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Sample records for technology atlanta ga

  1. Secretary Moniz's Keynote at the Sam Nunn Policy Forum in Atlanta, GA --

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As Delivered | Department of Energy Keynote at the Sam Nunn Policy Forum in Atlanta, GA -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Keynote at the Sam Nunn Policy Forum in Atlanta, GA -- As Delivered April 16, 2014 - 11:35am Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well, thank you. Professor Bankoff, Provost Bras, I'll also acknowledge the Bank of America support of this symposium and also my monthly support of the Bank of America which is quite considerable with those credit

  2. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Georgia Institute of Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joined the Challenge: February 2014 Headquarters: Atlanta, GA Charging Location: Atlanta, GA Domestic Employees: 6,490 Georgia Institute of Technology is a leader in innovation and ...

  3. Remarks by Federal Blue Ribbon Commission J. David Jameson Atlanta, GA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Blue Ribbon Commission J. David Jameson Atlanta, GA October 18, 2011 Good Morning. I am David Jameson. I am President and CEO of the Greater Aiken, South Carolina, Chamber of Commerce. I am here today in my capacity as current Chairman of the SRS Community Reuse Organization. The SRSCRO is a non-profit regional group supporting economic diversification and job creation in a five-county in Georgia and South Carolina near the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. We are unique among

  4. USD E'16 ATLANTA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USD E'16 ATLANTA 2016 REGISTER NOW! 15th Annual DOE Small Business Forum & Expo MAY 23 - 25, 2016 Atlanta Marriott Marquis 265 Peachtree Center Avenue Atlanta, GA 30303 Government per diem $135.00/night (+taxes/fees) Register Now for USDOE16! smallbusinessconference.energy.gov CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

  5. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Atlanta Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Atlanta Workshop 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Atlanta Workshop On July 29, 2008, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Atlanta, GA to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The agenda and full transcript are available below. 7-29-08 Congestion Workshop Agenda - Atlanta, GA.pdf (17.48 KB) Transcript - 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Atlanta Workshop.pdf (205.97

  6. Advancing Residential Retrofits in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick K; Kim, Eyu-Jin; Roberts, Sydney; Stephenson, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This report will summarize the home energy improvements performed in the Atlanta, GA area. In total, nine homes were retrofitted with eight of the homes having predicted source energy savings of approximately 30% or greater based on simulated energy consumption.

  7. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia (Fact Sheet),

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA, that demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low density spray foam insulation, glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements, and a high performance heating and cooling system.

  8. Atlanta TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 3-6-07

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atlanta, GA - January 31, 2007 Session Chaired by: Jay Jones (DOE, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, OCRWM) Regular Members in Attendance: Kenny Anderson (Las Vegas ...

  9. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  10. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  12. Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting in Atlanta (April 11, 2016) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Atlanta (April 11, 2016) Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting in Atlanta (April 11, 2016) Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting in Atlanta Meeting Summary Consent-based siting public meeting in Atlanta. On April 11, 2016, the Department of Energy's consent-based siting initiative hosted a public meeting in Atlanta, Georgia at the Georgia Institute of Technology's Conference Center. The purpose of this meeting was to hear from the public and stakeholders on important

  13. Atlanta Community Leaders’ Institute Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atlanta Community Leaders Institute (CLI) held a conference on February 8 and 9 at Morehouse School of Medicine, in Atlanta, Georgia.

  14. WNRC diverting to Atlanta FRC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NOTICE - NARA Diversion Prgm re WNRC Transfers Routed to FRC-Atlanta, GA.pdf More Documents & Publications Denver FRC diverting to Kingsridge FRC (Dayton, OH) POINT OF CONTACT...

  15. Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC Name: Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC Place: Marietta, Georgia Country: United...

  16. Building Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow's Engineers and Researchers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (BETTER) Capstone | Department of Energy Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow's Engineers and Researchers (BETTER) Capstone Building Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow's Engineers and Researchers (BETTER) Capstone Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology. Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology. Lead Performer: Georgia Institute of Technology - Atlanta, GA Partners: - Alphabet Energy - Hayward, CA - Alabama Heat Exchangers, AL - Advanced Renewable Energy - Emrgy Hydro -

  17. Making Connections for Atlanta Students

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atlanta Students in Energy and Climate Forum, held in April 2013, brought together entrepreneurs, and professors to share experiences and motivations in their pursuit of environmental stewardship.

  18. Atlanta, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solarity Sustainable World Capital TCE Energy Corporation Waspa Wheego Electric Cars Energy Incentives for Atlanta, Georgia City of Atlanta - Sustainable Home Initiative in...

  19. City of Atlanta Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aaron Bastian: According to the U.S. EPA, Atlanta is one of the top ten cities in the country for green buildings. It is a city that is walk and bike friendly, and now Atlanta is second in the...

  20. Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Southface Energy Institute – Atlanta, GA Partners: - City of AtlantaAtlanta, GA - Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlanta, GA - Kendeda Fund – Atlanta, GA - Oak Ridge National Laboratory – Oak Ridge, TN - Acuity Brands Lighting – Atlanta, GA - Vermont Energy Investment Corp – Burlington, VT - Georgia Power– Atlanta, GA - Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance – Atlanta, GA - JPB Foundation – New York, NY - Central Atlanta Progress – Atlanta, GA

  1. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60tifrancis2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications DeKalb CountyMetropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project DeKalb CountyMetropolitan...

  2. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vt060francis2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications DeKalb CountyMetropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project DeKalb CountyMetropolitan...

  3. DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60tifrancis2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications DeKalb CountyMetropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project DeKalb CountyMetropolitan...

  4. fe0013961-GaTech | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA 30332 Background While earlier research focused on the properties of the hydrate mass per se (Sloan Jr and Koh 2007), ...

  5. Progress toward technology transition of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, D.N.; Marvin, D.C.; Brinker, D.J.; Curtis, H.B.; Price, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of the joint WL/PL/NASA Multijunction Solar Cell Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program is to scale up high efficiency GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge multijunction solar cells to production size, quantity, and yield while limiting the production cost/Watt ($/W) to 15% over GaAs cells. Progress made by the program contractors, Spectrolab and TECSTAR, include, respectively, best cell efficiencies of 25.76% and 24.7% and establishment of 24.2% and 23.8% lot average efficiency baseline designs. The paper also presents side-by-side testing results collected by Phillips Laboratory and NASA Lewis on Phase 1 deliverable cells, which shows compliance with program objectives. Cell performance, pre- and post-radiation, and temperature coefficient results on initial production GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge solar cells will be presented.

  6. Energy Department Announces Progress, Next Steps on Improving the Reliability of the Nation’s Electric Grid with Synchrophasor Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 22, 2016, as the first-ever International Synchrophasor Symposium continues in Atlanta, GA, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) released a new report chronicling American efforts to deploy this technology as well as two new funding opportunities to further advance the technology.

  7. Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, [approximately] 1 [times] 10[sup 5] cm[sup [minus]5], as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 [times]10[sup 7] cm[sup [minus]2]. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

  8. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southern Pine Based Biorefinery Center May 20 - 23, 2013 Bio-Oil Technology Area Review Project WBS: 7.5.7.3 Art J. Ragauskas Institute of Paper Science and Technology School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal/Objective Statement Leveraging kraft pulp mill infrastructure for biofuels and bio- based materials via pine wood, pine residues, and kraft

  9. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diode Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Dashiell; J Beausang; H Ehsani; G Nichols; D DePoy; L Danielson; P Talamo; K Rahner; E Brown; S Burger; P Fourspring; W Topper; P Baldasaro; C Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; Jizhong Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryl

    2005-01-26

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes fabricated from InGaAsSb alloys lattice-matched to GaSb substrates are grown by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diodes utilizing front-surface spectral control filters have been tested in a vacuum cavity and a TPV thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency ({eta}{sub TPV}) and a power density (PD) of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19% and PD=0.58 W/cm{sup 2} were measured for T{sub radiator} = 950 C and T{sub diode} = 27 C. Recombination coefficients deduced from minority carrier measurements and the theory reviewed in this article predict a practical limit to the maximum achievable conversion efficiency and power density for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV. The limits for the above operating temperatures are projected to be {eta}{sub TPV} = 26% and PD = 0.75 W/cm{sup 2}. These limits are extended to {eta}{sub TPV} = 30% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} if the diode active region is bounded by a reflective back surface to enable photon recycling and a two-pass optical path length. The internal quantum efficiency of the InGaAsSb TPV diode is close to the theoretically predicted limits, with the exception of short wavelength absorption in GaSb contact layers. Experiments show that the open circuit voltage of the 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diodes is not strongly dependent on the device architectures studied in this work where both N/P and P/N double heterostructure diodes have been grown with various acceptor and donor doping levels, having GaSb and AlGaAsSb confinement, and also partial back surface reflectors. Lattice matched InGaAsSb TPV diodes were fabricated with bandgaps ranging from 0.6 to 0.5eV without significant degradation of the open circuit voltage factor, quantum efficiency, or fill factor as the composition approached the miscibility gap. The key diode performance parameter which is limiting efficiency and power density below the theoretical limits in InGaAsSb TPV devices is the open circuit voltage. The open circuit voltages of

  10. EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel EECBG Success Story: Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel December 7, 2011 - 3:33pm Addthis Downtown ...

  11. Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities How energy related research has helped Clark Atlanta University. Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities (1.62 MB) More Documents & Publications 2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL EDUCATION AT CALIFORNIA STATE

  12. Empower Energy Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Empower Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Empower Energy Technology Name: Empower Energy Technology Address: 245 N. Highland Avenue, Suite 230.162 Place: Atlanta,...

  13. QER SECOND INSTALLMENT PUBLIC MEETING-ATLANTA, GEORGIA | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy ATLANTA, GEORGIA QER SECOND INSTALLMENT PUBLIC MEETING-ATLANTA, GEORGIA MEETING DATE AND LOCATION Tuesday, May 24, 2016 Doors open: 9:00 AM; Program begins: 10:00 AM Georgia Tech GTRI Conference Center 250 14th Street, NW Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Watch the May 24th Atlanta meeting here. MEETING INFORMATION The Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force will host a public stakeholder meeting on the second installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), an integrated study of the U.S.

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: City of Atlanta | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    City of Atlanta Joins U.S. Department of Energy Workplace Charging Challenge Challenge aims to increase the number of employers offering workplace charging stations over the next ...

  15. Direct wafer bonding technology for large-scale InGaAs-on-insulator transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Li, Jian; Kao, Yung-Chung

    2014-07-28

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V devices on Si wafers have been explored for realizing high device performance as well as merging electrical and photonic applications on the Si platform. Existing methodologies have unavoidable drawbacks such as inferior device quality or high cost in comparison with the current Si-based technology. In this paper, we present InGaAs-on-insulator (-OI) fabrication from an InGaAs layer grown on a Si donor wafer with a III-V buffer layer instead of growth on a InP donor wafer. This technology allows us to yield large wafer size scalability of III-V-OI layers up to the Si wafer size of 300 mm with a high film quality and low cost. The high film quality has been confirmed by Raman and photoluminescence spectra. In addition, the fabricated InGaAs-OI transistors exhibit the high electron mobility of 1700 cm{sup 2}/V s and uniform distribution of the leakage current, indicating high layer quality with low defect density.

  16. Atlanta TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 3-6-07

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel Atlanta Suburb Greases the Path to Savings with Biodiesel December 7, 2011 - 3:33pm Addthis Downtown Smyrna, Georgia, a town that's poised to see big savings thanks to their investment in biodiesel. | Photo by Ken Cook Downtown Smyrna, Georgia, a town that's poised to see big savings thanks to their investment in biodiesel. | Photo by Ken Cook Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency

  17. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia (Fact Sheet), Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Ground Source Heat Pump ...

  18. Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe sub 2 solar cell modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanbery, B.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large-area CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS)/Cd{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y}S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin-film solar cell modules will enable 15% median efficiencies to be achieved in high-volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x{ge}0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30-year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large-area integrated thin-film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

  19. Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 5} cm{sup {minus}5}, as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 {times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}2}. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

  20. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Atlanta

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Elliott, Ph.D., Associate Director Georgia Institute of Technology's Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development CONSENT- BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING ...

  1. Better Buildings Challenge, Atlanta Nears Halfway Mark in Meeting Citywide Goal of 20% Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department yesterday recognized Atlanta for its progress and leadership in meeting a citywide goal to improve the energy performance of its buildings by 20% by 2020.

  2. Monolithically interconnected GaAs solar cells: A new interconnection technology for high voltage solar cell output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinetta, L.C.; Hannon, M.H.

    1995-10-01

    Photovoltaic linear concentrator arrays can benefit from high performance solar cell technologies being developed at AstroPower. Specifically, these are the integration of thin GaAs solar cell and epitaxial lateral overgrowth technologies with the application of monolithically interconnected solar cell (MISC) techniques. This MISC array has several advantages which make it ideal for space concentrator systems. These are high system voltage, reliable low cost monolithically formed interconnections, design flexibility, costs that are independent of array voltage, and low power loss from shorts, opens, and impact damage. This concentrator solar cell will incorporate the benefits of light trapping by growing the device active layers over a low-cost, simple, PECVD deposited silicon/silicon dioxide Bragg reflector. The high voltage-low current output results in minimal 12R losses while properly designing the device allows for minimal shading and resistance losses. It is possible to obtain open circuit voltages as high as 67 volts/cm of solar cell length with existing technology. The projected power density for the high performance device is 5 kW/m for an AMO efficiency of 26% at 1 5X. Concentrator solar cell arrays are necessary to meet the power requirements of specific mission platforms and can supply high voltage power for electric propulsion systems. It is anticipated that the high efficiency, GaAs monolithically interconnected linear concentrator solar cell array will enjoy widespread application for space based solar power needs. Additional applications include remote man-portable or ultra-light unmanned air vehicle (UAV) power supplies where high power per area, high radiation hardness and a high bus voltage or low bus current are important. The monolithic approach has a number of inherent advantages, including reduced cost per interconnect and increased reliability of array connections. There is also a high potential for a large number of consumer products.

  3. Registration Open for National Environmental Justice Advisory Council (NEJAC) Public Meeting, September 11-12, 2013, Atlanta, Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration Open for National Environmental Justice Advisory Council (NEJAC) Public Meeting, September 11-12, 2013, Atlanta, Georgia.

  4. Building America Case Study: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA in the mixed-humid climate. This home serves as a residence and home office for the firm's owners, as well as a demonstration of their design approach to potential and current clients. Southface believes the home demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low density spray foam insulation, glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements, and a high performance heating and cooling system. Construction quality and execution was a high priority for TaC Studios and was ensured by a third party review process. Post construction testing showed that the project met stated goals for envelope performance, an air infiltration rate of 2.15 ACH50. The homeowner's wished to further validate whole house energy savings through the project's involvement with Building America and this long-term monitoring effort. As a Building America test home, this home was evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and the efficiency and operation of the ground source heat pump and associated systems. Given that the home includes many non-typical end use loads including a home office, pool, landscape water feature, and other luxury features not accounted for in Building America modeling tools, these end uses were separately monitored to determine their impact on overall energy consumption.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  6. DOE ZERH Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Advanced low-cost SIC and GaN wide...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced low-cost SiC and GaN wide...

  9. bia-cemkiln | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Passamaquoddy Technology, L.P.), Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference, Atlanta, GA. U.S. Department of Energy report CONF-9309152. Recovery Scrubber Installation and ...

  10. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  11. OPTIMIZED MULTI-FREQUENCY SPECTRA FOR APPLICATIONS IN RADIATIVE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States) ... CALCULATIONS; RADIANT HEAT TRANSFER; STAR ACCRETION; STAR MODELS; STARS; ...

  12. TTW 7-2-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the other 3 were remote-handled waste ... Systems Security, recently worked with Sourcefire founder and Chief Technology ... Cyber Security Conference in Atlanta, Ga., ...

  13. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States) Univ. of Los Andes, Bogota (Colombia) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States) Georgia Inst. ...

  14. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    163 Praxair, Inc. Tonawanda, WV Georgia Institute of Technology, 505 10th Street, NW, Atlanta, GA 30332 FESCCAESD Kenneth David Lyons Improving Energy Efficiency of Air...

  15. bectso-conzo | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Pennsylvania Electric Company), Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference, Atlanta, GA. U.S. Department of Energy report CONF-9309152. Update and Results of Bechtel's ...

  16. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , Robert J. Broderick 2 , Santiago Grijalva 1 1 Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract - Many utilities ...

  17. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matthew J. Reno, Abraham Ellis, Jeff Smith, and Roger Dugan Prepared by Sandia ... of Technology Atlanta, GA, 30332 Jeff Smith and Roger Dugan Electric Power Research ...

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    This case study describes the construction of a new test home that demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a high performance ground source heat pump for heating and cooling, a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low-density spray foam insulation, and glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements.

  19. Atlanta Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Fleets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,589 2,569 651 369 SIC Codes Ag.For.Fish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 65 31 Q Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  20. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting Atlanta, Georgia - March 16-18, 2011 May 2011 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

  1. Characterization of heavy masses of two-dimensional conduction subband in InGaAs/InAlAs MQW structures by pulsed cyclotron resonance technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotera, N.; Tanaka, K. [Kyushu Inst. of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan); Arimoto, H.; Miura, N. [Univ. of Tokyo, Roppongi, Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Solid State Physics; Jones, E.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mishima, T. [Hitachi Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo (Japan). Central Research Lab.; Washima, M. [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Research Center

    1998-05-01

    Conduction-band effective masses in a direction parallel to the quantum well plane were investigated in n-type-modulation-doped InGaAs/InAlAs multiquantum well system. Thicknesses of well and barrier were 5 and 10 nm. Three highly-doped specimens having about 1 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2} per one quantum well were prepared by MBE. Double-crystal X-ray diffraction was used to check the crystal quality. Heavy electron effective masses, almost 50% bigger than the band edge mass of 0.041m{sub 0}, were measured by far-infrared and infrared cyclotron resonances under pulse high magnetic fields up to 100 T. Nonparabolicity of this subband was less than 12% by comparing the two cyclotron resonances. Observed two-dimensional subband structure was quite different from conduction-band effective mass in a direction perpendicular to the same quantum well and from GaAs/GaAlAs quantum well system.

  2. Making it pay in Athens, GA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-04-01

    The materials recovery facility (MRF) in Athens, GA, is a well-fed recycling facility. But, if the local government has its way, it will be even better fed in the near future. The Athens-Clarke County (ACC) regional municipality in which the facility resides has a put-or-pay contract with the plant`s owner/operator, under which the more it feeds the MRF, the more money it receives in return, through the sale of recycled end products. The ACC Solid Waste Department uses a volume-based waste collection system that encourages residents to recycle--the more they recycle, the less trash they have to put out, and the less they pay each month. The Athens facility, which will be a featured site tour at next month`s WasteExpo `97 in nearby Atlanta, had its ground-breaking two years ago, in April 1995. ACC is responsible for delivering material--or seeing that recyclables are delivered--to the MRF, which is owned and operated by Resource Recovery Systems (RRS, Centerbrook, Conn.). Over the past year, ACC has stepped up various incentives for businesses to recycle and send their recyclables to the facility, including instituting pilot programs for commercial interests that offer them versions of volume-based collection similar to that done by residents.

  3. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  4. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Gary Grider (second from right) with the 2015 Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize. Also pictured (left to right): Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory; Terry Wallace, Program Associate Director for Global Security at Los Alamos; and Lee

  5. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  6. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The HiWAIS technology is a significant step forward in the warfighter support arena. Honeybees for Explosive Detection Honeybees for Explosive Detection Los Alamos researchers have ...

  7. Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing ...

  9. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zavada, J. M.

    2014-08-25

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540 nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300 arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540 nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  10. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  11. Preparation of public housing energy efficiency publications for the Atlanta Housing Authority

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) has produced and evaluated the effectiveness of pamphlets prepared to encourage utility cost conservation. The target population for this project is not only public housing residents but also the public housing maintenance staff (who also have a dramatic impact on facility energy costs). Because the majority of the problems associated with excess resident utility costs occur during extreme cold weather of the heating season, heating conservation was the focus of this study.

  12. Lateral and Vertical Transistors Using the AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S; Mishra, UK

    2013-10-01

    Power conversion losses are endemic in all areas of electricity consumption, including motion control, lighting, air conditioning, and information technology. Si, the workhorse of the industry, has reached its material limits. Increasingly, the lateral AlGaN/GaN HEMT based on gallium nitride (GaN-on-Si) is becoming the device of choice for medium power electronics as it enables high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor at attractive pricing for wide market penetration. The reduced form factor enabled by high-efficiency operation at high frequency further enables significant system price reduction because of savings in bulky extensive passive elements and heat sink costs. The high-power market, however, still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes more difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside of silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high power conversion needs. In this paper, the development, performance, and status of lateral and vertical GaN devices are discussed.

  13. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajłasz, M.; Donkers, J. J. T. M.; Sque, S. J.; Heil, S. B. S.; Gravesteijn, D. J.; Rietveld, F. J. R.; Schmitz, J.

    2014-06-16

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact is thought to come from reactions between the contact metals and the AlGaN/GaN. As a consequence, conventional extraction of the specific contact resistance and transfer length leads to erroneous results. In this Letter, the sheet resistance under gold-free Ti/Al-based Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates has been investigated by means of electrical measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and technology computer-aided design simulations. It was found to be significantly lower than that outside of the contact area; temperature-dependent electrical characterization showed that it exhibits semiconductor-like behavior. The increase in conduction is attributed to n-type activity of nitrogen vacancies in the AlGaN. They are thought to form during rapid thermal annealing of the metal stack when Ti extracts nitrogen from the underlying semiconductor. The high n-type doping in the region between the metal and the 2-dimensional electron gas pulls the conduction band towards the Fermi level and enhances horizontal electron transport in the AlGaN. Using this improved understanding of the properties of the material underneath the contact, accurate values of transfer length and specific contact resistance have been extracted.

  14. General Atomics (GA) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Atomics (GA) Subscribe to RSS - General Atomics (GA) General Atomics Image: General Atomics (GA) The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" Read more about The Scorpion's...

  15. Ultra High p-doping Material Research for GaN Based Light Emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Dmitriev

    2007-06-30

    The main goal of the Project is to investigate doping mechanisms in p-type GaN and AlGaN and controllably fabricate ultra high doped p-GaN materials and epitaxial structures. Highly doped p-type GaN-based materials with low electrical resistivity and abrupt doping profiles are of great importance for efficient light emitters for solid state lighting (SSL) applications. Cost-effective hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) technology was proposed to investigate and develop p-GaN materials for SSL. High p-type doping is required to improve (i) carrier injection efficiency in light emitting p-n junctions that will result in increasing of light emitting efficiency, (ii) current spreading in light emitting structures that will improve external quantum efficiency, and (iii) parameters of Ohmic contacts to reduce operating voltage and tolerate higher forward currents needed for the high output power operation of light emitters. Highly doped p-type GaN layers and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with low electrical resistivity will lead to novel device and contact metallization designs for high-power high efficiency GaN-based light emitters. Overall, highly doped p-GaN is a key element to develop light emitting devices for the DOE SSL program. The project was focused on material research for highly doped p-type GaN materials and device structures for applications in high performance light emitters for general illumination P-GaN and p-AlGaN layers and multi-layer structures were grown by HVPE and investigated in terms of surface morphology and structure, doping concentrations and profiles, optical, electrical, and structural properties. Tasks of the project were successfully accomplished. Highly doped GaN materials with p-type conductivity were fabricated. As-grown GaN layers had concentration N{sub a}-N{sub d} as high as 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Mechanisms of doping were investigated and results of material studies were reported at several International conferences providing

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photon Source, Argonne, IL (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photon Source, Argonne, IL (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo ... IL (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IL (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States) Battelle Memorial...

  1. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mreke, Janina Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin; Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain

    2014-07-07

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  2. TJ Solar Cell (GaInP/GaAs/Ge Ultrahigh-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Daniel

    2002-04-17

    This talk will discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction photovoltaic technology which have led to the highest-efficiency solar cells ever demonstrated. The relationship between the materials science of III-V semiconductors and the achievement of record solar cell efficiencies will be emphasized. For instance, epitaxially-grown GAInP has been found to form a spontaneously-ordered GaP/InP (111) superlattice. This ordering affects the band gap of the material, which in turn affects the design of solar cells which incorporate GaInP. For the next generation of ultrahigh-efficiency III-V solar cells, we need a new semiconductor which is lattice-matched to GaAs, has a band gap of 1 eV, and has long minority-carrier diffusion lengths. Out of a number of candidate materials, the recently-discovered alloy GaInNAs appears to have the greatest promise. This material satisfies the first two criteria, but has to date shown very low diffusion lengths, a problem which is our current focus in the development of these next-generation cells.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: High-Efficiency High-Density GaN-Based 6.6kW Bidirectional On-Board Charger for PEVs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delta Products Corporation at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Electric Drive...

  4. GA SNC Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GA-SNC Solar Place: Nevada Sector: Solar Product: Nevada-based PV project developer and joint venture of GA-Solar North America and Sierra Nevada Corp. References: GA-SNC...

