light

154

Costs, Culture, and Complexity: An Analysis of Technology Enhancements in a Large Lecture Course at UC Berkeley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$ 68,731 total. Table 5: Development/Revision Costs ActivityWhile Table 5 presents development/revision costs thatof development/revision activities, which appear in Table 5,

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature DC-Bus Capacitors Cost Reduction and Performance Improvements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Sigma Technologies International at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

157

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

160

Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Optodot Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about innovative manufacturing...

162

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. (2004). Advances in solar thermal electricity technology.table.. 21  Table 8. Solar Thermal Cooling Data19  Solar Thermal Cooling

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about overcoming...

164

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

165

A HIGH ASPECT RATIO, FLEXIBLE, TRANSPARENT AND LOW-COST PARYLENE-C SHADOW MASK TECHNOLOGY FOR MICROPATTERNING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(HAR) structures. The potential applications of this stencil technology are numerous including. Sridhar3 , A. Khademhosseini4 , A. Busnaina2 , and M. R. Dokmeci1,* 1 Department of Electrical) up to 9 times. This technology has potential applications for patterning proteins, cells and organic

Dokmeci, Mehmet

166

PON08010 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) Cost Share: Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program Questions and Answers 4/27/09 to 5/1/09 Two questions (How far's solicitation "seek and obtain an award" through a federal ARRA solicitation. 3) May a project producing bio and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program. The Energy Commission recommends that you submit a pre

167

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Miltec UV International at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the utilization of UV...

168

2004 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Review Presentation COST AND PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS FOR A PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

Mark K. Gee

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Zoltek at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development and commercialization of a...

170

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Super Boiler High-efficiency welding Pumppercent and the gas boiler has an efficiency of 68 percent.natural gas boiler plus 33.4% efficiency grid electricity

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Advanced low-cost SIC and GaN wide...

172

Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Suter, Jonathan D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wang, Mr. Michael [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruth, Mr. Mark [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Andress, Mr. David [David Andress & Associates, Inc.; Ward, Jacob [U.S. Department of Energy; Joseck, Fred [U.S. Department of Energy; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. Department of Energy; Das, Sujit [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) Cost Share: Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other matching funds instead of federal dollars, does this exclude us from the process? Will the Energy and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program. Questions and Answers as of 4/27/09 1 1) Our county is working on a joint proposal for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds with other agencies

175

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Cost Analysis David Edge Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission 131 ESL-IE-00-04-21 Proceedings from the Twenty-second National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 5-6, 2000 Tuas Natural... Resource Conservation CorDDliuion Environmental Cost Analysis Presented By David Edge Determine the Costs c> Input co Output c> Hidden c> Capital (non recurring) Envirormenlal Cost Analy.;is "There has to be a measurable result...

Edge, D.

177

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologie...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologies to Reduce Levelized Cost of Electricity for Hydrothermal Development and EGS Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies...

179

Literature Review of Data on the Incremental Costs to Design and Build Low-Energy Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes findings from a literature review into the incremental costs associated with low-energy buildings. The goal of this work is to help establish as firm an analytical foundation as possible for the Building Technology Program's cost-effective net-zero energy goal in the year 2025.

Hunt, W. D.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reactor Cost Analysis Brian James  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactor Cost Analysis Brian James Directed Technologies, Inc. 6-7 November 2007 This presentation specification & optimization · Capital cost estimation · Projected hydrogen $/kg #12;Directed Technologies, Inc/WGS Membrane Reactor OTM/ Water-Splitting ANL With WGS #12;Directed Technologies, Inc. 6-7 November 2007 BILIWG

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

used at coal-fired power plants would result in a more cost-effective application of pollution-control technology, thus enhancing the economics of coal-fired power generation. If...

182

Estimating Renewable Energy Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

183

THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER TECHNOLOGY: A PROVEN AND COST EFFECTIVE METHOD TO VERIFY INTEGRITY AND MONITOR LONG TERM PERFORMANCE OF WALLS, FLOORS, CAPS, AND COVER SYSTEMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, containment system failures are detected by monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. Clearly this approach is inefficient, as the contaminants will have migrated from the disposal area before they are detected. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict impending cover failure are needed. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) technology can measure performance changes and integrity losses as the cover ages. This allows early detection of cover failure or pending failure so that repair or replacement can be made before contaminants leave the disposal cell. The PFT technology has been successfully applied to four subsurface barrier problems, one leak detection problem from underground ducts, and one surface cover problem. Testing has demonstrated that the PFTs are capable of accurately detecting and locating leaks down to fractions of an inch. The PFT technology has several advantages over competing approaches. The ability to simultaneously use multiple PFTs separates it from other gas tracer technologies. Using multiple tracers provides independent confirmation of flaw location, helps to clearly define transport pathways, and can be used for confirmatory testing (e.g., repeat the test using a new tracer). The PFT tests provide a direct measure of flaws in a barrier, whereas other measurements (pressure, moisture content, temperature, subsidence) provide indirect measures that need interpretation. The focus of the six PFT demonstrations has been on engineering aspects of the technology with the intent of finding if a flaw existed in the barrier. Work remains to be done on the scientific basis for this technology. This includes determining PFT diffusion rates through various materials (soils and barrier) as a function of moisture content, determining the effects of barometric pumping on PFT flow for cover systems, and determining wind effects on side slopes of cover systems and their impact on PFT performance. It also includes application of models to assist in the design of the monitoring system and the interpretation of the data. The set of demonstrations was performed on small sites (< 1/4 acre). Future work also needs to consider scaling issues to develop and design optimal techniques for delivery and monitoring of the PFTs.

HEISER, J.; SULLIVAN, T.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to update costs of specific equipment, raw material or labor or CAPEX and OPEX of entire plants Cost Indices

Boisvert, Jeff

185

Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScience and InnovationexperimentsTechnology

186

Energy Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Technologies Energy Technologies State, local, and tribal governments can use clean energy technologies to address increasing energy use and costs, economic investment and...

187

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bounding the marginal cost of producing potable water including the use of seawater desalinization as a backstop potable water production technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis presented in this technical report should allow for the creation of high, medium, and low cost potable water prices for GCAM. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) based desalinization should act as a backstop for the cost of producing potable water (i.e., the literature seems clear that SWRO should establish an upper bound for the plant gate cost of producing potable water). Transporting water over significant distances and having to lift water to higher elevations to reach end-users can also have a significant impact on the cost of producing water. The three potable fresh water scenarios describe in this technical report are: low cost water scenario ($0.10/m3); medium water cost scenario ($1.00/m3); and high water cost scenario ($2.50/m3).

Dooley, James J.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Find Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| Department ofFind R&D

192

Find Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| Department ofFind R&DStandards

193

Technological Change, Depletion and the U.S. Petroleum Industry: A New Approach to Measurement and Estimation***  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and crude oil reserve additions, respectively, are estimated. These functions enable us to isolate. The impact of technological change on finding costs for U.S. crude oil reserves has been more modest. This paper also looks at finding costs for crude oil. The material on stationarity and cointegration analysis

194

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

Ruth, M.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

196

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind Energy Value from Integration Cost Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately calculating integration costs is important so that wind generation can be fairly compared with alternative generation technologies.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

199

Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

200

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of a Method Using BIM Technology to Determine the Utility Bill and Total Cost of Ownership of a Single-family Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they will or will not benefit from BIM. A ROI can be found by using a formula to establish the first year ROI that includes particular variables, such as the proposed systems cost, labor costs, the training time, expected percentage loss, and the percentage expected to gain... and labor. I used the wall areas to compute quantities, and made educated estimates. The RSMeans books were very good sources for all the building elements in both homes. Within the books they broke down the cost of materials and labor and explained...

McGarity, Ashley

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Finding Acceptable Solutions Faster Using Inadmissible Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explicit estimation search (EES), a bounded suboptimal search algorithm that uses unbiased cost(n)+h(n) becomes f (n) = g(n)+w·h(n). The weight, w, increases the importance of h (estimated cost of reaching attempt to find a solution quickly while guaranteeing that its cost does not exceed optimal by more than

Ruml, Wheeler

206

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Applied Materials at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about modular process equipment...

207

Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vehicles by 5% using advanced low cost TE technology: - Low cost materials, modules, heat exchangers, power conditioning, and vehicle integration for exhaust gas waste heat...

208

Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vehicles by 5% using advanced low cost TE technology: - Low cost materials, modules, heat exchangers, power conditioning, and vehicle integration for exhaust gas waste heat...

