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1

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

2

Putting Accelerator Technology to Work Fully Superconducting GunFully Superconducting Gun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Putting Accelerator Technology to Work Fully Superconducting GunFully Superconducting Gun BNL PS Gun LANL/AES NC or AES FS gun e- 1.5-2.5 MeV 500-300 mA CW * e- 1.6-2.8 MeV 500-300 mA CW Beam cavity with low current beam * NC gun with derated gradient FS gun permits 25% higher current Ilan Ben

3

AEO Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of AEO99 Cases Summary of AEO99 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.57 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $29.35 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated Residential: 1999 Technology

5

Preliminary Assumptions for Wind Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of operation Investment Tax Credit (ITC) alternative 30% towards developer's income tax for qualifying solar" prior to 12/31/16 Post-2016, credit drops to 10% - solar PV, geothermal 6 #12;Status of Regional RPS utilities Wind development in the PNW has slowed down significantly compared to the past decade Little new

6

Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011  

SciTech Connect

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000-Table 1. Summary of the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Cases 0 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated Residential: 2000 Technology

8

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 1. Summary of AEO2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Cases 1 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 3.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $15.10 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.42 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated Residential: 2001 Technology

9

Key Assumptions Policy Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/13/2014 1 Key Assumptions and Policy Issues RAAC Steering Committee November 17, 2014 Portland Supply Limitations 8 Withi h B l i8. Within-hour Balancing 9. Capacity and Energy Values for Wind/Solar t b it d d li d· Thermal: must be sited and licensed · Wind/solar: must be sited and licensed · EE

10

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by INFINIUM, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about scale-up of magnesium...

11

Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLIMATE ACTION PLANNING TOOL FORMULAS AND ASSUMPTIONS Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions The Climate Action Planning Tool calculations use the following formulas and assumptions to generate the business-as-usual scenario and the greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals for the technology options. Business-as-Usual Scenario All Scope 1 (gas, oil, coal, fleet, and electricity) and Scope 2 calculations increase at a rate equal to the building growth rate. Scope 3 calculations (commuters and business travel) increase at a rate equal to the population growth rate. Assumptions New buildings will consume energy at the same rate (energy use intensity) as existing campus buildings. Fleet operations will be proportional to total building area.

12

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Gillian Charles and Steve Simmons GRAC, Reciprocating Engines Next steps 2 #12;Definitions Baseload Energy: power generated (or conserved) across a period of time to serve system demands for electricity Peaking Capacity: capability of power generating

13

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Gillian Charles GRAC 2/27/14 #12;Today Vernon, WA PSE Klamath Generation Peakers June 2002 (2) 54 MW P&W FT8 Twin- pac 95 MW Klamath, OR IPP; winter-only PPA w/ PSE Dave Gates Generating Station Jan 2011 (3) P&W SWIFTPAC 150 MW Anaconda, MT North

14

Price Corrected Domestic Technology AssumptionA Method To Assess Pollution Embodied in Trade Using Primary Official Statistics Only. With a Case on CO2 Emissions Embodied in Imports to Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For various countries, it has been shown that apparent decoupling of CO2 emissions or primary material use from GDP growth is actually the result of the relocation of material and energy-intensive production abroad. ... Compiling MR EE IO databases demands a high level of harmonization and consolidation of different data sources which often conflict (e.g., trade statistics usually differ from trade data in SUIOT). ... Figure 3. CO2 emissions per capita, 20002006: (a) emitted at EU27 territory; (b) embodied in EU27 imports; (c) embodied in EU27 exports; and (d) embodied in EU27 domestic final demand, calculated with Domestic Technology Assumption (standard) and with price adjustments. ...

Arnold Tukker; Arjan de Koning; Richard Wood; Stephan Moll; Maaike C. Bouwmeester

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to the to the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Household Expenditures Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Oil and Gas Supply Module

16

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Section 25: Future State Assumptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Compliance Certification Application (CCA), Chapter 6.0, Section 6.2 and Appendices SCR and MASS (U.S. DOE 1996). Many of these future state assumptions were derived from the...

18

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

19

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

20

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M068(2003) April 2003. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

22

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

23

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to the Annual Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3

24

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA- 7, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

25

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

26

Empirically Revisiting the Test Independence Assumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirically Revisiting the Test Independence Assumption Sai Zhang, Darioush Jalali, Jochen Wuttke}@cs.washington.edu ABSTRACT In a test suite, all the test cases should be independent: no test should affect any other test's result, and running the tests in any order should produce the same test results. Techniques such as test

Ernst, Michael

27

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

28

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Module Energy Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 21 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Module The LFMM International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the LFMM IEM computes BRENT and WTI prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, and generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail. The IEM also provides, for each year of the projection period, endogenous and

29

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

30

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

31

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M068(2008). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

32

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA- M068(2004). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

33

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

34

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, and (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2003, DOE/EIA- M062(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003).

35

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20031 (AEO2003), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2003 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and International Affairs, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

36

Fleet test evaluation of fully formulated heavy-duty coolant technology maintained with a delayed-release filter compared with coolant inhibited with a nitrited organic acid technology: An interim report  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a controlled extended service interval (ESI) study of the comparative behaviors of a nitrite/borate/low-silicate, low total dissolved solids (TDS) coolant maintained with delayed-release filters, and an organic acid inhibited coolant technology in heavy-duty engines. It reports both laboratory and fleet test data from 66 trucks, powered with different makes of heavy-duty diesel engines. The engines were cooled with three different types of inhibitors and two different glycol base (ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) coolants for an initial period exceeding two years and 500,000 km (300,000 miles). The data reported include chemical depletion rates, periodic coolant chemical analyses, and engine/cooling system reliability experience. The ongoing test will continue for approximately five years and a 1.6 million km (1 million miles) duration. Thirteen trucks were retained as controls, operating with ASTM D 4985 specification (GM-6038 type) coolant maintained with a standard ASTM D 57542 supplemental coolant additive (SCA). Engines produced by Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corp., Cummins Engine Co., and Mack Trucks are included in the test mix.

Aroyan, S.S.; Eaton, E.R. [Penray Companies, Inc., Elk Grove Village, IL (United States). Technical Service

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Definitions of parameters and table of assumptions for the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint

38

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

40

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

42

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

43

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

44

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

45

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.106

46

Fully kinetic modeling of a divergent cusped-field thruster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fully kinetic, particle-in-cell plasma simulation tool has been incrementally developed by members of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Space Propulsion Laboratory. Adapting this model to simulate the performance ...

Gildea, Stephen Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

48

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

49

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

50

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

51

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

52

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

53

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

54

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M060(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

55

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).119 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

56

2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions and Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This 13-page document provides definitions and assumptions used in the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010)

57

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

58

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

59

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

60

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

62

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

63

New Educational Technologies Cannot be Fully Integrated in Existing Educational Systems Some Lessons Drawn from the Analysis of the Introduction of Computers in French Schools During the Last Decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the context of future educational systems design, this paper addresses the important point of new technologies integration. A general overview of possible uses of computers in education is provided as a fir...

Monique Grandbastien

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVoCS 2006 Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking Nick Moffat1 Systems Assurance using CSP. In our formulation, an assumption-commitment style property of a process SYS takes the form-Guarantee, CSP, Model Checking, Compositional Reasoning 1 Introduction The principle of compositional program

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 This report presents major assumptions of NEMS that are used to generate the projections in the AEO2006. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

66

Fully depleted back illuminated CCD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

Holland, Stephen Edward (Hercules, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fully synthetic taped insulation cables  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

69

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

R.E. Sweeney

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to AEO2013 Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual

71

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2012 Assumptions to AEO2012 Release Date: August 2, 2012 | Next Release Date: August 2013 | Full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 [1] (AEO2012), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in AEO2012 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA) of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the

72

Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental assumption in Lubrication Theory. Derivation of thin film flow equations from Navier-Stokes equations. Importance of fluid inertia effects in thin film flows. Some fluid physical properties...

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap assumptions document. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel as a key element in the implementation of the Roadmap Methodology for the INEL Site. The development and identification of these assumptions in an important factor in planning basis development and establishes the planning baseline for all subsequent roadmap analysis at the INEL.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fully Integrated Ballast Controller with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Research (through CoPEC) and the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Simplified block diagram of the two primary control loops in the ballast IC: (I) inner phase control and (2

75

Physics of Fully Depleted CCDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we present simple, physics-based models for two effects that have been noted in the fully depleted CCDs that are presently used in the Dark Energy Survey Camera. The first effect is the observation that the point-spread function increases slightly with the signal level. This is explained by considering the effect on charge-carrier diffusion due to the reduction in the magnitude of the channel potential as collected signal charge acts to partially neutralize the fixed charge in the depleted channel. The resulting reduced voltage drop across the carrier drift region decreases the vertical electric field and increases the carrier transit time. The second effect is the observation of low-level, concentric ring patterns seen in uniformly illuminated images. This effect is shown to be most likely due to lateral deflection of charge during the transit of the photogenerated carriers to the potential wells as a result of lateral electric fields. The lateral fields are a result of space charge in the fully...

Holland, S E; Kolbe, W F; Lee, J S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

link.gif (1946 bytes) link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage introduction.gif (4117 bytes) This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 19991 (AEO99), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3

77

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20061 (AEO2006), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System

78

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States. States. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 93 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2007) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Primary inputs for the module are varied. One set of key assumptions concerns estimates of domestic technically recoverable oil and gas resources. Other factors affecting the projection include the assumed

79

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Petroleum Market Module

80

COMPARING ALASKA'S OIL PRODUCTION TAXES: INCENTIVES AND ASSUMPTIONS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 COMPARING ALASKA'S OIL PRODUCTION TAXES: INCENTIVES AND ASSUMPTIONS1 Matthew Berman In a recent analysis comparing the current oil production tax, More Alaska Production Act (MAPA, also known as SB 21 oil prices, production rates, and costs. He noted that comparative revenues are highly sensitive

Pantaleone, Jim

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81

Reasoning by Assumption: Formalisation and Analysis of Human Reasoning Traces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the traces acquired in experiments undertaken. 1 Introduction Practical reasoning processes are often not limited to single reasoning steps, but extend to traces or trajectories of a number of interrelated by assumption'. This (non-deductive) practical reasoning pattern in- volves a number of interrelated reasoning

Treur, Jan

82

Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks Mawloud Omar, Yacine University of Technology, France. bouabdal@hds.utc.fr Abstract A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a wireless that defines who trusts who and how. Our work aims to provide a fully distributed trust model for mobile ad hoc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.9232544°, -91.09694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.9232544,"lon":-91.09694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

85

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20021 (AEO2002), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2002 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of

86

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook2001 Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20011 (AEO2001), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2001 were produced with the National Energy

87

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 as of 4/4/2000 1. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 4-Speed Automatic" should be .045 instead of .030. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 5-Speed Automatic" should be .065 instead of .045. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 2. Table 28 should be labeled: "Alternative-Fuel Vehicle Attribute Inputs for Compact Cars for Two Stage Logit Model". (Change made on 3/6/2000) 3. The capital costs in Table 29 should read 1998 dollars not 1988 dollars. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 4. Table 37 changed the label "Year Available" to "First Year Completed." Changed the second sentence of Footnote 1 to read "these estimates are costs of new projects

88

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

89

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9., Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 11.1. Petroleum Product Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.2. Year Round Gasoline Specifications by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.3. Gasolline Sulfur Content Assumptions, by Region and Gasoline Type, Parts per Million (PPM). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version

90

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

91

Fully Adaptive AMG Scott MacLachlan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" Ah "-1 ik ff Energy measure: Let G (i) j = (Ah )-1 ij , Sij = G(i) - G (i) j e(j) Ah G(i) Ah Fully, Sij? Apply (localized) relaxation to Ah G(i) = e(i) Fully Adaptive AMG ­ p.11 #12;Approximating Sij to Ah G(i) = e(i) Weighted Jacobi, 1 step: Fully Adaptive AMG ­ p.11 #12;Approximating Sij Can

MacLachlan, Scott

92

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [1] (AEO2010), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2010 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

93

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20081 (AEO2008), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2008 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The AEO projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

94

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009),1 including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2009 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

95

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

96

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

97

Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

Binford, F.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

99

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20001 (AEO2000), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2000 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

100

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by obtaining market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation Report: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO62/1, January 1999.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA-M060(2004) (Washington, DC, 2004). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

102

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2000, DOE/EIA-M062(2000), January 2000.

103

The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction  

SciTech Connect

The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kastengren, Alan L [ANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind.112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

105

Electrical conductivity of nondegenerate, fully ionized plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within a virial expansion of the electrical conductivity of a fully ionized plasma, which takes into account many-particle effects, different limiting cases are considered. An appropriate interpolation formula is compared with experimental values.

G. Rpke and R. Redmer

1989-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wind Speed Scaling in Fully Developed Seas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent tests of all generations of numerical wave models indicate that extreme wave heights are significantly underpredicted by these models. This behavior is consistent with the finding by Ewing and Laing that fully developed wave spectra do not ...

Donald T. Resio; Val R. Swail; Robert E. Jensen; Vincent J. Cardone

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

108

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

109

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

110

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

111

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

112

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

113

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1 (AEO2007), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant to formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports. 2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 3 , which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2007 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and

114

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

115

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in Three Cases, 1995-2035 Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2035 (2008 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

116

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

117

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

118

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

119

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

120

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7), 7), (Washington, DC, January 2007). Key Assumptions The output of the U.S. economy, measured by GDP, is expected to increase by 2.9 percent between 2005 and 2030 in the reference case. Two key factors help explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 3 indicates, for the Reference Case GDP growth slows down in each of the periods identified, from 3.0 percent between 2005 and 2010, to 2.9 percent between 2010 and 2020, to 2.8 percent in the between 2020 and 2030. In the near term from 2005 through 2010, the growth in nonfarm employment is low at 1.2 percent compared with 2.4 percent in the second half of the 1990s, while the economy is expected to experiencing relatively strong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2030 (2006 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids

122

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

123

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

124

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 3. OPEC Oil Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Table 4. Worldwide Oil Reserves as of January 1, 2002 (Billion Barrels) Printer Friendly Version Region Proved Oil Reserves Western Hemisphere 313.6 Western‘Europe 18.1 Asia-Pacific 38.7

125

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

126

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

127

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

128

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

129

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, 7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

130

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

131

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

132

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

133

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

134

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

135

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security systems, microwave ovens, set-top boxes, home audio equipment, rechargeable electronics, and VCR/DVDs. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric appliances. The module's output includes number Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central

136

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

137

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below. 75

138

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

139

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9),

140

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

142

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind108. Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind108. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

143

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 12 . Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost

144

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 13 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 14 for eleven building categories 15 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

145

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

146

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

147

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

148

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids supply and demand curves (1 curve per year; 2008-2030; approximated, isoelastic fit to previous NEMS results). These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2008 with IEO2007 and the STEO some functionality was removed from IEM while a new algorithm was implemented. Based on the difference between U.S. total petroleum liquids production (consumption) and the expected U.S. total liquids production (consumption) at the current WTI price, curves for global petroleum liquids consumption (production) were adjusted for each year. According to previous operations, a new WTI price path was generated. An exogenous oil supply module, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also used in IEM to provide annual regional (country) level production detail for conventional and unconventional liquids.