  5. SR0006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 25, 2000 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 DOE Cleanup Science On Display In Atlanta National Workshop Shares Research Progress Flag Ribbon Art The latest advances in environmental cleanup science and technology are on display at the Department of Energy Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) National Workshop in Atlanta, GA on April 25-27 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza. Hosted by DOE's Office of Environmental Management and Office of Science, Idaho Operations Office, and

  6. Low Cost Production of InGaN for Next-Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick M. Sbrockey, Shangzhu Sun, Gary S. Tompa,

    2012-07-09

    The goal of this project is to develop a low-cost and low-energy technology for production of photovoltaic devices based on InGaN materials. This project builds on the ongoing development by Structured Materials Industries (SMI), of novel thin film deposition technology for Group III-Nitride materials, which is capable of depositing Group-III nitride materials at significantly lower costs and significantly lower energy usage compared to conventional deposition techniques. During this project, SMI demonstrated deposition of GaN and InGaN films using metalorganic sources, and demonstrated compatibility of the process with standard substrate materials and hardware components.

  7. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  8. GaP/Si heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saive, R.; Chen, C.; Emmer, H.; Atwater, H.

    2015-05-11

    Improving the efficiency of solar cells requires the introduction of novel device concepts. Recent developments have shown that in Si solar cell technology there is still room for tremendous improvement. Using the heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) approach 25.6 % power conversion efficiency was achieved. However, a-Si as a window and passivation layer comes with disadvantages as a-Si shows low conductivity and high parasitic absorption. Therefore, it is likely that using a crystalline material as window layer with high band gab and high mobility can further improve efficiency. We have studied GaP grown by MOCVD on Si with (001) and (112) orientation. We obtained crystalline layers with carrier mobility around 100 cm2/Vs and which passivate Si as confirmed by carrier lifetime measurements. We performed band alignment studies by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy yielding a valence band offset of 0.3 eV. Comparing this value with the Schottky-model leads to an interface dipole of 0.59 eV. The open circuit voltage increases with increasing doping and is consistent with the theoretical open circuit voltage deduced from work function difference and interface dipole. We obtain an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V for n-doped GaP with doping levels in the order of 10^17 1/cm^3. In our next steps we will increase the doping level further in order to gain higher open circuit voltage. We will discuss the implications of these findings for GaP/Si heterojunction solar cells.

  9. Second annual clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-09

    The Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference was held at Atlanta, Georgia, September 7--9, 1993. The Conference, cosponsored by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), seeks to examine the status and role of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) and its projects. The Program is reviewed within the larger context of environmental needs, sustained economic growth, world markets, user performance requirements and supplier commercialization activities. This will be accomplished through in-depth review and discussion of factors affecting domestic and international markets for clean coal technology, the environmental considerations in commercial deployment, the current status of projects, and the timing and effectiveness of transfer of data from these projects to potential users, suppliers, financing entities, regulators, the interested environmental community and the public. Individual papers have been entered separately.

  10. Upcoming Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) Southeast Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summit on July 9 in Atlanta, GA | Department of Energy Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) Southeast Regional Summit on July 9 in Atlanta, GA Upcoming Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) Southeast Regional Summit on July 9 in Atlanta, GA June 25, 2015 - 8:19am Addthis On July 9, the U.S. Department of Energy will be holding the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) Southeast Regional Summit at the Renaissance Atlanta Midtown Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. The Summit will

  11. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  12. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  13. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  14. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  15. Airports & Lodging | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbia, SC Columbia Metropolitan Airport - all major carriers; 1.5-2h drive to SREL. Atlanta, GA Hartsfield Airport - all major carriers; 2.5-3 hour drive from Atlanta, GA, to ...

  16. High Quantum Efficiency AlGaN/InGaN Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, James H; Leopold, Daniel

    2009-11-24

    High efficiency photon counting detectors in use today for high energy particle detection applications have a significant spectral mismatch with typical sources and have a number of practical problems compared with conventional bialkali photomultiplier tubes. Numerous high energy physics experiments that employ scintillation light detectors or Cherenkov detectors would benefit greatly from photomultipliers with higher quantum efficiencies. The need for extending the sensitivity of photon detectors to the blue and UV wavebands comes from the fact that both Cherenkov light and some scintillators have an emission spectrum which is peaked at short wavelengths. This research involves the development of high quantum efficiency, high gain, UV/blue photon counting detectors based on AlGaN/InGaN photocathode heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The work could eventually lead to nearly ideal light detectors with a number of distinct advantages over existing technologies for numerous applications in high-energy physics and particle astrophysics. Potential advantages include much lower noise detection, better stability and radiation resistance than other cathode structures, very low radioactive background levels for deep underground experiments and high detection efficiency of individual UV-visible photons. We are also working on the development of photocathodes with intrinsic gain, initially improving the detection efficiency of hybrid semiconductor-vacuum tube devices, and eventually leading to an all-solid-state photomultiplier device.

  17. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Klem, John F.; Jones, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  18. Magnetism and transport properties of epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films on GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong Anh Tuan; Shin, Yooleemi; Cho, Sunglae; Dang Duc Dung; Vo Thanh Son

    2012-04-01

    Epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films in disordered bcc {alpha}-Fe crystal structure (A2) have been grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The saturated magnetization (M{sub S}) decreased from 1371 to 1105 kA/m with increasing Ga concentration from 10.5 to 24.3 % at room temperature. The lattice parameter increased with the increase in Ga content because of the larger atomic radius of Ga atom than that of Fe. The increase in carrier density with Ga content caused in lower resistivity.

  19. Graphene induced remote surface scattering in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiwen; Li, Dan; Wang, Bobo; Liu, Bin; Chen, Famin; Jin, Guangri; Lu, Yanwu

    2014-10-20

    The mobilities of single-layer graphene combined with AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on two-dimensional electron gases in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction are calculated. The impact of electron density in single-layer graphene is also studied. Remote surface roughness (RSR) and remote interfacial charge (RIC) scatterings are introduced into this heterostructure. The mobilities limited by RSR and RIC are an order of magnitude higher than that of interface roughness and misfit dislocation. This study contributes to designing structures for generation of higher electron mobility in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction.

  20. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the kp method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 . The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  1. Semiconductor Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting ReSeaRch & development at Sandia national laboRatoRieS The bridge to a new way of lighting the world ssls.sandia.gov Initiates decades-long investment into compound semiconductor science and technology, eventually establishing its Center for Compound Semiconductor Science and Technology 1 9 7 7 Begins investing in gallium nitride (GaN) materials, physics, and device capabilities 1 9 9 5 Launches its Grand Challenge Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project, "A

  2. Optical and magnetotransport properties of InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs structures doped with a magnetic impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalentyeva, I. L. Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Demina, P. B.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Zdoroveyshchev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs bilayer quantum-well structures containing a magnetic-impurity δ-layer (Mn) at the GaAs/InGaAs interface are experimentally studied for the first time. The structures are fabricated by metal organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD) and laser deposition on substrates of conducting (n{sup +}) and semi-insulating GaAs in a single growth cycle. The InGaAs-layer thickness is varied from 1.5 to 5 nm. The significant effect of a decrease in the InGaAs quantum-well thickness on the optical and magnetotransport properties of the structures under study is detected. Nonlinear magnetic-field dependence of the Hall resistance and negative magnetoresistance at temperatures of ≤30–40 K, circular polarization of the electroluminescence in a magnetic field, opposite behaviors of the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission intensities in the structures, and an increase in the contribution of indirect transitions with decreasing InGaAs thickness are observed. Simulation shows that these effects can be caused by the influence of the δ-layer of acceptor impurity (Mn) on the band structure and the hole concentration distribution in the bilayer quantum well.

  3. SREL Reprint #3129

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Outer Membrane-Associated Serine Protease Involved in Adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) Oxides Justin L. Burns1, Brian R. Ginn1, David J. Bates1, Steven N. Dublin2, Jeanette V. Taylor2, Robert P. Apkarian2, Samary Amaro-Garcia3, Andrew L. Neal3, and Thomas J. Dichristina1 1School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 2Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core Facility, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 3Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, The

  4. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and

  5. Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    irradiated AlGaNGaN HEMTs This content will become publicly available on August 26, 2016 Title: Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaNGaN HEMTs Authors: ...

  6. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  7. (In,Ga)As/GaP electrical injection quantum dot laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidemann, M. Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.

    2014-01-06

    The paper reports on the realization of multilayer (In,Ga)As/GaP quantum dot (QD) lasers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The QDs have been embedded in (Al,Ga)P/GaP waveguide structures. Laser operation at 710 nm is obtained for broad area laser devices with a threshold current density of 4.4 kA/cm{sup 2} at a heat-sink temperature of 80 K.

  8. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  9. Atlanta Central UESC Pilot Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Rebates 0 0 Water Usage Costs 1,266,004 1,112,051 ... Average Power Cost Annual Saving Rome - 330 kW (DC) Solar Photovoltaic System 1,371,468 380,052 kWh 0.082 31,164 ...

  10. Metal-interconnection-free integration of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao; Cai, Yuefei; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Jun; Lau, Kei May

    2015-05-04

    We report a metal-interconnection-free integration scheme for InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by combining selective epi removal (SER) and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) techniques. SER of HEMT epi was carried out first to expose the bottom unintentionally doped GaN buffer and the sidewall GaN channel. A LED structure was regrown in the SER region with the bottom n-type GaN layer (n-electrode of the LED) connected to the HEMTs laterally, enabling monolithic integration of the HEMTs and LEDs (HEMT-LED) without metal-interconnection. In addition to saving substrate real estate, minimal interface resistance between the regrown n-type GaN and the HEMT channel is a significant improvement over metal-interconnection. Furthermore, excellent off-state leakage characteristics of the driving transistor can also be guaranteed in such an integration scheme.

  11. Ground-state energy trends in single and multilayered coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dots capped with InGaAs layers: Effects of InGaAs layer thickness and annealing temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.; Ghosh, K.; Jejurikar, S.; Mishra, A.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Investigation of ground state energy in single and multi-layered InAs/GaAs QD. Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) prevents the formation of non-radiative. Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) is responsible for high activation energy. Significant deviation from the Varshni model, E(T) = E ? ?T{sup 2}/T + ?. - Abstract: Vertically coupled, multilayered InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) covered with thin InGaAs strain-reducing layers (SRLs) are in demand for various technological applications. We investigated low temperature photoluminescence of single and multilayered structures in which the SRL thickness was varied. The SRL layer was responsible for high activation energies. Deviation of experimental data from the Varshni (1967) model, E(T) = E ? ? T{sup 2}/T + ?, suggests that the InAs-layered QDs have properties different from those in bulk material. Anomalous ground-state peak linewidths (FWHM), especially for annealed multilayer structures, were observed. A ground-state peak blue-shift with a broadened linewidth was also observed. Loss of intensity was detected in samples annealed at 800 C. Presence of SRLs prevents formation of non-radiative centers under high temperature annealing. The results indicate the potential importance of such structures in optoelectronic applications.

  12. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2015-02-09

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ?332?meV to ?294?meV at 80?A/cm{sup 2} and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs.

  13. Smart Manufacturing Institute Industry Day Workshop Proceedings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    AMO hosted an Industry Day workshop to explain the concept, vision, and technology needs associated with support for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute on Smart Manufacturing. The workshop was held on February 25, 2015 at the Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center in Atlanta, GA.

  14. AMO Industry Day Workshop, February 25th, Targets Smart Manufacturing FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO will host an Industry Day workshop to explain the concept, vision, and technology needs associated with support for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute on Smart Manufacturing. The workshop will take place on Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center, Atlanta, GA.

  15. Smart Manufacturing Institute Industry Day Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted an Industry Day workshop to explain the concept, vision, and technology needs associated with support for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute on Smart Manufacturing. The workshop was held on February 25, 2015 at the Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center in Atlanta, GA.

  16. AlGaN/GaN heterostructure prepared on a Si (110) substrate via pulsed sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, T.; Ohta, J.; Kondo, T.; Ohashi, M.; Ueno, K.; Kobayashi, A.; Fujioka, H.

    2014-05-05

    GaN films were grown on Si (110) substrates using a low-temperature growth technique based on pulsed sputtering. Reduction of the growth temperature suppressed the strain in the GaN films, leading to an increase in the critical thickness for crack formation. In addition, an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure with a flat heterointerface was prepared using this technique. Furthermore, the existence of a two dimensional electron gas at the heterointerface with a mobility of 1360 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a sheet carrier density of 1.3??10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?2} was confirmed. Finally, the use of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in a high electron mobility transistor was demonstrated. These results indicate that low-temperature growth via pulsed sputtering is quite promising for the fabrication of GaN-based electronic devices.

  17. GaP/Silicon Tandem Solar Cell with Extended Temperature Range - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search GaP/Silicon Tandem Solar Cell with Extended Temperature Range NASA Glenn Research Center (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/home/index.html) National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact NASA About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryNASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) innovators have developed unique, tandem photovoltaic cells (or "solar

  18. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0476: ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To support DOE's goal to provide clean and secure energy, the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) invests in research and development that:

  20. Carrier quenching in InGaP/GaAs double heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Nathan P. Driskell, Travis U.; Hudson, Andrew I.; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Lotshaw, William T.; Forbes, David V.; Hubbard, Seth M.

    2015-08-14

    Photoluminescence measurements on a series of GaAs double heterostructures demonstrate a rapid quenching of carriers in the GaAs layer at irradiance levels below 0.1 W/cm{sup 2} in samples with a GaAs-on-InGaP interface. These results indicate the existence of non-radiative defect centers at or near the GaAs-on-InGaP interface, consistent with previous reports showing the intermixing of In and P when free As impinges on the InGaP surface during growth. At low irradiance, these defect centers can lead to sub-ns carrier lifetimes. The defect centers involved in the rapid carrier quenching can be saturated at higher irradiance levels and allow carrier lifetimes to reach hundreds of nanoseconds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a nearly three orders of magnitude decrease in carrier lifetime at low irradiance in a simple double heterostructure. Carrier quenching occurs at irradiance levels near the integrated Air Mass Zero (AM0) and Air Mass 1.5 (AM1.5) solar irradiance. Additionally, a lower energy photoluminescence band is observed both at room and cryogenic temperatures. The temperature and time dependence of the lower energy luminescence is consistent with the presence of an unintentional InGaAs or InGaAsP quantum well that forms due to compositional mixing at the GaAs-on-InGaP interface. Our results are of general interest to the photovoltaic community as InGaP is commonly used as a window layer in GaAs based solar cells.

  1. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J. Ota, Y.; Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  2. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  3. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  4. Zinc blende GaAs films grown on wurtzite GaN/sapphire templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaldyshev, V.V.; Nielsen, B.; Mendez, E.E.; Musikhin, Yu.G.; Bert, N.A.; Ma, Zh.; Holden, Todd

    2005-03-28

    1-{mu}m-thick zinc-blende GaAs (111) films were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on wurtzite GaN/sapphire (0001) templates. In spite of a {approx}20% lattice mismatch, epitaxial growth was realized, so that the GaAs films showed good adhesion and their surface had a larger mirror-like area with an average surface roughness of 10 nm. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a flat and abrupt epitaxial GaAs/GaN interface with some nanocavities and a large number of dislocations. Reasonably good crystalline quality of the GaAs films was confirmed by Raman characterization. Spectroscopic ellipsometry showed sharp interference fringes and characteristic parameters in the range of 0.75-5.3 eV. Photoluminescence study revealed extended band tails and dominance of non-radiative carrier recombination.

  5. High-performance InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, J.-H. Chiu, S.-Y.; Lour, W.-S.; Guo, D.-F.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a novel InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor is first demonstrated. Though the valence band discontinuity at InGaP/GaAs heterojunction is relatively large, the addition of a {delta}-doped sheet between two spacer layers at the emitter-base (E-B) junction effectively eliminates the potential spike and increases the confined barrier for electrons, simultaneously. Experimentally, a high current gain of 25 and a relatively low E-B offset voltage of 60 mV are achieved. The offset voltage is much smaller than the conventional InGaP/GaAs pnp HBT. The proposed device could be used for linear amplifiers and low-power complementary integrated circuit applications.

  6. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - General Atomics (GA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    general-atomics-ga General Atomics en The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" http:www.pppl.govnode1132

  8. Simplified 2DEG carrier concentration model for composite barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Palash Biswas, Dhrubes

    2014-04-24

    The self consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations is used along with the total charge depletion model and applied with a novel approach of composite AlGaN barrier based HEMT heterostructure. The solution leaded to a completely new analytical model for Fermi energy level vs. 2DEG carrier concentration. This was eventually used to demonstrate a new analytical model for the temperature dependent 2DEG carrier concentration in AlGaN/GaN HEMT.

  9. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Burger, Arnold; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  10. Technology Partnering

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The U.S. Air Force and other branches of the military use GA-ASI's Lynx Multi-mode Radar systems. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection also operates a fleet of unmanned aerial ...

  11. Magnetic coupling in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Rushforth, A. W.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Charlton, T. R.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.

    2015-08-07

    We report on a study of ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers using magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). From depth-resolved characterization of the magnetic structure obtained by PNR, we concluded that the (Ga,Mn)As and (Al,Ga,Mn)As layers have in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic easy axes, respectively, with weak interlayer coupling. Therefore, the layer magnetizations align perpendicular to each other under low magnetic fields and parallel at high fields.

  12. Accelerated aging of GaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.E.

    1982-04-01

    An accelerated aging study of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells has been completed. The purpose of the study was to identify the possible degradation mechanisms of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells in terrestrial applications. Thermal storage tests and accelerated AlGaAs corrosion studies were performed to provide an experimental basis for a statistical analysis of the estimated lifetime. Results of this study suggest that a properly designed and fabricated AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell can be mechanically rugged and environmentally stable with projected lifetimes exceeding 100 years.

  13. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  14. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technology Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Acceleration NREL offers technology-specific assistance to federal and private industry to help address market barriers to sustainable energy technologies. Learn more ...

  15. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih; Rajan, Siddharth E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5??10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  16. GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) with In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prongjit, Patchareewan Pankaow, Naraporn Boonpeng, Poonyasiri Thainoi, Supachok Panyakeow, Somsak Ratanathammaphan, Somchai

    2013-12-04

    We present the fabrication of GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) substrates with inserted In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers. The samples are grown by droplet epitaxy using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The dependency of nanostructural and optical properties of GaP nanostructures on In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness is investigated by ex-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL). It is found that the characteristics of GaP ring-like structures on GaAs strongly depend on the In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness.

  17. Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J.; Charache, G.W.

    1997-05-01

    The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

  18. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  19. Ultrathin body GaSb-on-insulator p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors on Si fabricated by direct wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoyama, Masafumi Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Haruki

    2015-02-16

    We have realized ultrathin body GaSb-on-insulator (GaSb-OI) on Si wafers by direct wafer bonding technology using atomic-layer deposition (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and have demonstrated GaSb-OI p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (p-MOSFETs) on Si. A 23-nm-thick GaSb-OI p-MOSFET exhibits the peak effective mobility of ∼76 cm{sup 2}/V s. We have found that the effective hole mobility of the thin-body GaSb-OI p-MOSFETs decreases with a decrease in the GaSb-OI thickness or with an increase in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD temperature. The InAs passivation of GaSb-OI MOS interfaces can enhance the peak effective mobility up to 159 cm{sup 2}/V s for GaSb-OI p-MOSFETs with the 20-nm-thick GaSb layer.

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL Awarded $4.9 Million for Small...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awarded 4.9 Million for Small Business Voucher Pilot July 9, 2015 During the July 8 Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Southeast Regional Summit in Atlanta, Georgia, the...

  1. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, G.M.; Baca, A.G.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1998-09-08

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device is disclosed. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices. 5 figs.

  2. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Baca, Albert G.; Zutavern, Fred J.

    1998-01-01

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices.

  3. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN coremore » of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.« less

  4. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN core of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.

  5. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Etheridge, Joanne; Wong, Bryan M.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  6. InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot interdiffiusion induced by cap layer overgrowth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, J.; Babinski, A.; Czeczott, M.; Bozek, R.

    2000-06-28

    The effect of thermal treatment during and after growth of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures was studied. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of interacting QDs, as was expected from analysis of temperature dependence of QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. The results indicate that the effect of post-growth annealing can be similar to the effect of elevated temperature of capping layer growth. Both, these thermal treatments can lead to a similar In and Ga interdiffiusion resulting in a similar blue-shift of QD PL peak.

  7. Semi-automated lab-on-a-chip for dispensing GA-68 radiotracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, Irving

    2014-03-12

    We solved a technical problem that is hindering American progress in molecular medicine, and restricting US citizens from receiving optimal diagnostic care. Specifically, the project deals with a mother/daughter generator of positron-emitting radiotracers (Ge-68/Ga-68). These generator systems are approved in Europe but cannot be used in the USA, because of safety issues related to possible breakthrough of long-lived Ge-68 (mother) atoms. Europeans have demonstrated abilities of Ga-68-labeled radiotracers to image cancer foci with high sensitivity and specificity, and to use such methods to effectively plan therapy.The USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have taken the position that every patient administration of Ga-68 should be preceded by an assay demonstrated that Ge-68 breakthrough is within acceptable limits. Breakthrough of parent elements is a sensitive subject at the FDA, as evidenced by the recent recall of Rb-82 generators due to inadvertent administrations of Sr-82. Commercially, there is no acceptable rapid method for assaying breakthrough of Ge-68 prior to each human administration. The gamma emissions of daughter Ga-68 have higher energies than the parent Ge-68, so that the shielding assays typically employed for Mo-99/Tc-99m generators cannot be applied to Ga-68 generators. The half-life of Ga-68 is 68 minutes, so that the standard 10-half-life delay (used to assess breakthrough in Sr-82/Rb-82 generators) cannot be applied to Ga-68 generators. As a result of the aforementioned regulatory requirements, Ga-68 generators are sold in the USA for animal use only.The American clinical communitys inability to utilize Ga-68 generators impairs abilities to treat patients domestically, and puts the USA at a disadvantage in developing exportable products. The proposed DOE project aimed to take advantage of recent technological advances developed for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. Based on our experiences

  8. Structural and optical properties of InGaN--GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Hofling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmore » to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, μ-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.« less

  9. Structural and optical properties of InGaN--GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Hofling, S.; Worschech, L.; Grutzmacher, D.

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, μ-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  10. Structural and optical properties of InGaNGaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmoreto higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.less

  11. Investigation of surface-plasmon coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well with Ag nanostructures coated on GaN surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Liu, Bin E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Rong E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, JiangPing; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Zhang, Guogang; Chen, Peng; Ren, Fangfang; Zhao, Hong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-04-21

    Surface-plasmon (SP) coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structure is fabricated and investigated. The centre wavelength of 5-period InGaN/GaN MQW structure is about 620?nm. The intensity of photoluminescence (PL) for InGaN QW with naked Ag nano-structures (NS) is only slightly increased due to the oxidation of Ag NS as compared to that for the InGaN QW. However, InGaN QW with Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure can evidently enhance the emission efficiency due to the elimination of surface oxide layer of Ag NS. With increasing the laser excitation power, the PL intensity is enhanced by 25%53% as compared to that for the SiO{sub 2} coating InGaN QW. The steady-state electric field distribution obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is different for both structures. The proportion of the field distributed in the Ag NS for the GaN/Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure is smaller as compared to that for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure. As a result, the energy loss of localized SP modes for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure will be larger due to the absorption of Ag layer.

  12. Strain-compensated (Ga,In)N/(Al,Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells for improved yellow/amber light emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekhal, K.; Damilano, B. De Mierry, P.; Venngus, P.; Ngo, H. T.; Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Hussain, S.

    2015-04-06

    Yellow/amber (570600?nm) emitting In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaN-on- sapphire templates. When the (Al,Ga)N thickness of the barrier increases, the room temperature photoluminescence is red-shifted while its yield increases. This is attributed to an increase of the QW internal electric field and an improvement of the material quality due to the compensation of the compressive strain of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N QWs by the Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N layers, respectively.

  13. Energy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Energy Technologies Area (ETA) Building Technology & Urban Systems Energy Analysis & Environmental...

  14. Composition profiling of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Giddings, A. D.; Prosa, T. J.; Larson, D. J.; Mano, T.

    2014-10-13

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) is a growth method which can create III-V quantum dots (QDs) whose optoelectronic properties can be accurately controlled through the crystallisation conditions. In this work, GaAs/AlGaAs DE-QDs have been analyzed with the complimentary techniques of cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography. Structural details and a quantitative chemical analysis of QDs of different sizes are obtained. Most QDs were found to be pure GaAs, while a small proportion exhibited high intermixing caused by a local etching process. Large QDs with a high aspect ratio were observed to have an Al-rich crown above the GaAs QD. This structure is attributed to differences in mobility of the cations during the capping phase of the DE growth.

  15. High-field quasi-ballistic transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Tripachko, N. A.; Belyaev, A. E.; Vitusevich, S. A. Hardtdegen, H.; Lth, H.

    2014-02-17

    Mechanisms of electron transport formation in 2D conducting channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures in extremely high electric fields at 4.2?K have been studied. Devices with a narrow constriction for the current flow demonstrate high-speed electron transport with an electron velocity of 6.8??10{sup 7}?cm/s. Such a velocity is more than two times higher than values reported for conventional semiconductors and about 15% smaller than the limit value predicted for GaN. Superior velocity is attained in the channel with considerable carrier reduction. The effect is related to a carrier runaway phenomenon. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for GaN-based materials.