209

The Recovery Act: Cutting Costs and Upping Capacity | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technologies are helping make solar power much more cost-competitive, with significant cost reductions expected between now and 2015. The Recovery Act included more than 5...

210

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for reduced cost of lightweight materials while meeting national objectives for improved fuel economy * Specific technology improvements affecting major cost drivers detrimental...

211

Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Commercialization of High Efficiency Low Cost CIGS Technology Based on Electroplating: Final Technical Progress Report, 28 September 2007 - 30 June 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes SoloPower's work as a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program. The term of this subcontract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was two years. The project focused on SoloPower's electrodeposition-based copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) technology. Under this subcontract, SoloPower improved the quality of its flexible metal substrates, increased the size of its solar cells from 0.5 cm2 to 120 cm2, increased the small-area cell efficiencies from near 11% to near 14%, demonstrated large-area cells, and developed a module manufacturing process.

Basol, B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help...

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Transmission line capital costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Productization and Manufacturing Scaling of High-Efficiency Solar Cell and Module Products Based on a Disruptive Low-Cost, Mono-Crystalline Technology: Final Technical Progress Report, April 1, 2009 - December 30, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for PV incubator subcontract with Solexel, Inc. The purpose of this project was to develop Solexel's Unique IP, productize it, and transfer it to manufacturing. Silicon constitutes a significant fraction of the total solar cell cost, resulting in an industry-wide drive to lower silicon usage. Solexel's disruptive Solar cell structure got around these challenges and promised superior light trapping, efficiency and mechanical strength, despite being significantly thinner than commercially available cells. Solexel's successful participation in this incubator project became evident as the company is now moving into commercial production and position itself to be competitive for the next Technology Pathway Partnerships (TPP) funding opportunity.

Fatemi, H.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 3.2 discuss levelized cost of energy, solar resource,various CSP technologies. 3.1. Levelized Cost of Energy, PVand CSP Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is the ratio of an

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries From Aluminum Substituted Cathode...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries From Aluminum Substituted Cathode Materials Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing...

218

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for improved fuel economy * Identify specific technology improvements that affect major cost drivers *...

219

Analytic framework for TRL-based cost and schedule models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many government agencies have adopted the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale to help improve technology development management under ever increasing cost, schedule, and complexity constraints. Many TRL-based cost and ...

El-Khoury, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Investigation of the Application of Medium-Voltage Variable-Speed Drive Technology to Improve the Cost of Energy from Low Wind Speed Turbines; Behnke, Erdman and Whitaker Engineering, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Behnke, Erdman & Whitaker Engineering, Inc. to test the feasibility of applying medium-voltage variable-speed drive technology to low wind speed turbines.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the...

223

Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 5} cm{sup {minus}5}, as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 {times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}2}. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

Vernon, S.M. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) BestPractices: Process Heating (Fact sheet)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |Charles Page -toMetabolicHydrogen

226

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

227

Alternative technologies to steam-methane reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam-methane reforming (SMR) has been the conventional route for hydrogen and carbon monoxide production from natural gas feedstocks. However, several alternative technologies are currently finding favor for an increasing number of applications. The competing technologies include: steam-methane reforming combined with oxygen secondary reforming (SMR/O2R); autothermal reforming (ATR); thermal partial oxidation (POX). Each of these alternative technologies uses oxygen as a feedstock. Accordingly, if low-cost oxygen is available, they can be an attractive alternate to SMR with natural gas feedstocks. These technologies are composed technically and economically. The following conclusions can be drawn: (1) the SMR/O2R, ATR and POX technologies can be attractive if low-cost oxygen is available; (2) for competing technologies, the H{sub 2}/CO product ratio is typically the most important process parameter; (3) for low methane slip, the SMR/O2R, ATR and POX technologies are favored; (4) for full CO{sub 2} recycle, POX is usually better than ATR; (5) relative to POX, the ATR is a nonlicensed technology that avoids third-party involvement; (6) economics of each technology are dependent on the conditions and requirements for each project and must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Tindall, B.M.; Crews, M.A. [Howe-Baker Engineers, Inc., Tyler, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

Robichaud, R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

Boisvert, Jeff

230

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs, andrequirements, usage patterns, tariffs, and incentives. Toassessment Electricity tariff Natural gas tariff Technology

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Finding Solutions to Solar's Soft Cost Dilemma | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S.Financial Statement: OAS-FS-13-10Financing

234

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

236

Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

light duty diesel solutions for the US market Technology Strategy Lowest system cost Engine technology selection Aftertreatment technology selection Control approach & OBD...

237

Essays on the Evolution of Health Care Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more tools for evaluating technology cost—effectiveness ifDiscourage Investment in Therapeutic Technology? 5 2.12008, “Input and Technology Choices in Regulated Indus-

Hodgson, Ashley Renee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fuel Cell Technology Challenges | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology Challenges Fuel Cell Technology Challenges Cost and durability are the major challenges to fuel cell commercialization. However, hurdles vary according to the...

239

Hydrogen Production - Current Technology | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Current Technology Hydrogen Production - Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processes is key to a viable future...

240

Energy Saving with Absorption Refrigeration Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption refrigeration technology can be an economical and cost effective means of reducing energy cost and/or improving the efficiency and output of your process. We believe the potential benefits of absorption refrigeration technology have...

Davis, R. C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Strategic Use of Information Technology - Google  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

google/technology.pdf Barroso, L. A. , Dean, J. , & Holzle,Cost Query Source: Barroso, et al, 2003. Performance To

Chen, Rex; Lam, Oisze; Kraemer, Kenneth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Practical Issues when Selecting PV Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation highlighting practical considerations for photovoltaic technologies and strategies for future reductions in cost and increases in efficiency.

Kurtz, S.

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Employee Replacement Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Replacement Costs Arindrajit Dube, Eric Freeman andproperties of employee replacement costs, using a panel2008. We establish that replacement costs are sub- stantial

Dube, Arindrajit; Freeman, Eric; Reich, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

PVMaT cost reductions in the EFG high volume PV manufacturing line: Annual report, 5 August 1998--4 August 1999[PhotoVoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Edge-defined Film-fed Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by ASE Americas researchers during the first year of this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology 5A2 program. Significant accomplishments in each of three task are as follows. Task 1--Manufacturing Systems: Researchers completed key node analysis, started statistical process control (SPC) charting, carried out design-of-experiment (DoE) matrices on the cell line to optimize efficiencies, performed a capacity and bottleneck study, prepared a baseline chemical waste analysis report, and completed writing of more than 50% of documentation and statistical sections of ISO 9000 procedures. A highlight of this task is that cell efficiencies in manufacturing were increased by 0.4%--0.5% absolute, to an average in excess of 14.2%, with the help of DoE and SPC methods. Task 2--Low-Cost Processes: Researchers designed, constructed, and tested a 50-cm-diameter, edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) cylinder crystal growth system to successfully produce thin cylinders up to 1.2 meters in length; completed a model for heat transfer; successfully deployed new nozzle designs and used them with a laser wafer-cutting system with the potential to decrease cutting labor costs by 75% and capital costs by 2X; achieved laser-cutting speeds of up to 8X and evaluation of this system is proceeding in production; identified laser-cutting conditions that reduce damage for both Q-switched Nd:YAG and copper-vapor lasers with the help of a breakthrough in fundamental understanding of cutting with these short-pulse-length lasers; and found that bulk EFG material lifetimes are optimized when co-firing of silicon nitride and aluminum is carried out with rapid thermal processing (RTP). Task 3--Flexible Manufacturing: Researchers improved large-volume manufacturing of 10-cm {times} 15-cm EFG wafers by developing laser-cutting fixtures, adapting carriers and fabricating adjustable racks for etching and rinsing facilities, and installing a high-speed data collection net work; initiated fracture studies to develop methods to reduce wafer breakage; and started a module field studies program to collect data on field failures to help identify potential manufacturing problems. New encapsulants, which cure at room temperature, are being tested to improve flexibility and provide higher yields for thin wafers in lamination.

Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J.; Kardauskas, M.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas This program record...

246

Carbon capture retrofits and the cost of regulatory uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation firms confront impending replacement of an aging coal-fired fleet in a business environment characterized by volatile natural gas prices and uncertain carbon regulation. We develop a stochastic dynamic programming model of firm investment decisions that minimizes the expected present value of future power generation costs under uncertain natural gas and carbon prices. We explore the implications of regulatory uncertainty on generation technology choice and the optimal timing of investment, and assess the implications of these choices for regulators. We find that interaction of regulatory uncertainty with irreversible investment always raises the social cost of carbon abatement. Further, the social cost of regulatory uncertainty is strongly dependent on the relative competitiveness of IGCC plants, for which the cost of later carbon capture retrofits is comparatively small, and on the firm's ability to use investments in natural gas generation as a transitional strategy to manage carbon regulation uncertainty. Without highly competitive IGCC or low gas prices, regulatory uncertainty can increase the expected social cost of reducing emissions by 40 to 60%.