149

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.100

150

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

151

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).117 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

152

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

153

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

154

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable.gif (4875 bytes) renewable.gif (4875 bytes) The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittence, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

155

Original Paper Fully interconnected, linear control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original Paper Fully interconnected, linear control for limit cycle walking Joseph H Solomon1 and simple control methodologies for these models (Collins & Ruina, 2005; Hobbelen & Wisse, 2008a, 2008b. Corresponding author: Joseph H. Solomon, Northwestern University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2145

Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

156

The inverter in a hybrid or fully  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inverter in a hybrid or fully electric vehicle, such as the Toyota Prius, supplies power from the batteries to the motor. Inverters used in this application are currently limited by their power new material devices under real operating conditions. A project with TRW and others is investigating

Davies, Christopher

157

On the self-similarity assumption in dynamic models for large eddy simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the present formulation of the DP is usually incompatible with its under- lying self-similarity assumption SSAOn the self-similarity assumption in dynamic models for large eddy simulations Daniele Carati eddy simulations and their underlying self-similarity assumption is discussed. The interpretation

Van Den Eijnden, Eric

158

VisualSEEk: a fully automated content-based image query John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VisualSEEk: a fully automated content-based image query system John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Image Technology for New Media Columbia University New

Chang, Shih-Fu

159

Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

160

Comparison of risk-dominant scenario assumptions for several TRU waste facilities in the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

In order to gain a risk management perspective, the DOE Rocky Flats Field Office (RFFO) initiated a survey of other DOE sites regarding risks from potential accidents associated with transuranic (TRU) storage and/or processing facilities. Recently-approved authorization basis documents at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been based on the DOE Standard 3011 risk assessment methodology with three qualitative estimates of frequency of occurrence and quantitative estimates of radiological consequences to the collocated worker and the public binned into three severity levels. Risk Class 1 and 2 events after application of controls to prevent or mitigate the accident are designated as risk-dominant scenarios. Accident Evaluation Guidelines for selection of Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are based on the frequency and consequence bin assignments to identify controls that can be credited to reduce risk to Risk Class 3 or 4, or that are credited for Risk Class 1 and 2 scenarios that cannot be further reduced. This methodology resulted in several risk-dominant scenarios for either the collocated worker or the public that warranted consideration on whether additional controls should be implemented. RFFO requested the survey because of these high estimates of risks that are primarily due to design characteristics of RFETS TRU waste facilities (i.e., Butler-type buildings without a ventilation and filtration system, and a relatively short distance to the Site boundary). Accident analysis methodologies and key assumptions are being compared for the DOE sites responding to the survey. This includes type of accidents that are risk dominant (e.g., drum explosion, material handling breach, fires, natural phenomena, external events, etc.), source term evaluation (e.g., radionuclide material-at-risk, chemical and physical form, damage ratio, airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, leakpath factors), dispersion analysis (e.g., meteorological assumptions, distance to receptors, plume meander, deposition, and other factors affecting the calculated {chi}/Q), dose assessments (specific activities, inhalation dose conversion factors, breathing rates), designated frequency of occurrence, and risk assignment per the DOE Standard 3011 methodology. Information from the sites is being recorded on a spreadsheet to facilitate comparisons. The first response from Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions for the Savannah River Site (SRS) also provided a detailed analysis of the major differences in methods and assumptions between RFETS and SRS, which forms much of the basis for this paper. Other sites responding to the survey include the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Hanford, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Marx, D.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 and 27) including incremental fuel 6 and 27) including incremental fuel efficiency improvement, incremental cost, first year of introduction, and fractional horsepower change. These assumed technology characterizations are scaled up or down to approximate the differences in each attribute for 6 Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) size classes of cars and light trucks. The vehicle sales share module holds the share of vehicle sales by import and domestic manufacturers constant within a vehicle size class at 1999 levels based on National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration data. 32 EPA size class sales shares are projected as a function of income per capita, fuel prices, and average predicted vehicle prices based on endogenous calculations within the MTCM

162

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

163

Development of pyro-processing technology for thorium-fuelled molten salt reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is classified as the non-classical nuclear reactor type based on the specific features coming out from the use of liquid fuel circulating in the MSR primary circuit. Other uniqueness of the reactor type is based on the fact that the primary circuit of the reactor is directly connected with the on-line reprocessing technology, necessary for keeping the reactor in operation for a long run. MSR is the only reactor system, which can be effectively operated within the {sup 232}Th- {sup 233}U fuel cycle as thorium breeder with the breeding factor significantly higher than one. The fuel cycle technologies proposed as ford the fresh thorium fuel processing as for the primary circuit fuel reprocessing are pyrochemical and mainly fluoride. Although these pyrochemical processes were never previously fully verified, the present-day development anticipates an assumption for the successful future deployment of the thorium-fuelled MSR technology. (authors)

Uhlir, J.; Straka, M.; Szatmary, L. [Nuclear Research Inst. ReZ Plc, ReZ 130, Husinec - CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

165

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

166

A fully automated and integrated multi-scale forecasting scheme for emergency preparedness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present one multi-scale integrated simulation technology for emergency preparedness with a holistic approach in hurricane, related storm surge and flood forecasting; infrastructure assessment; and emergency planning. This is an emergency ... Keywords: Finite element, Fully automated through scripting, Multi-scale hurricane simulation, Overland flow, Parallel computation, Water surge

Muhammad Akbar; Shahrouz Aliabadi; Reena Patel; Marvin Watts

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A DC stabilized fully differential amplifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conventional method of constructing a gain amplifier is to use resistor feedback networks. However, present CMOS technology provides capacitors that offer substantially better tracking and linearity performance over ...

Sun, Nancy Y

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electron Capture in a Fully Ionized Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of fully ionized water plasmas are discussed including plasma charge density oscillations and the screening of the Coulomb law especially in the dilute classical Debye regime. A kinetic model with two charged particle scattering events determines the transition rate per unit time for electron capture by a nucleus with the resulting nuclear transmutations. Two corrections to the recent Maiani et al. calculations are made: (i) The Debye screening length is only employed within its proper domain of validity. (ii) The WKB approximation employed by Maiani in the long De Broglie wave length limit is evidently invalid. We replace this incorrect approximation with mathematically rigorous Calogero inequalities in order to discuss the scattering wave functions. Having made these corrections, we find a verification for our previous results based on condensed matter electro-weak quantum field theory for nuclear transmutations in chemical batteries.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

OIKOS 101: 499504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIKOS 101: 499­504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed size models. ­ Oikos 101: 499­504. ESS for the occupancy of `safe sites' or vegetation gaps. If mortality rates are high and/or frequency-independent, ESS

Silvertown, Jonathan

170

Granular Matter 4(3) (2002) How good is the equipartition assumption for the transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular Matter 4(3) (2002) How good is the equipartition assumption for the transport properties of a granular mixture? Meheboob Alam (1) , Stefan Luding (1;2) ? Abstract Kinetic-theory, with the assumption of equipar- tition of granular energy, suggests that the pressure and viscosity of a granular mixture vary

Luding, Stefan

171

Impact of assumption of log-normal distribution on monthly rainfall estimation from TMI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The log-normal assumption for the distribution of the rain rates used for the estimation of monthly rain totals proposed in Wilheit et al 1991 was examined. Since the log-normal assumption was originally used for the SSM/I, it is now necessary to re...

Lee, Dong Heon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Moldy Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustainability movements. 2 Despite these noble intentions, using human responsibility as a base for architecture

Heully, Gustave Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CBE UFAD cost analysis tool: Life cycle cost model, issues and assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Maintenance and Repair Cost Reference. WhitestoneJ. Wallis and H. Lin. 2008. CBE UFAD Cost Analysis Tool:UFAD First Cost Model, Issues and Assumptions. Center for

Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Microwave Properties of Ice-Phase Hydrometeors for Radar and Radiometers: Sensitivity to Model Assumptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simplified framework is presented for assessing the qualitative sensitivities of computed microwave properties, satellite brightness temperatures, and radar reflectivities to assumptions concerning the physical properties of ice-phase ...

Benjamin T. Johnson; Grant W. Petty; Gail Skofronick-Jackson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie Californias residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the states ambitious greenhouse gas reduction goals.

177

Length measurement of a moving rod by a single observer without assumptions concerning its magnitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the results presented by Weinstein concerning the measurement of the length of a moving rod by a single observer, without making assumptions concerning the distance between the moving rod and the observer who measures its length.

Bernhard Rothenstein; Ioan Damian

2005-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Assumptions about the U.S., the EU, NATO, and their Impact on the Transatlantic Agenda  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I propose in this paper to discuss, from an American perspective, the assumptions and assertions that influence the way that I look at foreign policy events at the end of this decade. I will conclude with a fe...

Stanley Sloan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Title Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-58178 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, David S. Watson, Naoya Motegi, and Norman Bourassa Date Published 10/18/2005 Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report describes the results of the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of time dependant activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and provide systems that encourage load shifting or shedding during times when the electric grid is near its capacity or electric prices are high. Demand Response is a subset of demand side management, which also includes energy efficiency and conservation. The overall goal of this research project was to support increased penetration of DR in large facilities through the use of automation and better understanding of DR technologies and strategies in large facilities. To achieve this goal, a set of field tests were designed and conducted. These tests examined the performance of Auto-DR systems that covered a diverse set of building systems, ownership and management structures, climate zones, weather patterns, and control and communication configurations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fully Automated Radiation Hardened by Design Circuit Construction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fully automated logic design methodology for radiation hardened by design (RHBD) high speed logic using fine grained triple modular redundancy (TMR) is presented. The (more)

Hindman, Nathan David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR): Method and System to fully...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR): Method and System to fully fission actinides for electric power production without fuel enrichment, fabrication, or reprocessing A method for...

183

Beyond familiar shores: faculty teaching with technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integration of technology in classrooms has had a positive impact on student achievement. But an investment of time is necessary to move technology from a part-time tool to an active tool, fully integrated into the curriculum. Also, in order to provide ... Keywords: academic, campus needs, curriculum, education, faculty development, higher education, instructional technology, learning, retention, teaching, technology, web-based training

JoAnn C. Ullery

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

FUNWAVE-TVD FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUNWAVE-TVD FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL WITH TVD SOLVER DOCUMENTATION AND USER'S MANUAL a new version of the fully nonlinear Boussinesq wave model (FUN- WAVE) initially developed by Kirby et of surfzone-scale optical properties in a Boussinesq model framework, and modeling of Tsunami wave in both

Kirby, James T.

185

TSUNAMI BENCHMARK RESULTS FOR FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TSUNAMI BENCHMARK RESULTS FOR FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL FUNWAVE-TVD, VERSION 1 of the Boussinesq model FUNWAVE- TVD, carried out in conjunction with the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program.3 Conservative form of fully nonlinear Boussinesq equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.4 Numerical schemes

Kirby, James T.

186

Towards Fully Automatic Placement of Security Sanitizers and Declassifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this space has focused on finding missing sanitizers and was performed on relatively small ap- plicationsTowards Fully Automatic Placement of Security Sanitizers and Declassifiers Benjamin Livshits Fully Automatic Placement of Security Sanitizers and Declassifiers Benjamin Livshits Microsoft Research

Livshits, Ben

187

Design and Control of a Fully Automated Vehicle door  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to develop a fully automated vehicle car door that can detect any object obstructing its path during operation. A fully automated door concept has not yet been implemented in the car industry. The door, operated via...

Hong, Kyung-Min

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Appendix G: Major Assumptions for the Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases/ Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Download Report - Entire AEO2001 (PDF) - AEO2001 by Chapters (PDF) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Acronyms bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts Related Links bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO2001 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 (Only available on the Web) - Regional and more detailed AEO 2001 Reference Case Results - 1998, 2000 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Forecast Homepage bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage Appendix G Major Assumptions for the Forecasts Component Modules Major Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2001

189

Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

191

Campus Recreation at Sonoma State University RELEASE OF LIABILITY -PROMISE NOT TO SUE ASSUMPTION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus Recreation at Sonoma State University RELEASE OF LIABILITY - PROMISE NOT TO SUE ASSUMPTION OF RISK - AGREEMENT TO PAY CLAIMS PERMISSION TO USE VISUAL LIKENESS Activities: a) USE OF SSU RECREATION RECREATION PROGRAMS. Effective Locations and Time Periods: a) RECREATION CENTER: DURING HOURS OF OPERATION

Ravikumar, B.

192

Cognitive Assessment Models with Few Assumptions, and Connections with Nonparametric IRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive Assessment Models with Few Assumptions, and Connections with Nonparametric IRT Brian of the monotonicity conditions discussed in Section 4. #12;Abstract In recent years, as cognitive theories of learning" on student achievement relative to theory-driven lists of examinee skills, beliefs and other cognitive

Junker, Brian

193

Draft -F. Nicoud 1 About the zero Mach number assumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft - F. Nicoud 1 About the zero Mach number assumption in the calculation of thermoacoustic as the the flame forcing ('Rayleigh') term. Besides, the net effect of the non zero Mach number terms the frequency of oscillation and growth rate are modified when the Mach number is not zero. It is demonstrated

Nicoud, Franck

194

Models of transcription factor binding: Sensitivity of activation functions to model assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on statistical physics, a Markov-chain model and a computational simulation. Comparison of these models suggests for cooperativity. The simulation model suggests that direct interactions between TFs are unlikely to be the main in this contribution, the assumption of the cell being a well stirred reactor makes a qualitative difference

Kent, University of

195

Development of a tool dedicated to the evaluation of hydrogen term source for technological Wastes: assumptions, physical models, and validation  

SciTech Connect

In radioactive waste packages hydrogen is generated, in one hand, from the radiolysis of wastes (mainly organic materials) and, in the other hand, from the radiolysis of water content in the cement matrix. In order to assess hydrogen generation 2 tools based on operational models have been developed. One is dedicated to the determination of the hydrogen source term issues from the radiolysis of the wastes: the STORAGE tool (Simulation Tool Of Emission Radiolysis Gas), the other deals with the hydrogen source term gas, produced by radiolysis of the cement matrices (the Damar tool). The approach used by the STORAGE tool for assessing the production rate of radiolysis gases is divided into five steps: 1) Specification of the data packages, in particular, inventories and radiological materials defined for a package medium; 2) Determination of radiochemical yields for the different constituents and the laws of behavior associated, this determination of radiochemical yields is made from the PRELOG database in which radiochemical yields in different irradiation conditions have been compiled; 3) Definition of hypothesis concerning the composition and the distribution of contamination inside the package to allow assessment of the power absorbed by the constituents; 4) Sum-up of all the contributions; And finally, 5) validation calculations by comparison with a reduced sampling of packages. Comparisons with measured values confirm the conservative character of the methodology and give confidence in the safety margins for safety analysis report.

Lamouroux, C. [CEA Saclay, Nuclear Energy Division /DANS, Department of physico-chemistry, 91191 Gif sur yvette (France); Esnouf, S. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M/Radiolysis Laboratory , 91191 Gif sur yvette (France); Cochin, F. [Areva NC,recycling BU, DIRP/RDP tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Defense (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

775 Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering P. A systems developed specifically for neutron scattering environ- ments. The refrigerators are completely relatively recently however, the lowest temperatures available in almost all neutron scattering laboratories

Boyer, Edmond

197

Crowd modeling: generation of a fully articulated crowd of characters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I present a fast, efficient, and production friendly method to generate a crowd of fully articulated characters. A wide variety of characters can be created from a relatively few base models. The models that are generated...

Swaminathan, Karthik

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015 and resource assumptions through 2030. The GWOB model provides annual country level oil production detail for eight conventional and unconventional oils.