  16. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Nurgl Okur; Akdemir, Hande Gnay; ??can, ?mdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  17. On-sun concentrator performance of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Sinha, K.; McMahon, W.E.; Olson, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    The GaInP/GaAs concentrator device has been adapted for and tested in a prototype {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} concentrator power system. The device achieved an on-sun efficiency of 28% {+-} 1% in the range of approximately 200-260 suns with device operating temperatures of 38{degrees}C to 42{degrees}C. The authors discuss ways of further improving this performance for future devices.

  18. InGaAs/GaAs (110) quantum dot formation via step meandering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diez-Merino, Laura; Tejedor, Paloma

    2011-07-01

    InGaAs (110) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer very promising prospects as a material base for a new generation of high-speed spintronic devices, such as single electron transistors for quantum computing. However, the spontaneous formation of InGaAs QDs is prevented by two-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth on singular GaAs (110) substrates. In this work we have studied, by using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), the growth of InGaAs/GaAs QDs on GaAs (110) stepped substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the modification of the adatom incorporation kinetics to surface steps in the presence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen. The as-grown QDs exhibit lateral dimensions below 100 nm and emission peaks in the 1.35-1.37 eV range. It has been found that a step meandering instability derived from the preferential attachment of In adatoms to [110]-step edges relative to [11n]-type steps plays a key role in the destabilization of 2D growth that leads to 3D mound formation on both conventional and H-terminated vicinal substrates. In the latter case, the driving force for 3D growth via step meandering is enhanced by H-induced upward mass transport in addition to the lower energy cost associated with island formation on H-terminated substrates, which results in a high density array of InGaAs/GaAs dots selectively nucleated on the terrace apices with reduced lateral dimensions and improved PL efficiency relative to those of conventional MBE-grown samples.

  19. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav; Luque, Antonio

    2014-09-26

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  20. GaNPAs Solar Cells Lattice-Matched To GaP: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We propose the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct band-gaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We demonstrate the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and discuss the prospects for the development of monolithic high-efficiency multijunction solar cells based on silicon substrates.

  1. Exploration Technologies Technology Needs Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Exploration Technologies Needs Assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the program's research and development.

  2. Exploration Technologies - Technology Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Amanda I.; Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur; Reinhardt, Tim; Solomon, Samantha; James, Mallory

    2011-06-01

    This assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the Geothermal Technology Program's research and development.

  3. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  4. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  5. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Technologies Available for Licensing...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Workforce Development Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology ...

  7. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  8. Hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure with enhanced photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Hai-Ming; Liang, Baolai Simmonds, Paul J.; Juang, Bor-Chau; Yang, Tao; Young, Robert J.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-03-09

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) properties of a hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structure grown in a GaAs matrix by molecular beam epitaxy. This hybrid QD structure exhibits more intense PL with a broader spectral range, compared with control samples that contain only InAs or GaSb QDs. This enhanced PL performance is attributed to additional electron and hole injection from the type-I InAs QDs into the adjacent type-II GaSb QDs. We confirm this mechanism using time-resolved and power-dependent PL. These hybrid QD structures show potential for high efficiency QD solar cell applications.

  9. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Materials Technologies Ed Owens Jerry Gibbs Will Joost eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $36.9 M Lightweight Materials $28.0 M Values are FY14 enacted Propulsion Materials $8.9 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M

  11. Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003 Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003 The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a ...

  12. Study of the effects of GaN buffer layer quality on the dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, Shihyun; Zhu, Weidi; Dong, Chen; Le, Lingcong; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Kim, Byung-Jae; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J.; Lind, Aaron G.; Jones, Kevin S.; et al

    2015-04-21

    Here we studied the effect of buffer layer quality on dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility (HEMTs). AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures with 2 and 5 μm GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates from two different vendors with the same Al concentration of AlGaN were used. The defect densities of HEMT structures with 2 and 5 μm GaN buffer layer were 7 × 109 and 5 × 108 cm₋2, respectively, as measured by transmission electron microscopy. There was little difference in drain saturation current or in transfer characteristics in HEMTs on these two types of buffer. However, there was no dispersionmore » observed on the nonpassivated HEMTs with 5 μm GaN buffer layer for gate-lag pulsed measurement at 100 kHz, which was in sharp contrast to the 71% drain current reduction for the HEMT with 2 μm GaN buffer layer.« less

  13. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper; Reedy, Robert

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  14. Three-junction solar cells comprised of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs tandem cell mechanically stacked on a Si cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Y.; Tamura, K.; Watahiki, S.; Kitatani, T.; Ohtsuka, H.; Warabisako, T.

    1997-12-31

    Three-junction tandem solar cells were fabricated by mechanical stacking of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell and a Si cell. The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique was used for the thinning of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells. Both spectral responses of the GaInP top cell and the GaAs middle cell in the thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell were conserved. The Si cell performance has been improved by reducing the absorption loss in the GaAs substrate.

  15. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Ars, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  16. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  17. Integrating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor with Si: A comparative study of integration schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Nagaboopathy; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Manikant,; Soman, Rohith

    2015-10-07

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor stacks deposited on a single growth platform are used to compare the most common transition, AlN to GaN, schemes used for integrating GaN with Si. The efficiency of these transitions based on linearly graded, step graded, interlayer, and superlattice schemes on dislocation density reduction, stress management, surface roughness, and eventually mobility of the 2D-gas are evaluated. In a 500 nm GaN probe layer deposited, all of these transitions result in total transmission electron microscopy measured dislocations densities of 1 to 3 × 10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2} and <1 nm surface roughness. The 2-D electron gas channels formed at an AlGaN-1 nm AlN/GaN interface deposited on this GaN probe layer all have mobilities of 1600–1900 cm{sup 2}/V s at a carrier concentration of 0.7–0.9 × 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}. Compressive stress and changes in composition in GaN rich regions of the AlN-GaN transition are the most effective at reducing dislocation density. Amongst all the transitions studied the step graded transition is the one that helps to implement this feature of GaN integration in the simplest and most consistent manner.

  18. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  19. Available Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    application. Search Our Technologies submit Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Biotechnology Biotechnology Chemistry Chemistry Energy Energy High Performance Computing:...

  20. Licensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Licensing Technology Licensing Technology The primary function of Los Alamos Licensing Program is to move Los Alamos technology to the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. Our intellectual property may be licensed for commercial use, research applications, and U.S. government use. Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Although Los Alamos's primary mission is national security, our technologies

  1. Technology Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intellectual Property » Technology Opportunities Technology Opportunities We deliver innovation through an integrated portfolio of R&D work across our key national security sponsoring agencies, enhanced by the ideas developed through our strategic internal investments. Contact Business Development Team Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-9090 Email Periodically, the Laboratory notifies the public of technologies and capabilities that may be of interest. These technologies may

  2. Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As/GaAs(100) hetermostructures with anomalously high carrier mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seredin, P. V. Goloshchapov, D. L.; Lenshin, A. S.; Ternovaya, V. E.; Arsentyev, I. N. Nikolaev, D. N.; Tarasov, I. S.; Shamakhov, V. V.; Popov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    Structural and spectroscopic methods are used to study the epitaxial layers of n-type Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As solid solutions produced by the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method. It is shown that, when Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As solid solutions are doped with carbon to a level of (1.2–6.7) × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, the electron mobility is anomalously high for the given impurity concentration and twice exceeds the calculated value. It is assumed that the ordered arrangement of carbon in the metal sublattice of the solid solution leads to a change in the average distance between impurity ions, i.e., to an increase in the mean free path of the carriers and, consequently, in the carrier mobility. The observed effect has immediate practical importance in the search for various technological ways of increasing the operating speed of functional elements of modern optoelectronic devices. The effect of the anomalously high carrier mobility in the epitaxial layer of a heteropair opens up new opportunities for the development of new structures on the basis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As compounds.

  3. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT 1 Advanced Composites Materials and their Manufacture 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ................................................................................................ 2 4 2. Technology Potential and Assessment .................................................................................................. 4 5 2.1 The Potential for Advanced Composites for Clean Energy Application Areas

  4. Raman spectroscopy of InGaAs/GaAs nanoheterostructures δ-doped with Mn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plankina, S. M.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Kalentyeva, I. L.; Nezhdanov, A. V.; Chunin, I. I.; Yunin, P. A.

    2015-01-15

    The results of complex studies of InGaAs/GaAs nanoheterostructures δ-doped with Mn are reported. The structures are grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy in combination with laser deposition. By confocal Raman spectroscopy, it is shown that the low-temperature δ-doped GaAs cap layers are of higher crystal quality compared to uniformly doped layers. Scattering of light in the coupled phonon-plasmon mode is observed. The appearance of this mode is conditioned by the diffusion of manganese from the δ-layer. The thickness of the cap layer is found to be d{sub c} ≈ 9–20 nm, optimal for attainment of the highest photoluminescence intensity of the quantum well and the highest layer concentration of holes by doping with manganese.

  5. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  6. Electrical compensation by Ga vacancies in Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korhonen, E.; Tuomisto, F.; Gogova, D.; Wagner, G.; Baldini, M.; Galazka, Z.; Schewski, R.; Albrecht, M.

    2015-06-15

    The authors have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the vacancy defects in undoped and Si-doped Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. The results show that Ga vacancies are formed efficiently during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. Their concentrations are high enough to fully account for the electrical compensation of Si doping. This is in clear contrast to another n-type transparent semiconducting oxide In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where recent results show that n-type conductivity is not limited by cation vacancies but by other intrinsic defects such as O{sub i}.

  7. Graphene in ohmic contact for both n-GaN and p-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Shi, Lin; Xu, Gengzhao; Fan, Yingmin; Huang, Zengli; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Xu, Ke

    2014-05-26

    The wrinkles of single layer graphene contacted with either n-GaN or p-GaN were found both forming ohmic contacts investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The local IV results show that some of the graphene wrinkles act as high-conductive channels and exhibiting ohmic behaviors compared with the flat regions with Schottky characteristics. We have studied the effects of the graphene wrinkles using density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the standing and folded wrinkles with zigzag or armchair directions have a tendency to decrease or increase the local work function, respectively, pushing the local Fermi level towards n- or p-type GaN and thus improving the transport properties. These results can benefit recent topical researches and applications for graphene as electrode material integrated in various semiconductor devices.

  8. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  9. A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-05-30

    The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

  10. Analysis of defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy on high index GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2013-09-27

    The lattice defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy on GaAs 311B and GaAs 10A toward [110] were characterized and discussed by using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and on the basis of temperature dependence of the junction capacitances (C{sub J}). In one hand, GaAsN films grown on GaAs 311B and GaAs 10A showed n-type and p-type conductivities, respectively although the similar and simultaneous growth conditions. This result is indeed in contrast to the common known effect of N concentration on the type of conductivity, since the surface 311B showed a significant improvement in the incorporation of N. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of C{sub J} has shown that GaAs 311B limits the formation of N-H defects. In the other hand, the energy states in the forbidden gap of GaAsN were obtained. Six electron traps, E1 to E6, were observed in the DLTS spectrum of GaAsN grown on GaAs 311B, with apparent activation energies of 0.02, 0.14, 0.16, 0.33, 0.48, and 0.74 eV below the bottom edge of the conduction band, respectively. In addition, four hole traps, H1 to H4, were observed in the DLTS spectrum of GaAsN grown on GaAs 10A, with energy depths of 0.13, 0.20, 0.39, and 0.52 eV above the valence band maximum of the alloy, respectively. Hence, the surface morphology of the GaAs substrate was found to play a key factor role in clarifying the electrical properties of GaAsN grown by CBE.

  11. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J. ); Koploy, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  12. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J.; Koploy, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  13. Photoluminescence studies of individual and few GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Roberts, J.; Noori, Y. J.; Noble, M. T.; Krier, A.; Hayne, M.; Young, R. J.; Smakman, E. P.; Koenraad, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    We present optical studies of individual and few GaSb quantum rings embedded in a GaAs matrix. Contrary to expectation for type-II confinement, we measure rich spectra containing sharp lines. These lines originate from excitonic recombination and are observed to have resolution-limited full-width at half maximum of 200 ?eV. The detail provided by these measurements allows the characteristic type-II blueshift, observed with increasing excitation power, to be studied at the level of individual nanostructures. These findings are in agreement with hole-charging being the origin of the observed blueshift.

  14. Temperature dependency of the emission properties from positioned In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, T.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Forchel, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Igusa, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter we study the influence of temperature and excitation power on the emission linewidth from site-controlled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on nanoholes defined by electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching. We identify thermal electron activation as well as direct exciton loss as the dominant intensity quenching channels. Additionally, we carefully analyze the effects of optical and acoustic phonons as well as close-by defects on the emission linewidth by means of temperature and power dependent micro-photoluminescence on single quantum dots with large pitches.

  15. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-08-12

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport.

  16. Intermediate band solar cell simulation use InAs quantum dot in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendra P, I. B. Rahayu, F.; Sahdan, M. F.; Darma, Y.

    2015-04-16

    Intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) has become a new approach in increasing solar cell efficiency significantly. One way to create intermediate band is by proposing quantum dots (QD) technology. One of the important aspects in utilizing IBSC is the absorption of light. In this work we simulated the influence of QD arrangement in order to increase absorption coefficient and solar cell efficiency. We also simulated the influence of QD size to capture a wider light spectrum. We present a simple calculation method with low computing power demand. Results show that the increasing in quantum dot size can increase in capturing wider spectrum of light. Arrangement InAs QD in bulk material GaAs can capture wider spectrum of light and increase the absorption coefficient. The arrangement InAs QD 2 nm in GaAs bulk can increase solar cell efficiency up to 49.68%.

  17. Construction Begins on Idaho Site's Final Building for Waste Retrieval |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Atlanta (April 11, 2016) Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting in Atlanta (April 11, 2016) Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting in Atlanta Meeting Summary Consent-based siting public meeting in Atlanta. On April 11, 2016, the Department of Energy's consent-based siting initiative hosted a public meeting in Atlanta, Georgia at the Georgia Institute of Technology's Conference Center. The purpose of this meeting was to hear from the public and stakeholders on important

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Efficiency High-Density

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GaN-Based 6.6kW Bidirectional On-Board Charger for PEVs | Department of Energy High-Efficiency High-Density GaN-Based 6.6kW Bidirectional On-Board Charger for PEVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Efficiency High-Density GaN-Based 6.6kW Bidirectional On-Board Charger for PEVs Presentation given by Delta Products Corporation at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-efficiency

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives | Department of Energy Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives Presentation given by Wolfspeed at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer

  20. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  1. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  2. High-Efficiency GaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Cramer, C.; Olson, J. M.

    1996-09-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved efficiencies between 25.7-30.2%, depending on illumination conditions. The efficiencies are the highest confirmed two-terminal values measured for any solar cell within each standard illumination category. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance.

  3. High-efficiency GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K.A.; Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved new record efficiencies, specifically 25.7% under air-mass 0 (AM0) illumination, 29.5% under AM 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination, and 30.2% at 140-180x concentration under AM 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) illumination. These values are the highest two-terminal efficiencies achieved by any solar cell under these illumination conditions. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance. 31 refs.

  4. AlGaAs/InGaAlP tunnel junctions for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHARPS,P.R.; LI,N.Y.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Optimization of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs dual and GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge triple junction cells, and development of future generation monolithic multi-junction cells will involve the development of suitable high bandgap tunnel junctions. There are three criteria that a tunnel junction must meet. First, the resistance of the junction must be kept low enough so that the series resistance of the overall device is not increased. For AMO, 1 sun operation, the tunnel junction resistance should be below 5 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}-cm. Secondly, the peak current density for the tunnel junction must also be larger than the J{sub sc} of the cell so that the tunnel junction I-V curve does not have a deleterious effect on the I-V curve of the multi-junction device. Finally, the tunnel junction must be optically transparent, i.e., there must be a minimum of optical absorption of photons that will be collected by the underlying subcells. The paper reports the investigation of four high bandgap tunnel junctions grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  5. Multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells with Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelyanov, V. M. Kalyuzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Lantratov, V. M.

    2010-12-15

    Effect of subcell parameters on the efficiency of GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge tandem solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons at fluences of up to 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} has been theoretically studied. The optimal thicknesses of GaInP and GaInAs subcells, which provide the best photocurrent matching at various irradiation doses in solar cells with and without built-in Bragg reflectors, were determined. The dependences of the photoconverter efficiency on the fluence of 1-MeV electrons and on the time of residence in the geostationary orbit were calculated for structures optimized to the beginning and end of their service lives. It is shown that the optimization of the subcell heterostructures for a rated irradiation dose and the introduction of Bragg reflectors into the structure provide a 5% overall increase in efficiency for solar cells operating in the orbit compared with unoptimized cells having no Bragg reflector.

  6. Localized corrosion of GaAs surfaces and formation of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S.; Fraser, J.; Graham, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The present work deals with pitting corrosion of p- and n-type GaAs (100). Pit growth can be electrochemically initiated on both conduction types in chloride-containing solutions and leads after extended periods of time to the formation of a porous GaAs structure. In the case of p-type material, localized corrosion is only observed if a passivating film is present on the surface, otherwise -- e.g. in acidic solutions -- the material suffers from a uniform attack (electropolishing) which is independent of the anion present. In contrast, pitting corrosion of n-type material can be triggered independent of the presence of an oxide film. This is explained in terms of the different current limiting factor for the differently doped materials (oxide film in the case of the p- and a space charge layer in the case of the n-GaAs). The porous structure was characterized by SEM, EDX and AES, and consists mainly of GaAs. From scratch experiments it is clear that the pit initiation process is strongly influenced by surface defects. For n-type material, AFM investigations show that light induced roughening of the order of several hundred nm occurs under non-passivating conditions. This nm- scale roughening however does not affect the pitting process.

  7. Simulation of quantum dots size and spacing effect for intermediate band solar cell application based on InAs quantum dots arrangement in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendra, P. I. B. Rahayu, F. Darma, Y.

    2014-03-24

    Intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) has become a promising technology in increasing solar cell efficiency. In this work we compare absorption coefficient profile between InAs quantum dots with GaAs bulk. We calculate the efficiency of GaAs bulk and GaAs doped with 2, 5, and 10 nm InAs quantum dot. Effective distances in quantum dot arrangement based on electron tunneling consideration were also calculated. We presented a simple calculation method with low computing power demand. Results showed that arrangement of quantum dot InAs in GaAs can increase solar cell efficiency from 23.9 % initially up to 60.4%. The effective distance between two quantum dots was found 2 nm in order to give adequate distance to prevent electron tunneling and wave functions overlap.

  8. Photoluminescence from GaAs nanodisks fabricated by using combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GaAs nanodisks fabricated by using combination of neutral beam etching and atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy regrowth Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  9. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  10. Technology Partnering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transfer and Related Technology Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities Fiscal Years 2009-2013 Report to Congress May 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary The Report on Technology Transfer and Related Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities for Fiscal Year 2009-2013 is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act of 2000: It is

  11. Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology transfer Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government and research centers for their "uncommon creativity and initiative in conveying innovations from their facilities to industry and local government." Scientists and engineers from more than 650 federal government laboratories and research centers compete for the 30 awards presented each year.

  12. Atomic structure of defects in GaN:Mg grown with Ga polarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Tomaszewicz, T.; Zakharov, D.; Jasinski, J.; O'Keefe, M.A.; Hautakangas, S.; Laakso, A.; Saarinen, K.

    2003-11-25

    Electron microscope phase images, produced by direct reconstruction of the scattered electron wave from a focal series of high-resolution images, were used to determine the nature of defects formed in GaN:Mg crystals. We studied bulk crystals grown from dilute solutions of atomic nitrogen in liquid gallium at high pressure and thin films grown by the MOCVD method. All the crystals were grown with Ga-polarity. In both types of samples the majority of defects were three dimensional Mg-rich hexagonal pyramids with bases on the (0001) plane and six walls on {l_brace}11{und 2}3{r_brace} planes seen in cross-section as triangulars. Some other defects appear in cross-section as trapezoidal (rectangular) defects as a result of presence of truncated pyramids. Both type of defects have hollow centers. They are decorated by Mg on all six side walls and a base. The GaN which grows inside on the defect walls shows polarity inversion. It is shown that change of polarity starts from the defect tip and propagates to the base, and that the stacking sequence changes from ab in the matrix to bc inside the defect. Exchange of the Ga sublattice with the N sublattice within the defect leads to 0.6 {+-} 0.2{angstrom} displacement between Ga sublattices outside and inside the defects. It is proposed that lateral overgrowth of the cavities formed within the defect takes place to restore matrix polarity on the defect base.

  13. Fuels Technologies

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Displacement of petroleum n Approach n Example Project Accomplishments n Research Directions Fuels Technologies R&D Budget by Activities Major Activities FY 2007 ...

  14. Deep level defects in n-type GaAsBi and GaAs grown at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mooney, P. M.; Watkins, K. P.; Jiang, Zenan; Basile, A. F.; Lewis, R. B.; Bahrami-Yekta, V.; Masnadi-Shirazi, M.; Beaton, D. A.; Tiedje, T.

    2013-04-07

    Deep level defects in n-type GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} having 0 < x < 0.012 and GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at substrate temperatures between 300 and 400 Degree-Sign C have been investigated by Deep Level Capacitance Spectroscopy. Incorporating Bi suppresses the formation of an electron trap with activation energy 0.40 eV, thus reducing the total trap concentration in dilute GaAsBi layers by more than a factor of 20 compared to GaAs grown under the same conditions. We find that the dominant traps in dilute GaAsBi layers are defect complexes involving As{sub Ga}, as expected for MBE growth at these temperatures.

  15. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  16. Deep level centers and their role in photoconductivity transients of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratenko, S. V. Vakulenko, O. V.; Mazur, Yu. I. Dorogan, V. G.; Marega, E.; Benamara, M.; Ware, M. E.; Salamo, G. J.

    2014-11-21

    The in-plane photoconductivity and photoluminescence are investigated in quantum dot-chain InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. Different photoconductivity transients resulting from spectrally selecting photoexcitation of InGaAs QDs, GaAs spacers, or EL2 centers were observed. Persistent photoconductivity was observed at 80?K after excitation of electron-hole pairs due to interband transitions in both the InGaAs QDs and the GaAs matrix. Giant optically induced quenching of in-plane conductivity driven by recharging of EL2 centers is observed in the spectral range from 0.83?eV to 1.0?eV. Conductivity loss under photoexcitation is discussed in terms of carrier localization by analogy with carrier distribution in disordered media.

  17. NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-7353. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  18. Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co...

  19. Self-catalyzed growth of dilute nitride GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasanaboina, Pavan Kumar; Ahmad, Estiak; Li, Jia; Iyer, Shanthi; Reynolds, C. Lewis; Liu, Yang

    2015-09-07

    Bandgap tuning up to 1.3 μm in GaAsSb based nanowires by incorporation of dilute amount of N is reported. Highly vertical GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs core-shell configured nanowires were grown for different N contents on Si (111) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed close lattice matching of GaAsSbN with GaAs. Micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) revealed red shift as well as broadening of the spectra attesting to N incorporation in the nanowires. Replication of the 4K PL spectra for several different single nanowires compared to the corresponding nanowire array suggests good compositional homogeneity amongst the nanowires. A large red shift of the Raman spectrum and associated symmetric line shape in these nanowires have been attributed to phonon localization at point defects. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the dominance of stacking faults and twins in these nanowires. The lower strain present in these dilute nitride nanowires, as opposed to GaAsSb nanowires having the same PL emission wavelength, and the observation of room temperature PL demonstrate the advantage of the dilute nitride system offers in the nanowire configuration, providing a pathway for realizing nanoscale optoelectronic devices in the telecommunication wavelength region.

  20. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The cycled'' organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  1. DC characteristics of OMVPE-grown N-p-n InGaP/InGaAsN DHBTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, N.Y.; Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Xie, X.M.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.

    2000-01-04

    The authors demonstrate, for the first time, a functional N-p-n heterojunction bipolar transistor using a novel material, InGaAsN, with a bandgap energy of 1.2eV as the p-type base layer. A 300{angstrom}-thick In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As graded layer was introduced to reduce the conduction band offset at the p-type InGaAsN base and n-type GaAs collector junction. For an emitter size of 500 {mu}m{sup 2}, a peak current gain of 5.3 has been achieved.

  2. PRESENTATION TITLE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydroelectric Design Center "Leaders in Hydropower Engineering" 12 April 2016 Presentation ... Atlanta, GA BUILDING STRONG HYDROELECTRIC DESIGN CENTER 2 Items for Discussion ...

  3. QER- Comment of Stephen Arthur 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good morning, I simply was curious if the Atlanta, GA meeting on Business/Economic Development was still on schedule and going to take place?

  4. DOE Pens New Agreement with Southern Company to Test Advanced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Southern Company (Atlanta, Ga.) will test both pre- and post-combustion ... with DOE. The NCCC is equipped to test multiple slipstreams from diverse fuel ...

  5. Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: IEEE Sensors 2007, Atlanta, GA, United States, Oct 28 - Oct 31, 2007 ...

  6. A new pre-processing method for scanning X-ray microdiffraction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 2015 IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (BioCAS);Oct. 22-24, 205;Atlanta, GA Publisher: 2015 IEEE Biomedical ...

  7. ABSTRACT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Atlanta, GA, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. Beko, G., G. Clausen and C. J. Weschler (2008). "Sensory pollution from bag filters, ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States) Battelle Memorial Institute (United States) Bechtel Hanford Inc. (BHI),...