Reinelt, P.S.; Keith, D.W. [SUNY College of Fredonia, Fredonia, NY (United States). Dept. of Economics

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ventilation technologies scoping study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Next-Generation Wind Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wind Program works with industry partners to increase the performance and reliability of next-generation wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy.

250

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbine equipment-related costs are assumed to equal 85% of 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report periods to further avoid “noise”

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 activitiesof Energy As a basis for

252

Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

Walker, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

LOW-COST LED LUMINAIRE FOR GENERAL ILLUMINATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this two-year Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Manufacturing R&D project Cree developed novel light emitting diode (LED) technologies contributing to a cost-optimized, efficient LED troffer luminaire platform emitting at ~3500K correlated color temperature (CCT) at a color rendering index (CRI) of >90. To successfully achieve program goals, Cree used a comprehensive approach to address cost reduction of the various optical, thermal and electrical subsystems in the luminaire without impacting performance. These developments built on Cree’s high- brightness, low-cost LED platforms to design a novel LED component architecture that will enable low-cost troffer luminaire designs with high total system efficacy. The project scope included cost reductions to nearly all major troffer subsystems as well as assembly costs. For example, no thermal management components were included in the troffer, owing to the optimized distribution of compact low- to mid-power LEDs. It is estimated that a significant manufacturing cost savings will result relative to Cree’s conventional troffers at the start of the project. A chief project accomplishment was the successful development of a new compact, high-efficacy LED component geometry with a broad far-field intensity distribution and even color point vs. emission angle. After further optimization and testing for production, the Cree XQ series of LEDs resulted. XQ LEDs are currently utilized in Cree’s AR series troffers, and they are being considered for use in other platforms. The XQ lens geometry influenced the independent development of Cree’s XB-E and XB-G high-voltage LEDs, which also have a broad intensity distribution at high efficacy, and are finding wide implementation in Cree’s omnidirectional A-lamps.

Lowes, Ted

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

257

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Services & Testing Contract September 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Advanced Technologies & Labs International Inc. DE-AC27-10RV15051 Cost Plus Award Fee...

258

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to the Rooftop Practical...

259

Evaluation of Stationary Fuel Cell Deployments, Costs, and Fuels (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL's technology validation of stationary fuel cell systems and presents data on number of deployments, system costs, and fuel types.

Ainscough, C.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.; Saur, G.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009). Technology Roadmap – Wind Energy. Paris, France:5) Ceńa, A; Simonot, E. (2011). The Cost of Wind Energy.Spanish Wind Energy Association (AEE) contribution to IEA

Wiser, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Low-Cost Wireless Sensors for Building Monitoring Applications...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the cost of sensors by improving the technology-specifically, through the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, including printable electronics and additive roll-to-roll...

262

Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Commercialize...

263

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

264

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

265

Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

266

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

267

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assembly Solar Technology BrightSource DE-EE0005792 | February 15, 2013 | Toister * The proposed assembly process is based on small, cost-effective assembly cells (to be designed...

268

ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

l d i n g D e s i g n E n v e l o p e R&D Program Summaries Effective, cost competitive solar shingles. Building-integrated photovoltaic (PV) technologies helps make solar power...

269

Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Program (FEMP) offers information about energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies through the following areas. Energy-Efficient Product Procurement: Find...

270

Cost prediction via quantitative analysis of complexity in U.S. Navy shipbuilding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the sophistication and technology of ships increases, U.S. Navy shipbuilding must be an effective and cost-efficient acquirer of technology-dense one-of-a-kind ships all while meeting significant cost and schedule ...

Dobson, Aaron T. (Aaron Travis)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

technology * 2015 projected technology 2 Determine costs for these 3 tech level Fuel Cell System Battery System Storage 2. Determine costs for these 3 tech level systems at 5...

272

Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns. The ownership costs of fuel cells fall in between.reduce the ownership cost of the fuel cell technologies byalternative options. Fuel cells cost the most, between $500~

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Costing of Joining Methods -Arc Welding Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing of Joining Methods - Arc Welding Costs ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems.S. Colton © GIT 2009 5 #12;LaborLabor Di t ti f ldi· Direct time of welding ­ time to produce a length of weld ­ labor rate ­ multiplication gives labor cost per length · Set-up time, etc. · Personal time

Colton, Jonathan S.

276

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for  any net energy consumption with solar panels, the cost energy generation technologies (such as solar panels).   

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technology development - Evaluation of electric vehicle benefits and challenges 3 HEV Systems Reduce cost, increase energy of energy storage Low-cost power electronics Modeling...

278

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Manufacturin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost...

279

Activity Based Costing  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL COST REDUCTION VIA STEAM TURBINE COGENERATION LYNN B. DI TULLIO, P.E. Project Engineer Ewing Power Systems, Inc. South Deerfield, Mass. ABSTRACT Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used... mature technology. Steam turbines and engines have been used by industry to cogen erate power since before there were electric utilities. While the technology for turbines, generators and controls has continued to develop there is very little about...

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per kW, 5,000-hr durability Hydrogen Cost Technology Validation: Technologies Techno Barri y g. Benefits · Efficiencies can be 60% (electrical) and 3 60% (electrical) and 85% (with CHP) · > 90% reduction (> 40% increase over 2008) Fuel cells can be a cost-competitive option for critical

282

Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines Barton Smith, Barbara Frame, Larry Anovitz and Cliff;Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate of pipeline per day. · $190k/mile capital cost for distribution pipelines · Hydrogen delivery cost below $1

283

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

286

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

Blaedel, K.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

288

Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

Brockbank, B.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Contracting with reading costs and renegotiation costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Contracting with Reading Costs andrents, and the competitive contracting process. Journal ofReiche. Foundation of incomplete contracting in a model of

Brennan, James R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems DE-FC02-99EE50587 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge in the development of fuel cell system technologies by providing cost and manufacturing analysis. · To develop ­ Presented results to the fuel cell industry for feedback and incorporated this into a revised baseline cost

291

Systems Engineering Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on project, human capital impact. 7 How to estimate Cost? Difficult to know what we are building early on1 Systems Engineering Lecture 3 Cost Estimation Dr. Joanna Bryson Dr. Leon Watts University of Bath: Contrast approaches for estimating software project cost, and identify the main sources of cost

Bryson, Joanna J.

292

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cost Estimation Package  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fast, Low Cost Method for Manufacturing Porous Structures for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Fast, Low Cost Method for Manufacturing Porous Structures for Fuel Cells, Catalysts and Filtration...

295

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Utilization of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Utilization of...

296

Ramping-up Investments in Advanced Vehicle Technologies | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

exceed existing state-of-the-art technologies in terms of performance andor cost. Advanced power electronics and electric motor technology: Four projects to develop the...

297

Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Energy Storage R&D Progress Report,...

298

Technology Adoption and Commercialization Program (New Brunswick, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Technology Adoption and Commercialization Program (TAC) is intended to encourage the adoption of improved technologies and processes by offsetting some of the direct costs associated with...

299

Power Electronics and Balance of System Hardware Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is targeting solar technology improvements related to power electronics and balance of system (BOS) hardware technologies to reduce the installed cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity and...

300

Idaho National Laboratory Testing of Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technologies and their required fueling infrastructures Barriers Barriers addressed 1. Cost 2. Infrastructure 3. Constant Advances in Technology Budget *FY 2011 project funding...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Time-Energy Costs of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time and energy of quantum processes are a tradeoff against each other. We propose to ascribe to any given quantum process a time-energy cost to quantify how much computation it performs. Here, we analyze the time-energy costs for general quantum measurements, along a similar line as our previous work for quantum channels, and prove exact and lower bound formulae for the costs. We use these formulae to evaluate the efficiencies of actual measurement implementations. We find that one implementation for a Bell measurement is optimal in time-energy. We also analyze the time-energy cost for unambiguous state discrimination and find evidence that only a finite time-energy cost is needed to distinguish any number of states.

Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

OOTW COST TOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NPR (New Production Reactor) capacity cost evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL Cost Evaluation Technical Support Group (CETSG) has been assigned by DOE-HQ Defense Programs (DP) the task defining, obtaining, and evaluating the capital and life-cycle costs for each of the technology/proponent/site/revenue possibilities envisioned for the New Production Reactor (NPR). The first part of this exercise is largely one of accounting, since all NPR proponents use different accounting methodologies in preparing their costs. In order to address this problem of comparing ''apples and oranges,'' the proponent-provided costs must be partitioned into a framework suitable for all proponents and concepts. If this is done, major cost categories can then be compared between concepts and major cost differences identified. Since the technologies proposed for the NPR and its needed fuel and target support facilities vary considerably in level of technical and operational maturity, considerable care must be taken to evaluate the proponent-derived costs in an equitable manner. The use of cost-risk analysis along with derivation of single point or deterministic estimates allows one to take into account these very real differences in technical and operational maturity. Chapter 2 summarizes the results of this study in tabular and bar graph form. The remaining chapters discuss each generic reactor type as follows: Chapter 3, LWR concepts (SWR and WNP-1); Chapter 4, HWR concepts; Chapter 5, HTGR concept; and Chapter 6, LMR concept. Each of these chapters could be a stand-alone report. 39 refs., 36 figs., 115 tabs.

none,

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elec Del Cali: Del Investment Cost Delivery Cost OperatingCost Feedstock Cost Investment Cost Delivery Cost Operatingcosts Annualized investment cost, 1000$/yr Total annualized

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

The Keystone Center

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Volvo SuperTruck - Powertrain Technologies for Efficiency Improvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

highway transportation technologies to reduce petroleum consumption, reducing operating cost, fuel consumption, environmental impact, and time to market * Approach: Through...

308

Dezincing Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half of the steel produced in the US is derived from scrap. With zinc-coated prompt scrap increasing fivefold since 1980, steel-makers are feeling the effect of increased contaminant loads on their operations. The greatest concern is the cost of treatment before disposal of waste dusts and water that arise from remelting zinc-coated scrap. An economic process is needed to strip and recover the zinc from scrap to provide a low residual scrap for steel- and iron-making. Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., with the assistance of Argonne National Laboratory, have been developing a caustic leach dezincing process for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tons/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Service Div.; Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Commercialization of clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

Bharucha, N. [Dept. of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra (Australia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling learning when alternative technologies are learning & resource constrained : cases In semiconductor & advanced automotive manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When making technology choice decisions, firms must consider technology costs over time. In many industries, technology costs have been shown to decrease over time due to (a) improvements in production efficiency and the ...

Rand-Nash, Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Vacuum Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

Biltoft, P J

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

How to Find  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeterans |VirtualLoveApplyDownload,Find

316

Find People | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and EventsFiber LasersFind

317

Find Theses and Dissertations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| Department ofFind

318

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four: business administration, wind farm management, aircraft maintenance, tooling production, quality and safety or selected program track focus. Transfer students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: business administration, energy management, wind farm management, automation and controls, aircraft, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses over for WSU credit. Laboratory

322

Holographic technology could increase solar efficiency | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cost. Redirect the light And that's just part of what holographic technology offers to solar energy generation. Because of its light-bending properties, holographic thin film...

323

Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production.

324

ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

disturbance. Low-Cost and Efficient Production- Use advanced technologies to improve process efficiencies from exploration to final product. Advanced Products- Maintain and...

325

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

New venture commercialization of clean energy technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean energy technologies lower harmful emissions associated with the generation and use of power (e.g. CO2) and many of these technologies have been shown to be cost effective and to provide significant benefits to adopters. ...

Miller, David S. (David Seth)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Finding Extreme Subdwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I develop a new technique to identify M-type extreme subdwarfs (esdMs) and demonstrate that it is substantially more efficient than previous methods. I begin by obtaining spectroscopy and improved photometry of a sample of 54 late-type halo candidates using the rNLTT reduced proper motion (RPM) diagram. From spectroscopy, I find that four of these are esdMs, three of which were previously unknown. From the improved photometry, I show that all four lie in a narrow RPM corridor that contains only 4 non-esdMs. Hence, with good photometry (i.e., without spectroscopy), it appears possible to select esdM candidates with a 50% esdM yield. This is more than an order of magnitude more efficient than previous methods.

J. L. Marshall

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Solution to time-energy costs of quantum channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a formula for the time-energy costs of general quantum channels proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 88, 012307 (2013)]. This formula allows us to numerically find the time-energy cost of any quantum channel using positive semidefinite programming. We also derive a lower bound to the time-energy cost for any channels and the exact the time-energy cost for a class of channels which includes the qudit depolarizing channels and projector channels as special cases.

Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau; Chi-Kwong Li; Nung-Sing Sze

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs Annualized Investment Cost, 1000$/yr Total AnnualizedH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/yr) OperatingH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/kg) Operating

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

(Environmental technology)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

Boston, H.L.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geothermal Technologies Newsletter Archives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find past issues of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies program newsletter, which features information about its geothermal research and development efforts....

333

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Index provides a comprehensive list of site problems, problem area/constituents, remedial technologies, and regulatory terms discussed in the D&D sections of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. All entries provide specific page numbers, or cross-reference entries that provide specific page numbers, in the D&D volumes (Vol. 1, Pt. A; Vol. 2, Pt. A; and appropriate parts of Vol. 3). The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA) and WM activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Pension costs and liabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be to charge the cost over the current and subsequent years on the assumption that the cost, even though measured by past services, is incurred in contemplation of present and future 1 services. 1'he development of accounting thought concerning retire...? present liabilities are under- stated and owner's equity is overstated by a corresponding amount. It seems, however, that charging retained earnings with the past service cost does not, represent the true picture. Pension payments based solely on past...

Courtney, Harley Macon

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Placental findings in cord accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placental findings in cord accidents. BMC Pregnancy andPlacental findings in cord accidents Mana M Parast Fromfor stillbirth. “Cord accident,” defined by obstruction of

Parast, Mana M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

''When Cost Measures Contradict''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P. M.

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Apportioning Climate Change Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

Farber, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG rate and average cost-per-kWh of generation of thatas the incremental cost-per-kWh of the low-GHG technology (

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. University ofPipeline network gradually expands and eventually takes over all hydrogenpipelines. These technologies compete with each other to meet an exogenously estimated hydrogen

Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

344

DOE to Fund up to $50 Million to Demonstrate Innovative, Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to Fund up to 50 Million to Demonstrate Innovative, Cost-Competitive Solar Energy Technologies DOE to Fund up to 50 Million to Demonstrate Innovative, Cost-Competitive Solar...

345

Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Low Cost Energy Management Program at Engelhard Industries Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in technology related to precious metals and nonmetallic minerals. It manufactures high-performance chemical and precious metals products, including catalysts for the petroleum and automotive industries. Engelhard's energy costs have risen dramatically over...

Brown, T. S.; Michalek, R.; Reiter, S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Development of a low-cost underwater manipulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the design, modeling, manufacture, and testing of a low cost, multiple degree-of-freedom underwater manipulator. Current underwater robotic arm technologies are often expensive or limited in functionality. ...

Cooney, Lauren Alise

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE hosted the "Big & Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs" breakout session during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum. This session explored a range of...

349

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm001das2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost...

350

Find It. Delete It. Protect It. Information Technology Security Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that security will be a process rather than project. Achievement of the goal, optimized risk management to external best practices and seek external advice on effectiveness. For critical processes and systems valuable information for governance. This process will achieve the long term Internal Controls Maturity

Sheridan, Jennifer

351

Technology Review Magazine, January 1996 Finding One's Own in Cyberspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porn scandal broke, my phone didn't stop ringing: "Are women comfortable on the Net?" "Should women use

Bruckman, Amy

352

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

354

Investigator Title Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of Biobutanol as a Biofuel Advanced/ Alternative Energy $353,521 $548,698 6 $35,000 $150,000 $100 Vehicle Technology Advanced/ Alternative Energy Metrics Not Yet Available Sahai, Yogeshwar Development of Cost Effective MEA and DBFC Advanced/ Alternative Energy Metrics Not Yet Available Alsdorf, Doug ORSP

355

RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY PORTFOLIOS Guy MEUNIER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a technology with a positive expected return. If the technology with the lower expected cost is more risky than aversion can explain a full specialization of the industry, the less risk averse firms using the low cost surround the prices of fossil fuels and CO2 emissions as well as the sub- sidy schemes that support

Boyer, Edmond

356

Faience Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

Nicholson, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing avoided cost methodology and established thefor certain avoided cost methodologies or avoided cost inpu

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

Sanders, Seth

360

Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing! Prof. Shreyes Melkote, Manufacturing Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology Photovoltaics (PV) will be part of the energy mix volume PV manufacturing, therefore to reduce manufacturing cost and accelerate PV use. ! q Silicon wafer

Das, Suman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the findings of a technology market assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) in space cooling applications. The potential impact of TES in Federal facilities is modeled using the Federal building inventory with the appropriate climatic and energy cost data. In addition, this assessment identified acceptance issues and major obstacles through interviews with energy services companies (ESCOs), TES manufacturers, and Federal facility staff.