199

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

200

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

Phillip Mills

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fully-automatic laser welding and micro-sculpting with universal in situ inline coherent imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though new affordable high power laser technologies make possible many processing applications in science and industry, depth control remains a serious technical challenge. Here we show that inline coherent imaging, with line rates up to 312 kHz and microsecond-duration capture times, is capable of directly measuring laser penetration depth in a process as violent as kW-class keyhole welding. We exploit ICI's high speed, high dynamic range and robustness to interference from other optical sources to achieve fully automatic, adaptive control of laser welding as well as ablation, achieving micron-scale sculpting in vastly different heterogeneous biological materials.

Webster, Paul J L; Ji, Yang; Galbraith, Christopher M; Kinross, Alison W; Van Vlack, Cole; Fraser, James M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions x-rays and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 1012 neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF with predicted ion and neutron spectra neutron anisotropy neutron spot size and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

M. May

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four: business administration, wind farm management, aircraft maintenance, tooling production, quality and safety or selected program track focus. Transfer students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses

204

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: business administration, energy management, wind farm management, automation and controls, aircraft, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses over for WSU credit. Laboratory

205

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design.

206

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors. ISPO C-50 Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

Binford, F.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Towards Fully Automatic Placement of Security Sanitizers and Declassifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has fallen on the developer. However, sanitizer placement in large-scale applications is difficult in this space focuses on finding missing sanitizers and is applied to relatively small appli- cations. SeveralTowards Fully Automatic Placement of Security Sanitizers and Declassifiers Benjamin Livshits

Chong, Stephen

209

VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES ZHENJIE REN Abstract, inspired by [3], we define the viscosity solution, by using the nonlinear expectation. The paper contains , that for any bounded viscosity subsolution u1 and Key words and phrases. Path dependent PDEs, Dirichlet problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Honeywell fully commercializes eco-friendly blowing agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Honeywell Specialty Materials has fully commercialized a novel low-global-warming-potential (GWP) blowing agent for one-component foam and aerosol applications in Europe. Hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234ze has zero ozone-depletion potential and meets European Union regulatory requirements for reducing the use of high GWP substances, the company says.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A FULLY DISTRIBUTED PRIME NUMBERS GENERATION USING THE WHEEL SIEVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A FULLY DISTRIBUTED PRIME NUMBERS GENERATION USING THE WHEEL SIEVE Gabriel Paillard Laboratoire d distributed approach for generating all prime numbers up to a given limit. From Er- atosthenes, who elaborated. In this work, we propose a new distributed algorithm which generates all prime num- bers in a given finite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

213

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 3. Coal-Related  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia Eastern Interior Western Fraction of underground coal production at: Gassy mines 0.885 0.368 0.971 0.876 0.681 Nongassy mines 0.115 0.632 0.029 0.124 0.319 Production from mines with degasification systems (fraction of underground production) 0.541 0.074 0.810 0.067 0.056 Emission factors (kilograms methane per short ton of coal produced) Underground Mining Gassy mines 6.047 5.641 27.346 2.988 6.027 Nongassy mines 0.362 0.076 15.959 0.285 0.245 Degassified mines 4.085 37.724 22.025 0.310 0.000 Surface Mining 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 Post-Mining, underground-mined 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 Post-Mining, surface-mined 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 Methane recovery at active coal mines

214

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M060(2010) (Washington, DC, 2010). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs.

215

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M060(2008) (Washington, DC, 2008). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

216

Examining pervasive technology practices in schools : a mental models approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of computers and education have failed to account for the relevance and importance of tacit assumptions and unquestioned expectations that underlie educational technology practices. A major premise of this dissertation ...

Vaikakul, Savalai, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fully Three-dimensional Simulation and Modeling of a Dense Plasma Focus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is a pulsed-power machine that electromagnetically accelerates and cylindrically compresses a shocked plasma in a Z-pinch. The pinch results in a brief (about 100 nanosecond) pulse of X-rays, and, for some working gases, also a pulse of neutrons. A great deal of experimental research has been done into the physics of DPF reactions, and there exist mathematical models describing its behavior during the different time phases of the reaction. Two of the phases, known as the inverse pinch and the rundown, are approximately governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and there are a number of well-established codes for simulating these phases in two dimensions or in three dimensions under the assumption of axial symmetry. There has been little success, however, in developing fully three-dimensional simulations. In this work we present three-dimensional simulations of DPF reactions and demonstrate that 3D simulations predict qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior than their 2D counterp...

Meehan, B T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Temperature Dependence of Digital Single-Event Transients in Bulk and Fully-Depleted SOI Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors that affect single-event transient pulse widths, such as drift, diffusion, and parasitic bipolar transistor parameters, are also strong functions of operating temperature. In this paper, SET pulse-width measurements ...

Gouker, Pascale M.

219

FRACSTIM/I: A Fully Coupled Fluid Flow/Heat Transport and Geomechanica...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FRACSTIMI: A Fully Coupled Fluid FlowHeat Transport and Geomechanical DeformationFracture Generation Simulator FRACSTIMI: A Fully Coupled Fluid FlowHeat Transport and...

220

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

222

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

223

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

224

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - National Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 National Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

225

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

226

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

227

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

228

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

229

Fully relativistic theory for magnetic EXAFS: Formalism and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully relativistic theory for magnetic extended x-ray absorption fine structure is presented that is based on the Dirac equation for spin-polarized systems and relativistic multiple scattering theory. This scheme not only allows one to treat spin polarization and all relativistic effects on the same level but can also be applied to go beyond the standard muffin-tin construction by using nonspherical potentials. To illustrate the application of the presented fully relativistic scheme, results for the K-edge spectra of Ni in fcc Ni and the L2,3 edges of Pt in fcc Fe3Pt are presented. A very simple and convincing interpretation of the corresponding dichroic spectra is given on the basis of the differential form of the so-called sum rules.

H. Ebert, V. Popescu, and D. Ahlers

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

General Relativity as a fully singular Lagrange system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present some gauge conditions to eliminate all second time derivative terms in the vierbein forms of the ten Einstein equations of general relativity; at the same time, we present the corresponding Lagrangian in which there is not any quadratic term of first time derivative that can leads to those vierbein forms of the Einstein equations without second time derivative term by the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations. General relativity thus becomes a fully singular Lagrange system.

T. Mei

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Phase Diagram of Fully Developed Drainage in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect

Using concepts of invasion percolation in a gradient, we develop a phase diagram of fully developed drainage in porous media. The transition between stabilized displacement (where the conventional continuum applies) and fingering is controlled by the change of the sign of the gradient of the percolation probability (from stabilizing to destabilizing). The transition boundary is described by scaling laws. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Yortsos, Y.C.; Xu, B. [Petroleum Engineering Program, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1211 (United States)] [Petroleum Engineering Program, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1211 (United States); Salin, D. [Laboratoire Fluides, Automatique et Systemes Thermiques, Universite Paris VI and XI, associated with C.N.R.S. (URA 871), Batiment 502, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire Fluides, Automatique et Systemes Thermiques, Universite Paris VI and XI, associated with C.N.R.S. (URA 871), Batiment 502, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Newtonian limit of fully nonlinear cosmological perturbations in Einstein's gravity  

SciTech Connect

We prove that in the infinite speed-of-light limit (i.e., non-relativistic and subhorizon limits), the relativistic fully nonlinear cosmological perturbation equations in two gauge conditions, the zero-shear gauge and the uniform-expansion gauge, exactly reproduce the Newtonian hydrodynamic perturbation equations in the cosmological background; as a consequence, in the same two gauge conditions, the Newtonian hydrodynamic equations are exactly recovered in the Minkowsky background.

Hwang, Jai-chan [Department of Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Hyerim, E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: hr@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High Temperature, High Voltage Fully Integrated Gate Driver Circuit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

234

High Temperature, High Voltage Fully Integrated Gate Driver Circuit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

235

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test test Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Energy ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES Aerosol Sealing Aerosol Remote Sealing System Clog-free Atomizing and Spray Drying Nozzle Air-stable Nanomaterials for Efficient OLEDs Solvent Processed Nanotube Composites OLEDS with Air-stable Structured Electrodes APIs for Online Energy Saving Tools: Home Energy Saver and EnergyIQ Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost Dynamic Solar Glare Blocking System Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Electrochromic Windows with Multiple-Cavity Optical Bandpass Filter Electrochromic Window Technology Portfolio Universal Electrochromic Smart Window Coating

236

Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report  

SciTech Connect

The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system  

SciTech Connect

A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system  

SciTech Connect

A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. 50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside July 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - Doctors have a new way of thinking about how to treat heart and skeletal muscle diseases. Body builders have a new way of

240

Special relativity as the limit of an Aristotelian universal friction theory under Reye's assumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores a classical mechanical theory under two further assumptions: (a) there is a universal dry friction force (Aristotelian mechanics), and (b) the variation of the mass of a body due to wear is proportional to the work done by the friction force on the body (Reye's hypothesis). It is shown that mass depends on velocity as in Special Relativity, and that the velocity is constant for a particular characteristic value. In the limit of vanishing friction the theory satisfies a relativity principle as bodies do not decelerate and, therefore, the absolute frame becomes unobservable. However, the limit theory is not Newtonian mechanics, with its Galilei group symmetry, but rather Special Relativity. This result suggests to regard Special Relativity as the limit of a theory presenting universal friction and exchange of mass-energy with a reservoir (vacuum). Thus, quite surprisingly, Special Relativity follows from the absolute space (ether) concept and could have been discovered following studies of Aristotelian mechanics and friction. We end the work confronting the full theory with observations. It predicts the Hubble law through tired light, and hence it is incompatible with supernova light curves unless both mechanisms of tired light (locally) and universe expansion (non-locally) are at work. It also nicely accounts for some challenging numerical coincidences involving phenomena under low acceleration.

E. Minguzzi

2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing offshore wind resources for the large scale generation of electricity. Drawing ...

Withee, Jon E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Archaeopteryx specimens are important but extremely rare fossils. Due to their possession of both reptilian (jaws with teeth, long bony tail) and avian (feathered wings) characters, Archaeopteryx has been crucial in the development of Darwinian evolution. Despite their importance, no Archaeopteryx specimen has ever been chemically analyzed. This in large part may be explained by the analytical obstacles which preclude applying standard methods to such valuable specimens; destructive sampling is not an option and most non-destructive methods cannot handle large specimens. Furthermore, mapping using conventional methods is far too slow to enable chemical zonation to be reasonably determined. Mapping of trace element chemistry is of tremendous interest, however, because it opens a window into understanding several critical questions about Archaeopteryx in particular, and about fossil specimens in general. Preserved trace chemistry in bones and soft tissue may be remnants of the living organism, and therefore may give insight into life processes of extinct organisms. When mapping includes the embedding rock matrix, mass transfer between the fossil and the matrix can be constrained, hence giving information about mode of preservation. Chemical analysis can also resolve artefacts of the curation process. Finally, accurate chemical maps can also be useful for directing future work by highlighting regions that may be promising for other types of analysis including structural methods (CT, diffraction) or techniques that use other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (infra-red).

243

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Biotechnology and Medicine DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS CANCER CANCER PROGNOSTICS 14-3-3 Sigma as a Biomarker of Basal Breast Cancer ANXA9: A Therapeutic Target and Predictive Marker for Early Detection of Aggressive Breast Cancer Biomarkers for Predicting Breast Cancer Patient Response to PARP Inhibitors Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Analysis Using Selected Gene Expression Comprehensive Prognostic Markers and Therapeutic Targets for Drug-Resistant Breast Cancers Diagnostic Test to Personalize Therapy Using Platinum-based Anticancer Drugs Early Detection of Metastatic Cancer Progenitor Cells

244

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

245

DSM of Newton type for solving operator equations F(u) = f with minimal smoothness assumptions on F  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the authors' results on the Dynamical Systems Method (DSM) for solving operator equation (*) F(u) = f. It is assumed that (*) is solvable. The novel feature of the results is the minimal assumption on the smoothness of F. It is assumed that F is continuously Frechet differentiable, but no smoothness assumptions on F?(u) are imposed. The DSM for solving equation (*) is developed. Under weak assumptions global existence of the solution u(t) is proved, the existence of u(?) is established, and the relation F(u(?)) = f is obtained. The DSM is developed for a stable solution of equation (*) when noisy data f? are given, ''f ? f?'' ? ?.

N.S. Hoang; A.G. Ramm

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nonequilibrium Transitions in Fully Frustrated Josephson Junction Arrays  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of thermal fluctuations in a fully frustrated Josephson junction array driven by a current I larger than the apparent critical current I{sub c}(T) . We calculate numerically the behavior of the chiral order parameter of Z{sub 2} symmetry and the transverse helicity modulus [related to the U(1) symmetry] as a function of temperature. We find that the Z{sub 2} transition occurs at a temperature T{sub Z{sub 2}}(I) which is lower than the temperature T{sub U(1)}(I) for the U(1) transition. Both transitions could be observed experimentally from measurements of the longitudinal and transverse voltages.

Marconi, Veronica I.; Dominguez, Daniel

2001-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fabrication and Characterization of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The current generation of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels, consisting of Tristructural Isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix, is fabricated by hot pressing. Matrix powder feedstock is comprised of alumina - yttria additives thoroughly mixed with silicon carbide nanopowder using polyethyleneimine as a dispersing agent. Fuel compacts are fabricated by hot pressing the powder - fuel particle mixture at a temperature of 1800-1900 C using compaction pressures of 10-20 MPa. Detailed microstructural characterization of the final fuel compacts shows that oxide additives are limited in extent and are distributed uniformly at silicon carbide grain boundaries, at triple joints between silicon carbide grains, and at the fuel particle-matrix interface.

Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Shimoda, Kazuya [Kyoto University, Japan; Montgomery, Fred C [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Kyoto University, Japan; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Optical Spectrum of Partially and Fully Fluorinated Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we study the electronic structures and optical properties of partially and fully fluorinated graphene by a combination of \\abinitio\\ \\G0W0\\ calculations and large-scale multi-orbital tight-binding simulations. We find that for partially fluorinated graphene, the appearance of paired fluorine atoms is more favorable than unpaired atoms. We also show that different types of structural disorder, such as carbon vacancies, fluorine vacancies, fluorine vacancy-clusters and fluorine armchair- and zigzag-clusters, will introduce different types of midgap states and extra excitations within the optical gap. Furthermore we argue that the local formation of $sp^3$ bonds upon fluorination can be distinguished from other disorder inducing mechanisms which do not destroy the $sp^2$ hybrid orbitals by measuring the polarization rotation of passing polarized light.

Yuan, Shengjun; Schulz, Alexander; Wehling, Tim O; Katsnelson, Mikhail I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

High quality factor, fully switchable THz superconducting metasurface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a complementary THz metasurface realised with Niobium thin film which displays a quality factor Q=54 and a fully switchable behaviour as a function of the temperature. The switching behaviour and the high quality factor are due to a careful design of the metasurface aimed at maximising the ohmic losses when the Nb is above the critical temperature and minimising the radiative coupling. The superconductor allows the operation of the cavity with an high Q and inductive elements with an high aspect ratio. Comparison with three dimensional finite element simulations highlights the crucial role of the inductive elements and of the kinetic inductance of the Cooper pairs in achieving the high quality factor and the high field enhancement.

Scalari, Giacomo; Cibella, Sara; Leoni, Roberto; Faist, Jerome

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Debye-Onsager relaxation effect in fully ionized plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the virial expansion of the inverse conductivity in fully ionized plasmas ?-1=A(T)ln n+B(T)+C(T)n1/2ln n+O(n1/2) and the coefficient C(T), which is related to the Debye-Onsager relaxation effect, is evaluated in the nondegenerate case. In analogy to the Chapman-Enskog treatment of the Boltzmann equation, a moment expansion to evaluate C(T) is presented. Including the two-particle distribution in the generalized linear response theory, the original Onsager result is recovered within a hydrodynamic approximation. Improved results for the relaxation effect beyond this approximation are obtained considering higher moments of the two-particle distribution function.