  9. Strain Effects in Raman Thermal Conductivity Measurements. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sciences Conference held October 9-11, 2012 in Atlanta, GA.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the Society of Engineering Sciences Conference held October 9-11, ...

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    Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States) Battelle Memorial Institute (United States) Bechtel...

  11. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 Atlanta, GA Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010 More Documents & Publications Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010 Methane...

  12. Industrial Feedstock Flexibility Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozokwelu, Dickson; Margolis, Nancy; Justiniano, Mauricio; Monfort, Joe; Brueske, Sabine; Sabouni, Ridah

    2009-08-01

    This report (PDF 649 KB) summarizes the results of the 2009 Industrial Feedstock Flexibility Workshop, which took place in Atlanta, GA on August 19-20, 2009.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... facilities (1) molybdenum 99 (1) monitoring (1) neutron detectors (1) Filter by ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... Filter Results Filter by Subject monitoring (4) nuclear fuel cycle and fuel materials (3) ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... Filter Results Filter by Subject safeguards (17) monitoring (16) nuclear fuel cycle and ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... gcep safeguards (1) iaea (1) load cell monitoring (1) mock feed and withdrawal (1) ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... (3) design (2) fissile materials (2) monitoring (2) nuclear fuels (2) performance (2) ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... and fuel materials (18) safeguards (16) monitoring (15) nuclear materials management (10) ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... system (1) hvac (1) hvac systems (1) monitoring (1) new construction (1) occupants (1) ...

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    Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project ... Filter Results Filter by Subject computers (1) continuous load cell monitoring (1) design ...

  1. DE-FE0009897 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA Background Fine-grained sediments host more than 90 percent of global gas hydrate accumulation. Yet hydrate formation in ...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: 13,051 lbs of Carpet Sent for Reuse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous shipments sent out for recycle were delivered to Interface Carpet in Atlanta, GA, where the manufacture has an extensive recycling program that recycles vinyl backed ...

  3. ORISE Resources: Population Monitoring in Radiation Emergencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Local Public Health Planners was released in April and presented at the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Preparedness Summit in Atlanta, Ga. ...

  4. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Involvement Training Conference (Pending requests: Cook, Lyons) August 4-6, 2015 Atlanta, GA www.epa.govciconferenc e NA Ohio EPA National Brownfields Conference (Pending ...

  5. ORISE: Research Participation Programs by Sponsor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graduates, and university faculty opportunities to participate in project-specific CDC research and current public health research initiatives at their facilities in Atlanta, Ga. ...

  6. The National Traffic Safety Summit Traffic Incident Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Mapping ) Deputy Sean Alexander, Houston County Sheriff's Office, (Metro Atlanta, GA) 1030 to 1200 Criminalistics: Using Crime Labs in your Investigations (Evidence ...

  7. Presentations - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conferences APS DPP 2009 Meeting, Atlanta, GA, November 2-6, 2009 Zane Taylor, Strategies for Observing Self-excitation in the Madison Dynamo Experiment Elliot Kaplan, Perturbative ...

  8. fe0013889-TEES | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performers Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA Background The experimental study of hydrate-bearing sediments has been hindered ...

  9. Other Participants 1993 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Downey High School , Modesto , CA Venice High School , Los Angeles , CA Walt Whitman High School , Bethesda , MD Westminster School , Atlanta , GA Woodbridge High School , Irvine

  10. Microsoft Word - Tribal Call Jan 17 Summary 1-25-07 wep

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) Meeting Jay reminded callers that the TEC meeting is scheduled for January 31-February 1 in Atlanta, GA. Tribal Topic Group ...

  11. 2015 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop

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    University Turbine Systems Research Workshop November 3-5, 2015 Accommodations Georgian Terrace Hotel 659 Peachtree Street, NE Atlanta, GA 30308 The Georgian Terrace Hotel will be...

  12. Keynote Address at MIT Energy Conference 2016 | Department of...

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    ... -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Keynote at the Sam Nunn Policy Forum in Atlanta, GA -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz Remarks to the National Coal Council -- As Delivered

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, ... Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric System Research Bartlesville Project Office, OK ...

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Volkswagen Group of America...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hills, MI; Golden, CO; Clearwater, FL; Buffalo Grove, IL; Davie, FL; Irving, TX; Livermore, CA; Atlanta, GA; Dublin, OH; Marlborough, MA; Renton, WA; Santa Monica, CA; Wheat ...

  15. DOE Recognizes Green Power Network Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today recognized five leading organizations for advancing the development and use of green energy. The five ...

  16. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killat, N. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Paskova, T.; Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 ; Evans, K. R.; Leach, J.; Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 ; Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D.

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  17. A monolithic white LED with an active region based on InGaN QWs separated by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F. Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Synitsin, M. A.; Sizov, V. S.; Zakgeim, A. L.; Mizerov, M. N.

    2010-06-15

    A new approach to development of effective monolithic white-light emitters is described based on using a short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice as a barrier layer in the active region of LED structures between InGaN quantum wells emitting in the blue and yellow-green spectral ranges. The optical properties of structures of this kind have been studied, and it is demonstrated that the use of such a superlattice makes it possible to obtain effective emission from the active region.

  18. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  19. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roll to Roll (R2R) Processing 1 Technology Assessment 2 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 5 1.1. Introduction to R2R Processing..................................................................................................... 2 6 1.2. R2R Processing Mechanisms ......................................................................................................... 3 7 2.

  20. Near-infrared electroluminescence and photo detection in InGaAs p-i-n microdisks grown by selective area growth on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjellman, Jon yvind; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2014-06-16

    Microselective-area growth of p-i-n InGaAs disks on (111) silicon by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is a promising technology for III/V-on-Si integration. As a proof-of-concept, room-temperature electroluminescence is reported from ensembles of p-i-n InGaAs-on-Si micro-disks. The observed spectrum shows peak luminescence at 1.78??m with a local maxima at 1.65??m. The disks are also shown to generate a measurable photo current when illuminated by infrared light with less energy than the silicon bandgap energy. This makes these InGaAs-on-Si disks a promising technology for monolithic integration of light sources and detectors with silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics for optical communication, sensing, and imaging.

  1. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: The Imery Group, Proud Green Home, Serenbe, GA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Serenbe, GA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you superior

  2. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  3. Photoeffects in WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.S.; Kang, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Photoeffects of a {ital p}-type GaAs coated with WO{sub 3} thin film have been investigated as a function of film thickness and photoresponse transients of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were studied. Also, these results were compared to those for a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. The photocurrent of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode depended on the film thickness of the WO{sub 3}, showing an optimum photon efficiency for specimens of 800 A thickness. This is due to the existence of an effective interface state within the band gap which reduces trapping of carriers and facilitates carrier movement. For an 800-A-thick WO{sub 3} thin film deposited {ital p}-GaAs photoelectrode, the photogenerated electrons were found to move to an electrolyte at a higher positive onset potential compared with that of single {ital p}-type GaAs, which was confirmed as a result of transient behavior. {ital I}{endash}{ital V} and {ital C}{endash}{ital V} characteristics of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were also compared with those of a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Paper Title (use style: paper title)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interconnection Risk Analysis through Distribution System Impact Signatures and Feeder Zones Matthew J. Reno, Kyle Coogan, Santiago Grijalva School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA, USA Robert J. Broderick, Jimmy E. Quiroz Photovoltaics and Distributed Grid Integration Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract- High penetrations of PV on the distribution system can impact the operation of the grid and may require interconnection

  5. Paper Title (use style: paper title)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Low-Voltage Circuit Topology Estimation using Smart Metering Data Jouni Peppanen, Santiago Grijalva School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA, USA Matthew J. Reno, Robert J. Broderick Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract- Operating distribution systems with a growing number of distributed energy resources requires accurate feeder models down to the point of interconnection. Many of the new resources are located in the

  6. Paper Title (use style: paper title)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secondary Circuit Model Generation Using Limited PV Measurements and Parameter Estimation Jouni Peppanen, Santiago Grijalva School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA, USA Matthew J. Reno, Robert J. Broderick Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract- This paper presents an approach for generating simplified secondary circuit models with limited SCADA and PV micro-inverter measurement data. The proposed method is computationally

  7. Race to Zero 2015 Analysis Excellence Award Presentations | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Analysis Excellence Award Presentations Race to Zero 2015 Analysis Excellence Award Presentations View the presentations for the 2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competition Analysis Excellence Award winners. HouZe GT - The Zeroes Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA The Corner House - [DAS]Haus Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada The Serrano House - Negawatt Team University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA The TownHauZ - Invent the Future Virginia Tech,

  8. SR0005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 7, 2000 Media Contact: Rick Ford (803) 725-2889 Invitation To Cover Environmental Management Science Program National Workshop April 24-27 Flag Ribbon Art NOTE TO EDITORS AND NEWS DIRECTORS The latest advances in environmental cleanup science and technology will be on display at the Department of Energy Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) National Workshop in Atlanta, GA on April 24-27 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza. Hosted by DOE's Office of Environmental Management, Office of

  9. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detailed Grid Integration Analysis of Distributed PV Jimmy Quiroz 1 and Matthew Reno 2 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, USA 2 Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332, USA Abstract - This paper shows examples of detailed PV grid integration analysis performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on two separate distribution feeders with two different simulated PV deployments for each. Through the use of advanced modeling tools and techniques, examples of

  10. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Inverter Capabilities for Mitigating Over-Voltage on Distribution Systems with High Penetrations of PV Matthew J. Reno 1,2 , Robert J. Broderick 2 , Santiago Grijalva 1 1 Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract - As the penetration level of PV on the distribution system grows, the current injection by PV can create over-voltage issues around the location of the interconnection of PV. Often, the voltage regulation in

  11. Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008 Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Patrick B.

    2009-06-19

    Presentation illustrating various technology commercialization opportunities and unexploited investment gaps for the Vehicle Technologies Program.

  12. Long-wavelength shift and enhanced room temperature photoluminescence efficiency in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs-based heterostructures emitting in the spectral range of 1.01.2??m due to increased charge carrier's localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryzhkov, D. I. Yablonsky, A. N.; Morozov, S. V.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a study of the photoluminescence (PL) temperature dependence in quantum well GaAs/GaAsSb and double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with different parameters of GaAsSb and InGaAs layers has been performed. It has been demonstrated that in double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, a significant shift of the PL peak to a longer-wavelength region (up to 1.2??m) and a considerable reduction in the PL thermal quenching in comparison with GaAs/GaAsSb structures can be obtained due to better localization of charge carriers in the double quantum well. For InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, an additional channel of radiative recombination with participation of the excited energy states in the quantum well, competing with the main ground-state radiative transition, has been revealed.

  13. Growth of GaN@InGaN Core-Shell and Au-GaN Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Aloni, Shaul; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Mokari, Taleb

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated a method to control the bandgap energy of GaN nanowires by forming GaN@InGaN core-shell hybrid structures using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Furthermore, we show the growth of Au nanoparticles on the surface of GaN nanowires in solution at room temperature. The work shown here is a first step toward engineering properties that are crucial for the rational design and synthesis of a new class of photocatalytic materials. The hybrid structures were characterized by various techniques, including photoluminescence (PL), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD).

  14. High-Efficiency Non-Polar GaN-Based LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Fini

    2010-11-30

    Inlustra Technologies with subcontractor U.C. Santa Barbara conducted a project with the principle goal of demonstrating high internal quantum efficiency blue (430 nm) and green (540nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on low-defect density non-polar GaN wafers. Inlustra pursued the fabrication of smooth thick a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as defect reduction techniques such as lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) to uniformly lower dislocation density in these films. Limited free-standing wafers were produced as well. By the end of the reporting period, Inlustra had met its milestone of dislocation reduction to < 5 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. Stacking faults were still present in appreciable density ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -1}), but were not the primary focus of defect reduction since there have been no published studies establishing their detrimental effects on LED performance. Inlustra's LEO progress built a solid foundation upon which further commercial development of GaN substrates will occur. UCSB encountered multiple delays in its LED growth and fabrication efforts due to unavoidable facilities outages imposed by ongoing construction in an area adjacent to the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) laboratory. This, combined with the large amount of ab initio optimization required for the MOCVD system used during the project, resulted in unsatisfactory LED progress. Although numerous blue-green photoluminescence results were obtained, only a few LED structures exhibited electroluminescence at appreciable levels. UCSB also conducting extensive modeling (led by Prof. Van de Walle) on the problem of non-radiative Auger recombination in GaN-based LED structures, which has been posited to contribute to LED efficiency 'droop' at elevated current density. Unlike previous modeling efforts, UCSB's approach was truly a first-principles ab initio methodology. Building on solid numerical foundations, the Auger recombination rates of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x

  15. Raman spectroscopy of GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrovolsky, A.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Sukrittanon, S.; Kuang, Y. J.; Tu, C. W.

    2014-11-10

    Raman spectroscopy is employed to characterize structural and phonon properties of GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. According to polarization-dependent measurements performed on single NWs, the dominant Raman modes associated with zone-center optical phonons obey selection rules in a zinc-blende lattice, confirming high crystalline quality of the NWs. Two additional modes at 360 and 397 cm{sup −1} that are specific to the NW architecture are also detected in resonant Raman spectra and are attributed to defect-activated scattering involving zone-edge transverse optical phonons and surface optical phonons, respectively. It is concluded that the formation of the involved defect states are mainly promoted during the NW growth with a high V/III ratio.

  16. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-μm transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2 ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75 kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  17. Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali Goswami, Srijit Ghosh, Arindam; Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Tripathi, Vikram; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

  18. Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-28

    The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

  19. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K.; Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huffaker, D. L.; Huyet, G.; Houlihan, J.

    2015-01-19

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures.

  1. Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

    2010-01-05

    We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

  2. Germanium subcells for multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Evstropov, V. V.; Lantratov, V. M.; Mintairov, S. A.; Timoshina, N. Kh.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Andreev, V. M.

    2010-11-15

    Photovoltaic converters based on n-GaInP/n-p-Ge heterostructures grown by the OMVPE under different conditions of formation of the p-n junction are studied. The heterostructures are intended for use as narrow-gap subcells of the GaInP/GaInAs/Ge three-junction solar cells. It is shown that, in Ge p-tn junctions, along with the diffusion mechanism, the tunneling mechanism of the current flow exists; therefore, the two-diode electrical equivalent circuit of the Ge p-n junction is used. The diode parameters are determined for both mechanisms from the analysis of both dark and 'light' current-voltage dependences. It is shown that the elimination of the component of the tunneling current allows one to increase the efficiency of the Ge subcell by {approx}1% with conversion of nonconcentrated solar radiation. The influence of the tunneling current on the efficiency of the Ge-based devices can be in practice reduced to zero at photogenerated current density of {approx}1.5 A/cm{sup 2} due to the use of the concentrated solar radiation.

  3. Thermal Design and Characterization of Heterogeneously Integrated InGaP/GaAs HBTs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choi, Sukwon; Peake, Gregory M.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Geib, Kent M.; Briggs, Ronald D.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Shaffer, Ryan A.; Clevenger, Jascinda; Patrizi, Gary A.; Klem, John F.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Flip-chip heterogeneously integrated n-p-n InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) with integrated thermal management on wide-bandgap AlN substrates followed by GaAs substrate removal are demonstrated. Without thermal management, substrate removal after integration significantly aggravates self-heating effects, causing poor I–V characteristics due to excessive device self-heating. An electrothermal codesign scheme is demonstrated that involves simulation (design), thermal characterization, fabrication, and evaluation. Thermoreflectance thermal imaging, electrical-temperature sensitive parameter-based thermometry, and infrared thermography were utilized to assess the junction temperature rise in HBTs under diverse configurations. In order to reduce the thermal resistance of integrated devices, passive cooling schemes assisted by structural modification, i.e.,more » positioning indium bump heat sinks between the devices and the carrier, were employed. By implementing thermal heat sinks in close proximity to the active region of flip-chip integrated HBTs, the junction-to-baseplate thermal resistance was reduced over a factor of two, as revealed by junction temperature measurements and improvement of electrical performance. In conclusion, the suggested heterogeneous integration method accounts for not only electrical but also thermal requirements providing insight into realization of advanced and robust III–V/Si heterogeneously integrated electronics.« less

  4. Transport properties of InGaAs/GaAs Heterostructures with {delta}-doped quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baidus, N. V.; Vainberg, V. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Pylypchuk, A. S. Poroshin, V. N.; Sarbey, O. G.

    2012-05-15

    The lateral transport of electrons in single- and double-well pseudomorphic GaAs/n-InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with quantum wells 50-100 meV deep and impurity {delta}-layers in the wells, with concentrations in the range 10{sup 11} < N{sub s} < 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, has been investigated. Single-well structures with a doped well at the center exhibit a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient and an increase in low-temperature electron mobility with an increase in the impurity concentration. The results obtained indicate that the impurity-band electron states play an important role in the conductivity of these structures. Involvement of the impurity band also allows to explain adequately the characteristics of the conductivity of double-well structures; in contrast to single-well structures, band bending caused by asymmetric doping is of great importance. The numerical calculations of conductivity within the model under consideration confirm these suggestions.

  5. Optical properties of multi-stacked InGaAs/GaNAs quantum dot solar cell fabricated on GaAs (311)B substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoji, Yasushi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-15

    Quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) comprised of 10 stacked pairs of strain-compensated InGaAs/GaNAs QD structure have been fabricated by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A homogeneous and high-density QD array structure with improved in-plane ordering and total density of {approx}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} has been achieved on GaAs (311)B grown at 460 Degree-Sign C after stacking. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of InGaAs/GaNAs QDSC increases in the longer wavelength range due to additive contribution from QD layers inserted in the intrinsic region. The short-circuit current density measured for QDSC is 17.2 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to 14.8 mA/cm{sup 2} of GaAs reference cell. Further, an increase in EQE due to photocurrent production by 2-step photon absorption has been observed at room temperature though it is still small at around 0.1%.

  6. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors A GaAlInP compound ...

  7. Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M.T.T., 60 (6) (2012) 3 Jon Ihlefeld, Sandia National Laboratories Electronic Materials ... Undoped GaN Undoped AlGaN Doped AlGaN 2D Electron Gas Enhancement Mode (nominally ...

  8. General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Confinement | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement

  9. Tag: technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tags

    technology<...

  10. Technology Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To reduce solar technology risks, DOE and its partners evaluate the performance and reliability of novel photovoltaic (PV) hardware and systems through laboratory and field testing. The focus of...

  11. Atlanta, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Energy Holdings Group formerly Xethanol Corporation Navajo Wind Energy Plum Combustion Radiance Solar Servidyne SilvaGas Corporation FERCO Enterprises Inc Solar Systems...

  12. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Atlanta

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    dispute system and process design consultations and training for resolving environmental and land disputes in Estonia, IsraelWest Bank, Nicaragua, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Germany. ...

  13. Defect reduction in epitaxial GaSb grown on nanopatterned GaAs substrates using full wafer block copolymer lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Smita; Liu, C.-C.; Nealey, P. F.; Kuech, T. F.; Kuan, T. S.; Babcock, S. E.; Park, J. H.; Mawst, L. J.

    2009-08-10

    Defect reduction in the large lattice mismatched system of GaSb on GaAs, {approx}7%, was accomplished using full wafer block copolymer (BCP) lithography. A self-assembled BCP mask layer was used to generate a hexagonal pattern of {approx}20 nm holes on {approx}40 nm centers in a 20 nm SiO{sub 2} layer. GaSb growth initially takes place selectively within these holes leading to a dense array of small, strain-relaxed epitaxial GaSb islands. The GaSb grown on the patterned SiO{sub 2} layer exhibits a reduction in the x-ray linewidth attributed to a decrease in the threading dislocation density when compared to blanket pseudomorphic film growth.

  14. Structural and emission properties of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots emitting at 1.3??m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldmann, Elias Jahnke, Frank; Paul, Matthias; Kettler, Jan; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Krause, Florian F.; Mller, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2014-10-13

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) emitting at 1.3??m under the influence of a strain-reducing InGaAs quantum well is presented. We demonstrate a red shift of 2040?nm observed in photoluminescence spectra due to the quantum well. The InGaAs/GaAs QDs grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy show a bimodal height distribution (1?nm and 5?nm) and indium concentrations up to 90%. The emission properties are explained with combined tight-binding and configuration-interaction calculations of the emission wavelengths in conjunction with high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations of QD geometry and indium concentrations in the QDs, which directly enter the calculations. QD geometries and concentration gradients representative for the ensemble are identified.

  15. Tritium Technology at CNL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Titanium Metal vapour deposition -17- UNRESTRICTED ILLIMIT *GaAs substrate *Large ... from these two samples Delamination of Titanium Metal -20- UNRESTRICTED ILLIMIT ...

  16. Effect of InGaAs interlayer on the properties of GaAs grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Li, Jingling; Guan, Yunfang; Wang, Wenliang; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting; Zhang, Xiaona; Zhang, Shuguang E-mail: mssgzhang@scut.edu.cn; Li, Guoqiang E-mail: mssgzhang@scut.edu.cn

    2014-11-21

    High-quality GaAs films have been epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrates by inserting an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As interlayer with proper In composition by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The effect of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As (0 < x < 0.2) interlayers on the properties of GaAs films grown on Si (111) substrates by MBE has been studied in detailed. Due to the high compressive strain between InGaAs and Si, InGaAs undergoes partial strain relaxation. Unstrained InGaAs has a larger lattice constant than GaAs. Therefore, a thin InGaAs layer with proper In composition may adopt a close lattice constant with that of GaAs, which is beneficial to the growth of high-quality GaAs epilayer on top. It is found that the proper In composition in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As interlayer of 10% is beneficial to obtaining high-quality GaAs films, which, on the one hand, greatly compensates the misfit stress between GaAs film and Si substrate, and on the other hand, suppresses the formation of multiple twin during the heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs film. However, when the In composition does not reach the proper value (∼10%), the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As adopts a lower strain relaxation and undergoes a lattice constant smaller than unstrained GaAs, and therefore introduces compressive stress to GaAs grown on top. When In composition exceeds the proper value, the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As will adopt a higher strain relaxation and undergoes a lattice constant larger than unstrained GaAs, and therefore introduces tensile stress to GaAs grown on top. As a result, In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As interlayers with improper In composition introduces enlarged misfit stress to GaAs epilayers grown on top, and deteriorates the quality of GaAs epilayers. This work demonstrates a simple but effective method to grow high-quality GaAs epilayers and brings up a broad prospect for the application of GaAs-based optoelectronic devices on Si substrates.

  17. Design of a GaAs/Ge solar array for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheiman, D.A.; Colozza, A.J.; Brinker, D.J.; Bents, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being proposed for many applications including surveillance, mapping and atmospheric studies. These applications require a lightweight, low speed, medium to long duration airplane. Due to the weight, speed, and altitude constraints imposed on such aircraft, solar array generated electric power is a viable alternative to air-breathing engines. Development of such aircraft is currently being funded under the Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is currently building a Solar Electric Airplane to demonstrate UAV technology. This aircraft utilizes high efficiency Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) GaAs/Ge space solar cells. The cells have been provided by the Air Force through the ManTech Office. Expected completion of the plane is early 1995, with the airplane currently undergoing flight testing using battery power.

  18. Design of a GaAs/Ge solar array for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheiman, D.A.; Brinker, D.J.; Bents, D.J.; Colozza, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being proposed for many applications including surveillance, mapping and atmospheric studies. These applications require a lightweight, low speed, medium to long duration airplane. Due to the weight, speed, and altitude constraints imposed on such aircraft, solar array generated electric power is a viable alternative to air-breathing engines. Development of such aircraft is currently being funded under the Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is currently building a Solar Electric Airplane to demonstrate UAV technology. This aircraft utilizes high efficiency Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) GaAs/Ge space solar cells. The cells have been provided by the Air Force through the ManTech Office. Expected completion of the plane is early 1995, with the airplane currently undergoing flight testing using battery power.

  19. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D ...

  20. Ferromagnetism in undoped One-dimensional GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeganathan, K. E-mail: jagan@physics.bdu.ac.in; Purushothaman, V.; Debnath, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-05-15

    We report an intrinsic ferromagnetism in vertical aligned GaN nanowires (NW) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy without any external catalyst. The magnetization saturates at ?0.75 emu/gm with the applied field of 3000 Oe for the NWs grown under the low-Gallium flux of 2.4 10{sup ?8} mbar. Despite a drop in saturation magnetization, narrow hysteresis loop remains intact regardless of Gallium flux. Magnetization in vertical standing GaN NWs is consistent with the spectral analysis of low-temperature photoluminescence pertaining to Ga-vacancies associated structural defects at the nanoscale.

  1. Characterization of Zns-GaP Naon-composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, V.

    1993-12-09

    It proved possible to produce consistent, high-quality nanocrystalline ZnS powders with grain sizes as small as 8 nm. These powders are nano-porous and are readily impregnated with GaP precursor, although inconsistently. Both crystal structure and small grain size of the ZnS can be maintained through the use of GaP. Heat treatment of the impregnated powders results in a ZnS-GaP composite structure where the grain sizes of the phases are on the order of 10--20 nm. Conventional powder processing should be able to produce optically dense ceramic compacts with improved mechanical properties and suitable IR transmission.