Chvala, William D.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Technology, Knowledge, Culture, and Management: the keys The shift from industrial societies to information societies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology, Knowledge, Culture, and Management: the keys to success Abstract The shift from to success: technology, knowledge, culture and management. Organizations employ technology with the goal of improving efficiency and reducing operational costs. Hence technology structures within organizations must

Kopec, Danny

364

Careers In Fuel Cell Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to combined heat and power (CHP) units used for distributed electricity generation, to passenger vehicles. Today's Technology and Its Growth Potential Today's fuel cell technology offers cost in hydrogen and fuel cells. Activities have reduced the amount of platinum needed by more than a factor

365

COST 4138/10 1 European Cooperation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Pathway Evaluation and pest Risk Management In Transport - PERMIT Delegations will find attached AND PEST RISK MANAGEMENT IN TRANSPORT - PERMIT The Parties to this Memorandum of Understanding, declaring. The COST Action PERMIT addresses this shortfall in knowledge and practice and will focus on reducing

366

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

367

Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications CX-009154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview Carbon Fiber Technology...

368

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information Processing and Communications Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information of various societal and environmental mandates followed by a review of technologies, systems, and hardware

369

A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar TechnologiesRPS costs, per unit of renewable energy generation, rangedFlores-Espino National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Plug-in Hybrid Modeling and Application: Cost/Benefit Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presents data from a simulation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle efficiency and cost, including baseline vehicle assumptions, powertrain technology scenarios, and component modeling.

Simpson, A.

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Thermal Control Enabling Cost Reduction for Automotive Power Electronics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes NREL's work on next-generation vehicle cooling technologies (jets, sprays, microchannels) and novel packaging topologies to reduce costs and increase performance and reliability.

Abraham, T.; Kelly, K.; Bennion, K.; Vlahinos, A.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies (such as solar panels).   Combined with energy wind turbine height,  solar panel visibility, etc. ).   In consumption with solar panels, the cost may determine 

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

374

Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

375

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Hydrogen Pathways: Cost,...

376

Assessing the costs of solar power plants for the Island of Roatŕn .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This is an analysis assessing the installation costs of different solar power plant technologies and the current commercial availability for installation on the Island or… (more)

Huwe, Ethan (Ethan L.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evidence of cost growth under cost-plus and fixed-price contracting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As defined by the US Department of Energy (DOE), privatization refers to a shifting of responsibilities for the completion of projects from a cost-plus Management and Operations (M and O) contract, to incentive-based contracts with the private sector. DOE`s new vision is to arrange cleanup work around incentives-based contracts, which are won via competitive bidding. Competition in awarding cleanup contracts can make use of market incentives to lower project costs and reduce slippage time. Fixed-price contracts encourage contractors to minimize schedule delays and cost overruns once the scope of a project has been negotiated. Conversely, cost-plus contracting offers weak incentives for contractors to select cost-minimizing production and management approaches. Because privatization explicitly allocates more risk to the contractor, it forces the government to better define its goals and methods. This study summarizes actual cost experiences with government contracts performed under cost-plus and fixed-price incentive structures at all levels of government. The first section provides some background on the problem of making contractor activity more cost-efficient. Following this are sections on the measurement of performance and the costs of projects, limitations on measurement, and findings of similar studies. The study concludes with appendices discussing the details of the performance measurement methodology and the project data sets used in the study.

Scott, M.J.; Paananaen, O.H.; Redgate, T.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Jaksch, J.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Management of Energy Technology for Sustainability: How to Fund Energy Technology R&D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management of Energy Technology for Sustainability: How to Fund Energy Technology R&D (Authors public policy problem: energy technology R&D portfolio management under climate change. We apply a multi to cost reduction, other times leading to better environmental outcomes. Key words : energy technology, R

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

379

Estimating the manufacturing cost of purely organic solar cells Joseph Kalowekamo 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a levelized cost of electricity (LEC) of between 49˘ and 85˘/kWh. In order to achieve a more competitive COE that into a levelized electricity cost (LEC). We find that there is a great deal of uncertainty about the capital costs., Estimating the manufacturing cost of purely organic solar cells, Sol. Energy (2009), doi:10.1016/j

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

380

Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technologies R&D Program Investments Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

HOW TO FIND A JOB Job boards and Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus on new graduates, some on particular sectors: charities, information technology, finance as in large companies. It takes more research to find small companies (sometimes labelled SMEs or small by unwanted applicants. Those `hard to find' SMEs do not and they might be pleased to be approached

Chittka, Lars

383

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(say, a trip) and such factors are not fully captured in this dataset. 9. Older combined cycle units were a step change in lower operating costs due to cycling...

384

Cost Estimating Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Investments of uncertain cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study irreversible investment decisions when projects take time to complete, and are subject to two types of uncertainty over the cost of completion. The first is technical uncertainty, i.e., uncertainty over the amount ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Standard costs for labor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANDARD COSTS FOR LABOR A Thesis By MD. NURUL ABSAR KHAN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texms in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... January 1960 Ma/or Sub)acts Accounting STANOAHD COSTS FOR LABOR ND, NURUL ABSAR KHAN Approved as t style and content bys Chairman of Committee Head of Hepartment January 1960 The author acknowledges his indebtedness to Mr. T. M. Leland, Mr. T. D...

Khan, Mohammed Nurul Absar

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Cost of Capital  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation summarizes the information given by PV Evolution Labs during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

389

Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Cost effective reduction of legislated emissions...

390

Finding  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North - Consequences ofr t l--

391

THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog Massachusetts Institute of Technology's technology for CO2 separation and capture at three types of power plants: integrated coal gasification (NGCC). The analysis was based on studies from the literature that analyzed the economics of capturing

392

Digital Actuator Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Report on Transmission Cost Allocation for RTOs and Others (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented at the MARC 2011 Annual Conference, 6 June 2011, Rapid City, South Dakota. This presentation provides an overview of the latest research findings and policy developments pertaining to cost allocation and new variable generation resources on the power grid.

Coles, L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

CIGNA Study Uncovers Relationship of Disabilities to Total Benefits Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The findings of a new study reveal an interesting trend. Integrating disability programs with health care programs can potentially lower employers' total benefits costs and help disabled employees get back to work sooner and stay at work.

397

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

Wang, Conghua [TreadStone Technologies, Inc.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Value of Advanced Technologies in the U.S. Buildings Sector in Climate Change Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a wide body of research focused on the potential of advanced technologies to reduce energy consumption in buildings. How such improvements relate to global climate change, however, is less clear, due to the complexity of the climate change issue, and the implications for the energy system as a whole that need to be considered. This study uses MiniCAM, an integrated assessment model, to examine the contributions of several suites of advanced buildings technologies in meeting national carbon emissions reduction targets, as part of a global policy to mitigate climate change by stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 ppmv. Focal technology areas include building shells, heat pumps for HVAC and water heating applications, solid-state lighting, and miscellaneous electric equipment. We find that advanced heat pumps and energy-efficient miscellaneous electric equipment show the greatest potential to reduce aggregate building sector future energy consumption and policy costs, but that all focal areas are important for reducing energy consumption. Because of assumed availability of low-cost, emissions-reduced electricity generation technologies in these scenarios, heat pumps are especially important for facilitating fuel-switching towards electricity. Buildings sector energy consumption is reduced by 28% and policy costs are reduced by 17% in a scenario with advanced technologies in all focal areas.

Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

400

Sunk Costs and Competitive Bidding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUNK COSTS AND COMPETITIVE BIDDING Kenneth R. FrenchRevised: November 1982 SUNK COSTS AND COMPETITIVE BIDDINGl the winning bid be? I f sunk costs do not matter, I f the

French, Kenneth R.; McCormick, Robert E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Arizona Corporation Commission requires electric utilities to conduct a cost/benefit analysis to compare the cost of line extension with the cost of installing a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)...

402

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Decontamination and Conversion of Nickel Radioactive Scrap Metal. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

NONE

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean Air Amendments helped lower the cost of natural gas turbines vis-a-vis coal based technologies.