A. Esser and G. Rpke

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

PNNL Global Energy Technology Strategy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Strategy Program Technology Strategy Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Name Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Agency/Company /Organization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sector Energy Website http://www.pnl.gov/gtsp/ References Global Energy Technology Strategy Program [1] "Since its inception in 1998, the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program (GTSP) has been assessing the important roles that technology can play in effectively managing the long-term risks of climate change. This involves an integrated approach to fully exploring all aspects of climate change - including scientific, economic, regulatory, and social impacts - and then aligning new or existing technologies to mitigate negative consequences.[1]

252

Emerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Emerging Technologies (ET) Program of the Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports applied research and development (R&D) for technologies, systems, and models that contribute to building energy consumption.

253

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta-Analysis of Estimates in the Literature and overlapping choices of assumptions. The purpose of the study is to use regression and related analyses

Watson, Andrew

255

Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government...

256

Tools & Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Weprovide leadership for transforming workforce development through the power of technology. It develops corporate educational technology policy and enables the use of learning tools and...

257

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

258

21-389 Technology and Environmental Deterioration in Pre-Industrial Societies Chapter 21. TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21-389 Technology and Environmental Deterioration in Pre-Industrial Societies Chapter 21. TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERIORATION IN PRE-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES One assumption made by most... [is... Robert Heizer 1955 More than one half [of the extent of the Roman Em- pire] is either deserted

Richerson, Peter J.

259

Older People With Dementia Cared for Mostly at Home Study challenges assumption that most patients die in nursing homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Older People With Dementia Cared for Mostly at Home Study challenges assumption that most patients die in nursing homes -- Robert Preidt FRIDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Many elderly people with dementia live and die at home rather than in nursing homes, a new study has found. The findings challenge

Belogay, Eugene A.

260

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Exploration Technologies Technology Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Exploration Technologies Needs Assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the program's research and development.

262

A fully nonlinear characteristic method for gyrokinetic simulation  

SciTech Connect

We present a new scheme which evolves the perturbed part of the distribution function along a set of characteristics that solves the fully nonlinear gyrokinetic equations. This nonlinear characteristic method for particle simulation is an extension of the partially linear weighting scheme, and may be considered an improvement of existing {delta} f methods. Some of the features of this new method are: the ability to keep all of the nonlinearities, particularly those associated with parallel acceleration; the loading of the physical equilibrium distribution function f{sub o} (e.g., a Maxwellian), with or without the multiple spatial scale approximation; the use of a single of trajectories for the particles; and also, the retention of the conservation properties of the original gyrokinetic system in the numerically converged limit. Therefore, one can take advantage of the low noise property of the weighting scheme together with the quiet start techniques to simulate weak instabilities, with a substantially reduced number of particles than required for a conventional simulation. The new method is used to study a one dimensional drift wave model which isolates the parallel velocity nonlinearity. A mode coupling calculation of the saturation mechanism is given, which is in good agreement with the simulation results and predicts a considerably lower saturation level then the estimate of Sagdeev and Galeev. Finally, we extend the nonlinear characteristic method to the electromagnetic gyrokinetic equations in general geometry.

Parker, S.E.; Lee, W.W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fully Electromagnetic Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Equations for Tokamak Edge Turbulence  

SciTech Connect

An energy conserving set of the fully electromagnetic nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and Maxwell's equations, which is applicable to both L-mode turbulence with large amplitude and H-mode turbulence in the presence of high E ? B shear has been derived. The phase-space action variational Lie perturbation method ensures the preservation of the conservation laws of the underlying Vlasov-Maxwell system. Our generalized ordering takes ?[sub ]i [\\sub]<< ?? ~ LE ~ Lp << R (here ?[sub ]i [\\sub] is the thermal ion Larmor radius and ?? = [B over B?] ?[sub ]i [\\sub]), as typically observed in the tokamak H-mode edge, with LE and Lp being the radial electric field and pressure gradient lengths. We take ?[sub ] perpendicular to[/sub] ?[sub ]i [\\sub] ~ 1 for generality, and keep the relative fluctuation amplitudes e?? ? ?[sub ]i [\\sub]~ ?? ? ? up to the second order. Extending the electrostatic theory in the presence of high E ? B shear [Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)], contributions of electromagnetic fluctuations to the particle charge density and current are explicitly evaluated via pull-back transformation from the gyrocenter distribution function in the gyrokinetic Maxwell's equation.

Hahm, T.S.; Wang, Lu,; Madsen, J.

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

summer 2004, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) summer 2004, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers used two different kinds of technology, a price signal sent over the internet to facility computers, and a hard-wired internet relay box, to test auto- mated demand response. They found up to four megawatts (MW) of savings in 36 buildings located at 18 sites, according to a new report. The research, published as "Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response

265

Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Best practices, project resources, and other tools on energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

266

Numerical study of natural convection in fully open tilted cavities  

SciTech Connect

A numerical simulation of two-dimensional laminar natural convection in a fully open tilted square cavity with an isothermally heated back wall is conducted. The remaining two walls of the cavity are adiabatic. Steady-state solutions are presented for Grashof numbers between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 5} and for tilt angles ranging from {minus}60{degree} to 90{degree} (where 90{degree} represents a cavity with the opening facing down). The fluid properties are assumed to be constant except for the density variation with temperature that gives rise to the buoyancy forces, which is treated by the Boussinesq approximation. The fluid concerned is air with Prandtl number fixed at 0.71. The governing equations are expressed in a normalized primitive variables formulation. Numerical predictions of the velocity and temperature fields are obtained using the finite-volume-based power law (SIMPLER: Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations Revised) algorithm. For a vertical open cavity ({alpha} = 0{degree}), the algorithm generated results that were in good agreement with those previously published. Flow patterns and isotherms are shown in order to give a better understanding of the heat transfer and flow mechanisms inside the cavity. Effects of the controlling parameters-Grashof number and tilt angle-on the heat transfer (average Nusselt number) are presented and analyzed. The results also revealed that the open-cavity Nusselt number approaches the flat-plate solution when either Grashof number or tilt angle increases. In addition, a correlation of the Nusselt number in terms of the Grashof number and tilt angle is developed and presented; a comparison is made with available data from other literature.

Elsayed, M.M.; Al-Najem, N.M.; El-Refaee, M.M.; Noor, A.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Int. J. Spray and Comb. Dynamics -Accepted for publication 1 About the zero Mach number assumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as much as the the flame forcing ('Rayleigh') term. Besides, the net effect of the non zero Mach numberInt. J. Spray and Comb. Dynamics - Accepted for publication 1 About the zero Mach number assumption in the calculation of thermoacoustic instabilities By F. N I C O U D1 AND K. W I E C Z O R E K1,2 1 University

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Waiver of Liability, Assumption of Risk and Indemnification Agreement for Use of Colorado School of Mines Student Recreation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mines Student Recreation Center (For children of faculty, staff and students, and CSM students under the Colorado School of Mines Recreation Center (hereinafter "Facility") facilities, activities and programs. 2 of the Facility. I am fully aware of the risks and hazards associated with my child's participation in recreation

269

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loans Energy Doctor Energy Audits Incentives to Builders/Developers New building/shell technologies Passive solar

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Technology Roadmaps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thispage contains links to DOE's Technology Roadmaps, multi-year plans outlining solid-state lighting goals, research and development initiatives aimed at accelerating technology advances and...

271

Technology Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In presenting this chapter on technology development, it must be stated that attempts to make an up-to-date technology survey are restricted, unfortunately, by the proprietary nature of recent advances, detail...

B. E. Conway

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

FRACSTIM/I: A Fully Coupled Fluid Flow/Heat Transport and Geomechanica...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FRACSTIMI: A Fully Coupled Fluid FlowHeat Transport and Geomechanical DeformationFracture Generation Simulator aka FALCON: Fracturing and Liquid CONservation Robert K....

273

Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

Bieber, Michael

274

Fully integrated safeguards and security for reprocessing plant monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants contain a wealth of plant monitoring data including material measurements, process monitoring, administrative procedures, and physical protection elements. Future facilities are moving in the direction of highly-integrated plant monitoring systems that make efficient use of the plant data to improve monitoring and reduce costs. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) is an analysis tool that is used for modeling advanced monitoring systems and to determine system response under diversion scenarios. This report both describes the architecture for such a future monitoring system and present results under various diversion scenarios. Improvements made in the past year include the development of statistical tests for detecting material loss, the integration of material balance alarms to improve physical protection, and the integration of administrative procedures. The SSPM has been used to demonstrate how advanced instrumentation (as developed in the Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies campaign) can benefit the overall safeguards system as well as how all instrumentation is tied into the physical protection system. This concept has the potential to greatly improve the probability of detection for both abrupt and protracted diversion of nuclear material.

Duran, Felicia Angelica; Ward, Rebecca; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Middleton, Bobby D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 News Stories (and older) 6 News Stories (and older) 12.21.2005___________________________________________________________________ Genzyme acquires gene therapy technology invented at Berkeley Lab. Read more here. 07.19.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Symyx, a start up company using Berkeley Lab combinatorial chemistry technology licensed by the Technology Transfer Department and developed by Peter Schultz and colleagues in the Materials Sciences Division, will be honored with Frost & Sullivan's 2005 Technology Leadership Award at their Excellence in Emerging Technologies Awards Banquet for developing enabling technologies and methods to aid better, faster and more efficient R&D. Read more here. 07.11.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Nanosys, Inc., a Berkeley Lab startup, is among the solar nanotech companies investors along Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park hope that thinking small will translate into big profits. Read more here.

276

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-58178 Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities M;Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities September 7, 2005 Mary Ann Manager Dave Michel Contract 500-03-026 Sponsored by the California Energy Commission PIER Demand Response

277

Fully-Coupled Simulations of the Rotorcraft / Ship Dynamic Interface Emre Alpman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of the effect of ship deck on the rotor wake (simplified ground effectFully-Coupled Simulations of the Rotorcraft / Ship Dynamic Interface Emre Alpman exa152@psu A fully- coupled simulation tool has been developed to analyze the rotorcraft/ship dynamic interface

278

A Discriminative Model-Constrained Graph Cuts Approach to Fully Automated Pediatric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Discriminative Model-Constrained Graph Cuts Approach to Fully Automated Pediatric Brain Tumor of Radiology, University Medical Center, Erlangen, Germany 4 Siemens, CT SE SCR 2, Erlangen, Germany Abstract. In this paper we present a fully automated approach to the segmentation of pediatric brain tumors in multi

Carneiro, Gustavo

279

Transportation radiological risk assessment for the programmatic environmental impact statement: An overview of methodologies, assumptions, and input parameters  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future configuration of radioactive waste management at its network of facilities. Because the transportation of radioactive waste is an integral component of the management alternatives being considered, the estimated human health risks associated with both routine and accident transportation conditions must be assessed to allow a complete appraisal of the alternatives. This paper provides an overview of the technical approach being used to assess the radiological risks from the transportation of radioactive wastes. The approach presented employs the RADTRAN 4 computer code to estimate the collective population risk during routine and accident transportation conditions. Supplemental analyses are conducted using the RISKIND computer code to address areas of specific concern to individuals or population subgroups. RISKIND is used for estimating routine doses to maximally exposed individuals and for assessing the consequences of the most severe credible transportation accidents. The transportation risk assessment is designed to ensure -- through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions -- that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful. This is accomplished by uniformly applying common input parameters and assumptions to each waste type for all alternatives. The approach presented can be applied to all radioactive waste types and provides a consistent and comprehensive evaluation of transportation-related risk.

Monette, F.; Biwer, B.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fuel Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Layering Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Planar technology requires that thin layers of materials be formed and patterned sequentially, commencing with a flat rigid substrate. The key aspects of each layer are its Thi...

Ivor Brodie; Julius J. Muray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnGen EnGen < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET EnGen.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technologies Inc Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Sandy Cove Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The EnGen point absorber, which features 'Smart Float' technology that allows the device to travel along a rigid spar at an incline of 45 degrees. The spar is moored at a single point of contact which allows the device to be fully compliant on all three axes (pitch, roll and yaw). Mooring Configuration Proprietary

283

Glass Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... WE have received from the Department of Glass Technology, University of Sheffield, a copy of vol. ii. of Experimental Researches ... that department. The papers included have already appeared in the Journal of the Society of Glass Technology. They range over a somewhat wide field of the ...

1920-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

NREL: Technology Deployment - Technology Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

assistance to federal and private industry to help address market barriers to sustainable energy technologies. Learn more about NREL's work in the following areas:...

285

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

286

Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

287

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research

288

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Sandia Cooler's innovative, compact design combines a fan and a finned metal heat sink into a single element, efficiently transferring heat in microelectronics and reducing energy use. Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Learn More

289

PNNL Global Energy Technology Strategy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Strategy Program Technology Strategy Program (Redirected from Global Energy Technology Strategy Program) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Name Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Agency/Company /Organization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sector Energy Website http://www.pnl.gov/gtsp/ References Global Energy Technology Strategy Program [1] "Since its inception in 1998, the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program (GTSP) has been assessing the important roles that technology can play in effectively managing the long-term risks of climate change. This involves an integrated approach to fully exploring all aspects of climate change - including scientific, economic, regulatory, and social impacts - and then aligning new or existing technologies to mitigate negative consequences.[1]

290

Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Multi-Path Transportation Futures * Idling Studies * EDrive Vehicle Monthly Sales Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Technology Analysis truck Heavy vehicle techologies are one subject of study. Research Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation Heavy Vehicle Technologies Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study Idling Studies Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Reports Propane Vehicles: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities (pdf; 525 kB) Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities (pdf; 696 kB) Regulatory Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles (pdf; 1.02 MB)

291

Coal Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several large demonstrations of FBC technology for electrical power generation have proven ... -MW(e) atmospheric pressure circulating fluidized-bed boiler at the ColoradoUte Electric Association's...14 ...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Boussinesq-type formulations for fully nonlinear and extremely dispersive water waves: derivation and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Boussinesq-type formulations for fully nonlinear...Agern Alle 11, 2970 Horsholm, Denmark Boussinesq formulations valid for highly dispersive...operators are replaced by finite-series (Boussinesq-type) approximations. Three different...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the use of fully coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools to perform a loads analysis of a 5-MW offshore wind turbine supported by a barge with moorings, one of many promising floating platform concepts.

Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microfabrication of Optically Flat Silicon Micro-Mirrors for Fully Programmable Micro-Diffraction Gratings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have fabricated and characterized a Fully Programmable Micro-Diffraction Grating (FPMDG) with 64 silicon micro-mirrors for spectral shaping in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. The FPMDG arrays of 50 ?m ...

Timotijevic, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanowire networks as window layers in thin film solar cells.window layer for fully solution-deposited thin filmITO) thin films by silver nanowire composite window layers

Chung, Choong-Heui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

New pole tip shapes mitigating torque ripple in short pitched and fully pitched switched reluctance motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High torque ripple is one of the major disadvantages of switched reluctance motor (SRM). Although there are several publications in the literature addressing the full or partial solution to the problem for conventional SRM, no publication exists for the torque ripple reduction of recently emerging fully pitched SRM. This paper deals with finding best dimension set for a particular stator and rotor pole tip shape aiming to reduce torque ripple in both short pitched and fully pitched SRMs. Five new stator and rotor pole tip structures have been investigated and compared with conventional pole tip. Analyses have been performed with the finite element (FE) models of 6/43-phase short pitched and fully pitched SRM with unipolar excitation. With the proposed pole tips, torque ripple is reduced by 24.1% in short pitched SRM for 10A phase current and by 22.6% in fully pitched SRM for 5.59A phase current.