  2. High Voltage GaN Schottky Rectifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAO,X.A.; CHO,H.; CHU,S.N.G.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHYI,J.-I.; DANG,G.T.; HAN,JUNG; LEE,C.-M.; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; WILSON,R.G.; ZHANG,A.P.

    1999-10-25

    Mesa and planar GaN Schottky diode rectifiers with reverse breakdown voltages (V{sub RB}) up to 550V and >2000V, respectively, have been fabricated. The on-state resistance, R{sub ON}, was 6m{Omega}{center_dot} cm{sup 2} and 0.8{Omega}cm{sup 2}, respectively, producing figure-of-merit values for (V{sub RB}){sup 2}/R{sub ON} in the range 5-48 MW{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. At low biases the reverse leakage current was proportional to the size of the rectifying contact perimeter, while at high biases the current was proportional to the area of this contact. These results suggest that at low reverse biases, the leakage is dominated by the surface component, while at higher biases the bulk component dominates. On-state voltages were 3.5V for the 550V diodes and {ge}15 for the 2kV diodes. Reverse recovery times were <0.2{micro}sec for devices switched from a forward current density of {approx}500A{center_dot}cm{sup -2} to a reverse bias of 100V.

  3. Outdoor Testing of GaInP2/GaAs Tandem Cells with Top Cell Thickness Varied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, W. E.; Emergy, K. E.; Friedman, D. J.; Ottoson, L.; Young, M. S.; Ward, J. S.; Kramer, C. M.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we measure the performance of GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells under direct beam sunlight outdoors in order to quantify their sensitivity to both spectral variation and GaInP2 top-cell thickness. A set of cells with five different top-cell thicknesses was mounted on a two-axis tracker with the incident sunlight collimated to exclude all except the direct beam. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were taken throughout the course of several days, along with measurements of the direct solar spectrum. Our two major conclusions are: (1) GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells designed for either the ASTM G-173 direct (G-173D) spectrum or the "air mass 1.5 global" (AM1.5G) spectrum perform the best, and (2) cells can be characterized indoors and modeled using outdoor spectra with the same result. These results are equally valid for GaInP2/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells.

  4. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving ...

  5. Local Structures and Interface Morphology of InGaAsN Thin Films Grown on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Chen, J.G.; Geisz, J.F.; Huang, S.; Hulbert, S.L.; Jones, E.D.; Kao, Y.H.; Kurtz, S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Olson, J.M.; Soo, Y.L.

    1999-02-23

    The compound semiconductor system InGaAsN exhibits many intriguing properties which are particularly useful for the development of innovative high efficiency thin film solar cells and long wavelength lasers. The bandgap in these semiconductors can be varied by controlling the content of N and In and the thin films can yet be lattice-matched to GaAs. In the present work, x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) techniques have been employed to probe the local environment surrounding both N and In atoms as well as the interface morphology of InGaAsN thin films epitaxially grown on GaAs. The soft x-ray XAFS results around nitrogen K-edge reveal that N is in the sp{sup 3} hybridized bonding configuration in InGaAsN and GaAsN, suggesting that N impurities most likely substitute for As sites in these two compounds. The results of In K-edge XAFS suggest a possible trend of a slightly larger coordination number of As nearest neighbors around In atoms in InGaAsN samples with a narrower bandgap whereas the In-As interatomic distance remains practically the same as in InAs within the experimental uncertainties. These results combined suggest that N-substitution of the As sites plays an important role of bandgap-narrowing while in the meantime counteracting the compressive strain caused by In-doping. Grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) experiments verify that InGaAsN thin films can indeed form very smooth interfaces with GaAs yielding an average interfacial roughness of 5-20{angstrom}.

  6. Information Technology - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Technology

  7. Electrical spin injection using GaCrN in a GaN based spin light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D.; Adari, R.; Sankaranarayan, S.; Kumar, A.; Aldhaheri, R. W.; Hussain, M. A.; Balamesh, A. S.

    2013-12-09

    We have demonstrated electrical spin-injection from GaCrN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in a GaN-based spin light emitting diode (spin-LED). The remanent in-plane magnetization of the thin-film semiconducting ferromagnet has been used for introducing the spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic InGaN quantum well. The output circular polarization obtained from the spin-LED closely follows the normalized in-plane magnetization curve of the DMS. A saturation circular polarization of ?2.5% is obtained at 200?K.

  8. Microscopic, electrical and optical studies on InGaN/GaN quantum wells based LED devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutta, Geeta Rani; Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-02-21

    We report here on the micro structural, electronic and optical properties of a GaN-based InGaN/GaN MQW LED grown by the MOVPE method. The present study shows that the threading dislocations present in these LED structures are terminated as V pits at the surface and have an impact on the electrical and optical activity of these devices. It has been pointed that these dislocations were of edge, screw and mixed types. EBIC maps suggest that the electrically active defects are screw and mixed dislocations and behave as nonradiative recombinant centres.

  9. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  10. High-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser with enhanced broad spectrum of stimulated emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huolei; Yu, Hongyan; Zhou, Xuliang; Kan, Qiang; Yuan, Lijun; Wang, Wei; Pan, Jiaoqing; Chen, Weixi; Ding, Ying

    2014-10-06

    We report the demonstration of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) broadband stimulated emission laser with a structure that integrated a GaAs tunnel junction with two QW active regions. The laser exhibits ultrabroad lasing spectral coverage of ?51?nm at a center wavelength of 1060?nm with a total emission power of 790 mW, corresponding to a high average spectral power density of 15.5 mW/nm, under pulsed current conditions. Compared to traditional lasers, this laser with an asymmetric separate-confinement heterostructure shows broader lasing bandwidth and higher spectral power density.

  11. CX-002603: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DeKalb County/Metro Atlanta Alternative Fuel ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-000340: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DeKalb County/Metro Atlanta Alternative Fuel ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. Plasma technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlitz, H.G.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes the uses of plasma technology for the thermal destruction of hazardous wastes such as PCBs, dioxins, hydrocarbons, military chemicals and biological materials; for metals recovery from steel making dusts. One advantage of the process is that destruction of wastes can be carried out on site. Systems in several countries use the excess thermal energy for district heating.

  14. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  15. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  16. Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

  17. Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5,780 ...

  18. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell spherical quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emre Kavruk, Ahmet E-mail: aekavruk@gmail.com; Koc, Fatih; Sahin, Mehmet E-mail: mehsahin@gmail.com

    2013-11-14

    In this work, the optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell quantum dot heterostructure have been studied as a function of Al doping concentrations for cases with and without a hydrogenic donor atom. It has been observed that the absorption coefficient strength and/or resonant absorption wavelength can be adjusted by changing the Al content of inner-barrier and/or outer-barrier regions. Besides, it has been shown that the donor atom has an important effect on the control of the electronic and optical properties of the structure. The results have been presented as a function of the Al contents of the inner-barrier x and outer-barrier y regions and probable physical reasons have been discussed.

  19. Evaporation-based Ge/.sup.68 Ga Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Whipple, Richard E.; Grant, Patrick M.; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1981-01-01

    Micro concentrations of .sup.68 Ga in secular equilibrium with .sup.68 Ge in strong aqueous HCl solution may readily be separated in ionic form from the .sup.68 Ge for biomedical use by evaporating the solution to dryness and then leaching the .sup.68 Ga from the container walls with dilute aqueous solutions of HCl or NaCl. The chloro-germanide produced during the evaporation may be quantitatively recovered to be used again as a source of .sup.68 Ga. If the solution is distilled to remove any oxidizing agents which may be present as impurities, the separation factor may easily exceed 10.sup.5. The separation is easily completed and the .sup.68 Ga made available in ionic form in 30 minutes or less.

  20. CX-001791: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dekalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project (Atlanta)CX(s) Applied: A1, A7Date: 04/21/2010Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. Composition and Interface Analysis of InGaN/GaN Multiquantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B--Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures, 32(5):Article No....

  2. Enhanced optical property in quaternary GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chien-Hung Lee, Chien-Ping

    2014-10-21

    High quality GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy using proper interface treatments. By controlling the group-V elements at interfaces, we obtained excellent optical quality QWs, which were free from undesired localized trap states, which may otherwise severely affect the exciton recombination. Strong and highly efficient exciton emissions up to room temperature with a wavelength of 2.2 μm were observed. A comprehensive investigation on the QW quality was carried out using temperature dependent and power dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL emission intensity remains nearly constant at low temperatures and is free from the PL quenching from the defect induced localized states. The temperature dependent emission energy had a bulk-like behavior, indicating high quality well/barrier interfaces. Because of the uniformity of the QWs and smooth interfaces, the low temperature limit of inhomogeneous line width broadening is as small as 5 meV.

  3. Mismatch relaxation by stacking fault formation of AlN islands in AlGaN/GaN structures on m-plane GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Grzegory, Izabella

    2011-08-08

    We study the mismatch relaxation of 2-5 nm thin elongated AlN islands formed during growth of AlGaN on bulk m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy. The relaxation of these m-plane AlN layers is anisotropic and occurs through the introduction of stacking faults in [0001] planes during island coalescence, while no relaxation is observed along the perpendicular [1120] direction. This anisotropy in the mismatch relaxation and the formation of stacking faults in the AlN islands are explained by the growth mode of the AlN platelets and their coalescence along the [0001] direction.

  4. A new InGaP/GaAs tunneling heterostructure-emitter bipolar transistor (T-HEBT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui; Lee, Ching-Sung; Lour, Wen-Shiung; Ma, Yung-Chun; Ye, Sheng-Shiun

    2011-05-15

    Excellent characteristics of an InGaP/GaAs tunneling heterostructure-emitter bipolar transistor (T-HEBT) are first demonstrated. The insertion of a thin n-GaAs emitter layer between tynneling confinement and base layers effectivelty eliminates the potential spike at base-emitter junction and reduces the collector-emitter offset voltage, while the thin InGaP tunneling confinement layer is employed to reduce the transporting time across emitter region for electrons and maintain the good confinement effect for holes. Experimentally, the studied T-HEBN exhibits a maximum current gain of 285, a relatively low offset voltage of 40 mW, and a current-gain cutoff frequency of 26.4 GHz.

  5. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer has the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.

  6. Quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN quantum well on vicinal c-plane substrate for high emission intensity of green wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Pak, Y. Eugene; Park, Chang Young; Mishra, Dhaneshwar; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Hee Shim, Mun-Bo; Kim, Sungjin

    2015-05-14

    Electronic and optical properties of non-trivial semipolar AlInGaN/InGaN quantum well (QW) structures are investigated by using the multiband effective-mass theory and non-Markovian optical model. On vicinal c-plane GaN substrate miscut by a small angle (??GaN/InGaN system is shown to have ?3 times larger spontaneous emission peak intensity than the conventional InGaN/GaN system at green wavelength. It is attributed to much larger optical matrix element of the quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN system, derived from the reduction of internal electric field induced by polarizations. This effect exceeds the performance-degrading factor of smaller quasi-Fermi-level separation for the quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN system than that for the conventional InGaN/GaN system. Results indicate that the use of quaternary III-nitride QWs on vicinal substrates may be beneficial in improving the performance of optical devices emitting green light.

  7. The first principle study of Ni{sub 2}ScGa and Ni{sub 2}TiGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    zduran, Mustafa; Turgut, Kemal; Arikan, Nihat; ?yigr, Ahmet; Candan, Abdullah

    2014-10-06

    We computed the electronic structure, elastic moduli, vibrational properties, and Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa alloys in the cubic L2{sub 1} structure. The obtained equilibrium lattice constants of these alloys are in good agreement with available data. In cubic systems, there are three independent elastic constants, namely C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44}. We calculated elastic constants in L2{sub 1} structure for Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa using the energy-strain method. The electronic band structure, total and partial density of states for these alloys were investigated within density functional theory using the plane-wave pseudopotential method implemented in Quantum-Espresso program package. From band structure, total and projected density of states, we observed metallic characters of these compounds. The electronic calculation indicate that the predominant contributions of the density of states at Fermi level come from the Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The computed density of states at Fermi energy are 2.22 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, 0.76 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The vibrational properties were obtained using a linear response in the framework at the density functional perturbation theory. For the alloys, the results show that the L2{sub 1} phase is unstable since the phonon calculations have imagine modes.

  8. CSP technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  9. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodorou, Y.

    2007-02-15

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Efficient carrier relaxation and fast carrier recombination of N-polar InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Shih-Wei Liao, Po-Hsun; Leung, Benjamin; Han, Jung; Yang, Fann-Wei; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2015-07-28

    Based on quantum efficiency and time-resolved electroluminescence measurements, the effects of carrier localization and quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) on carrier transport and recombination dynamics of Ga- and N-polar InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported. The N-polar LED exhibits shorter ns-scale response, rising, delay, and recombination times than the Ga-polar one does. Stronger carrier localization and the combined effects of suppressed QCSE and electric field and lower potential barrier acting upon the forward bias in an N-polar LED provide the advantages of more efficient carrier relaxation and faster carrier recombination. By optimizing growth conditions to enhance the radiative recombination, the advantages of more efficient carrier relaxation and faster carrier recombination in a competitive performance N-polar LED can be realized for applications of high-speed flash LEDs. The research results provide important information for carrier transport and recombination dynamics of an N-polar InGaN/GaN LED.

  11. Effects of high-temperature AIN buffer on the microstructure of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coerekci, S.; Oeztuerk, M. K.; Yu, Hongbo; Cakmak, M.; Oezcelik, S.; Oezbay, E.

    2013-06-15

    Effects on AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor structure of a high-temperature AlN buffer on sapphire substrate have been studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques. The buffer improves the microstructural quality of GaN epilayer and reduces approximately one order of magnitude the edge-type threading dislocation density. As expected, the buffer also leads an atomically flat surface with a low root-mean-square of 0.25 nm and a step termination density in the range of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Due to the high-temperature buffer layer, no change on the strain character of the GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers has been observed. Both epilayers exhibit compressive strain in parallel to the growth direction and tensile strain in perpendicular to the growth direction. However, an high-temperature AlN buffer layer on sapphire substrate in the HEMT structure reduces the tensile stress in the AlGaN layer.

  12. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  13. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations on multi-valence-electron systems: Benchmarks on Ga-like ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Feng; Yang Jiamin; Wang Chuanke; Jing Longfei; Chen Shubo; Jiang Gang; Liu Hao; Hao Lianghuan

    2011-10-15

    High-accuracy calculations of term energies and wavelengths of resonance lines in Ga-like ions have been performed as benchmarks in the request for accurate treatments of relativity, electron correction, and QED effects in multi-valence-electron systems. The calculated energy levels are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and the experimentally compiled energy values of the National Institute for Standards and Technology wherever available. The calculated values including core-valence correction are found to be in good agreement with other theoretical and experimental values for low- to medium-Z ions. On the basis of our calculations, some theoretical wavelengths for Ga-like Rb vii to Mo xii are also given. For higher-Z ions, computed wavelengths are compared well with the experimental results [E. Traebert, J. Clementson, P. Beiersdorfer, J. A. Santana, and Y. Ishikawa, Phys. Rev. A 82, 062519 (2010), I. N Draganicet al., J. Phys. B 44, 025001 (2011)].

  14. p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode driven by three-dimensional hole gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Tiam Tan, Swee; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Ju, Zhengang; Zhang, Xueliang [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore) [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey); Department of Physics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey)

    2013-12-23

    Here, GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N heterostructures with a graded AlN composition, completely lacking external p-doping, are designed and grown using metal-organic-chemical-vapour deposition (MOCVD) system to realize three-dimensional hole gas (3DHG). The existence of the 3DHG is confirmed by capacitance-voltage measurements. Based on this design, a p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) driven by the 3DHG is proposed and grown using MOCVD. The electroluminescence, which is attributed to the radiative recombination of injected electrons and holes in InGaN/GaN quantum wells, is observed from the fabricated p-doping-free devices. These results suggest that the 3DHG can be an alternative hole source for InGaN/GaN LEDs besides common Mg dopants.

  15. Intermixing of InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Well Using Multiple Cycles Annealing Cu-doped SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongpinyo, V; Ding, Y H; Dimas, C E; Wang, Y; Ooi, B S; Qiu, W; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E M; Cole, G D; Bond, T C

    2008-06-11

    The authors investigate the effect of intermixing in InGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure using Cu-doped SiO{sub 2}. The incorporation of Cu into the silica film yields larger bandgap shift than typical impurity-free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) method at a lower activation temperature. We also observe enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) signal from the intermixed InGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure after being cycle-annealed at 850 C.

  16. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer hasmore » the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.« less

  17. Radiation damage of GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nishioka, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    1987-01-15

    1-MeV electron irradiation damages in GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates are examined for the first time. Damage constant for minority-carrier diffusion length in GaAs heteroepitaxial films on Si substrates is found to be the same as that in GaAs homoepitaxial films on GaAs substrates. This agreement suggests that GaAs/Si has the same defect introduction rate with radiation as GaAs/GaAs. The degradation of GaAs solar cells on Si with electron irradiation is less than that of GaAs solar cells on GaAs, because in the present, GaAs films on Si substrates have lower minority-carrier diffusion length compared to GaAs films on GaAs and these films are insensitive to radiation. The p/sup +/-p/sup +/-n AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cell with junction depth of about 0.3 ..mu..m is concluded to be useful for a high-efficiency and radiation-resistant solar cell fabricated on a Si substrate.

  18. Dislocation related droop in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes investigated via cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pozina, Galia; Ciechonski, Rafal; Bi, Zhaoxia; Samuelson, Lars; Monemar, Bo

    2015-12-21

    Today's energy saving solutions for general illumination rely on efficient white light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the output efficiency droop experienced in InGaN based LEDs with increasing current injection is a serious limitation factor for future development of bright white LEDs. We show using cathodoluminescence (CL) spatial mapping at different electron beam currents that threading dislocations are active as nonradiative recombination centers only at high injection conditions. At low current, the dislocations are inactive in carrier recombination due to local potentials, but these potentials are screened by carriers at higher injection levels. In CL images, this corresponds to the increase of the dark contrast around dislocations with the injection (excitation) density and can be linked with droop related to the threading dislocations. Our data indicate that reduction of droop in the future efficient white LED can be achieved via a drastic reduction of the dislocation density by using, for example, bulk native substrates.

  19. Radiation resistance of GaAs-GaAlAs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabbour, J.; Zazoui, M.; Sun, G.C.; Bourgoin, J.C.; Gilard, O.

    2005-02-15

    The variations of the optical and electrical characteristics of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser based on GaAs quantum wells have been monitored versus irradiation with 1 MeV electrons. The results are understood by the introduction of nonradiative recombination centers in the wells whose characteristics, capture cross section for minority carriers times their introduction rate, can be determined. A similar study performed for proton irradiation shows that the results can be explained in the same way when the introduction rate of the defects is replaced by the proton energy loss into atomic collisions. These results allow us to deduce the equivalence between electron and proton irradiations: A flux of 1 proton cm{sup -2} which loses an energy E{sub nl} (eV) into atomic collisions is equivalent to a fluence of about 9x10{sup -2} E{sub nl} cm{sup -2}, 1 MeV electrons.

  20. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT

  1. Laser Gain and Threshold Properties in Compressive-Strained and Lattice-Matched GaInNAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Modine, N.A.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1999-08-04

    The optical gain spectra for compressive-strained and lattice-matched GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of lasing threshold current density for different GAInNAs/GaAs laser structures.

  2. Theory of the electronic structure of dilute bismide and bismide-nitride alloys of GaAs: Tight-binding and k.p models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usman, Muhammad; Broderick, Christopher A.; O'Reilly, Eoin P.

    2013-12-04

    The addition of dilute concentrations of bismuth (Bi) into GaAs to form GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1?x} alloys results in a large reduction of the band gap energy (E{sub g}) accompanied by a significant increase of the spin-orbit-splitting energy (?{sub SO}), leading to an E{sub g} < ?{sub SO} regime for x ? 10% which is technologically relevant for the design of highly efficient photonic devices. The quaternary alloy GaBi{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1?x?y} offers further flexibility for band gap tuning, because both nitrogen and bismuth can independently induce band gap reduction. This work reports sp{sup 3}s* tight binding and 14-band k?p models for the study of the electronic structure of GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1?x} and GaBi{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1?x?y} alloys. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  3. Vertical zone melt growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.L.; Nordquist, P.E.R.; Gorman, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A Vertical Zone Melt (VZM) technique has been applied to the single crystal growth of GaAs. A pyrolytic boron nitride crucible and a (100) oriented seed were used along with liquid encapsulation by boric oxide. In the case of GaAs, the ampoule was pressurized with either argon or argensic vapor from elemental arsenic at pressures ranging from 1 to 2 atmospheres. A molten zone length of 22 mm gave a growth interface which is nearly flat and resulted in routine single crystal growth. Temperature gradients of 4{degrees}C/cm. and 9{degrees}C/cm. have produced dislocation densities of <1000/cm{sup 2} and 2000-5000/cm{sup 2} respectively for 34 mm diameter crystals of GaAs. Post growth cooling rates for GaAs have been 35, 160 and 500{degrees}C/hr. The cooling rate has been found to affect the number and size of arsenic precipitates and the EL2 concentration in the GaAs crystal. The effects of these and other growth parameters on the crystalline perfection and electrical properties of the crystals will be discussed.

  4. Antaki, G.A. 22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PIPES; DYNAMIC LOADS; ANALYTIC FUNCTIONS; ANALYTICAL SOLUTION; STRESSES; REGULATIONS; SEISMIC EFFECTS; STRESS ANALYSIS; EPRI; STANDARDS The paper addresses several analytical...

  5. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies Emerging Technologies R&D Program Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. karma.sawyer@ee.doe.gov BTO Goal Reduce building energy use by ...

  6. NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer October 25, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Did you know? The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer is the nationwide network of federal laboratories that provides the forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking laboratory mission technologies and expertise with the marketplace. In consonance with the Federal Technology Transfer Act of

  7. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies to serve as an overview of the HIT Catalyst program activities, including a summary of the selection process undertaken to identify, evaluate and prioritize the current HITs, descriptions of the technologies and markets for each HIT, and plans for deployment. High

  8. Structural transformations in amorphous ↔ crystalline phase change of Ga-Sb alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. G.; Sen, S.; Hung, I.; Gan, Z.; Kalkan, B.; Raoux, S.

    2013-12-21

    Ga-Sb alloys with compositions ranging between ∼12 and 50 at. % Ga are promising materials for phase change random access memory applications. The short-range structures of two such alloys with compositions Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86} and Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} are investigated, in their amorphous and crystalline states, using {sup 71}Ga and {sup 121}Sb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The Ga and Sb atoms are fourfold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} with nearly 40% of the constituent atoms being involved in Ga-Ga and Sb-Sb homopolar bonding. This necessitates extensive bond switching and elimination of homopolar bonds during crystallization. On the other hand, Ga and Sb atoms are all threefold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86}. Crystallization of this material involves phase separation of GaSb domains in Sb matrix and a concomitant increase in the Ga coordination number from 3 to 4. Results from crystallization kinetics experiments suggest that the melt-quenching results in the elimination of structural “defects” such as the homopolar bonds and threefold coordinated Ga atoms in the amorphous phases of these alloys, thereby rendering them structurally more similar to the corresponding crystalline states compared to the as-deposited amorphous phases.

  9. Nano-scale luminescence characterization of individual InGaN/GaN quantum wells stacked in a microcavity using scanning transmission electron microscope cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Gordon Mller, Marcus; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jrgen; Glauser, Marlene; Carlin, Jean-Franois; Cosendey, Gatien; Butt, Raphal; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    Using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy directly performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope at liquid helium temperatures, the optical and structural properties of a 62 InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well embedded in an AlInN/GaN based microcavity are investigated at the nanometer scale. We are able to spatially resolve a spectral redshift between the individual quantum wells towards the surface. Cathodoluminescence spectral linescans allow directly visualizing the critical layer thickness in the quantum well stack resulting in the onset of plastic relaxation of the strained InGaN/GaN system.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle ... FY14EDTAnnualReport.pdf (15.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and ...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will ...

  13. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  14. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  15. NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Ombuds NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to help resolve issues and concerns regarding the laboratory's technology partnership,...

  16. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szyszka, A. E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-28

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated thatwith respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBRthe insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  17. Highly transparent ammonothermal bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, WK; Ehrentraut, D; Downey, BC; Kamber, DS; Pakalapati, RT; Do Yoo, H; D'Evelyn, MP

    2014-10-01

    A novel apparatus has been employed to grow ammonothermal (0001) gallium nitride (GaN) with diameters up to 2 in The crystals have been characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and optical spectroscopy. High crystallinity GaN with FWHM values about 20-50 arcsec and dislocation densities below 1 x 10(5) cm(-2) have been obtained. High optical transmission was achieved with an optical absorption coefficient below 1 cm(-1) at a wavelength of 450 nm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Graphene/GaN diodes for ultraviolet and visible photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Fang; Chen, Shao-Wen; Meng, Jie; Tse, Geoffrey; Fu, Xue-Wen; Xu, Fu-Jun [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Bo; Liao, Zhi-Min, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn; Yu, Da-Peng, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2014-08-18

    The Schottky diodes based on graphene/GaN interface are fabricated and demonstrated for the dual-wavelength photodetection of ultraviolet (UV) and green lights. The physical mechanisms of the photoelectric response of the diodes with different light wavelengths are different. For UV illumination, the photo-generated carriers lower the Schottky barrier and increase the photocurrent. For green light illumination, as the photon energy is smaller than the bandgap of GaN, the hot electrons excited in graphene via internal photoemission are responsible for the photoelectric response. Using graphene as a transparent electrode, the diodes show a ?mS photoresponse, providing an alternative route toward multi-wavelength photodetectors.