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lessons Learned from the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D and Thin Film PV Partnership Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program initiates new cost-shared solar energy R&D under the Solar America Initiative (SAI), it is useful to analyze the experience gained from cost-shared R&D projects that have been funded through the program to date. This report summarizes lessons learned from two DOE-sponsored photovoltaic (PV) projects: the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMaT/PVMR&D) project and the Thin-Film PV Partnership project. During the past 10-15 years, these two projects have invested roughly $330 million of government resources in cost-shared R&D and leveraged another $190 million in private-sector PV R&D investments. Following a description of key findings and brief descriptions of the PVMaT/PVMR&D and Thin-Film PV Partnership projects, this report presents lessons learned from the projects.

Margolis, R.; Mitchell, R.; Zweibel, K.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS CASE METHODOLOGY GUIDE & WORKBOOK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance advantages of the new digital technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. This Business Case Methodology approaches building a business case for a particular technology or suite of technologies by detailing how they impact an operator in one or more of the three following areas: Labor Costs, Non-Labor Costs, and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are “harvestable,” meaning they result in an actual reduction in headcount and/or cost. The report consists of a Digital Technology Business Case Methodology Guide and an accompanying spreadsheet workbook that will enable the user to develop a business case.

Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Hart, Adam; Vlahoplus, Chris

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Environmental technologies program, Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents details of the technology that is currently being demonstrated at the Hanford Site. The program is testing technology for cost and time savings in the following clean-up areas: detection and characterization; soil and ground water remediation; remote handling; waste minimization; and high-level, low-level, and mixed waste treatment. This document also contains a technology integration section.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies.

410

Officials launch Carbon Fiber Technology Facility, announce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reduce carbon fiber's high cost, Danielson noted: "Many of these new clean energy technologies are withinSCIENCE Officials launch Carbon Fiber Technology Facility, announce new manufacturing initiative and a large crowd of local business and civic leaders came to the Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF

Pennycook, Steve

411

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell...

412

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

413

Expanding the role of the cost engineer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been many questions about the costs of providing medical services. These questions have resulted in the development of Resource-Based Relative Values Scale (RBRVS) at the national level. Policymakers view RBRVS as a potential tool to pay physicians. The questions, about the cost of operations of HSE-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, revolve around doing routine occupation health physicals for the Laboratory. Generally, these questions are concerned about why the costs appear to be high relative to what private physician suggests the costs should be. There is also an interest in trying to find methods to reduce these costs if possible. Many of the tools developed to help in construction estimating can be applied to estimating medical costs. With the need to perform many thousands of physicals each year the saving of even a few dollars for each exam can quickly add up to a large saving. There are a number of different types of physicals and different levels; based on age, sex, type of work, and years since last physical. The LANL Health Services are housed in a 12,600 square foot building close to the population center of the Laboratory Health Services, produced by a staff of seven physicians and approximately 25 support personnel, include acute medical care, routine surveillance exams, and preventive medicine programs. This paper will consider the routine surveillance exams, which constitute the major activity of the medical staff, in terms of time and dollars expended.

Stutz, R.A.; Shaw, R.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technology catalogue. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for remediating DOE contaminated sites and managing the DOE waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste-management programs within EM. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to: (a) provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers responsible for preparing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) and other compliance documents for the DOE`s clean-up and waste-management programs; and (b) identify partnering and commercialization opportunities with industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sponsored Programs Enhancement Finding funding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sources Government (federal, state, international) Foundations Corporations Other: disciplinary for proposal announced electronically in TechToday The 5 Grants(asterisked items are available to new faculty) : Scholarship & Creativity Grants* Mentoring Grants* Research Seed Grants* Technology & Equipment Grants

417

Cost Type Examples Salary costs for staff working  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Equipment access charges Service contracts, running costs, materials and consumables and staff time

Rambaut, Andrew

418

Finding rebirth in international service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drinking water, prevent damage to plumbing systems, and guarantee cost-effective remedial measures. the frightening implications of those early tests fueled edwards to "fight it with every ounce of energy I had. Brik spent weeks in Icu, receiving more than a dozen radiation treatments. when follow-up scans showed

Virginia Tech

419

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Technology Catalogue. First edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for remediating its contaminated sites and managing its waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste management programs within EM`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Office of Waste Management. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers assessing and recommending technical solutions within the Department`s clean-up and waste management programs, as well as to industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. OTD`s applied research and demonstration activities are conducted in programs referred to as Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and Integrated Programs (IPs). The IDs test and evaluate.systems, consisting of coupled technologies, at specific sites to address generic problems, such as the sensing, treatment, and disposal of buried waste containers. The IPs support applied research activities in specific applications areas, such as in situ remediation, efficient separations processes, and site characterization. The Technology Catalogue is a means for communicating the status. of the development of these innovative technologies. The FY93 Technology Catalogue features technologies successfully demonstrated in the field through IDs and sufficiently mature to be used in the near-term. Technologies from the following IDs are featured in the FY93 Technology Catalogue: Buried Waste ID (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho); Mixed Waste Landfill ID (Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico); Underground Storage Tank ID (Hanford, Washington); Volatile organic compound (VOC) Arid ID (Richland, Washington); and VOC Non-Arid ID (Savannah River Site, South Carolina).

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technology Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roll to Roll (R2R) Processing 1 Technology Assessment 2 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

422

7th Conference for Systems Engineering Research Trading Project Costs and Benefits in Multi-Attribute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Hare International Airport · Airlines seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 9 #12 (Boston, ca. 1982-2007) Projected cost (1985): $2.8bn Cost spent (2007): $22 bn (incl. interest Massachusetts Institute of Technology 5 #12;Approach (1)Introduction to case study: Airport Express for Chicago

de Weck, Olivier L.

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies radiologic findings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coimbra Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 85 Welcome to the NEW Pediatric Emergency Medicine Summary: ) and the nurses can help you find our latest...

424

Passive solar technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

Watson, D

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

Epler, John

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels that could be achieved if the most energy-efficient and cost-effective end-use technologiesAnalysis Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a , Inęs L of five, lowering barriers to adoption of energy efficient alternatives with higher up-front costs

Michalek, Jeremy J.

427

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications number of vehicles it represents, DOE has established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell and track the cost of automotive fuel cell systems as progress is made in fuel cell technology. The purpose

428

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update it represents, the DOE has established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell systems and components of automotive fuel cell systems as progress is made in fuel cell technology. The purpose of these cost analyses

429

Hay Harvesting Costs $$$$$ in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hay is an important crop in Ta 1 Harvesting costs constitute the major5 pense of hay production in many M Mg and Wayne D . Taylor INTRODUCTION .................................................... 2 Fixed Costs or Ownership Costs... ............................................. 10 Totarl Cost .............................................................. 10 HAY HARVESTING ALTERNATIVES COMPARED ...................... 11 HOW TO MAKE WISE DECISIONS CONCERNING INVESTMENTS IN MACHINERY...

Long, James T.; Taylor, Wayne D.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION .............................................................................13 Definition of Levelized Cost ........................................................................................................13 Levelized Cost Components

431

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION............................................................ 3 Definition of Levelized Cost.................................................................................... 3 Levelized Cost Categories

Laughlin, Robert B.

432

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming...

433

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) Basic Energy Sciences Vehicle Technologies Cost-shared development activity with industry leading to full battery systems Benchmark...

434

Future of Wind Energy Technology in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the status of wind energy in the United States as of 2007, its cost, the potential for growth, offshore development, and potential technology improvements.

Thresher, R.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(EGI) - Demonstrate a low-impact rig technology with potential to reduce the cost of drilling temperature gradient wells (Aerospect) - Identify best locale within designated area...

436

assessing technological readiness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cost, quality, regulation, and competitive ... Rothman, Craig Jeremy 2012-01-01 47 Technology assessment of renewable energy sustainability in South Africa. Open Access...

437

assessment ppa technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cost, quality, regulation, and competitive ... Rothman, Craig Jeremy 2012-01-01 34 Technology assessment of renewable energy sustainability in South Africa. Open Access...

438

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Low-Cost Carbon Fiber | Proposal Guidelines Proposal Guidelines Proposals should be no more than 5 single spaced...

439

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power...

440

And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

screen printing process, this silicon ink technology offers a novel path to producing solar cells with higher conversion efficiencies at lower cost. A pair of presenters...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Request for Information: High Impact Commercial Building Technology...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO) is developing a pipeline of high impact, cost-effective, energy saving and underutilized commercial building...