Yusuf Ozoglu; Muhammet Garip; Erkan Mese

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Next-to-leading order hard scattering using fully unintegrated parton distribution functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We calculate the next-to-leading order fully unintegrated hard scattering coefficient for unpolarized gluon-induced deep inelastic scattering using the logical framework of parton correlation functions developed in previous work. In our approach, exact four-momentum conservation is maintained throughout the calculation. Hence, all nonperturbative functions, like parton distribution functions, depend on all components of parton four-momentum. In contrast to the usual collinear factorization approach where the hard scattering coefficient involves generalized functions (such as Dirac ? functions), the fully unintegrated hard scattering coefficient is an ordinary function. Gluon-induced deep inelastic scattering provides a simple illustration of the application of the fully unintegrated factorization formalism with a nontrivial hard scattering coefficient, applied to a phenomenologically interesting case. Furthermore, the gluon-induced process allows for a parametrization of the fully unintegrated gluon distribution function.

Ted C. Rogers

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fully automatic calibration of LIDAR and video streams from a vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work describes a fully automatic technique to calibrate a geometric mapping between lidar and video feeds on a mobile ground-based platform. This data association is a crucial first step for any multi-modal scene ...

Bileschi, Stanley M.

299

Next-to-Leading Order Hard Scattering Using Fully Unintegrated Parton Distribution Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the next-to-leading order fully unintegrated hard scattering coefficient for unpolarized gluon-induced deep inelastic scattering using the logical framework of parton correlation functions developed in previous work. In our approach, exact four-momentum conservation is maintained throughout the calculation. Hence, all non-perturbative functions, like parton distribution functions, depend on all components of parton four-momentum. In contrast to the usual collinear factorization approach where the hard scattering coefficient involves generalized functions (such as Dirac $\\delta$-functions), the fully unintegrated hard scattering coefficient is an ordinary function. Gluon-induced deep inelastic scattering provides a simple illustration of the application of the fully unintegrated factorization formalism with a non-trivial hard scattering coefficient, applied to a phenomenologically interesting case. Furthermore, the gluon-induced process allows for a parameterization of the fully unintegrated gluon distribution function.

Ted C. Rogers

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

Next-to-leading order hard scattering using fully unintegrated parton distribution functions  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the next-to-leading order fully unintegrated hard scattering coefficient for unpolarized gluon-induced deep inelastic scattering using the logical framework of parton correlation functions developed in previous work. In our approach, exact four-momentum conservation is maintained throughout the calculation. Hence, all nonperturbative functions, like parton distribution functions, depend on all components of parton four-momentum. In contrast to the usual collinear factorization approach where the hard scattering coefficient involves generalized functions (such as Dirac {delta} functions), the fully unintegrated hard scattering coefficient is an ordinary function. Gluon-induced deep inelastic scattering provides a simple illustration of the application of the fully unintegrated factorization formalism with a nontrivial hard scattering coefficient, applied to a phenomenologically interesting case. Furthermore, the gluon-induced process allows for a parametrization of the fully unintegrated gluon distribution function.

Rogers, Ted C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies Hadi with chip power reduc- tions. This paper examines how well process technology and mi- croarchitecture delivered on this assumption. This paper evalu- ates power and performance of native and Java workloads

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Measurements of imbalance response for a rigid rotor fully supported on squeeze film dampers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEASUREMENTS OF IMBALANCE RESPONSE FOR A RIGID ROTOR FULLY SUPPORTED ON SQUEEZE FILM DAMPERS A Thesis by DANIEL ROGER LUBELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MEASUREMENTS OF IMBALANCE RESPONSE FORA RIGID ROTOR FULLY SUPPORTED ON SQUEEZE FILM DAMPERS by DANIEL ROGER LUBELL Submitted to Texas AlbM University in partial...

Lubell, Daniel Roger

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division to them in California. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM MAY 2011, VOL. 3, NO. 1 California's Transition

California at Berkeley, University of

304

A fully 3D atomistic quantum mechanical study on random dopant induced effects in 25nm MOSFETs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Fully 3D Atomistic Quantum Mechanical Study on RandomWang* Abstract We present a fully 3D atomistic quantum me-Dopant ?uctuation, MOSFETs, 3D, threshold, LCBB, quantum

Jiang, Xiang-Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

306

Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transfer plus technology application. A&C Enercom has learned from experience that technology deployment will not occur unless utilities achieve both technology transfer (e.g, the dissemination of information) and technology application (e.g., the direct...

Kuhel, G. J.

307

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

Blaedel, K.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Coupled robot-flow injection analysis system for fully automated determination of total polyphenols in olive oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupled robot-flow injection analysis system for fully automated determination of total polyphenols in olive oil ...

Jose A. Garcia-Mesa; M. Dolores Luque de Castro; Miguel Valcarcel

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Vertical structure and turbulent saturation level in fully radiative protoplanetary disc models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Unlike, for example, the solar butterfly diagram, the field reversals shown in Fig. 2...OUTLOOK We have performed 3D radiative MHD simulations of MRI-turbulent protoplanetary...sufficient to justify the assumption of ideal MHD. The logical next step will be to include......

M. Flaig; W. Kley; R. Kissmann

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stream Turbine Stream Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization StatoilHydro co owned by Hammerfest Strong Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A fully operational 300kW prototype tidal turbine has been running in Norway since 2003 and has achieved good results It s the world s first tidal turbine to supply electricity directly to the onshore grid In the autumn of 2008 Hammerfest Str�m signed an intention agreement with Scottish Power to further develop tidal technology in the UK A 1 MW turbine is currently under development

311

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

312

FRACSTIM/I: A Fully Coupled Fluid Flow/Heat Transport and Geomechanical Deformation/Fracture Generation Simulator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This research will develop a fully coupled, fully implicit approach for EGS stimulation and reservoir simulation. Solve all governing equations simultaneously in fully implicit way. Enable massively parallel performance and scalability. Apply state of the art nonlinear PDE solvers: Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) method.

313

(Environmental technology)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

Boston, H.L.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

COMMERCIALIZING TECHNOLOGIES &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurement." Dan Gillings President Applied Technology Associates NMSBA reduced my manufacturing costs by 20 a patent for a revolutionary new, even more shock absorbent mouthguard they will manufacture from material including a new additive. 2 Animated Talking Toys Heilbron Associates had acquired rights to a fiber optic

315

Vacuum Technology  

SciTech Connect

The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

Biltoft, P J

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

A fully differential BiCMOS OTA for a 10.7MHz bandpass filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A FULLY DIFFERENTIAL BICMOS OTA FOR A 10. 7MHZ BANDPASS FILTER A Thesis by MUHAMMAD IMTIAZ ALI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1993 Major Subject: ElectricaJ Engineering A FULLY DIFFERENTIAL BICMOS OTA FOR A 10. 7MHZ BANDPASS FILTER A Thesis by MUHAMMAD IMTIAZ ALI Approved as to style and content by: g) /4 Edgar Sanchez-Sinencio (Chair of Committee) She f H. K...

Ali, Muhammad Imtiaz

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

318

Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com//w/images/6/63/RE_C Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Screenshot References: Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers[1] Summary "Provided herein is a preliminary, high-level summary of future and projected cost estimates for 1) Biofuels, 2) Solar (PV & CSP), and 3) Vehicle Batteries. Cost estimates are dependent on various assumptions and

319

Emerging technologies  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

Lu, Shin-yee

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Positional Disorder in the Fully Frustrated Josephson Junction Array: Random Gaussian Phase Shifts in the Fully Frustrated 2D XY Model  

SciTech Connect

We consider the effect of positional disorder on a Josephson junction array with an applied magnetic field of f=1/2 flux quantum per unit cell. This is equivalent to the problem of random Gaussian phase shifts in the fully frustrated 2D XY model. Using simple analytical arguments and numerical simulations, we present evidence that the ground state vortex lattice of the pure model becomes disordered, in the thermodynamic limit, by {ital any} finite amount of positional disorder. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Gupta, P.; Teitel, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Building Technologies Office: About Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies The Emerging Technologies team funds the research and development of cost-effective, energy-efficient building technologies within five years of commercialization. Learn more about the: Key Technologies Benefits Results Key Technologies Specific technologies pursued within the Emerging Technologies team include: Lighting: advanced solid-state lighting systems, including core technology research and development, manufacturing R&D, and market development Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC): heat pumps, heat exchangers, and working fluids Building Envelope: highly insulating and dynamic windows, cool roofs, building thermal insulation, façades, daylighting, and fenestration Water Heating: heat pump water heaters and solar water heaters

322

MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep Gen Tidal Turbines Deep Gen Tidal Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Gen Tidal Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Generation Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The DEEP Gen 1 MW fully submerged tidal turbine best exploits resources in depths 30m The horizontal axis turbine is inexpensive to construct and easy to install due to the lightweight 80 tons MW support structure allows rapid removal and replacement of powertrains enabling safe maintenance in a dry environment and is located out of the wave zone for improved survivability

323

A Fully Automated Fault-tolerant System for Distributed Video Processing and Off-site Replication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Fully Automated Fault-tolerant System for Distributed Video Processing and Off-site Replication been a failure-prone tedious operation with an operator needed to babysit the processing and off-site, off-site replication, fault-tolerance, grid, educational research. 1. INTRODUCTION In different fields

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

324

Two-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the magnetic field source (solenoid or permanent magnet). To test the technique, we show the results obtainedTwo-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands We describe a numerical technique for solving the coupled

D'Ambrosio, Domenic

325

FUNWAVE-TVD Fully Nonlinear Boussinesq Wave Model with TVD Solver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUNWAVE-TVD Fully Nonlinear Boussinesq Wave Model with TVD Solver Documentation and User's Manual Boussinesq wave model (FUN- WAVE) initially developed by Kirby et al. (1998). The development of the present version was motivated by recent needs for modeling of surfzone-scale optical properties in a Boussinesq

Kirby, James T.

326

ClusPro: a fully automated algorithm for protein protein docking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible to evaluate billions of putative complex structures covering a large set of the translationalClusPro: a fully automated algorithm for protein­ protein docking Stephen R. Comeau1 , David W.rcsb.org/pdb/). The docking algorithms evalu- ate billions of putative complexes, retaining a preset number with favorable

Vajda, Sandor

327

Fully Integrated NxN MEMS Wavelength Selective Switch with 100% Colorless Add-Drop Ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Integrated NxN MEMS Wavelength Selective Switch with 100% Colorless Add-Drop Ports Shifu Yuan/drop ports. © 2007 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (060.2330) Fiber optics communications; (060 multi-port wavelength selective switches using liquid crystal devices. Micro-Electro-Mechanical System

Bowers, John

328

A Fully Conservative Ghost Fluid Method & Stiff Detonation Waves Computer Science Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Fully Conservative Ghost Fluid Method & Stiff Detonation Waves Duc Nguyen Computer Science applicable for tracking material interfaces, inert shocks, and both deflagration and detonation waves tracking inert shocks and detonation waves, so that is the focus of this paper. In particular, we address

Fedkiw, Ron

329

Scalable Optoelectronic ATM Networks: The iPOINT Fully Functional Testbed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scalable Optoelectronic ATM Networks: The iPOINT Fully Functional Testbed J. W. Lockwood, H. Duan validates the design of a 128 Gb s optoelectronic ATM switch. Optoelectronics, rather than all optical that maximizes the utility of photonic, electronic, and optoelectronic devices while simultaneously satisfying

Lockwood, John W.

330

Thin film optical waveguide and optoelectronic device integration for fully embedded board level optical interconnects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin film optical waveguide and optoelectronic device integration for fully embedded board level on to the waveguide film. Measured propagation loss of the waveguide was 0.3dB/cm at 850nm. Keywords: optoelectronic between electronic and optoelectronic components as conventional approaches do, and additionally, real

Chen, Ray

331

Enhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determined by x-ray crystallography except at very high resolution. The scattering of neutrons by hydrogenEnhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin Fong and structurally, direct visu- alization of them by using crystallography is difficult. Neutron crys- tallography

Ramakrishnan, Venki

332

A Fully Autonomous Indoor Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Fully Autonomous Indoor Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard Abstract--Recently there has been an increased interest in the development of autonomous flying vehicles. Whereas most system to autonomously operate in indoor environments. To achieve this, we systematically extend

Teschner, Matthias

333

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

334

Propagation of Wind Energy into the Deep Ocean through a Fully Turbulent Mesoscale Eddy Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the 3D propagation of wind-forced near-inertial motions in a fully turbulent mesoscale eddy field with a primitive equation numerical model. Although the wind stress is uniform, the near-inertial motion field quickly becomes ...

Eric Danioux; Patrice Klein; Pascal Rivire

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meso-Machining Meso-Machining PDF format (182 kb) Sandia's Micro-Electro Discharge Machine (Micro-EDM) (above). On the upper right inset is the Micro-EDM electode in copper that was made with the LIGA (electroforming) process. On the lower right inset is a screen fabricated into .006 inch kovar sheet using the Micro-EDM electrode. The walls of the screen are .002 inch wide by .006 inch deep. Meso-machining technologies being developed at Sandia National Laboratories will help manufacturers improve a variety of production processes, tools, and components. Meso-machining will benefit the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and defense industries by creating feature sizes from the 1 to 50 micron range. Sandia's Manufacturing Science and Technology Center is developing the

336

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LTCC multi-chip module LTCC multi-chip module A high density LTCC multi-chip module Electronic Packaging PDF format (150 kb) The Electronic Packaging technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging Department are a resource for all aspects of microelectronic packaging. From design and layout to fabrication of prototype samples, the staff offers partners the opportunity for concurrent engineering and development of a variety of electronic packaging concepts. This includes assistance in selecting the most appropriate technology for manufacturing, analysis of performance characteristics and development of new and unique processes. Capabilities: Network Fabrication Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC) Thick Film Thin Film Packaging and Assembly Chip Level Packaging MEMs Packaging

337

Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

338

Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

339

TECHNOLOGY LICENSE APPLICATION Office of Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 TECHNOLOGY LICENSE APPLICATION Office of Technology Transfer UT-Battelle, LLC (UT. One of the functions of UT-BATTELLE's Office of Technology Transfer is to negotiate license agreements

Pennycook, Steve

340

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Information Technology and Libraries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sue Chesley Perry 196 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND LIBRARIES |LITA - Library & Information Technology Association). Two of the 190 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND LIBRARIES |

Hubble, Ann; Murphy, Deborah A.; Perry, Susan Chesley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Industrial clusters and regional innovation based on hydrogen and fuel cell technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial clusters and regional innovation based on hydrogen and fuel cell technologies-Westphalia (Germany): Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Network in North Rhine-Westphalia Regional authorities develops fully or regions in Europe with a potential to develop clusters based on hydrogen and fuel cell technologies? 3

343

Technology Transfer: Success Stories: Licensed Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Licensed Technologies Licensed Technologies Here are some of our licensees and the technologies they are commercializing; see our Start-Up Company page for more of our technology licenses. Company (Licensee) Technology Life Technologies Corp. Cell lines for breast cancer research Bristol Myers Squibb; Novartis; Plexxikon Inc.; Wyeth Research; GlaxoSmithKline; Johnson & Johnson; Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Genzyme Software for automated macromolecular crystallography Shell International Exploration and Production; ConnocoPhillips Company; StatOil ASA; Schlumburger Technology Corportation; BHP Billiton Ltd.; Chevron Energy Technology Company; EniTecnologie S.p.A. Geo-Hydrophysical modeling software Microsoft Home Energy Saver software distribution Kalinex Colorimetric bioassay

344

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

8 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced...