  19. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  20. Electronic contribution to friction on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, UC Berkeley; Dept. of Materials Sciences and Engineering, UC Berkeley; Salmeron, Miquel; Qi, Yabing; Park, J.Y.; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-15

    The electronic contribution to friction at semiconductor surfaces was investigated by using a Pt-coated tip with 50nm radius in an atomic force microscope sliding against an n-type GaAs(100) substrate. The GaAs surface was covered by an approximately 1 nm thick oxide layer. Charge accumulation or depletion was induced by the application of forward or reverse bias voltages. We observed a substantial increase in friction force in accumulation (forward bias) with respect to depletion (reverse bias). We propose a model based on the force exerted by the trapped charges that quantitatively explains the experimental observations of excess friction.

  1. Polycrystalline MBE-grown GaAs for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Al-Jassim, M.; Jones, K.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.

    1997-02-01

    This paper will discuss initial studies of thin-film GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy for use in developing a thin-film GaAs solar cell. Photocurrent and photoluminescence intensity are related to the material morphology as a function of growth conditions. Growth temperature and V/III ratio have a dramatic effect on the photocurrent. However, it seems likely that even after optimizing such growth parameters, it will be necessary to provide substrates that can provide templates to enhance grain size from the start of thin-film growth. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Polycrystalline MBE-grown GaAs for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Al-Jassim, M.; Jones, K.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.

    1997-02-15

    This paper will discuss initial studies of thin-film GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy for use in developing a thin-film GaAs solar cell. Photocurrent and photoluminescence intensity are related to the material morphology as a function of growth conditions. Growth temperature and V/III ratio have a dramatic effect on the photocurrent. However, it seems likely that even after optimizing such growth parameters, it will be necessary to provide substrates that can provide templates to enhance grain size from the start of thin-film growth.

  3. Enhanced sheet carrier densities in polarization controlled AlInN/AlN/GaN/InGaN field-effect transistor on Si (111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennig, J. Dadgar, A.; Witte, H.; Bläsing, J.; Lesnik, A.; Strittmatter, A.; Krost, A.

    2015-07-15

    We report on GaN based field-effect transistor (FET) structures exhibiting sheet carrier densities of n = 2.9 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} for high-power transistor applications. By grading the indium-content of InGaN layers grown prior to a conventional GaN/AlN/AlInN FET structure control of the channel width at the GaN/AlN interface is obtained. The composition of the InGaN layer was graded from nominally x{sub In} = 30 % to pure GaN just below the AlN/AlInN interface. Simulations reveal the impact of the additional InGaN layer on the potential well width which controls the sheet carrier density within the channel region of the devices. Benchmarking the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN/AlN/Al{sub 0.87}In{sub 0.13}N based FETs against GaN/AlN/AlInN FET reference structures we found increased maximum current densities of I{sub SD} = 1300 mA/mm (560 mA/mm). In addition, the InGaN layer helps to achieve broader transconductance profiles as well as reduced leakage currents.

  4. Strain relaxation in GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N superlattices grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotsar, Y.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Das, A.; Monroy, E.; Sarigiannidou, E.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the misfit relaxation process in GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.44) superlattices (SL) deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The SLs under consideration were designed to achieve intersubband absorption in the mid-infrared spectral range. We have considered the case of growth on GaN (tensile stress) and on AlGaN (compressive stress) buffer layers, both deposited on GaN-on-sapphire templates. Using GaN buffer layers, the SL remains almost pseudomorphic for x = 0.1, 0.3, with edge-type threading dislocation densities below 9 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} to 2 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. Increasing the Al mole fraction to 0.44, we observe an enhancement of misfit relaxation resulting in dislocation densities above 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. In the case of growth on AlGaN, strain relaxation is systematically stronger, with the corresponding increase in the dislocation density. In addition to the average relaxation trend of the SL, in situ measurements indicate a periodic fluctuation of the in-plane lattice parameter, which is explained by the different elastic response of the GaN and AlGaN surfaces to the Ga excess at the growth front. The results are compared with GaN/AlN SLs designed for near-infrared intersubband absorption.

  5. Alloy inhomogeneity and carrier localization in AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks in nanowires with 240350?nm emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himwas, C.; Hertog, M. den; Dang, Le Si; Songmuang, R.; Monroy, E.

    2014-12-15

    We present structural and optical studies of AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks (NDs) in nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The Al-Ga intermixing at Al(Ga)N/GaN interfaces and the chemical inhomogeneity in AlGaN NDs evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy are attributed to the strain relaxation process. This interpretation is supported by the three-dimensional strain distribution calculated by minimizing the elastic energy in the structure. The alloy inhomogeneity increases with the Al content, leading to enhanced carrier localization signatures in the luminescence characteristics, i.e., red shift of the emission, s-shaped temperature dependence, and linewidth broadening. Despite these effects, the emission energy of AlGaN/AlN NDs can be tuned in the 240350?nm range with internal quantum efficiencies around 30%.

  6. Characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors with triple delta-doped sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Kuei-Yi; Chiang, Meng-Hsueh Cheng, Shiou-Ying; Liu, Wen-Chau

    2012-02-15

    Fundamental and insightful characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs double channel pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (DCPHEMTs) with graded and uniform triple {delta}-doped sheets are coomprehensively studied and demonstrated. To gain physical insight, band diagrams, carrier densities, and direct current characteristics of devices are compared and investigated based on the 2D semiconductor simulator, Atlas. Due to uniform carrier distribution and high electron density in the double InGaAs channel, the DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped sheets exhibits better transport properties, higher and linear transconductance, and better drain current capability as compared with the uniformly triple {delta}-doped counterpart. The DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped structure is fabricated and tested, and the experimental data are found to be in good agreement with simulated results.

  7. High-performance broadband optical coatings on InGaN/GaN solar cells for multijunction device integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, N. G. Farrell, R. M.; Iza, M.; Speck, J. S.; Perl, E. E.; Keller, S.; Bowers, J. E.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a bulk (0001) substrate with high-performance broadband optical coatings to improve light absorption. A front-side anti-reflective coating and a back-side dichroic mirror were designed to minimize front surface reflections across a broad spectral range and maximize rear surface reflections only in the spectral range absorbed by the InGaN, making the cells suitable for multijunction solar cell integration. Application of optical coatings increased the peak external quantum efficiency by 56% (relative) and conversion efficiency by 37.5% (relative) under 1 sun AM0 equivalent illumination.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of a Single Hole Transistor in p-type GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Lisa A; Reno, John L.; Hargett, Terry W.

    2015-09-01

    Most spin qubit research to date has focused on manipulating single electron spins in quantum dots. However, hole spins are predicted to have some advantages over electron spins, such as reduced coupling to host semiconductor nuclear spins and the ability to control hole spins electrically using the large spin-orbit interaction. Building on recent advances in fabricating high-mobility 2D hole systems in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures at Sandia, we fabricate and characterize single hole transistors in GaAs. We demonstrate p-type double quantum dot devices with few-hole occupation, which could be used to study the physics of individual hole spins and control over coupling between hole spins, looking towards eventual applications in quantum computing. Intentionally left blank

  9. Terahertz intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, C.; Malis, O.; Shao, J.; Shirazi-HD, M.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate THz intersubband absorption (15.6–26.1 meV) in m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells. We find a trend of decreasing peak energy with increasing quantum well width, in agreement with theoretical expectations. However, a blue-shift of the transition energy of up to 14 meV was observed relative to the calculated values. This blue-shift is shown to decrease with decreasing charge density and is, therefore, attributed to many-body effects. Furthermore, a ∼40% reduction in the linewidth (from roughly 8 to 5 meV) was obtained by reducing the total sheet density and inserting undoped AlGaN layers that separate the wavefunctions from the ionized impurities in the barriers.

  10. Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped field-effect transistor on GaAs (100) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jingyun; Si, Mengwei; Wu, Heng; Ye, Peide D.; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G.; Shao, Jiayi; Manfra, Michael J.

    2015-02-16

    Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (WaveFETs) are demonstrated using atomic-layer epitaxy of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate dielectric on (111)A nano-facets formed on a GaAs (100) substrate. The wave-shaped nano-facets, which are desirable for the device on-state and off-state performance, are realized by lithographic patterning and anisotropic wet etching with optimized geometry. A well-behaved 1 μm gate length GaAs WaveFET shows a maximum drain current of 64 mA/mm, a subthreshold swing of 135 mV/dec, and an I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio of greater than 10{sup 7}.

  11. Degradation of InGaN/GaN laser diodes investigated by micro-cathodoluminescence and micro-photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meneghini, M. Carraro, S.; Meneghesso, G.; Trivellin, N.; Zanoni, E.; Rossi, F.; Salviati, G.; Schade, L.; Karunakaran, M. A.; Schwarz, U. T.

    2013-12-02

    We present an investigation of the degradation of InGaN/GaN laser diodes grown on a GaN substrate. The results indicate that: (i) Ageing induces a significant increase in the threshold current (Ith) of the lasers, which is attributed to an increase in non-radiative recombination; (ii) Ith increase is correlated to a decrease in the micro-cathodoluminescence signal measured (after the removal of the top metallization) in the region under the ridge; (iii) micro-photoluminescence measurements indicate that constant current stress increases non-radiative recombination within the quantum wells (and not only within the barriers), and induces an increase in the emission wavelength of the degraded region.

  12. Strong enhancement of terahertz emission from GaAs in InAs/GaAs quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estacio, Elmer; Pham, Minh Hong; Takatori, Satoru; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Somintac, Armando; Defensor, Michael; Awitan, Fritz Christian B.; Jaculbia, Rafael B.; Salvador, Arnel; Garcia, Alipio

    2009-06-08

    We report on the intense terahertz emission from InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Results reveal that the QD sample emission was as high as 70% of that of a p-type InAs wafer, the most intense semiconductor emitter to date. Excitation wavelength studies showed that the emission was due to absorption in strained undoped GaAs, and corresponds to a two order-of-magnitude enhancement. Moreover, it was found that multilayer QDs emit more strongly compared with a single layer QD sample. At present, we ascribe the intense radiation to huge strain fields at the InAs/GaAs interface.

  13. Current transient spectroscopy for trapping analysis on Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J. Groeseneken, G.; Stoffels, S.; Lenci, S.; Venegas, R.; Decoutere, S.; Bakeroot, B.

    2015-02-23

    This paper presents a combined technique of high voltage off-state stress and current transient measurements to investigate the trapping/de-trapping characteristics of Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes. The device features a symmetric three-terminal structure with a central anode contact surrounded by two separate cathodes. Under the diode off-state stress conditions, the two separate cathodes were electrically shorted. The de-trapping dynamics was studied by monitoring the recovery of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) current at different temperatures by applying 0.5?V at cathode 2 while grounding cathode 1. During the recovery, the anode contact acts as a sensor of changes in diode leakage current. This leakage variation was found to be mainly due to the barrier height variation. With this method, the energy level and capture cross section of different traps in the AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode can be extracted. Furthermore, the physical location of different trapping phenomena is indicated by studying the variation of the diode leakage current during the recovery. We have identified two distinct trapping mechanisms: (i) electron trapping at the AlGaN surface in the vicinity of the Schottky contact which results in the leakage reduction (barrier height ?{sub B} increase) together with R{sub ON} degradation; (ii) the electron trapping in the GaN channel layer which partially depletes the 2DEG. The physical origin of the two different traps is discussed in the text.

  14. Emission spectra of a laser based on an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolev, M. M. Buyalo, M. S.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Zolotareva, R. V.; Vasil’ev, A. P.; Ustinov, V. M.; Portnoi, E. L.

    2015-10-15

    The spectral characteristics of a laser with an active region based on a ten-layer system of In(Ga)As/GaAs vertically correlated quantum dots with 4.5-nm GaAs spacer layers between InAs quantum dots are studied under the conditions of spontaneous and stimulated emission, depending on the current and the duration of pump pulses. Data obtained by transmission electron microscopy and electroluminescence and absorption polarization anisotropy measurements make it possible to demonstrate that the investigated system of tunnel-coupled InAs quantum dots separated by thin GaAs barriers represents a quantum-dot superlattice. With an increase in the laser pump current, the electroluminescence intensity increases linearly and the spectral position of the electroluminescence maximum shifts to higher energies, which is caused by the dependence of the miniband density-of-states distribution on the pump current. Upon exceeding the threshold current, multimode lasing via the miniband ground state is observed. One of the lasing modes can be attributed to the zero-phonon line, and the other is determined by the longitudinal-optical phonon replica of quantum-dot emission. The results obtained give evidence that, under conditions of the laser pumping of an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice, strong coupling between the discrete electron states in the miniband and optical phonons takes place. This leads to the formation of quantum-dot polarons, resulting from the resonant mixing of electronic states whose energy separation is comparable to the optical-phonon energy.

  15. InGaAs/GaAsP strain balanced multi-quantum wires grown on misoriented GaAs substrates for high efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-lvarez, D.; Thomas, T.; Fhrer, M.; Hylton, N. P.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Lackner, D.; Philipps, S. P.; Bett, A. W.; Sodabanlu, H.; Fujii, H.; Watanabe, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Nasi, L.; Campanini, M.

    2014-08-25

    Quantum wires (QWRs) form naturally when growing strain balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells (MQW) on GaAs [100] 6 misoriented substrates under the usual growth conditions. The presence of wires instead of wells could have several unexpected consequences for the performance of the MQW solar cells, both positive and negative, that need to be assessed to achieve high conversion efficiencies. In this letter, we study QWR properties from the point of view of their performance as solar cells by means of transmission electron microscopy, time resolved photoluminescence and external quantum efficiency (EQE) using polarised light. We find that these QWRs have longer lifetimes than nominally identical QWs grown on exact [100] GaAs substrates, of up to 1??s, at any level of illumination. We attribute this effect to an asymmetric carrier escape from the nanostructures leading to a strong 1D-photo-charging, keeping electrons confined along the wire and holes in the barriers. In principle, these extended lifetimes could be exploited to enhance carrier collection and reduce dark current losses. Light absorption by these QWRs is 1.6 times weaker than QWs, as revealed by EQE measurements, which emphasises the need for more layers of nanostructures or the use light trapping techniques. Contrary to what we expected, QWR show very low absorption anisotropy, only 3.5%, which was the main drawback a priori of this nanostructure. We attribute this to a reduced lateral confinement inside the wires. These results encourage further study and optimization of QWRs for high efficiency solar cells.

  16. Airports & Lodging | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Airports and Lodging AIRPORTS Augusta, GA Augusta Regional Airport (Bush Field) - closest commercial airport; Delta and U.S. Express. Daniel Field - private planes, rentals, or chartered flights. Columbia, SC Columbia Metropolitan Airport - all major carriers; 1.5-2h drive to SREL. Atlanta, GA Hartsfield Airport - all major carriers; 2.5-3 hour drive from Atlanta, GA, to Aiken, SC. LODGING No lodging is available at SREL. However, hotels and motels are available in Aiken, SC, and Augusta, GA.

  17. Characteristics of stress-induced defects under positive bias in high-k/InGaAs stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, F. Winter, R.; Krylov, I.; Eizenberg, M.

    2014-06-23

    The introduction of InGaAs as a channel material for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology presents major challenges in terms of the characterization of the various defects that affect the performance and reliability. Understanding the generation of defects by constant voltage stresses is crucial in terms of their concentration profiles and energy levels. In particular, we want to understand the real nature of the defects responsible for the dispersion of C-V in strong accumulation. Here, we show that the degradation under positive bias of metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/n-InGaAs capacitors reveals two contributions depending on the temperature that affects the C-V curves in a different way. Based on features of stressed C-V curves, it is possible to estimate the onset point of the distribution of border traps near the midgap condition. The results suggest that these defects are strongly related to the characteristics of the InGaAs substrate.

  18. Defect-Reduction Mechanism for Improving Radiative Efficiency in InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes using InGaN Underlayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x~0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode(LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than theLED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This, then, suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resultedmore » from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Furthermore, quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.« less

  19. Excitonic transitions in highly efficient (GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb) type-II quantum-well structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gies, S.; Kruska, C.; Berger, C.; Hens, P.; Fuchs, C.; Rosemann, N. W.; Veletas, J.; Stolz, W.; Koch, S. W.; Heimbrodt, W.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.

    2015-11-02

    The excitonic transitions of the type-II (GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb) gain medium of a “W”-laser structure are characterized experimentally by modulation spectroscopy and analyzed using microscopic quantum theory. On the basis of the very good agreement between the measured and calculated photoreflectivity, the type-I or type-II character of the observable excitonic transitions is identified. Whereas the energetically lowest three transitions exhibit type-II character, the subsequent energetically higher transitions possess type-I character with much stronger dipole moments. Despite the type-II character, the quantum-well structure exhibits a bright luminescence.

  20. Properties of H, O and C in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The electrical properties of the light ion impurities H, O and C in GaN have been examined in both as-grown and implanted material. H is found to efficiently passivate acceptors such as Mg, Ca and C. Reactivation occurs at {ge} 450 C and is enhanced by minority carrier injection. The hydrogen does not leave the GaN crystal until > 800 C, and its diffusivity is relatively high ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 2}/s) even at low temperatures (< 200 C) during injection by wet etching, boiling in water or plasma exposure. Oxygen shows a low donor activation efficiency when implanted into GaN, with an ionization level of 30--40 meV. It is essentially immobile up to 1,100 C. Carbon can produce low p-type levels (3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}) in GaN during MOMBE, although there is some evidence it may also create n-type conduction in other nitrides.

  1. Technology Partnership Agreements | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Investment Agreements Technology Investment Agreements Guidance Policy Flash 2006-31 - Technology Investment Agreements Financial Assistance Letter 2006-03 - Guidance for Awarding Technology Investment Agreements Final Rule - Financial Assistance Regulations - Technology Investment Agreements Templates Company Template (Expenditure-Based) Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) Company Template (Fixed Support) Consortium Support (Fixed Support) Training Technology Investment

  2. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high

  3. Reduced Cu(InGa)Se2 Thickness in Solar Cells Using a Superstrate Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-03-30

    This project by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Delaware sought to develop the technology and underlying science to enable reduced cost of Cu(InGa)Se2 manufacturing by reducing the thickness of the Cu(InGa)Se2 absorber layer by half compared to typical production. The approach to achieve this was to use the superstrate cell configuration in which light is incident on the cell through the glass. This structure facilitates optical enhancement approaches needed to achieve high efficiency with Cu(InGa)Se2 thicknesses less than 1 µm. The primary objective was to demonstrate a Cu(InGa)Se2 cell with absorber thickness 0.5 - 0.7 µm and 17% efficiency, along with a quantitative loss analysis to define a pathway to 20% efficiency. Additional objectives were the development of stable TCO and buffer layers or contact layers to withstand the Cu(InGa)Se2 deposition temperature and of advanced optical enhancement methods. The underlying fundamental science needed to effectively transition these outcomes to large scale was addressed by extensive materials and device characterization and by development of comprehensive optical models. Two different superstrate configurations have been investigated. A frontwall cell is illuminated through the glass to the primary front junction of the device. This configuration has been used for previous efforts on superstrate Cu(InGa)Se2 but performance has been limited by interdiffusion or reaction with CdS or other buffer layers. In this project, several approaches to overcome these limitations were explored using CdS, ZnO and ZnSe buffer layers. In each case, mechanisms that limit device performance were identified using detailed characterization of the materials and junctions. Due to the junction formation difficulties, efforts were concentrated on a new backwall configuration in which light

  4. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; H Ehsani; GJ Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; P Talamo; KD Rahner; EJ Brown; SR Burger; PM Foruspring; WF Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; J Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

    2006-03-09

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) in the bandgap range of E{sub G} = 0.5 to 0.6eV. InGaAsSb TPV diodes, utilizing front-surface spectral control filters, are measured with thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency and power density of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19.7% and PD =0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively for a radiator temperature of T{sub radiator} = 950 C, diode temperature of T{sub diode} = 27 C, and diode bandgap of E{sub G} = 0.53eV. Practical limits to TPV energy conversion efficiency are established using measured recombination coefficients and optical properties of front surface spectral control filters, which for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV energy conversion is {eta}{sub TPV} = 28% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} at the above operating temperatures. The most severe performance limits are imposed by (1) diode open-circuit voltage (VOC) limits due to intrinsic Auger recombination and (2) parasitic photon absorption in the inactive regions of the module. Experimentally, the diode V{sub OC} is 15% below the practical limit imposed by intrinsic Auger recombination processes. Analysis of InGaAsSb diode electrical performance vs. diode architecture indicate that the V{sub OC} and thus efficiency is limited by extrinsic recombination processes such as through bulk defects.

  5. Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for plasmonic applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier...

  6. Correlation of DLTS and Performance of GaInNAs Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Johnston, S.; Friedman, D.; Ptak, A.; Geisz, J.; McMahon, W.; Olson, J.; Kibbler, A.; Crandall, R.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.

    2005-01-01

    A four-junction GaInP/GaAs/GaInAsN/Ge solar cell should be able to reach 40% efficiency if each of the junctions can be made with a quality similar to that demonstrated for GaAs. However, the GaInAsN subcell has shown poor performance. Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) can elucidate recombination centers in a material and could help identify the problem with the GaInAsN. So far, DLTS studies of GaInAsN have shown many peaks. In this paper we compare the performance of the GaInAsN solar cells with the DLTS spectra to identify which DLTS peak is correlated with the device performance.

  7. Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by ...

  8. Site-controlled fabrication of Ga nanodroplets by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Zhiming M.; Wu, Jiang; Li, Handong; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-03-31

    Ga droplets are created by focused ion beam irradiation of GaAs surface. We report that ordered Ga droplets can be formed on the GaAs surface without any implantation damage. The droplets are characterized with bigger sizes than those droplets formed on damaged area. These aligned Ga droplets are formed via the migration of Ga atoms from ion irradiation area to the edge of undamaged GaAs surface and further nucleation into droplets. The morphological evolution and size distribution of these nanodroplets are investigated systematically with different beam irradiation time and incident angles. Based on this method, well positioned Ga nanodroplets, such as chains, are achieved by using focus ion beam patterning. The controllable assembly of droplets on undamaged semiconductor surface can be used to fabricate templates, to fabricate quantum structures and quantum devices by droplet epitaxy technique.

  9. Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water ...

  10. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and ... A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound ...

  11. High-Efficiency GaAs Thin-Film Solar Cell Reliability | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GaAs Thin-Film Solar Cell Reliability High-Efficiency GaAs Thin-Film Solar Cell Reliability Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado ...

  12. Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface ...

  13. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce₃(Ni/Al/Ga)₁₁-A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...AlGa)-A new phase with the LaAl structure type Prev Next Title: Structure and magnetic properties of Ce(NiAlGa)-A new phase with the ...

  14. Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-GaN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dislocation confinement in the growth ...

  15. Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D X center Prev Next Title: Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D X center Authors: Ma, Jie ...

  16. Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa ...

  17. Influence of Ga content on the structure and anomalous Hall effect of Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Shin, Yooleemi; Viet Cuong, Tran; Cho, Sunglae; Phan, The-Long

    2014-05-07

    The Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films (x = 0.4, 0.5) have been grown on GaSb(100) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. An epitaxial film with bcc α-Fe crystal structure (A2) is observed in Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} film, while an impure Fe{sub 3}Ga phase with DO{sub 3} structure is appeared in Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. The saturated magnetizations at room temperature are observed to be 570 emu/cm{sup 3} and 180 emu/cm{sup 3} and the coercivities to be 170 and 364 Oe for Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} and Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}, respectively. A hysteresis trend in Hall resistance vs. magnetic field is observed for Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. However, there is a weak hysteresis noticed in Fe{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6} thin film.

  18. Plasmonic terahertz detectors based on a high-electron mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bia?ek, M. Witowski, A. M.; Grynberg, M.; ?usakowski, J.; Orlita, M.; Potemski, M.; Czapkiewicz, M.; Umansky, V.

    2014-06-07

    In order to characterize magnetic field (B) tunable THz plasmonic detectors, spectroscopy experiments were carried out at liquid helium temperatures and high magnetic fields on devices fabricated on a high electron mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The samples were either gated (the gate of a meander shape) or ungated. Spectra of a photovoltage generated by THz radiation were obtained as a function of B at a fixed THz excitation from a THz laser or as a function of THz photon frequency at a fixed B with a Fourier spectrometer. In the first type of measurements, the wave vector of magnetoplasmons excited was defined by geometrical features of samples. It was also found that the magnetoplasmon spectrum depended on the gate geometry which gives an additional parameter to control plasma excitations in THz detectors. Fourier spectra showed a strong dependence of the magnetoplasmon resonance amplitude on the conduction-band electron filling factor which was explained within a model of the electron gas heating with THz radiation. The study allows to define both the advantages and limitations of plasmonic devices based on high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures for THz detection at low temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  19. On the redox origin of surface trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Di; Tuller, Harry L.; Thompson, Carl V.; Palacios, Toms

    2014-03-28

    Water-related redox couples in ambient air are identified as an important source of the surface trapping states, dynamic on-resistance, and drain current collapse in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Through in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), direct signature of the water-related specieshydroxyl groups (OH) was found at the AlGaN surface at room temperature. It was also found that these species, as well as the current collapse, can be thermally removed above 200?C in vacuum conditions. An electron trapping mechanism based on the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} redox couples is proposed to explain the 0.5?eV energy level commonly attributed to the surface trapping states. Finally, the role of silicon nitride passivation in successfully removing current collapse in these devices is explained by blocking the water molecules away from the AlGaN surface.