442

Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Units at Eight Military Installations SunShot Home About Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Soft Costs Technology to Market Success Stories Financial...

443

Volvo SuperTruck - Powertrain Technologies for Efficiency Improvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

efficient highway transportation technologies to reduce petroleum consumption, operating cost, fuel consumption, environmental impact, and time to market for high risk high...

444

Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Study to establish cost projections for production of redox chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cost study of four proposed manufacturing processes for redox chemicals for the NASA REDOX Energy Storage System yielded favorable selling prices in the range $0.99 to $1.91/kg of chromic chloride, anhydrous basis, including ferrous chloride. The prices corresponded to specific energy storage costs from under $9 to $17/kWh. A refined and expanded cost analysis of the most favored process yielded a price estimate corresponding to a storage cost of $11/kWh. The findings supported the potential economic viability of the NASA REDOX system.

Walther, J.F.; Greco, C.C.; Rusinko, R.N.; Wadsworth, A.L. III

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Finding beam focus errors automatically  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Low Cost Carbon Fibre for Automotive Applications Part 1: Low Cost Carbon Fibre Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In pursuit of the goal to produce ultra-lightweight fuel efficient vehicles, there has been great excitement during the last few years about the potential for using carbon fibre reinforced composites in high volume applications. Currently, the greatest hurdle that inhibits wider implementation of carbon fibre composites in transportation is the high cost of carbon fibre when compared to other candidate materials. However, significant research is being conducted to develop lower cost, high volume technologies for producing carbon fibre. This chapter will highlight ongoing research in this area.

Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Wheatley, Dr. Alan [University of Sunderland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Comparison of Australian and US Cost-Benefit Approaches to MEPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Australian Greenhouse Office contracted with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) for LBNL to compare US and Australian approaches to analyzing costs and benefits of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS). This report compares the approaches for three types of products: household refrigerators and freezers, small electric storage water heaters, and commercial/industrial air conditioners. This report presents the findings of similarities and differences between the approaches of the two countries and suggests changes to consider in the approach taken in Australia. The purpose of the Australian program is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while the US program is intended to increase energy efficiency; each program is thus subject to specific constraints. The market and policy contexts are different, with the USA producing most of its own products and conducting pioneering engineering-economic studies to identify maximum energy efficiency levels that are technologically feasible and economically justified. In contrast, Australia imports a large share of its products and adopts MEPS already in place elsewhere. With these differences in circumstances, Australia's analysis approach could be expected to have less analytical detail and still result in MEPS levels that are appropriate for their policy and market context. In practice, the analysis required to meet these different objectives is quite similar. To date, Australia's cost-benefit analysis has served the goals and philosophies of the program well and been highly effective in successfully identifying MEPS that are significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions while providing economic benefits to consumers. In some cases, however, the experience of the USA--using more extensive data sets and more detailed analysis--suggests possible improvements to Australia's cost-benefit analysis. The principal findings of the comparison are: (1) The Technology and Market Assessments are similar; no changes are recommended. (2) The Australian approach to determining the relationship of price to energy efficiency is based on current market, while the US approach uses prospective estimates. Both approaches may benefit from increased retrospective analysis of impacts of MEPS on appliance and equipment prices. Under some circumstances, Australia may wish to consider analyzing two separate components leading to price impacts: (a) changes in manufacturing costs and (b) markups used to convert from manufacturing costs to consumer price. (3) The Life-Cycle Cost methods are similar, but the USA has statistical surveys that permit a more detailed analysis. Australia uses average values, while the US uses full distributions. If data and resources permit, Australia may benefit from greater depth here as well. If implemented, the changes will provide more information about the benefits and costs of the program, in particular identifying who benefits and who bears net costs so that programs can be designed to offset unintended negative consequences, and may assist the government in convincing affected parties of the justification for some MEPS. However, without a detailed and statistically representative national survey, such an approach may not be practical for Australia at this time. (4) The National Benefits and Costs methods are similar prospective estimates of shipments, costs and energy savings, as well as greenhouse gas emissions. Additional sensitivity studies could further illustrate the ranges in these estimates. Consideration of lower discount rates could lead to more stringent MEPS in some cases. (5) Both the Australian and US analyses of impacts on industry, competition, and trade ultimately depend upon sufficient consultation with industry experts. While the Australian analysis of financial impacts on manufacturers is less detailed than that of the US, the Australian treatment of impacts on market shares imported from different regions of the world is more detailed. No change is recommended. Implementing these changes would increase the depth o

McMahon, James E.

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

453

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Specialty Vehicles Fuel cells can be a cost-competitive option for critical-load facilities, backup power1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies

454

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ballard Material Products (BMP) performed a pre-design technical and cost analysis of state of the art production technologies feasible for high volume GDL manufacturing. Based upon criteria that also included environmental health and safety, customer quality requirements, and future needs, BMP selected technologies that can be integrated into its current manufacturing process. These selections included Many-At-A-Time (MAAT) coating and continuous mixing technologies, as well as various on-line process control tools. These processes have allowed BMP to produce high performance GDLs at lower cost for near-term markets, as well as to define the inputs needed to develop a conceptual Greenfield facility to meet the cost targets for automotive volumes of 500,000 vehicles per year.

Jason Morgan; Donald Connors; Michael Hickner

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

456

Technology and economics of gas utilization: Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the current and emerging technology for the conversion of natural gas into methanol and assesses its impact on the production economics. Technologies of potential use for offshore developments of large gas reserves or associated gas are discussed. New technologies for the production of methanol synthesis-gas, such as autothermal reforming and GHR technology, are described and the economic advantages over conventional steam reforming are quantified. New methanol synthesis technology, such as slurry phase reactors, are outlined but appear to offer little advantage over conventional technology for offshore gas utilization. The purification of methanol for fuel and chemical grade product is outlined and the cost of transport presented. The data presented gives an overview of the production costs for production of methanol from large gas reserves (> 1Tcf, 25--35PJ/a) and smaller scale reserves (10--20MMscfd, 4--10PJ/a). The variation of the production cost of methanol with gas price indicates that the gas price is the principal economic consideration. However, adoption of new technology will improve production economics by an amount equivalent to an incremental gas cost of about $0.5/GJ. For gas reserves of low development cost, the adoption of new technology is not a prerequisite to economic viability.

Seddon, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

Technology to Extend Battery Life Coming Soon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A cost-sharing award through the Recovery Acy is helping a technology firm in Albany, New York demonstrate a commercially viable, methanol fuel cell-powered charger for the consumer electronics market.

459

Objective assessment of manufacturing technology investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amgen is a biotechnology company with manufacturing plants throughout the world. New manufacturing technologies are constantly being developed and implemented in order to address cost, quality, regulation, and competitive ...

Rothman, Craig Jeremy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NREL Analysis: Cost-Effective and Reliable Integration of High-Penetration Solar in the Western United States (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.; Lefton, S.; Kumar, N.; Agan, D.; Jordan, G.; Venkatataman, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

A Program for Optimizing SRF Linac Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Every well-designed machine goes through the process of cost optimization several times during its design, production and operation. The initial optimizations are done during the early proposal stage of the project when none of the systems have been engineered. When a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac is implemented as part of the design, it is often a difficult decision as to the frequency and gradient that will be used. Frequently, such choices are made based on existing designs, which invariably necessitate moderate to substantial modifications so that they can be used in the new accelerator. Thus the fallacy of using existing designs is that they will frequently provide a higher cost machine or a machine with sub-optimal beam physics parameters. This paper describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK [1] several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project. The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs.

Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

included. As technologies to produce biodiesel from varyinginitial technology and lifetime operating costs Biodiesel (biodiesel usage through 2020 reveals a relatively small biofuel content in future diesel trucks, there are policy and technology

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1975, p. 48. "Clean Energy from Coal Technology," Office ofClean Ways to Burn Coal Estimated Busbar Power Costs for Coal-Electric TechnologiesClean Fuels from Coal," Cochran, N. P. , Office of Science and Technology,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

EDINBURGH TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER CENTRE LIMITED GUIDE TO INFORMATION AVAILABLE THROUGH OUR PUBLICATION SCHEME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDINBURGH TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER CENTRE LIMITED GUIDE TO INFORMATION AVAILABLE THROUGH OUR PUBLICATION and what it might cost. Edinburgh Technology Transfer Centre Limited ("the company") has adopted the Model Unless otherwise stated, Edinburgh Technology Transfer Centre Limited reserves copyright in all

Edinburgh, University of

466

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â��bottom-upâ� costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA�® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

Cost and Area Comparison Per Student of the Public Elementary Schools in Texas based on the Project Delivery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

student in line with A. N. Reinisch’s findings for CSP contracts in Texas, but not CMR average costs. The two ISD’s who supplied the documents were clearly concerned at cost control and appear to have managed this process. The earlier findings of a cost...