345

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle...

346

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Films Thin Films PDF format (189 kb) Multi Layer Thin Films Multi Layer Thin Films Planetary Sputtering SystemsPlanetary Sputtering Systems Planetary Sputtering Systems The Thin Film laboratory within Manufacturing Science & Technology provides a variety of vapor deposition processes and facilities for cooperative research and development. Available capabilities include electron beam evaporation, sputter deposition, reactive deposition processes, atomic layer deposition (ALD) and specialized techniques such as focused ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition. Equipment can be reconfigured for prototyping or it can be dedicated to long-term research, development and manufacturing. Most sputter and evaporative deposition systems are capable of depositing multiple materials.

347

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molding, Thermoforming & Compounding Molding, Thermoforming & Compounding PDF format (89 kb) The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center helps customers choose the best materials and techniques for their product by providing a variety of conformal coatings, thermoforming, and compounding materials using established or custom designed processes. The department provides consulting services for injection molding and rubber compounding projects. Capabilities: Thermoforming: Processing thermoplastics such as polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, polypropylene polystyrene, and ABS; producing holding trays, protective caps, and custom covers Injection Molding Consultation: Designing your part to be injection molded, helping you choose the best material for your application, and supporting your interface with injection molding companies

348

Technology Name  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Development DE-EM0000598 D&D KM-IT For the deployment of Information Technology for D&D knowledge management Page 1 of 2 Florida International University Florida D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool Challenge Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) work is a high priority across the DOE Complex. The D&D community associated with the various DOE sites has gained extensive knowledge and experience over the years. To prevent the D&D knowledge and expertise from being lost over time an approach is needed to capture and maintain this valuable information in a universally available and easily usable system. Technical Solution The D&D KM-IT serves as a centralized repository

349

CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS -2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS - 2013 GUIDELINES & PROFORMAE FOR NOMINATIONS Planning and Performance 2013 #12;CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS BRIEF DETAILS ,,CSIR Technology Awards were instituted in 1990 to encourage multi-disciplinary in- house team efforts and external interaction for technology development

Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

350

Fully coupled fluid flow and geomechanics in the study of hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work addresses the poroelastic effect on the processes involved in hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture production using a finite element based fully coupled poroelastic model (more)

Aghighi, Mohammad Ali

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Lab Visits on DOE Technology Roadmap and the Technology Advisory...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE Technology Roadmap and the Technology Advisory Board OCIO Technology Summit: High Performance Computing Lab Visits on DOE Technology Roadmap and the Technology Advisory Board...

352

INL Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Through collaboration with industry partners, INL's Technology Deployment office makes available to American agencies and international organizations unique...

353

Energy Technology Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Public-private partnerships transforming industry and list of commercialized technologies, knowledge-based results, and promising technologies

354

California Institute of Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California Institute of Technology o Ivan Celanovic, Principal Research Scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology o Geoffrey Kinsey, Director, Photovoltaic...

355

Technology Validation Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen and fuel cell technology validation efforts.

356

A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409,"HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"  

SciTech Connect

This paper revises and extends EPRI report EA-3409, ''Household Appliance Choice: Revision of REEPS Behavioral Models.'' That paper reported the results of an econometric study of major appliance choice in new residential construction. Errors appeared in two tables of that report. We offer revised versions of those tables, and a brief analysis of the consequences and significance of the errors. The present paper also proposes several possible extensions and re-specifications of the models examined by EPRI. Some of these are judged to be highly successful; they both satisfy economic intuition more completely than the original specification and produce a better quality fit to the dependent variable. We feel that inclusion of these modifications produces a more useful set of coefficients for economic modeling than the original specification. This paper focuses on EPRI's models of residential space heating technology choice. That choice was modeled as a nested logit structure, with consumers choosing whether to have central air conditioning or not, and, given that choice, what kind of space heating system to have. The model included five space heating alternatives with central cooling (gas, oil, and electric forced-air; heat pumps; and electric baseboard) and eight alternatives without it (gas, oil, and electric forced-air; gas and oil boilers and non-central systems; and electric baseboard heat). The structure of the nested logit model is shown in Figure 1.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J. E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fully frustrated Josephson junction ladders with Mobius boundary conditions as topologically protected qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how to realize a ``protected'' qubit by using a fully frustrated Josephson Junction ladder (JJL) with Mobius boundary conditions. Such a system has been recently studied within a twisted conformal field theory (CFT) approach (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 15 (2000) 1679; Nucl. Phys. B 641 (2002) 547) and shown to develop the phenomenon of flux fractionalization (Eur. Phys. J. B 49 (2006) 83). The relevance of a ``closed'' geometry has been fully exploited in relating the topological properties of the ground state of the system to the presence of half flux quanta and the emergence of a topological order has been predicted (JSTAT (2005) P03006). In this letter the stability and transformation properties of the ground states under adiabatic magnetic flux change are analyzed and the deep consequences on the realization of a solid state qubit, protected from decoherence, are presented.

Gerardo Cristofano; Vincenzo Marotta; Adele Naddeo; Giuliano Niccoli

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fully relativistic description of the magneto-optical properties of arbitrary layered systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully relativistic formalism is presented that allows us to define the frequency-dependent optical conductivity tensor for arbitrary layered systems in a layer-resolved way. This opens in particular the way to deal with the magneto-optical properties of magnetic surface layer systems and to calculate the corresponding magneto-optical Kerr spectra. The formalism, based on a fully relativistic description of response theory in arbitrary order, is described in some detail. For an implementation the very flexible spin polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method of band structure calculation has been used. Results of corresponding applications to the elemental ferromagnets bcc-Fe and fcc-Co treated as homogeneous layer systems are presented.

T. Huhne and H. Ebert

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cyclic hardening and softening behavior of a fully annealed Zircaloy-4  

SciTech Connect

Polycrystalline metals with a hexagonal close-packed (HCP) crystalline structure show a unique deformation behavior and fracture characteristics under cyclic loading conditions. As the HCP materials have limited slip systems and a tendency to develop a preferred orientation (texture), they show deformation anisotropy resulting from the texture during plastic deformation. Therefore, this anisotropy of the materials will affect not only the fatigue crack initiation/growth process but also the stress responses due to the increase in the slip irreversibility. It is well known that the fully annealed metals usually cyclically harden not soften. However, the initial cyclic hardening followed by softening in the higher strain ranges and the only cyclic softening to fracture in the lower strain ranges were observed in the fully annealed Zircaloy-4. This paper is proposing a new model to explain such cyclic behavior in Zircaloy-4 in terms of texture change during fatigue.

Lee, D.H. (Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)); Kwun, S.I. (Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division of asphalt pavements. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM JULY 2010, VOL. 2, NO. 1 Warm Mix Asphalt Hits the Road, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer Program, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division solve the very serious problem of waste tire disposal. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2009, VOL, University of California Pavement Research Center, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer

California at Berkeley, University of

362

Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration a Roadmap for Venus Exploration (RVE) that is consistent with VEXAG priorities as well as Planetary Decadal Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology

Rathbun, Julie A.

363

Innovative Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Power Innovative Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Power November 15, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis The PNM Prosperity Energy Storage Project is the nation’s first combined solar generation and storage facility to be fully integrated into a utility’s power grid. Pictured above are the facility's solar panels, including an aerial view in the upper left. | Image courtesy of PNM The PNM Prosperity Energy Storage Project is the nation's first combined solar generation and storage facility to be fully integrated into a utility's power grid. Pictured above are the facility's solar panels, including an aerial view in the upper left. | Image courtesy of PNM Dr. Imre Gyuk Dr. Imre Gyuk Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

364

A fully implicit method for 3D quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion.  

SciTech Connect

We describe the implementation of a prototype fully implicit method for solving three-dimensional quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion problems. This method allows us to solve the magnetic advection diffusion equations in an Eulerian frame with a fixed, user-prescribed velocity field. We have verified the correctness of method and implementation on two standard verification problems, the Solberg-White magnetic shear problem and the Perry-Jones-White rotating cylinder problem.

Siefert, Christopher; Robinson, Allen Conrad

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Partnership Agreements Technology Partnership Agreements Through technology partnership agreements, NREL provides partners with technical support to help commercialize and deploy energy technologies and products. We do not fund any projects under a technology partnership agreement. The partner provides the necessary resources and covers our costs of providing technical services. NREL does provide funding opportunities through competitively placed contracts. For more information, see our business opportunities. Process The technology partnership agreement process basically includes 11 steps. See the NREL Technology Partnership Agreement Process flowchart. We are committed to working through these steps in a timely manner. Experience suggests that the fastest means to reach an agreement is through

366

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses PDF format (74 kb) Sol Gel Sol Gel Coating with Sol-Gel Glasses Coating with Sol-Gel Glasses The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol-gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materials with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a substrate by spinning, dipping, spraying, electrophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate.

367

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beam Manufacture Ion Beam Manufacture PDF format (113 kb) Example sine wave FIB sputtered into initially planar Si substrate Example sine wave FIB sputtered into initially planar Si substrate Sandia Manufacturing Science & Technology's Focused Ion Beam (FIB) laboratory provides an opportunity for research, development and prototyping. Currently, our scientists are developing methods for ion beam sculpting microscale tools, components and devices. This includes shaping of specialty tools such as end-mills, turning tools and indenters. Many of these have been used in ultra-precision machining DOE applications. Additionally, staff are developing the capability to ion mill geometrically-complex features and substrates. This includes the ability to sputter predetermined curved shapes of various symmetries and

368

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 foot diameter cyanate ester / fiberglass laminated antenna 3 foot diameter cyanate ester / fiberglass laminated antenna 3 foot diameter cyanate ester / fiberglass laminated antenna Composites PDF format (145 kb) Polymer composite materials are composed of fibers in an organic matrix and can be useful in applications that require a high strength-to-weight ratio. Sandia's MS&T staff will work with you from part design, through mold and tooling design, and on through fabrication. The department is capable of fabricating small and large complex parts and will help you choose the most economical technique for your composite needs. Capabilities: The Center has a comprehensive program on the mechanical engineering design, tooling and fixturing, lay-out, complete processing of the composite structure, and technology transfer of composite structures for a

369

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Engineered Net Shaping(tm) Laser Engineered Net Shaping(tm) PDF format (140 kb) picture of processing blade Processing Blade Sandia National Laboratories has developed a new technology to fabricate three-dimensional metallic components directly from CAD solid models. This process, called Laser Engineered Net ShapingT (LENS®), exhibits enormous potential to revolutionize the way in which metal parts, such as complex prototypes, tooling, and small-lot production items, are produced. The process fabricates metal parts directly from the Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models using a metal powder injected into a molten pool created by a focused, high-powered laser beam. Simultaneously, the substrate on which the deposition is occurring is scanned under the beam/powder interaction zone to fabricate the desired

370

Diffusion of irreversible energy technologies under uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a model of technology diffusion is consistent with characteristics of participants in most energy markets. Whereas the models used most widely for empirical research are based on the assumption that the extended delays in adoption of cost-saving innovations are the result of either lack of knowledge about the new processes or heterogeneity across potential adopters, the model presented in this paper is based on the strategic behavior by firms. The strategic interdependence of the firms` decisions is rooted in spillover effects associated with an inability to exclude others from the learning-by-doing acquired when a firm implements a new technology. The model makes extensive use of recent developments in investment theory as it relates irreversible investments under uncertainty.

Cacallo, J.D.; Sutherland, R.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

7-117 The claim of a heat pump designer regarding the COP of the heat pump is to be evaluated. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-47 7-117 The claim of a heat pump designer regarding the COP of the heat pump is to be evaluated. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily. HP Wnet,in QH QL TL TH Analysis The maximum heat pump coefficient of performance would occur if the heat pump were completely reversible, 5.7 K026K300 K300 COP maxHP, LH H TT

Bahrami, Majid

372

Review of technical justification of assumptions and methods used by the Environmental Protection Agency for estimating risks avoided by implementing MCLs for radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed regulations for allowable levels of radioactive material in drinking water (40 CFR Part 141, 56 FR 33050, July 18, 1991). This review examined the assumptions and methods used by EPA in calculating risks that would be avoided by implementing the proposed Maximum Contaminant Levels for uranium, radium, and radon. Proposed limits on gross alpha and beta-gamma emitters were not included in this review.

Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mixing of the fully symmetric vibrational modes in carbon nanotubes M. Mohr,* M. Machn, and C. Thomsen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy of a nanotube. If we displace all atoms accord- ing to a pattern that belongs to an irreducibleMixing of the fully symmetric vibrational modes in carbon nanotubes M. Mohr,* M. Machón, and C 2007 We study the mixing of the fully symmetric modes in single-walled carbon nanotubes with ab initio

Nabben, Reinhard

374

MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlantis AN 150 Atlantis AN 150 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Atlantis AN 150.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Atlantis Resources Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Gujarat Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description The AN400 is a 400kW shallow water hydro kinetic turbine which has been extensively operated at an open ocean, grid connected test facility located at San Remo, Australia. The AN400 turbine uses Aquafoils to capture the kinetic energy present in the flow of water which drives a chain drive system powering 2 X 75kW induction generators. The system has 220o yaw capability, vertical recovery for maintenance and cleaning, and the system is fully autonomous and can be remotely controlled via internet connection. The converter and PLC/power conditioning/control systems are located on top of a surface piercing pylon. The turbine is robust and can withstand water flow containing significant debris. It is fully scalable and has been developed over a 6 year period with multiple tow-testing and continual optimisation.

375

Thermodynamic and optical analysis for a CPV/T hybrid system with beam splitter and fully tracked linear Fresnel reflector concentrator utilizing sloped panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Spectral splitting technology that separates solar spectrum into several parts and enables different energy conversions such as photovoltaic (PV) conversion and photo-thermal conversion aims to utilize the full spectrum solar energy efficiently. A novel concentrating PV/Thermal (CPV/T) hybrid system with beam splitter and fully tracked linear Fresnel reflector concentrator utilizing sloped panels was proposed in this study. The relations between the structural parameters and the optical performances of the system were investigated. The concentrated radiation distribution on the PV device surface was simulated by taking into account the main optical errors and shows a good uniformity. Based on the experimental data of the components, thermodynamic analysis on the CPV/T hybrid system was carried out and the results reveal that the overall energy conversion efficiencies of the proposed CPV/T hybrid system is higher than that of the CPV system under the same conditions.

Yang Liu; Peng Hu; Qian Zhang; Zeshao Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Summary and Presentations from Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop Now Available  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Beginning on September 30, 2014, the Department of Energy hosted a two-day workshop on Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies in Washington DC. The purpose of the workshop was to foster discussion about the analytic challenges associated with valuing the diverse impacts of deploying distributed energy technologies. Many valuation studies have been published in recent years, using different methods and assumptions.

377

Realization of Fully Frustrated Josephson-Junction Arrays with Cold Atoms  

SciTech Connect

Fully frustrated Josephson-junction arrays (FF-JJA's) exhibit a subtle compound phase transition in which an Ising transition associated with discrete broken translational symmetry and a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition associated with quasi-long-range phase coherence occur nearly simultaneously. In this Letter we discuss a cold-atom realization of the FF-JJA system. We demonstrate that both orders can be studied by standard momentum-distribution-function measurements and present numerical results, based on a successful self-consistent spin-wave approximation, that illustrate the expected behavior of observables.

Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Tosi, M.P. [NEST-INFM and Classe di Scienze, Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); MacDonald, A.H. [Physics Department, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

4e-condensation in a fully frustrated Josephson junction diamond chain  

SciTech Connect

Fully frustrated one-dimensional diamond Josephson chains have been shown [B. Doucot and J. Vidal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 227005 (2002)] to possess a remarkable property: The superfluid phase occurs through the condensation of pairs of Cooper pairs. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we analyze quantitatively the insulator to 4e-superfluid transition. We determine the location of the critical point and discuss the behavior of the phase-phase correlators. For comparison, we also present the case of a diamond chain at zero and 1/3 frustration where the standard 2e-condensation is observed.

Rizzi, Matteo [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Cataudella, Vittorio [COHERENTIA CNR-INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit Federico II, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Fazio, Rosario [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), via Beirut 2-4, I-34014, Trieste (Italy)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Demonstration of a fully tuneable entangling gate for continuous-variable one-way quantum computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a fully tuneable entangling gate for continuous-variable one-way quantum computation. We present a proof-of-principle demonstration by propagating two independent optical inputs through a three-mode linear cluster state and applying the gate in various regimes. The genuine quantum nature of the gate is confirmed by verifying the entanglement strength in the output state. Our protocol can be readily incorporated into efficient multi-mode interaction operations in the context of large-scale one-way quantum computation, as our tuning process is the generalisation of cluster state shaping.

Shota Yokoyama; Ryuji Ukai; Seiji C. Armstrong; Jun-ichi Yoshikawa; Peter van Loock; Akira Furusawa

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fully pseudospectral solution of the conformally invariant wave equation near the cylinder at spacelike infinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the scalar, conformally invariant wave equation on a four-dimensional Minkowski background in spherical symmetry, using a fully pseudospectral numerical scheme. Thereby, our main interest is in a suitable treatment of spatial infinity, which is represented as a cylinder. We consider both Cauchy problems, where we evolve data from a Cauchy surface to future null infinity, as well as characteristic initial value problems with data at past null infinity, and demonstrate that highly accurate numerical solutions can be obtained for a small number of grid points.

Jrg Frauendiener; Jrg Hennig

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Fully Solar-Powered Photoelectrochemical Conversion for Simultaneous Energy Storage and Chemical Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fully Solar-Powered Photoelectrochemical Conversion for Simultaneous Energy Storage and Chemical Sensing ... (15) Nonetheless, the storage and utilization of the oxidative energy carried by the photogenerated holes at the photoanodes are generally low, due to large overpotential for water oxidation, as well as the electric energy loss when driving charge carriers through multiple material interfaces and external circuits. ... In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H2 generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. ...

Yongcheng Wang; Jing Tang; Zheng Peng; Yuhang Wang; Dingsi Jia; Biao Kong; Ahmed A. Elzatahry; Dongyuan Zhao; Gengfeng Zheng

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fully differential study of interference effects in the ionization of H2 by proton impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured fully differential cross sections for ionization of H2 by 75-keV proton impact. The coherence length of the projectile beam was varied by changing the distance between a collimating slit and the target. By comparing the cross sections measured for large and small coherence lengths pronounced interference effects could be identified in the data. A surprising result is that the phase angle in the interference term is primarily determined by the momentum transfer and only to a lesser extent by the recoil-ion momentum.

S. Sharma; T. P. Arthanayaka; A. Hasan; B. R. Lamichhane; J. Remolina; A. Smith; M. Schulz

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer October 25, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Did you know? The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer is the nationwide network of federal laboratories that provides the forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking laboratory mission technologies and expertise with the marketplace. In consonance with the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 and related federal policy, the mission of the FLC is to promote and facilitate the rapid movement of federal laboratory research results and technologies into the mainstream of the U.S. economy. Learn more about the FLC. A great invention that sits on a shelf, gathering dust, benefits no one.

384

NREL: Technology Transfer - Technologies Available for Licensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Available for Licensing Technologies Available for Licensing Photo of NREL scientist in the NREL Hydrogen Lab. NREL's scientists and engineers develop award-winning technologies available for licensing. NREL scientists and engineers produce breakthrough and award-winning renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies that are available for licensing. We have many licensing opportunities for NREL-developed technologies, including our featured LED technologies. To see all our technologies available for licensing, visit the EERE Innovation Portal and search for NREL. Learn about our licensing agreement process. Contact For more information about licensing NREL-developed technologies, contact Eric Payne, 303-275-3166. Ombuds NREL strives to quickly resolve any issue or concern you may have regarding

385

Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo Institute of Technology 231 #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology 2 IT #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof

386

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways AF&PA estimates that the forest products industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity by 12% by 2012 relative to 2000 numbers. One of the main ways AF&PA anticipates that the industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity is through implementation of new technologies from research and development programs. AF&PA has been participating in DOE's Industries of the Future program, a collaborative research and development partnership between DOE and the forest products industry. Through this program, AF&PA has participated in the development of a number of technologies aimed at cutting energy use, minimizing environmental impacts, and improving productivity in industry. If fully commercialized, these technologies could make the U.S. forest

387

Modern Biomass Conversion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of key biomass conversion technologies currently deployed and technologies that may...2...capture and sequestration technology (CCS). In doing so, special at...

Andre Faaij

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Building Technologies Research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Breaking new ground in energy efficiency #12;Building Technologies Research To enjoy a sustainable energy and environmental future, America must these enormous challenges. Today, through the Building Technologies and Research Integration Center (BTRIC

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

389

A fully nonlinear wave model to account for breaking wave impact loads on offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical model capable of simulating offshore wind turbines exposed to extreme loading conditions. External condition-based extreme responses are reproduced by coupling a fully nonlinear wave kinematic solver with a hydro-aero-elastic simulator. The transient nonlinear free surface problem of water waves is formulated assuming the potential theory and a higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM) is used to discretize Laplaces equation. For temporal evolution a second-order Taylor series expansion is implemented. The code is successfully adopted to simulate overturning plunging breakers, which give rise to dangerous impact loads when they break against wind turbine substructures. Emphasis is also placed on the development of a global simulation framework that aims at embedding the wave simulator into a more general stochastic environment. Indeed, first a linear irregular sea is generated by a spectral approach, then only on critical sub-domains, where wave impacts are expected, the fully nonlinear solver is invoked for a more refined simulation. This permits to systematically account for dangerous effects on the structural response (which would be missed by adopting linear or weakly nonlinear wave theories alone) without penalizing the computational effort.

Enzo Marino; Claudio Borri; Udo Peil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Presentation given...

391

Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Technologies Technologies October 7, 2013 - 10:20am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information about energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies through the following areas. Energy-Efficient Product Procurement: Find energy-efficient product requirements and technology, purchasing specifications, energy cost savings calculators, model contract language, and resources. Technology Deployment: Look up information about developing, measuring, and implementing new and underutilized technologies for energy management in the Federal Government. Renewable Energy: Read about renewable energy requirements, resources and technologies, project planning, purchasing renewable power, and more. See FEMP's other program areas. Addthis FEMP Home

392

Emerging Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies Program Emerging Technologies Program Pat Phelan Program Manager patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov (202)287-1906 April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers * Solve technical barriers and test innovations to prove effectiveness * Measure and validate energy savings ET Mission: Accelerate the research, development and commercialization of emerging, high impact building technologies that are five years or less to market ready. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

393

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnerships and Technology Transfer User Facilities Visiting Us Contact Us Home About Us Success Stories Events News ORNL Inventors (internal only) Find a Technology Search go...

394

Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November 2000. Pursuant to Section 11, Technology Partnerships Ombudsman, each DOE national...

395

Vehicle Technologies Office: News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

396

Sandia Science & Technology Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search this site Sandia Science & Technology Park An internationally recognized technology community Home Properties Center for Collaboration & Commercialization (C3) Available...

397

Window industry technology roadmap  

SciTech Connect

Technology roadmap describing technology vision, barriers, and RD and D goals and strategies compiled by window industry stakeholders and government agencies.

Brandegee

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Technology Partnering Mechanisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expand a business with INL technologies, or require business support our Technology Transfer team is available to discuss the following contractual mechanisms: Cooperative...

399

Hydropower Program Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Green Purchasing & Green Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Technology and energy supply  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 Energy Conference Energy and the Economy Technology and Energy Transformation Science and Technology + Economics and Business + Society and Environment + Policy and...

402

Building Technologies Office Overview  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

data * Utilize energy performance data to inform decision making * Improve measurement and track and analyze results TECHNOLOGY TO MARKET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT 5...

403

Geothermal Technologies Subject Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alike at: Introducing The Geothermal Technologies Subject Portal is sponsored by the Geothermal Technologies Program, DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and is...

404

Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sponsored by DOE The Geothermal Technologies Subject Portal founding sponsorship by the Geothermal Technologies Program, DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and...

405

Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams that will be involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the...

406

Technology Integration Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Integration Overview Dennis A. Smith - Clean Cities Deployment Connie Bezanson - Vehicle Education June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE This presentation does not...

407

Integrated Technology Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

408

TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect

This Technology Maturation Plan schedules the development process that will bring the Lithium Hydrotalcite waste pretreatment process from its current estimated Technology Readiness Level of 3, to a level of 6. This maturation approach involves chemical and engineering research and development work, from laboratory scale to pilot scale testing, to incrementally make the process progress towards its integration in a fully qualified industrial system.

SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - MESA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microsystems > MESA Microsystems > MESA Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News MESA MESA Logo Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) Sandia's primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, reliable, and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Employing only the most advanced and failsafe technologies to fulfill our responsibilities as stewards of the nuclear stockpile, Sandia is responsible for the development, design and maintenance of approximately 90 percent of the several thousand parts found in any given weapon system, including radiation-hardened microelectronics. In support of this mission,

411

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

412

Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance The Chevron GE Technology Alliance will develop and commercialize valuable technologies to solve critical...

413

Fully coupled time-domain simulation of dynamic positioning semi-submersible platform using dynamic surface control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully coupled 6-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamic model is presented to analyze the dynamic response of a semi-submersible platform which is equipped with the dynamic positioning...

Haizhi Liang; Luyu Li; Jinping Ou

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The harmonization of Canadian and U.S. window programs and standards. Impact on U-factor and SHGC of differences in simulation styles and assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The thermal performance of a window is currently characterized by the window`s thermal transmittance (U-factor) and its solar heat gain coefficient. The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) has established a system for rating the thermal performance of windows. the U-factor is determined through computer simulation and validated with physical tests. The solar heat gain coefficient is determined for homogeneous products through computer simulation. Test methods exist for measuring solar heat gain through more complex products, although there is currently no standard. Under the NFRC`s rating program, a window must be simulated using the Window 4.1 and Frame 3.1 computer programs. There is some debate as to how accurately these computer programs simulate actual windows. This report addresses the differences in simulation styles and assumptions and what impact these differences have on the U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient. Section 2.0 covers center-of-glass modeling, section 3.0 covers spacer modeling, section 4.0 covers frame modeling, and section 5.0 concludes by weight the relative importance of the assumptions discussed. The focus of this research is on U-factor. For a more detailed study of solar heat gain coefficients refer to Wright (1995). This report also addresses the efficacy of various techniques, such as increasing glazing gap width or applying low-emittance coatings to interior glazing surfaces, at reducing total window U-factors.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Double ionization of helium by bare ions: Theoretical study of the fully differential cross sections  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a theoretical study of fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) for the double ionization of an He target by ion impact within a distorted wave model. The initial atomic system is described by two approximated wave functions of different accuracy proposed by Bonham and Kohl. For the final channel several models are considered based upon improvements and simplifications of the well-known three-body Coulomb (3C) model. The influence of the receding projectile on the resulting fragments is also studied by implementing a model with effective charges that depend on the momenta of the four particles. The FDCSs resulting for different electron energy sharing are discussed. The sensitivity of the FDCSs to the projectile charge sign and magnitude is explored over the energy range 700 keV/amu through 6 MeV/amu.

Lopez, S. D.; Garibotti, C. R. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Avenida Bustillo 9400, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Otranto, S. [Instituto de Fisica del Sur and Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Automatic code generation enables nuclear gradient computations for fully internally contracted multireference theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical nuclear gradients for fully internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) are reported. This implementation has been realized by an automated code generator that can handle spin-free formulas for the CASPT2 energy and its derivatives with respect to variations of molecular orbitals and reference coefficients. The underlying complete active space self-consistent field and the so-called Z-vector equations are solved using density fitting. With full internal contraction the size of first-order wave functions scales polynomially with the number of active orbitals. The CASPT2 gradient program and the code generator are both publicly available. This work enables the CASPT2 geometry optimization of molecules as complex as those investigated by respective single-point calculations.

MacLeod, Matthew K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Viscosity effects on waves in partially and fully ionized plasma in magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viscosity is discussed in multicomponent partially and fully ionized plasma, and its effects on two very different waves (Alfven and Langmuir) in solar atmosphere. A full set of viscosity coefficients is presented which includes coefficients for electrons, protons and hydrogen atoms. These are applied to layers with mostly magnetized protons in solar chromosphere where the Alfven wave could in principle be expected. The viscosity coefficients are calculated and presented graphically for the altitudes between 700 and 2200 km, and required corresponding cross sections for various types of collisions are given in terms of altitude. It is shown that in chromosphere the viscosity plays no role for the Alfven wave, which is only strongly affected by ion friction with neutrals. In corona, assuming the magnetic field of a few Gauss, the Alfven wave is more affected by ion viscosity than by ion-electron friction only for wavelengths shorter that 1-30 km, dependent on parameters and assuming the perturbed magnetic fiel...

Vranjes, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

cuInspiral: prototype gravitational waves detection pipeline fully coded on GPU using CUDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report the prototype of the first coalescing binary detection pipeline fully implemented on NVIDIA GPU hardware accelerators. The code has been embedded in a GPU library, called cuInspiral and has been developed under CUDA framework. The library contains for example a PN gravitational wave signal generator, matched filtering/FFT and detection algorithms that have been profiled and compared with the corresponding CPU code with dedicated benchmark in order to provide gain factor respect to the standard CPU implementation. In the paper we present performances and accuracy results about some of the main important elements of the pipeline, demonstrating the feasibility and the chance of obtain an impressive computing gain from these new many-core architectures in the perspective of the second and third generations of gravitational wave detectors.

Leone B. Bosi

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fully relativistic description of magnetic Compton profiles with an application to UFe2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic Compton profile of UFe2 has been calculated using the spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band-structure method. For this purpose a corresponding fully relativistic scheme to determine the magnetic Compton profile has been developed. This approach accounts for magnetism as well as all relativistic effects on the same footing, as it is indispensable when dealing with the electronic structure of magnetic compounds containing heavy elements. Results obtained for the magnetic Compton profile of UFe2 are found in good agreement with experimental data of Lawsonet al. An analysis of the component-resolved contributions to the magnetic Compton profile shows that there is no strict one-to-one relation to the corresponding spin moments. In addition an appreciable site-site interference contribution is found.

D. Benea, S. Mankovsky, and H. Ebert

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Fully Integrated Nanosystem of Semiconductor Nanowires for Direct Solar Water Splitting  

SciTech Connect

Artificial photosynthesis, the biomimetic approach to converting sunlight?s energy directly into chemical fuels, aims to imitate nature by using an integrated system of nanostructures, each of which plays a specific role in the sunlight-to-fuel conversion process. Here we describe a fully integrated system of nanoscale photoelectrodes assembled from inorganic nanowires for direct solar water splitting. Similar to the photosynthetic system in a chloroplast, the artificial photosynthetic system comprises two semiconductor light absorbers with large surface area, an interfacial layer for charge transport, and spatially separated cocatalysts to facilitate the water reduction and oxidation. Under simulated sunlight, a 0.12percent solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency is achieved, which is comparable to that of natural photosynthesis. The result demonstrates the possibility of integrating material components into a functional system that mimics the nanoscopic integration in chloroplasts. It also provides a conceptual blueprint of modular design that allows incorporation of newly discovered components for improved performance.