  20. High 400?C operation temperature blue spectrum concentration solar junction in GaInN/GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian

    2014-12-15

    Transparent wide gap junctions suitable as high temperature, high flux topping cells have been achieved in GaInN/GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. In structures of 25 quantum wells (QWs) under AM1.5G illumination, an open circuit voltage of 2.1?V is achieved. Of the photons absorbed in the limited spectral range of <450?nm, 64.2% are converted to electrons collected at the contacts under zero bias. At a fill factor of 45%, they account for a power conversion efficiency of38.6%. Under concentration, the maximum output power density per sun increases from 0.49?mW/cm{sup 2} to 0.51?mW/cm{sup 2} at 40?suns and then falls 0.42?mW/cm{sup 2} at 150?suns. Under external heating, a maximum of 0.59?mW/cm{sup 2} is reached at 250?C. Even at 400?C, the device is fully operational and exceeds room temperature performance. A defect analysis suggests that significantly higher fill factors and extension into longer wavelength ranges are possible with further development. The results prove GaInN/GaN QW solar junctions a viable and rugged topping cell for concentrator photovoltaics with minimal cooling requirements. By capturing the short range spectrum, they reduce the thermal load to any conventional cells stacked behind.

  1. Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlee, Jordan D. Anderson, Travis J.; Koehler, Andrew D.; Weaver, Bradley D.; Kub, Francis J.; Hobart, Karl D.; Specht, Petra; Dubon, Oscar D.; Luysberg, Martina; Weatherford, Todd R.

    2015-08-24

    Proton-induced damage in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs was investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and simulated using a Monte Carlo technique. The results were correlated to electrical degradation using Hall measurements. It was determined by EDS that the interface between GaN and AlGaN in the irradiated HEMT was broadened by 2.2 nm, as estimated by the width of the Al EDS signal compared to the as-grown interface. The simulation results show a similar Al broadening effect. The extent of interfacial roughening was examined using high resolution TEM. At a 2 MeV proton fluence of 6 × 10{sup 14} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, the electrical effects associated with the Al broadening and surface roughening include a degradation of the ON-resistance and a decrease in the electron mobility and 2DEG sheet carrier density by 28.9% and 12.1%, respectively.

  2. Effect of proton irradiation energy on AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, S.; Dong, C.; Zhu, W.; Kim, B. -j.; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, J.; Patrick, Erin; et al

    2015-08-18

    The effects of proton irradiation energy on dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs) using Al2O3 as the gate dielectric were studied. Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMTs were irradiated with a fixed proton dose of 5 × 1015 cm-2 at different energies of 5, 10, or 15 MeV. More degradation of the device dc characteristics was observed for lower irradiation energy due to the larger amount of nonionizing energy loss in the active region of the MOSHEMTs under these conditions. The reductions in saturation current were 95.3%, 68.3%, and 59.8% and reductions in maximum transconductance were 88%, 54.4%, andmore » 40.7% after 5, 10, and 15 MeV proton irradiation, respectively. Both forward and reverse gate leakage current were reduced more than one order of magnitude after irradiation. The carrier removal rates for the irradiation energies employed in this study were in the range of 127–289 cm-1. These are similar to the values reported for conventional metal-gate high-electron mobility transistors under the same conditions and show that the gate dielectric does not affect the response to proton irradiation for these energies.« less

  3. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA February 25, 2014 EIS-0476: Record of Decision Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} using oligonucleotide-functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Junjie; Li, Jiadong; Miao, Bin; Wu, Dongmin; Wang, Jine; Pei, Renjun; Wu, Zhengyan

    2014-08-25

    An oligonucleotide-functionalized ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of Hg{sup 2+}. The advantages of ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN HEMT and highly specific binding interaction between Hg{sup 2+} and thymines were combined. The current response of this Hg{sup 2+} ultrasensitive transistor was characterized. The current increased due to the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} ions on the surface by the highly specific thymine-Hg{sup 2+}-thymine recognition. The dynamic linear range for Hg{sup 2+} detection has been determined in the concentrations from 10{sup −14} to 10{sup −8} M and a detection limit below 10{sup −14} M level was estimated, which is the best result of AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensors for Hg{sup 2+} detection till now.

  5. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1991--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The ``cycled`` organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  6. Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    00PM EDT Online The Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator 2 FOA Informational Webinar will be held Wednesday, September 2, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ET. Standard...

  7. Influence of strain induced by AlN nucleation layer on the electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si(111) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christy, Dennis; Watanabe, Arata; Egawa, Takashi

    2014-10-15

    The crack-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrate with modified growth conditions of AlN nucleation layer (NL) and its influence on the electrical and structural properties of conductive GaN layer are presented. From the Hall electrical measurements, a gradual decrease of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration near heterointerface as the function of NL thickness is observed possibly due to the reduction in difference of piezoelectric polarization charge densities between AlGaN and GaN layers. It also indicates that the minimum tensile stress and a relatively less total dislocation density for high pressure grown NL can ensure a 20 % increment in mobility at room temperature irrespective of the interface roughness. The thickness and pressure variations in NL and the subsequent changes in growth mode of AlN contributing to the post growth residual tensile stress are investigated using X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering experiments, respectively. The post growth intrinsic residual stress in top layers of heterostructures arises from lattice mismatches, NL parameters and defect densities in GaN. Hence, efforts to reduce the intrinsic residual stress in current conducting GaN layer give an opportunity to further improve the electrical characteristics of AlGaN/GaN device structures on Si.

  8. Absorption enhancement through Fabry-Prot resonant modes in a 430?nm thick InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behaghel, B.; Tamaki, R.; Watanabe, K.; Sodabanlu, H.; Vandamme, N.; Dupuis, C.; Bardou, N.; Cattoni, A.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, M.; Collin, S.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-02-23

    We study light management in a 430?nm-thick GaAs p-i-n single junction solar cell with 10 pairs of InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The epitaxial layer transfer on a gold mirror improves light absorption and increases the external quantum efficiency below GaAs bandgap by a factor of four through the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances. We show a good agreement with optical simulation and achieve around 10% conversion efficiency. We demonstrate numerically that this promising result can be further improved by anti-reflection layers. This study paves the way to very thin MQWs solar cells.

  9. In-plane tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As/GaAs Esaki diodes in the regime of the excess current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiogai, J.; Ciorga, M. Utz, M.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Weiss, D.; Kohda, M.; Nitta, J.; Nojima, T.

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the angular dependence of the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As/n-GaAs spin Esaki diodes in the regime where the tunneling process is dominated by the excess current through midgap states in (Ga,Mn)As. We compare it to similar measurements performed in the regime of band-to-band tunneling. Whereas the latter show biaxial symmetry typical for magnetic anisotropy observed in (Ga,Mn)As samples, the former is dominated by uniaxial anisotropy along the 〈110〉 axes.

  10. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Construction | Department of Energy UQM Technologies, Inc. at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Electric Drive Systems edt044_ley_2016_o_web.pdf (1.13 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction Unique Lanthide-Free Motor

  12. Selective saturation of paramagnetic defects in electron- and neutron-irradiated GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goltzene, A.; Meyer, B.; Schwab, C.; Beall, R.B.; Newman, R.C.; Whitehouse, J.E.; Woodhead, J.

    1985-06-15

    A comparison of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra obtained in fast neutron- and electron-irradiated GaAs crystals has confirmed the simultaneous presence of the quadruplet and singlet spectra, ascribed previously to As/sup 4 +//sub Ga/ and V/sup 2 -//sub Ga/ centers. Only in electron-irradiated material, however, are both signals separated by the selective microwave power saturation of the quadruplet. This apparent disparity is ascribed to a difference in the coupling between the two partners in the As/sup 4 +//sub Ga/-V/sup 2 -//sub Ga/ associated complexes.

  13. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  14. Method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2012-12-25

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent to the process chamber. The process chamber contains a sample comprising a Ga-based compound semiconductor. The sample is in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. The method includes flowing SiCl.sub.4 gas into the chamber, flowing Ar gas into the chamber, and flowing H.sub.2 gas into the chamber. RF power is supplied independently to the source electrode and the platen. A plasma is generated based on the gases in the process chamber, and regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched to create a substantially smooth etched surface including features having substantially vertical walls beneath the masked portions.

  15. Method of plasma etching GA-based compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2013-01-01

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent thereto. The chamber contains a Ga-based compound semiconductor sample in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. SiCl.sub.4 and Ar gases are flowed into the chamber. RF power is supplied to the platen at a first power level, and RF power is supplied to the source electrode. A plasma is generated. Then, RF power is supplied to the platen at a second power level lower than the first power level and no greater than about 30 W. Regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched at a rate of no more than about 25 nm/min to create a substantially smooth etched surface.

  16. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  17. Average Structure Evolution of ?-phase Pu-Ga Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Alice Iulia; Page, Katharine L.; Gourdon, Olivier; Siewenie, Joan E.; Richmond, Scott; Saleh, Tarik A.; Ramos, Michael; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2015-03-30

    [Full Text] Plutonium metal is a highly unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, from room temperature to its melting point. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with temperature, pressure, chemical additions, and time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long time periods. The fcc ?-phase deserves additional attention, not only in the context of understanding the electronic structure of Pu, but also as one of the few high-symmetry actinide phases that can be stabilized down to ambient pressure and room temperature by alloying it with trivalent elements. We will present results on recent work on aging of Pu-2at.%Ga and Pu-7at.%Ga alloys

  18. Photosensitivity of the Ni-n-GaAs Schottky barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melebaev, D.; Melebaeva, G. D.; Rud', V. Yu. Rud', Yu. V.

    2009-01-15

    The method of chemical deposition is used to form the structures with the Ni-n-GaAs Schottky barrier. The thickness of the Ni layers with a specular outer surface was varied within the range of 150-220 A. It was experimentally observed for the first time that photosensitivity of the obtained barriers with the semitransparent Ni layers illuminated is practically absent in the Fowler region of the spectrum at hv = 0.9-1.5 eV. This circumstance is related mainly to the fact that, in this case, the Ni layer side of the structure was illuminated, and radiation with the photon energy hv < 1.3 eV was effectively reflected from the nickel surface. It is established that the developed Ni-n-GaAs structures can be used as high-efficiency wide-band photoconverters of both visible and ultraviolet radiation.

  19. Formation and properties of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Lockwood, D.J.; Fraser, J.W.; Graham, M.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1996-06-01

    Porous structures on n-type GaAs (100) can be grown electrochemically in chloride-containing solutions. Crystallographic etching of the sample is a precursor stage of the attack. Polarization curves reveal the existanece of a critical onset potential for por formation (PFP). PFP is strongly dependent on the doping level of the sample and presence of surface defects. Good agreement between PFP and breakdown voltage of the space charge layer is found. Surface analysis by EDX, AES, and XPS show that the porous structure consists mainly of GaAs and that anion uptake in the structure can only observed after attackhas been initiated. Photoluminescence measurements reveal (under certain conditions) visible light emission from the porous structure.

  20. The transputer based GA. SP data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, D.; Avano, B.; DePoli, M.; Maron, G. ); Negro, A.; Parlati, G. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, the new data acquisition for the GA.SP detector is presented. It is a distributed system based on a network of 40 T800 and T222 transputers linked to a VME system used for histogram storage. A 100 MBit/s FDDI ring connects the system to UNIX workstations used for the experiment control, histogram display and second level data analysis.

  1. Gallium hole traps in irradiated KTiOPO{sub 4}:Ga crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grachev, V.; Meyer, M.; Malovichko, G.; Hunt, A. W.

    2014-12-07

    Nominally pure and gallium doped single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}) have been studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at low temperatures before and after irradiation. Irradiation with 20?MeV electrons performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature caused an appearance of electrons and holes. Gallium impurities act as hole traps in KTiOPO{sub 4} creating Ga{sup 4+} centers. Two different Ga{sup 4+} centers were observed, Ga1 and Ga2. The Ga1 centers are dominant in Ga-doped samples. For the Ga1 center, a superhyperfine structure with one nucleus with nuclear spin was registered and attributed to the interaction of gallium electrons with a phosphorus nucleus or proton in its surrounding. In both Ga1 and Ga2 centers, Ga{sup 4+} ions substitute for Ti{sup 4+} ions, but with a preference to one of two electrically distinct crystallographic positions (site selective substitution). The Ga doping eliminates one of the shortcomings of KTP crystalsionic conductivity of bulk crystals. However, this does not improve significantly the resistance of the crystals to electron and ?-radiation.

  2. Characterization and device performance of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanket, Gregory; Boyle, Jonathan H.; Shafarman, William N.

    2009-06-08

    The study of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers is of interest in that Ag-chalcopyrites exhibit both wider bandgaps and lower melting points than their Cu counterparts. (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers were deposited over the composition range 0 < Ag/(Ag+Cu) < 1 and 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) < 1.0 using a variety of elemental co-evaporation processes. Films were found to be singlephase over the entire composition range, in contrast to prior studies. Devices with Ga content 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) <0.5 tolerated Ag incorporation up to Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.5 without appreciable performance loss. Ag-containing films with Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 showed improved device characteristics over Cu-only control samples, in particular a 30-40% increase in short-circuit current. An absorber layer with composition Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.75 and Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 yielded a device with VOC = 890 mV, JSC = 20.5mA/cm2, fill factor = 71.3%, and ? = 13.0%.

  3. Ga Lithography in Sputtered Niobium for Superconductive Micro and Nanowires.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Henry, Michael David; Lewis, Rupert M.; Wolfley, Steven L.; Monson, Todd C.

    2014-08-18

    This work demonstrates the use of FIB implanted Ga as a lithographic mask for plasma etching of Nb films. Using a highly collimated Ga beam of a FIB, Nb is implanted 12 nm deep with a 14 nm thick Ga layer providing etch selectivity better than 15:1 with fluorine based etch chemistry. Implanted square test patterns, both 10 um by and 10 um and 100 um by 100 um, demonstrate that doses above than 7.5 x 1015 cm-2 at 30 kV provide adequate mask protection for a 205 nm thick, sputtered Nb film. The resolution of this dry lithographic techniquemore » is demonstrated by fabrication of nanowires 75 nm wide by 10 um long connected to 50 um wide contact pads. The residual resistance ratio of patterned Nb films was 3. The superconducting transition temperature, Tc =7.7 K, was measured using MPMS. This nanoscale, dry lithographic technique was extended to sputtered TiN and Ta here and could be used on other fluorine etched superconductors such as NbN, NbSi, and NbTi.« less

  4. Ga lithography in sputtered niobium for superconductive micro and nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, M. David; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Lewis, Rupert

    2014-08-18

    This work demonstrates the use of focused ion beam (FIB) implanted Ga as a lithographic mask for plasma etching of Nb films. Using a highly collimated Ga beam of a FIB, Nb is implanted 12?nm deep with a 14?nm thick Ga layer providing etch selectivity better than 15:1 with fluorine based etch chemistry. Implanted square test patterns, both 10??m by 10??m and 100??m by 100??m, demonstrate that doses above than 7.5??10{sup 15?}cm{sup ?2} at 30?kV provide adequate mask protection for a 205?nm thick, sputtered Nb film. The resolution of this dry lithographic technique is demonstrated by fabrication of nanowires 75?nm wide by 10??m long connected to 50??m wide contact pads. The residual resistance ratio of patterned Nb films was 3. The superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c})?=?7.7?K was measured using a magnetic properties measurement system. This nanoscale, dry lithographic technique was extended to sputtered TiN and Ta here and could be used on other fluorine etched superconductors such as NbN, NbSi, and NbTi.

  5. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gačević, Ž. Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E.

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  6. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer NETL Sorbent Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorbent Technologies Licensed for Use in Biomass-to- Biofuel Conversion Process with Carbon Capture and Storage Success Story The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has granted a license for two of its patented sorbent technologies: carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) removal and water-gas shift (WGS) reaction enhancement to CogniTek Management Systems "CogniTek," a renewable energy systems developer. CogniTek plans to implement a regenerable magnesium sorbent,

  7. Forest products technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-07-18

    Report highlights DOE Industrial Technology Program co-funded R&D resulting in commercial energy-efficient technologies and emerging technologies helping the forest products industry save energy.

  8. Optical and quantum efficiency analysis of (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Jonathan; Hanket, Gregory; Shafarman, William

    2009-06-09

    (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 thin films have been deposited by elemental co-evaporation over a wide range of compositions and their optical properties characterized by transmission and reflection measurements and by relative shift analysis of quantum efficiency device measurements. The optical bandgaps were determined by performing linear fits of (?h?)2 vs. h?, and the quantum efficiency bandgaps were determined by relative shift analysis of device curves with fixed Ga/(In+Ga) composition, but varying Ag/(Cu+Ag) composition. The determined experimental optical bandgap ranges of the Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.31, 0.52, and 0.82 groups, with Ag/(Cu+Ag) ranging from 0 to 1, were 1.19-1.45 eV, 1.32-1.56 eV, and 1.52-1.76 eV, respectively. The optical bowing parameter of the different Ga/(In+Ga) groups was also determined.

  9. Efficiency calculations of thin-film GaAs solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Amano, C.

    1985-11-01

    Dislocation effect upon the efficiency of single-crystal thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cells on Si substrates is analyzed. Solar-cell properties are calculated based on a simple model; in the model, dislocations act as recombination centers to reduce the minority-carrier diffusion length in each layer and increase the space-charge layer recombination current. Numerical analysis is also carried out to optimize thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar-cell structures. The fabrication of thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cells with a practical efficiency larger than 18% on Si substrates appears possible if the dislocation density in the thin-film GaAs layer is less than 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -2/.

  10. NETL: SOFC Core Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Technology Core Technology-This key technology conducts applied research and development on technologies - exclusive of the cell components - that improve the cost, performance, robustness, reliability, and endurance of SOFC stack or balance-of-plant (BOP) technology. Projects in the Core Technology portfolio focus on interconnects and seals, identify and mitigate stack-related degradation, develop computational tools and models, and conduct laboratory- and bench-scale testing to improve

  11. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  12. Comparative investigation of InGaP/GaAs pseudomorphic field-effect transistors with triple doped-channel profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui; Guo, Der-Feng; Lour, Wen-Shiung

    2011-09-15

    In this article, the comparison of DC performance on InGaP/GaAs pseudomorphic field-effect transistors with tripe doped-channel profiles is demonstrated. As compared to the uniform and high-medium-low doped-channel devices, the low-medium-high doped-channel device exhibits the broadest gate voltage swing and the best device linearity because more twodimensional electron gases are formed in the heaviest doped channel to enhance the magnitude of negative threshold voltage. Experimentally, the transconductance within 50% of its maximum value for gate voltage swing is 4.62 V in the low-medium-high doped-channel device, which is greater than 3.58 (3.30) V in the uniform (high-medium-low) doped-channel device.

  13. 1.9 kV AlGaN/GaN Lateral Schottky Barrier Diodes on Silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Mingda; Song, Bo; Qi, Meng; Hu, Zongyang; Nomoto, Kazuki; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Yu; Johnson, Wayne; Kohn, Erhard; Jena, Debdeep; et al

    2015-02-16

    In this letter, we present AlGaN/GaN lateral Schottky barrier diodes on silicon with recessed anodes and dual field plates. A low specific on-resistance RON,SP (5.12 mΩ · cm2), a low turn-on voltage (<0.7 V) and a high reverse breakdown voltage BV (>1.9 kV), were simultaneously achieved in devices with a 25 μm anode/cathode separation, resulting in a power figure-of-merit (FOM) BV2/RON,SP of 727 MW·cm2. The record high breakdown voltage of 1.9 kV is attributed to the dual field plate structure.

  14. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ?{sub c}, and the microwave angular frequency, ?, satisfy 2? ? ?{sub c} ? 3.5? The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  15. Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. L.; Filippov, S.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Ishikawa, Fumitaro

    2014-12-22

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (?-PL) and ?-PL excitation (?-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation.

  16. Terrestrial Concentrator PV Modules Based on GaInP/GaAs/Ge TJ Cells and Minilens Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rumyantsev, V. D.; Sadchikov, N. A.; Chalov, A. E.; Ionova, E. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Glenn, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a description of research activity in the field of cost-effective modules realizing the concept of very high solar concentration with small-aperture area Fresnel lenses and multijunction III-V cells. Structural simplicity and 'all-glass' design are the guiding principles of the corresponding development. The advanced concentrator modules are made with silicone Fresnel lens panels (from 8 up to 144 lenses, each lens is 4 times 4 cm{sup 2} in aperture area) with composite structure. GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells with average efficiencies of 31.1 and 34.7% at 1000 suns were used for the modules. Conversion efficiency as high as 26.3% has been measured indoors in a test module using a newly developed large-area solar simulator.

  17. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Jain, M.; Wicks, G.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T.; McEwan, K.; Howle, C.

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  18. Degradation mechanisms of Ti/Al/Ni/Au-based Ohmic contacts on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Ahn, Shihyun; Dong, Chen; Zhu, Weidi; Kim, Byung-Jae; Le, Lingcong; Ren, Fan; Lind, Aaron G.; Dahl, James; Jones, Kevin S.; et al

    2015-04-27

    We investigated the degradation mechanism of Ti/Al/Ni/Au-based Ohmic metallization on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors upon exposure to buffer oxide etchant (BOE). The major effect of BOE on the Ohmic metal was an increase of sheet resistance from 2.89 to 3.69 Ω/ₜafter 3 min BOE treatment. The alloyed Ohmic metallization consisted 3–5 μm Ni-Al alloy islands surrounded by Au-Al alloy-rings. The morphology of both the islands and ring areas became flatter after BOE etching. Lastly, we used energy dispersive x-ray analysis and Auger electron microscopy to analyze the compositions and metal distributions in the metal alloys prior to and aftermore » BOE exposure.« less

  19. Passivation of deep level states caused by misfit dislocations in InGaAs on patterned GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matragrano, M.J.; Watson, G.P.; Ast, D.G. ); Anderson, T.J.; Pathangey, B. )

    1993-03-22

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to study the hydrogen passivation of misfit dislocations in In[sub 0.06]Ga[sub 0.94]As/GaAs heterostructures. The CL observations indicate that hydrogen plasma exposure passivates most, but not all, of the dark line defects existing in the specimen prior to hydrogenation. The concentration of deep level defect states that cannot be passivated is below the detection limit of the DLTS instrument (approximately 4[times]10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3]). We find the passivation is stable after anneals at temperatures as high as 600 [degree]C, indicating that hydrogen passivation of misfit dislocations is at least as stable as that of the isolated point defect studied previously with DLTS [W. C. Dautremont-Smith, J. C. Nabity, V. Swaminathan, M. Stavola, J. Chevalier, C. W. Tu, and S. J. Pearton, Appl. Phys. Lett. [bold 49] 1098 (1986)].

  20. Compositionally graded relaxed AlGaN buffers on semipolar GaN for mid-ultraviolet emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Erin C.; Wu Feng; Haeger, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Shuji; Denbaars, Steven P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Speck, James S.; Romanov, Alexey E.

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we report on the growth and properties of relaxed, compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N buffer layers on freestanding semipolar (2021) GaN substrates. Continuous and step compositional grades with Al concentrations up to x = 0.61 have been achieved, with emission wavelengths in the mid-ultraviolet region as low as 265 nm. Coherency stresses were relaxed progressively throughout the grades by misfit dislocation generation via primary (basal) slip and secondary (non-basal) slip systems. Threading dislocation densities in the final layers of the grades were less than 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} as confirmed by plan-view transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence studies.

  1. Study of the one dimensional electron gas arrays confined by steps in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huijie E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Guijuan; Liu, Guipeng; Wei, Hongyuan; Jiao, Chunmei; Yang, Shaoyan E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Lianshan; Zhu, Qinsheng

    2014-05-21

    One dimensional electron gas (1DEG) arrays in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterostructures have been studied. The steps at the interface would lead to the lateral barriers and limit the electron movement perpendicular to such steps. Through a self-consistent Schrdinger-Poisson approach, the electron energy levels and wave functions were calculated. It was found that when the total electron density was increased, the lateral barriers were lowered due to the screening effects by the electrons, and the electron gas became more two-dimension like. The calculated 1DEG densities were compared to the experimental values and good agreements were found. Moreover, we found that a higher doping density is more beneficial to form 1-D like electron gas arrays.

  2. Green Purchasing & Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

  4. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, ...

  5. Hydropower Program Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01

    New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

  6. NREL: Technology Transfer - Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you may have about NREL's technology transfer opportunities. Partnering with NREL Anne Miller, 303-384-7353 Licensing NREL Technologies Eric Payne, 303-275-3166 Printable Version...

  7. Technology Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies, including Technical Advisory Groups and the Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap. Technical Advisory Groups E3T engages stakeholders of electric power industries in...