Goyal Rakesh, Sheetal

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

Tan, C.Y.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this independent review will permit NREL and DOE to better understand the credibility of the TIAX cost estimation process and to implement changes in future cost analyses, if necessary. The Team found the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells to be reasonable and, using 2005 cell stack technology and assuming production of 500,000 units per year, to have calculated a credible cost of $108/kW.

Wheeler, D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet describes an advanced, low-cost receiver project for parabolic troughs, awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. Norwich Technologies is designing a novel receiver that addresses these issues for parabolic trough concentrating solar power systems. This technology represents significant operational and cost advances in the most trusted and broadly implemented form of CSP and provides a viable pathway to achieving SunShot’s $0.06/kWh goal for utility-scale CSP systems.

471

Vehicle operating costs: evidence from developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document presents information concerning the relationships between vehicle operating costs and highway conditions derived from four studies performed in Kenya, the Caribbean, Brazil, and India in the 1970s and early 1980s. The levels of transport costs and the amounts by which they are altered when highway conditions change depend on two main factors. The first is the production technology facing firms, in particular, the types and designs of vehicles to which firms have access. The second is the economic environment that firms face, in particular, relative prices of inputs to the production of transportation, such as fuel, tires, labor, and vehicles, and the nature of the transport markets that firms serve. The first part of the book sets out an economic model of firms managing vehicle fleets within which these influences can be examined. The second part of the book reports and interprets the results of the four major research projects which were designed to study the influences on vehicle operating costs. The third part of the book examines total vehicle operating costs.

Chesher, A.; Harrison, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA Blog|INDEPENDENT COST

473

Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

Bill Major

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

474

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Renewable build-up pathways for the US: Generation costs are not system costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition to a future electricity system based primarily on wind and solar PV is examined for all regions in the contiguous US. We present optimized pathways for the build-up of wind and solar power for least backup energy needs as well as for least cost obtained with a simplified, lightweight model based on long-term high resolution weather-determined generation data. In the absence of storage, the pathway which achieves the best match of generation and load, thus resulting in the least backup energy requirements, generally favors a combination of both technologies, with a wind/solar PV energy mix of about 80/20 in a fully renewable scenario. The least cost development is seen to start with 100% of the technology with the lowest average generation costs first, but with increasing renewable installations, economically unfavorable excess generation pushes it toward the minimal backup pathway. Surplus generation and the entailed costs can be reduced significantly by combining wind and solar power, and/or a...

Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Jacobson, Mark Z; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Road transport technology and climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost with established technologies such as engine downsizing, light- weighting and selection of smaller. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHevs) attempt to address this, but incur the extra costs in the use of vehicles in developing economies, and the dependence of low-carbon vehicles on the still

478

Using Web-Based Technology in Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Web-Based Technology in Laboratory Instruction to Reduce Costs RITA M. POWELL,1 HELEN curriculum while reducing their costs through the application of web-based teaching tools. The project.interscience. wiley.com.); DOI 10.1002/cae.10029 Keywords: engineering education; laboratory materials; World Wide Web

Plotkin, Joshua B.

479

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

Ruth, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment approaches (referred to as COBRA, COst estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment). We find through a case accurate and reliable cost estimates to allocate and control project resources, and to make realistic bids

Briand, Lionel C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology cost finding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ensuring cost effectiveness in the TAP process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Training Accredition Program (TAP) at the Waste Isolation Division (WID) is discussed by the general manager. Cost effectiveness in the TAP process is made possible by saving through sharing which refers to the exchange and co-development of information and technology among Westinghouse Government owned-contractor operators and with other organizations. In 1990 a comprehensive management and supervisor training (MAST) program plan was devised and a MAST certification program of 31 self-paced written moduler was developed. This program has proven to be inexpensive to develop and implement when compared to classroom training. In addition, total quality is used as a tool to continuously improve work process. Continuous improvement requires continued evaluation of work process, such as TAP analysis and development in summary to make training at DOE facilities the most cost-effective training anywhere, we need to share, challenge conventional wisdom, and seek to continuously improve.

Trego, A.L.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

482

Writing audit findings: Be reasonable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address root cause'' as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a root problems'' approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee's part. This in itself, is its own reward.

Girvin, N.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Writing audit findings: Be reasonable!  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address ``root cause`` as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a ``root problems`` approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee`s part. This in itself, is its own reward.

Girvin, N.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Review of encapsulation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of encapsulation technology to produce a compliant waste form is an outgrowth from existing polymer industry technology and applications. During the past 12 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been researching the use of this technology to treat mixed wastes (i.e., containing hazardous and radioactive wastes). The two primary encapsulation techniques are microencapsulation and macroencapsulation. Microencapsulation is the thorough mixing of a binding agent with a powdered waste, such as incinerator ash. Macroencapsulation coats the surface of bulk wastes, such as lead debris. Cement, modified cement, and polyethylene are the binding agents which have been researched the most. Cement and modified cement have been the most commonly used binding agents to date. However, recent research conducted by DOE laboratories have shown that polyethylene is more durable and cost effective than cements. The compressive strength, leachability, resistance to chemical degradation, etc., of polyethylene is significantly greater than that of cement and modified cement. Because higher waste loads can be used with polyethylene encapsulant, the total cost of polyethylene encapsulation is significantly less costly than cement treatment. The only research lacking in the assessment of polyethylene encapsulation treatment for mixed wastes is pilot and full-scale testing with actual waste materials. To date, only simulated wastes have been tested. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site had planned to conduct pilot studies using actual wastes during 1996. This experiment should provide similar results to the previous tests that used simulated wastes. If this hypothesis is validated as anticipated, it will be clear that polyethylene encapsulation should be pursued by DOE to produce compliant waste forms.

Shaulis, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Integration of Variable Generation and Cost-Causation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable renewable energy generation sources, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, zero fuel consumption, and low and stable costs. Advances in both technologies can reduce capital costs and provide significant control capabilities. However, their variability and uncertainty - which change with weather conditions, time of day, and season - can cause an increase in power system operating costs compared to a fully controllable power plant. Although a number of studies have assessed integration costs, calculating them correctly is challenging because it is difficult to accurately develop a baseline scenario without variable generation that properly accounts for the energy value. It is also difficult to appropriately allocate costs given the complex, nonlinear interactions between resources and loads.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Check Estimates and Independent Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

489

Cost Effectiveness NW Energy Coalition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Action 8 Cost Effectiveness Manual Kim Drury NW Energy Coalition Context · Inconsistent understanding of cost effectiveness contributed to under performing conservation E.g: individual measures vs Action Plan for Energy Efficiency published a comprehensive guide on cost effectiveness: best practices

490

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Commercial Buildings S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, J. Mathieu, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies;1 Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak

492

Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

was intended as an early step toward the development of widely-accepted concepts and methods for conducting such valuation studies. The agenda and summary are below....

494

Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

was intended as an early step toward the development of widely-accepted concepts and methods for conducting such valuation studies. Presentations from Day 1 are below....

495

Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

was intended as an early step toward the development of widely-accepted concepts and methods for conducting such valuation studies. Presentations from Day 2 are below....

496

Capitalizing on information technology to reduce environmental compliance costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last several years environmental regulations have proliferated at a pace similar to the explosive growth of micro-computing. The new desktop computing power has encouraged compliance solutions developed in-house using PC based database tools. The result has often been numerous internally developed applications scattered throughout the company, managed or supported by personnel unfamiliar with the underlying principles of the original software. Each individual database may contain redundant and sometimes conflicting data. Expertise on these systems is often not transferable to the next system and may be lost as staff is promoted, transferred, or downsized.

Schott, J. [Entergy Services, Beaumont, TX (United States); Gloski, D.M.; Manning, L.A. [Electric Software Products, Inc., Los Altos, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

497

Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Silicon Genesis is a San Jose, Calif., company that is advancing the field of solar energy by developing a process that will virtually eliminate all waste when cutting materials...

498

Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium Automotive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08mccarty4.pdf More Documents & Publications Magnesium Front End Design And Development (AMD603) Magnesium Front End Research And...

499

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20,

500

Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType Jump to:Co Agency/CompanyReference |