  8. First National Technology Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First National Technology First National Technology Center Center Electronic Equipment - manufactured to withstand 8 milliseconds of voltage disruption CBEMA Curve - Chips ...

  9. Promising Technologies List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about promising new and underutilized energy-saving technologies available for Federal and commercial building sector deployment. To identify promising technologies,...

  10. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY ... of the nation's energy system and secure U.S. leadership ...

  11. Microstructure of V-based ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures at a reduced annealing temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, A. Schroeter, Ch.; Otto, R.; Heitmann, J.; Schuster, M.; Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D.

    2015-02-02

    Ohmic contacts with V/Al/Ni/Au and V/Ni/Au metalization schemes were deposited on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The dependence of the specific contact resistance on the annealing conditions and the V:Al thickness ratio was shown. For an optimized electrode stack, a low specific contact resistance of 8.9??10{sup ?6} ? cm{sup 2} was achieved at an annealing temperature of 650?C. Compared to the conventional Ti/Al/Ni/Au contact, this is a reduction of 150?K. The microstructure and contact formation at the AlGaN/metal interface were investigated by transmission electron microscopy including high-resolution micrographs and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was shown that for low-resistive contacts, the resistivity of the metalization has to be taken into account. The V:Al thickness ratio has an impact on the formation of different intermetallic phases and thus is crucial for establishing ohmic contacts at reduced annealing temperatures.

  12. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH{sub 3}-molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-05-18

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH{sub 3} flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures.

  13. Blue Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue Spark Technologies (formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc.) Place: Westlake, Ohio...

  14. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This ...

  15. Sun Materials Technology aka Shanyang Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology aka Shanyang Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sun Materials Technology (aka Shanyang Technology) Place: Yilan County, Taiwan Product: A US-Taiwan JV company...

  16. Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc (Quantum Technologies) Place: Irvine,...

  17. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Integration and Education DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology Integration and Education Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies ...

  18. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review … Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Integration 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review Technology Integration Technology integration merit review results PDF icon 2010amr08.pdf ...

  19. GT Solar Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: GT Solar Technologies (formerly GT Equipment Technologies) Place: Merrimack, New Hampshire...

  20. Enhanced internal quantum efficiency and light extraction efficiency from textured GaN/AlGaN quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabalu, J.S.; Thomidis, C.; Moustakas, T.D.; Riyopoulos, S.; Zhou Lin; Smith, David J.

    2006-03-15

    GaN/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on randomly textured and atomically smooth (0001) GaN templates. Smooth and textured GaN templates were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by varying the III/V ratio and the substrate temperature during growth by the hydride vapor-phase epitaxy method. We find that the MQWs replicate the texture of the GaN template, which was found to have a Gaussian distribution. The peak photoluminescence intensity from the textured MQWs is always higher than from the smooth MQWs and for GaN (7 nm)/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N (8 nm) MQWs, it is 700 times higher than that from similarly produced MQWs on smooth GaN templates. This result is attributed partly to the enhancement in light extraction efficiency and partly to the enhancement in internal quantum efficiency. The origin of the increase in internal quantum efficiency is partly due to the reduction of the quantum-confined Stark effect, since the polarization vector intersects the quantum well (QW) planes at angles smaller than 90 deg. , and partly due to the charge redistribution in the QWs caused by the polarization component parallel to the planes of the QWs.

  1. NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-275-3051. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements...

  2. Selective area epitaxy of monolithic white-light InGaN/GaN quantum well microstripes with dual color emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuejing; Tong, Yuying; Yang, Guofeng Yao, Chujun; Sun, Rui; Cai, Lesheng; Xu, Guiting; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Ye, Xuanchao; Wu, Mengting; Wen, Zhiqin

    2015-09-15

    Monolithic color synthesis is demonstrated using InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN microstripes formed by selective area epitaxy on SiO{sub 2} mask patterns. The striped microfacet structure is composed of (0001) and (11-22) planes, attributed to favorable surface polarity and surface energy. InGaN/GaN QWs on different microfacets contain spatially inhomogeneous compositions owing to the diffusion of adatoms among the facets. This unique property allows the microfacet QWs to emit blue light from the (11-22) plane and yellow light from the top (0001) plane, the mixing of which leads to the perception of white light emission.

  3. Temporally and spatially resolved photoluminescence investigation of (112{sup }2) semi-polar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on nanorod templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-29

    By means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and confocal PL measurements, temporally and spatially resolved optical properties have been investigated on a number of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures with a wide range of indium content alloys from 13% to 35% on (112{sup }2) semi-polar GaN with high crystal quality, obtained through overgrowth on nanorod templates. With increasing indium content, the radiative recombination lifetime initially increases as expected, but decreases if the indium content further increases to 35%, corresponding to emission in the green spectral region. The reduced radiative recombination lifetime leads to enhanced optical performance for the high indium content MQWs as a result of strong exciton localization, which is different from the behaviour of c-plane InGaN/GaN MQWs, where quantum confined Stark effect plays a dominating role in emission process.

  4. H irradiation effects on the GaAs-like Raman modes in GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}/GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}:H planar heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulotto, E. Geddo, M.; Patrini, M.; Guizzetti, G.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Martelli, F.; Rubini, S.

    2014-12-28

    The GaAs-like longitudinal optical phonon frequency in two hydrogenated GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}/GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}:H microwire heterostructureswith similar N concentration, but different H dose and implantation conditionshas been investigated by micro-Raman mapping. In the case of GaAs{sub 0.991}N{sub 0.009} wires embedded in barriers where GaAs-like properties are recovered through H irradiation, the phonon frequency in the barriers undergoes a blue shift with respect to the wires. In GaAs{sub 0.992}N{sub 0.008} wires embedded in less hydrogenated barriers, the phonon frequency exhibits an opposite behavior (red shift). Strain, disorder, phonon localization effects induced by H-irradiation on the GaAs-like phonon frequency are discussed and related to different types of N-H complexes formed in the hydrogenated barriers. It is shown that the red (blue) character of the frequency shift is related to the dominant N-2H (N-3H) type of complexes. Moreover, for specific experimental conditions, an all-optical determination of the uniaxial strain field is obtained. This may improve the design of recently presented devices that exploit the correlation between uniaxial stress and the degree of polarization of photoluminescence.

  5. GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2009-05-01

    GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

  6. Innovative Process Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Process Technologies Research Team Members Key Contacts Innovative Process Technologies Innovative Process Technologies is concerned with the development of innovative costeffective technologies that promote efficiency, environmental performance, availability of advanced energy systems, and the development of computational tools that shorten development timelines of advanced energy systems. NETL, working with members of the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), will focus on

  7. Hydrogen delivery technology roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-11-15

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen delivery technology for transportation applications.

  8. Critical size for the generation of misfit dislocations and their effects on electronic properties in GaAs nanosheets on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zaoshi; Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5025 ; Shimamura, Kohei; Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555; Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 ; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 ; Nakano, Aiichiro

    2013-08-21

    While nanowires and nanosheets (NSs) grown on lattice-mismatched substrates have a number of promising technological applications such as solar cells, generation of misfit dislocations (MFDs) at their interfaces is a major concern for the efficiency of these devices. Here, combined molecular-dynamics and quantum-mechanical simulations are used to study MFDs at the interface between a GaAs NS and a Si substrate. Simulation results show the existence of a critical NS thickness, below which NSs are grown free of MFDs. The calculated critical thickness value is consistent with available experimental observations. Charge transfer at the MFD core is found to modify the electronic band profile at the GaAs/Si interface significantly. These effects should have profound impacts on the efficiency of lattice-mismatched NS devices.

  9. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  10. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The unique technology allows operators to optimize the processing to improve material yield, decrease energy use, and improve safety systems. Specialty metals, such as titanium or ...

  11. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel PlatinumChromium Alloy for the Manufacture of Improved Coronary Stents Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Partners A coronary...

  12. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MST Materials Science and Technology Providing world-leading, innovative, and agile materials science and technology solutions for national security missions. MST is metallurgy. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and technology for Los Alamos National Laboratory. READ MORE MST is engineered materials. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COORDINATORS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mark Hartney, Director of the Office of Strategic Planning, SLAC, discussed technology transfer at SLAC. Bob Hwang, Director, Transportation Energy Center, Combustion Research Facility, SNL presented on technology transfer at SNL. Elsie Quaite-Randall, Chief Technology Transfer Officer, Innovation and Partnerships Office, LBNL, presented on technology transfer at LBNL. Richard A. Rankin, Director, Industrial Partnerships Office and Economic Development Office (Interim), LLNL, presented on technology transfer at LLNL.

  14. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer NETL Technology for Safer,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology for Safer, Cleaner Corrosion-Protecting Metal Coatings Licensed by Pittsburgh Start-Up Success Story Corrosion-related issues cost the U.S. economy $276 billion a year. The Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) teamed up with Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to create a revolutionary, cost-effective technology to reduce that impact-work that resulted in the creation of a new CMU/NETL spin-off that signed a licensing agreement with the laboratory in June. The

  15. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cell absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Br, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-21

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for realistic surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin films with an average x?=?[Ga]/([In]?+?[Ga])?=?0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH{sub 3}-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is apart from a slight change in surface composition identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  16. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, T; Tomasulo, S; Lang, JR; Lee, ML

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated similar to 2.0 eV (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P and similar to 1.9 eV Ga0.51In0.49P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V-oc) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga0.51In0.49P cells, and 1.35-1.37 V for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W-oc = E-g/q - V-oc) of Ga0.51In0.49P cells to decrease from similar to 575 mV to similar to 565 mV, while that of (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant Woc as a function of substrate offcut for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga0.51In0.49P devices. In addition to larger Woc values, the (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga0.51In0.49P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  17. Method of making V.sub.3 Ga superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dew-Hughes, David

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for producing a vanadium-gallium superconductor wire having aluminum as a component thereof is disclosed, said wire being encased in a gallium bearing copper sheath. The superconductors disclosed herein may be fabricated under normal atmospheres and room temperatures by forming a tubular shaped billet having a core composed of an alloy of vanadium and aluminum and an outer sheath composed of an alloy of copper, gallium and aluminum. Thereafter the entire billet is swage reduced to form a wire therefrom and heat treated to form a layer of V.sub.3 Ga in the interior of the wire.

  18. Structure, transport and thermal properties of UCoGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purwanto, A.; Robinson, R.A.; Prokes, K.

    1994-04-01

    By means of neutron powder diffraction, we find that UCoGa crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAl structure and orders ferromagnetically at low temperatures with magnetic moments stacked along the c axis. The magnetic-ordering temperature is reflected in anomalies in the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivity and the specific heat at Tc = 47 K. Furthermore, the strong anisotropy in the electrical resistivity for i {parallel} c and i {perpendicular} c indicates a significant contribution of the magnetic anisotropy to the electrical resistivity.

  19. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahia, M. E.; National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences , Cairo University ; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  20. Low dimensional GaAs/air vertical microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessler, J.; Steinl, T.; Fischer, J.; Hfling, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Mika, A.; S?k, G.; Misiewicz, J.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs)/air distributed Bragg reflector microresonators with indium gallium arsenide quantum wells. The structures are studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy which allows us to investigate a pronounced optical mode quantization of the photonic dispersion. We can extract a length parameter from these quantized states whose upper limit can be connected to the lateral physical extension of the microcavity via analytical calculations. Laser emission from our microcavity under optical pumping is observed in power dependent investigations.

  1. GaInP semiconductor compounds doped with the Sb isovalent impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skachkov, A. F.

    2015-05-15

    GaInP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} layers containing different Sb fractions are produced by metal-organic vaporphase epitaxy on GaAs and Ge substrates. The charge-carrier mobilities in the GaInP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} layers are measured at room temperature and 77 K. The room-temperature charge-carrier mobilities in the GaInP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} layers additionally doped with donor and acceptor impurities are measured. The photoluminescence peaks of GaInP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} are detected. The influence of the Sb impurity on the band gap and charge-carrier mobility in GaInP is determined.

  2. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  3. Improving p-type doping efficiency in Al{sub 0.83}Ga{sub 0.17}N alloy substituted by nanoscale (AlN){sub 5}/(GaN){sub 1} superlattice with Mg{sub Ga}-O{sub N} δ-codoping: Role of O-atom in GaN monolayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Hong-xia; Shi, Jun-jie Jiang, Xin-he; Huang, Pu; Ding, Yi-min; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-15

    We calculate Mg-acceptor activation energy E{sub A} and investigate the influence of O-atom, occupied the Mg nearest-neighbor, on E{sub A} in nanoscale (AlN){sub 5}/(GaN){sub 1} superlattice (SL), a substitution for Al{sub 0.83}Ga{sub 0.17}N disorder alloy, using first-principles calculations. We find that the N-atom bonded with Ga-atom is more easily substituted by O-atom and nMg{sub Ga}-O{sub N} (n = 1-3) complexes are favorable and stable in the SL. The O-atom plays a dominant role in reducing E{sub A}. The shorter the Mg-O bond is, the smaller the E{sub A} is. The Mg-acceptor activation energy can be reduced significantly by nMg{sub Ga}-O{sub N} δ-codoping. Our calculated E{sub A} for 2Mg{sub Ga}-O{sub N} is 0.21 eV, and can be further reduced to 0.13 eV for 3Mg{sub Ga}-O{sub N}, which results in a high hole concentration in the order of 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} at room temperature in (AlN){sub 5}/(GaN){sub 1} SL. Our results prove that nMg{sub Ga}-O{sub N} (n = 2,3) δ-codoping in AlN/GaN SL with ultrathin GaN-layer is an effective way to improve p-type doping efficiency in Al-rich AlGaN.

  4. GaN-on-diamond electronic device reliability: Mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Sun, Huarui; Pomeroy, James W.; Kuball, Martin; Francis, Daniel; Faili, Firooz; Twitchen, Daniel J.

    2015-12-21

    The mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity of GaN-on-diamond wafers used for ultra-high power microwave electronic devices was studied using a micro-pillar based in situ mechanical testing approach combined with an optical investigation of the stress and heat transfer across interfaces. We find the GaN/diamond interface to be thermo-mechanically stable, illustrating the potential for this material for reliable GaN electronic devices.

  5. GaAsSb/GaAsN short-period superlattices as a capping layer for improved InAs quantum dot-based optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utrilla, A. D.; Ulloa, J. M. Guzman, A.; Hierro, A.

    2014-07-28

    The application of a GaAsSb/GaAsN short-period superlattice capping layer (CL) on InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) is shown to be an option for providing improved luminescence properties to this system. Separating both GaAsSb and GaAsN ternaries during the growth in 2 monolayer-thick phases solves the GaAsSbN immiscibility-related problems. Strong fluctuations in the CL composition and strain field as well as in the QD size distribution are significantly reduced, and a more regular CL interface is also obtained. Room-temperature (RT) photoluminescence (PL) is obtained for overall N contents as high as 3%, yielding PL peak wavelengths beyond 1.4 μm in samples with a type-II band alignment. High external quantum efficiency electroluminescence and photocurrent from the QD ground state are also demonstrated at RT in a single QD-layer p-i-n device. Thus, it becomes possible to combine and transfer the complementary benefits of Sb- and N-containing GaAs alloys to InAs QD-based optoelectronics.

  6. Electron and hole gas in modulation-doped GaAs/Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}As radial heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoni, Andrea; Royo, Miquel; Mahawish, Farah; Goldoni, Guido

    2011-11-15

    We perform self-consistent Schroedinger-Poisson calculations with exchange and correlation corrections to determine the electron and hole gas in a radial heterojunction formed in a GaAs/AlGaAs core-multi-shell nanowire, which is either n- or p-doped. We show that the electron and hole gases can be tuned to different localizations and symmetries inside the core as a function of the doping density/gate potential. Contrary to planar heterojunctions, conduction electrons do not form a uniform 2D electron gas (2DEG) localized at the GaAs/AlGaAs interface, but rather show a transition between an isotropic, cylindrical distribution deep in the GaAs core (low doping) and a set of six tunnel-coupled quasi-1D channels at the edges of the interface (high doping). Holes, on the other hand, are much more localized at the GaAs/AlGaAs interface. At low doping, they present an additional localization pattern with six separated 2DEGs strips. The field generated by a back-gate may easily deform the electron or hole gas, breaking the sixfold symmetry. Single 2DEGs at one interface or multiple quasi-1D channels are shown to form as a function of voltage intensity, polarity, and carrier type.

  7. Analysis of the GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge Cell and Related Structures for Terrestrial Concentrator Application: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the analysis of the potential of GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge four-junction solar cell to improve on the efficiency of the state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs/Ge benchmark. We emphasize three factors: (1) The newly proposed terrestrial concentrator spectrum has a lower ratio of red to blue light than does the old AM1.5 direct standard spectrum. (2) Standard two-layer antireflection coatings do not provide near-zero reflectance over the full spectral range of interest for these devices. (3) GaInNAs junctions used to date for the 1-eV junction have quantum efficiencies less than {approx}75%. These factors all limit the device current, adversely affecting the four-junction efficiency. We discuss strategies for ameliorating this problem, including going to alternate structures such as a GaInP/GaAs/0.9-eV three-junction device.

  8. Relaxation and critical strain for maximum In incorporation in AlInGaN on GaN grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuters, Benjamin; Finken, M.; Wille, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Hollaender, B.; Heuken, M.

    2012-11-01

    Quaternary AlInGaN layers were grown on conventional GaN buffer layers on sapphire by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy at different surface temperatures and different reactor pressures with constant precursor flow conditions. A wide range in compositions within 30-62% Al, 5-29% In, and 23-53% Ga was covered, which leads to different strain states from high tensile to high compressive. From high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we determined the compositions, strain states, and crystal quality of the AlInGaN layers. Atomic force microscopy measurements were performed to characterize the surface morphology. A critical strain value for maximum In incorporation near the AlInGaN/GaN interface is presented. For compressively strained layers, In incorporation is limited at the interface as residual strain cannot exceed an empirical critical value of about 1.1%. Relaxation occurs at about 15 nm thickness accompanied by strong In pulling. Tensile strained layers can be grown pseudomorphically up to 70 nm at a strain state of 0.96%. A model for relaxation in compressively strained AlInGaN with virtual discrete sub-layers, which illustrates the gradually changing lattice constant during stress reduction is presented.

  9. ALD TiO2-Al2O3 Stack: An Improved Gate Dielectrics on Ga-polar GaN MOSCAPs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wei, Daming; Edgar, James H.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Meyer, III, Harry M.

    2014-10-15

    This research focuses on the benefits and properties of TiO2-Al2O3 nano-stack thin films deposited on Ga2O3/GaN by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) for gate dielectric development. This combination of materials achieved a high dielectric constant, a low leakage current, and a low interface trap density. Correlations were sought between the films’ structure, composition, and electrical properties. The gate dielectrics were approximately 15 nm thick and contained 5.1 nm TiO2, 7.1 nm Al2O3 and 2 nm Ga2O3 as determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The interface carbon concentration, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profile, was negligible for GaN pretreated bymore » thermal oxidation in O2 for 30 minutes at 850°C. The RMS roughness slightly increased after thermal oxidation and remained the same after ALD of the nano-stack, as determined by atomic force microscopy. The dielectric constant of TiO2-Al2O3 on Ga2O3/GaN was increased to 12.5 compared to that of pure Al2O3 (8~9) on GaN. In addition, the nano-stack's capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis was small, with a total trap density of 8.74 × 1011 cm-2. The gate leakage current density (J=2.81× 10-8 A/cm2) was low at +1 V gate bias. These results demonstrate the promising potential of plasma ALD deposited TiO2/Al2O3 for serving as the gate oxide on Ga2O3/GaN based MOS devices.« less

  10. Internal quantum efficiency enhancement of GaInN/GaN quantum-well structures using Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iida, Daisuke; Fadil, Ahmed Ou, Yiyu; Kopylov, Oleksii; Ou, Haiyan; Chen, Yuntian; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2015-09-15

    We report internal quantum efficiency enhancement of thin p-GaN green quantum-well structure using self-assembled Ag nanoparticles. Temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements are conducted to determine the internal quantum efficiency. The impact of excitation power density on the enhancement factor is investigated. We obtain an internal quantum efficiency enhancement by a factor of 2.3 at 756 W/cm{sup 2}, and a factor of 8.1 at 1 W/cm{sup 2}. A Purcell enhancement up to a factor of 26 is estimated by fitting the experimental results to a theoretical model for the efficiency enhancement factor.

  11. Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukrittanon, Supanee; Liu, Ren; Ro, Yun Goo; Pan, Janet L.; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Tu, Charles W.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we demonstrate –2.05 eV dilute nitride GaNP solar cells on GaP substrates for potential use as the top junction in dual-junction integrated cells on Si. By adding a small amount of N into indirect-bandgap GaP, GaNP has several extremely important attributes: a direct-bandgap that is also tunable, and easily attained lattice-match with Si. Our best GaNP solar cell ([N] –1.8%, Eg –2.05 eV) achieves an efficiency of 7.9%, even in the absence of a window layer. This GaNP solar cell's efficiency is 3× higher than the most efficient GaP solar cell to date and higher than other solar cells with similar direct bandgap (InGaP, GaAsP). Through a systematic study of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the device, efficient broadband optical absorption and enhanced solar cell performance are demonstrated.

  12. Antimonide-Based Long-Wavelength Lasers on GaAs Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KLEM,JOHN F.; Blum, O.

    2000-08-17

    We have investigated the use of GaAsSb in edge-emitting laser active regions, in order to obtain lasing near 1.3 {micro}m. Single quantum well GaAsSb devices display electroluminescence at wavelengths as long as 1.34 {micro}m, but substantial blueshifts occur under high injection conditions. GaAsSb single quantum well edge emitters have been obtained which lase at 1.275 {micro}m with a room-temperature threshold current density as low as 535 A/cm{sup 2}. Modification of the basic GaAsSb/GaAs structure with the addition of InGaAs layers results in a strongly type-II band alignment which can be used to further extend the emission wavelength of these devices. Using GaAsSb/InGaAs active regions, lasers emitting at 1.17 {micro}m have been obtained with room-temperature threshold current densities of 120 A/cm{sup 2}, and devices operating at 1.29 {micro}m have displayed thresholds as low as 375 A/cm{sup 2}. Characteristic temperatures for devices employing various GaAsSb-based active regions have been measured to be 60-73 K.

  13. In-situ crystallization of GeTe\\GaSb phase change memory stacked films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velea, A.; Borca, C. N.; Grolimund, D.; Socol, G.; Galca, A. C.; Popescu, M.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2014-12-21

    Single and double layer phase change memory structures based on GeTe and GaSb thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Their crystallization behavior was studied using in-situ synchrotron techniques. Electrical resistance vs. temperature investigations, using the four points probe method, showed transition temperatures of 138 °C and 198 °C for GeTe and GaSb single films, respectively. It was found that after GeTe crystallization in the stacked films, Ga atoms from the GaSb layer diffused in the vacancies of the GeTe crystalline structure. Therefore, the crystallization temperature of the Sb-rich GaSb layer is decreased by more than 30 °C. Furthermore, at 210 °C, the antimony excess from GaSb films crystallizes as a secondary phase. At higher annealing temperatures, the crystalline Sb phase increased on the expense of GaSb crystalline phase which was reduced. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Ga and Ge K-edges revealed changes in their local atomic environments as a function of the annealing temperature. Simulations unveil a tetrahedral configuration in the amorphous state and octahedral configuration in the crystalline state for Ge atoms, while Ga is four-fold coordinated in both as-deposited and annealed samples.

  14. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  15. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  16. Double Power Output for GaAs Solar Cells Embedded in Luminescent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Double power output of bifacial thin-film GaAs microscale solar cells is achieved by embedding in luminescent waveguides (LSCs) with light- trapping backside reflectors (BSRs). ...

  17. Vacancy defects in as-grown and neutron irradiated GaP studied by positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dlubek, G.; Bruemmer, O.; Polity, A.

    1986-08-18

    Positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements have been used to study vacancy defects in n-italic-type GaP. Vacancies in the P sublattice with a concentration of some 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ were observed in as-grwon GaP. The vacancies disappear during annealing at 500--800 /sup 0/C. In neutron-irradiated GaP positrons are trapped by Ga vacancies which anneal out in two stages situated at 300--550 /sup 0/C and 550--700 /sup 0/C.

  18. Influence of Growth Temperature on AlGaN Multi-Quantum Well Point...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of Growth Temperature on AlGaN Multi-Quantum Well Point Defect Incorporation and Photoluminescence Efficiency. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of ...

  19. Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sukrittanon, Supanee; Liu, Ren; Ro, Yun Goo; Pan, Janet L.; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Tu, Charles W.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we demonstrate –2.05 eV dilute nitride GaNP solar cells on GaP substrates for potential use as the top junction in dual-junction integrated cells on Si. By adding a small amount of N into indirect-bandgap GaP, GaNP has several extremely important attributes: a direct-bandgap that is also tunable, and easily attained lattice-match with Si. Our best GaNP solar cell ([N] –1.8%, Eg –2.05 eV) achieves an efficiency of 7.9%, even in the absence of a window layer. This GaNP solar cell's efficiency is 3× higher than the most efficient GaP solar cell to date and higher than othermore » solar cells with similar direct bandgap (InGaP, GaAsP). Through a systematic study of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the device, efficient broadband optical absorption and enhanced solar cell performance are demonstrated.« less

  20. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-04-18

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.