Liu, Chong; Tang, Jinyao; Chen, HaoMing; Liu, Bin; Yang, Peidong

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Progress on matrix SiC processing and properties for fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel form  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The consolidation mechanism and resulting properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) matrix of fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel form are discussed. The matrix is produced via the nano-infiltration transient eutectic-forming (NITE) process. Coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, and strength characteristics of this SiC matrix have been characterized in the unirradiated state. An ad hoc methodology for estimation of thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated NITESiC matrix is also provided to aid fuel performance modeling efforts specific to this concept. Finally, specific processing methods developed for production of an optimal and reliable fuel form using this process are summarized. These various sections collectively report the progress made to date on production of optimal FCM fuel form to enable its application in light water and advanced reactors.

K.A. Terrani; J.O. Kiggans; C.M. Silva; C. Shih; Y. Katoh; L.L. Snead

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Single ionization of CH{sub 4} by bare ions: Fully differential cross sections  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical study of fully differential cross sections for the single ionization of CH{sub 4} by collisions with H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, and C{sup 6+} ions at energies in the order of MeV/amu is presented. We work in terms of the Born-3DW model, which considers a non-Coulomb central potential for the interaction of the active electron with the molecular core. Results obtained with the Born-3DW model are compared to those obtained with the Born-C3 model, which assumes this potential as purely Coulombic. The anisotropic potential of the CH{sub 4} molecule is smoothed through an angular integration, and results are averaged over all the possible orientations of the target molecule. Results for the lesser bound molecular orbitals (1T and 2A{sub 1}) are presented and discussed for different projectile momentum transfers for the coplanar geometry.

Fernandez-Menchero, L. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Dto. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca-Buenos Aires (Argentina); Atomic Data and Analysis Structure, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Otranto, S. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Dto. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca-Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Additive Manufacturing Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid Prototyping is the construction of complex three-dimensional parts using additive manufacturing technology.

Jrgen Stampfl; Markus Hatzenbichler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Calculus For Technology II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MA 22200, Spring 2012. Calculus For Technology II ... Other Information. Emergency procedures Exam info (A Hoffman)...

426

Tracers and Exploration Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Tracers and Exploration Technologies.

427

The Technology & Innovation Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Technology & Innovation Centre #12;The Technology and Innovation Centre revolutionises the way in Scotland and further afield ­ including power and energy, renewable technologies, photonics and sensors, for industry, the Technology and Innovation Centre has already attracted major partners including Scottish

Mottram, Nigel

428

UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION CENTRE #12;#12;#12;The Technology and Innovation HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES ADVANCED MANUFACTURING #12;Inspiring research and innovation with industry-by-side on innovative technology programmes aimed at addressing major challenges in: Low Carbon Power and Energy

Mottram, Nigel

429

General com Technology community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

Ferrara, Katherine W.

430

Predictive Maintenance Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

431

Technology Transfer: About the Technology Transfer Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management About the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department The Technology Transfer Department helps move technologies from the Lab to the marketplace to benefit society and the U. S. economy. We accomplish this through developing and managing an array of partnerships with the private and public sectors. What We Do We license a wide range of cutting-edge technologies to companies that have the financial, R & D, manufacturing, marketing, and managerial capabilities to successfully commercialize Lab inventions. In addition, we manage lab-industry research partnerships, ensure that inventions receive appropriate patent or copyright protection, license technology to start-up companies, distribute royalties to the Lab and to inventors and serve as

432

NREL: Technology Transfer - About Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Technology Transfer About Technology Transfer Through technology partnerships, NREL seeks to reduce private sector risk and enable investment in the adoption of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. The transfer of these technologies to the marketplace helps displace oil, reduce carbon emissions, and increase U.S. industry competitiveness. Principles NREL develops and implements technology partnerships based on the standards established by the following principles: Balancing Public and Private Interest Form partnerships that serve the public interest and advance U.S. Department of Energy goals. Demonstrate appropriate stewardship of publicly funded assets, yielding national benefits. Provide value to the commercial partner. Focusing on Outcomes Develop mutually beneficial collaborations through processes, which are

433

Building Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database

434

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

435

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Pretreatment Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

This technology plan presents a strategy for the identification, evaluation, and development of technologies for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This strategy includes deployment of facilities and process development schedules to support the other program elements. This document also presents schedule information for alternative pretreatment systems: (1) the reference pretreatment technology development system, (2) an enhanced pretreatment technology development system, and (3) alternative pretreatment technology development systems.

Barker, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US); Thornhill, C.K.; Holton, L.K. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alloy for the Manufacture of Improved Coronary Stents Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Partners A coronary stent is a small,...

438

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Basic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the flue or...

439

MHK Technologies/hyTide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/hyTide MHK Technologies/hyTide < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage HyTide.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/South Korea Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description hyTide is a horizontal axis tidal turbine optimized for reliability and low maintenance costs. Voith Hydro therefore develops innovative tidal power stations that do not utilize the water storage but, similar to wind power stations, exploit the kinetic energy of the current and are operated fully under water. For this purpose, up to three turbines, each with a nominal power of 1 MW, are installed within a bridge-like structure. These turbines can be rotated around their horizontal axis, which allows them to make optimum use of the water and its flow direction, which changes every six hours.

440

International low carbon technology transfer: Do intellectual property regimes matter?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Transfer of low carbon technologies to developing countries has been recognized as important in global efforts to limit climate change. Yet the mechanics of international technology transfer, especially around intellectual property rights, have remained a controversial issue in international negotiations. Using a new dataset on international partnerships in China and India in three key low carbon technologiessolar photovoltaics, electric vehicles, and coal gasification/integrated gasification combined cycleand complementary expert interviews we study the dynamics of the transfer of intellectual property and the underlying drivers that guide the development of business strategies and partnerships in the context of transitioning intellectual property regimes in emerging markets. We find that weak intellectual property regimes are indeed a hindrance to the diffusion of certain classes of low carbon technologies: (i) for cutting-edge technologies, (ii) for fully-embodied (explicitly codified) technologies, and (iii) for small firms. However, we also find that intellectual property issues do not represent a barrier to the diffusion of the relatively mature and low to medium cost low carbon technologies that are materially (at scale) most important for carbon dioxide emissions reduction in the short to medium term. Competitive technology supply, shifting market dynamics, and increasingly vigorous domestic innovation coupled with mechanisms and opportunities to structure credible intellectual property deals allow for the diffusion of key low carbon technologies to occur within the context of existing business, political, and institutional structures.

Varun Rai; Kaye Schultz; Erik Funkhouser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A detailed analysis of gains and losses of a fully-integrated flat roof amorphous silicon photovoltaic plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2003 a fully-integrated photovoltaic (PV) plant composed by amorphous silicon PV modules was installed on top of a flat roof in Lugano (Southern Switzerland) a site representative for most of continental Europe and continuously monitored since. This work follows a previous study which analyzed the first 2years of operation of the plant, ascribing most of the noticeable winter losses to reflection losses due the lower position of the sun in the sky. Other loss mechanisms were discussed only from a qualitative point of view. The energy production of this particular PV installation is in fact influenced by several combined phenomena such as StaeblerWronski, spectral variations, temperature and optical losses effects. The present work aims to widen the analysis by discerning between these partly competitive effects and attempts to give a quantitative description of the influence which each single phenomenon has on the energy performance of the PV plant. For this purpose, single PV modules similar to those of the plant (triple-junction a-Si) were subjected to several indoor and outdoor tests. By means of indoor characterization we found that reflection losses become significant for angles of incidence larger than 50. Repeated indoor and outdoor degradationrecovery cycles underlined the influence of annealing time and temperature on the recovery of the PV modules. In particular outdoor degradation tests showed that at our latitudes (46N) the influence of the StaeblerWronski effect on the output power of these devices is around 10% (5% around an annual average value). The influence of the spectral effects on the current of amorphous silicon modules was assessed by means of outdoor IV characterization: the short circuit current decreases linearly with AM value at a slope between 4% and 8% per AM-unit depending on the technology under investigation. Combining these three effects with the effect of temperature the authors are able to perform a simulation of gains and losses of the a-Si modules which well approximates the energy performance of the CPT-Solar plant over a whole year.

Lorenzo Fanni; Alessandro Virtuani; Domenico Chianese

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Commercial development of environmental technologies for the automotive industry towards a new model of technological innovation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic importance of environmental issues is increasing, and new technologies are expected to reduce pollution derived both from productive processes and products, with costs that are still unknown. Until now, there is still little knowledge concerning the process of technological innovation in this field. What does exist is outdated due to rapid change in technology. In this paper, we analyse the development of Zinc Air Fuel Cells (ZAFC) and their transfer from research laboratories to large mass production. ZAFC are a new ''environmental technology'', proved to have a commercial value, that can be used for building Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV). Although ZAFC performances are higher than traditional lead-acid batteries ones, difficulties in funding ZAFC engineering and ''moving'' them from laboratories to production caused some years delay in their diffusion. On the basis of this ''paradigmatic'' case, we argue that existing economic and organisational literature concerning technological innovation is not able to fully explain steps followed in developing environmental technologies. Existing models mainly consider adoption problems as due to market uncertainty, weak appropriability regime, lack of a dominant design, and difficulties in reconfiguring organisational routines. Additionally, the following aspects play a fundamental role in developing environmental technologies, pointing out how technological trajectories depend both on exogenous market conditions and endogenous firm competencies: 1. regulations concerning introduction of ZEV ''create'' market demand and business development for new technologies; they impose constraints that can be met only by segmenting transportation market at each stage of technology development; 2. each stage of technology development requires alternative forms of division and coordination of innovative labour; upstream and downstream industries are involved in new forms of inter-firm relationships, causing a reconfiguration of product architecture and reducing effects of path dependency; 3. product differentiation increases firm capabilities to plan at the same time technology introduction and customer selection, while meeting requirements concerning ''network externalities''; 4. it is necessary to find and/or create alternative funding sources for each research, development and design stage of the new technologies. From this discussion, we will draw some conclusions and issues for further researches concerning government policy and firms' strategies for sustaining the process of technological innovation and transfer.

Woodrow W. Clark II; Emilio Paolucci

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

MHK Technologies/Gentec WATS System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gentec WATS System Gentec WATS System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Gentec WATS System.gif Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Heat Solutions Limited Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The only renewable wave energy system that can deliver constant base load or load following electricity in the GW range A by product is desalinated water The system comprises a wave energy converter mounted on a sea going ship that is free to go to where the waves are Gentec WaTS deep ocean or pelagic waves travel up an artificial beach mounted on the vessel where the potential and kinetic energies are converted directly into heat It is stored as heat on board the ship in large thermal accumulators until they are fully charged up thermally Deep ocean waves contain a lot of power so the thermal batteries can be recharged in just a few hours When fully charged the ship returns to it onshore berth where its valuable cargo of heat is transferred to a much larger heat store it is from this heat store that continuous green base load electricity is generated with the option to peak shave The on shore Gentec WaTS power station has a capacity factor of 100 because it can run for

444

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the basic technologies and key terms used to describe marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

445

DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama August 22, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection has begun at the world's first fully integrated coal power and geologic storage project in southwest Alabama, with the goals of assessing integration of the technologies involved and laying the foundation for future use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The "Anthropogenic Test"--conducted by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven partnerships in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program--uses CO2 from a newly constructed post-combustion CO2-capture facility at Alabama Power's 2,657-megawatt Barry Electric Generating Plant (Plant Barry). It will help

446

Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

447

Vehicle Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: News to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... Vehicle Technologies News Blog Newsletters Information for Media Subscribe to News Updates News December 18, 2013 USDA Offers $118 Million for Renewable Energy, Smart Grid Projects The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced $73 million in funding for renewable energy projects and $45 million for smart grid technology as

448

The Effects of Anchor Length, Test Difficulty, Population Ability Differences, Mixture of Populations and Sample Size on the Psychometric Properties of Levine Observed Score Linear Equating Method for Different Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ b?A, and ?Y = c + d?A. i.e. the true scores of X and A and Y and A are linearly related. This is the congenericity assumption. However, the two sets differ on the third assumption that they make. For the first set, the third assumption is L3... is equity, which states that it must be a matter of indifference to the test taker whether he or she takes X or Y. Although equatability is a prerequisite for equity, it does not imply equity because two tests that measure the same construct can differ...

Carvajal, Jorge E.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agreements for Commercializing Technology Agreements for Commercializing Technology NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a partner seeks highly-specialized or technical services to complete a project. An ACT agreement also authorizes participating contractor-operated DOE laboratories, such as NREL, to partner with businesses using more flexible terms that are aligned with industry practice. The agreement type used depends on the business, and the specific partnership selected is determined on a case-by-case basis. Benefits The benefits of Agreements for Commercializing Technology include: Intellectual Property Rights. ACT provides a more flexible framework for negotiation of intellectual property rights to facilitate moving technology from the laboratory to the marketplace as quickly as possible.

451

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

452

Building Technologies Office Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roland Risser Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving Building Performance Research & Development Developing High Impact Technologies Standards & Codes Locking in the Savings Market Stimulation Accelerating Tech-to- Market 3 Building Technologies Office Goal: Reduce building energy use by 50% (compared to a 2010 baseline) 4 Building Technologies Office Working to Overcome Challenges Information Access * Develop building performance tools, techniques, and success stories, such as case studies * Form market partnerships and programs to share best practices * Solution Centers * Certify the workforce to ensure quality work

453

Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ambassadors to someone Ambassadors to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on AddThis.com... Goals Research & Development Testing and Analysis Workplace Charging Partners Ambassadors Resources Community and Fleet Readiness Workforce Development Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics Ambassadors Workplace Charging Challenge Clean Cities Coalitions Clean Cities logo. Clean Cities National: A network of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, supported by the

454

National Energy Map for India:Technology Vision 2030 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for India:Technology Vision 2030 for India:Technology Vision 2030 Jump to: navigation, search Name National Energy Map for India:Technology Vision 2030 Agency/Company /Organization Government of India, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics GHG inventory, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://psa.gov.in/writereaddat Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References National Energy Map for India:Technology Vision 2030[1] National Energy Map for India:Technology Vision 2030 Screenshot Overview "The report discusses the data, assumptions, and methodological framework used to estimate useful energy requirements of the country based on

455

A Comparative Study on Emerging Electric Vehicle Technology Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Numerous organizations have published reports in recent years that investigate the ever changing world of electric vehicle (EV) technologies and their potential effects on society. Specifically, projections have been made on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these vehicles and how they compare to conventional vehicles or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Similar projections have been made on the volumes of oil that these vehicles can displace by consuming large amounts of grid electricity instead of petroleum-based fuels. Finally, the projected rate that these new vehicle fleets will enter the market varies significantly among organizations. New ideas, technologies, and possibilities are introduced often, and projected values are likely to be refined as industry announcements continue to be made. As a result, over time, a multitude of projections for GHG emissions, oil displacement, and market penetration associated with various EV technologies has resulted in a wide range of possible future outcomes. This leaves the reader with two key questions: (1) Why does such a collective range in projected values exist in these reports? (2) What assumptions have the greatest impact on the outcomes presented in these reports? Since it is impractical for an average reader to review and interpret all the various vehicle technology reports published to date, Sentech Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted a comparative study to make these interpretations. The primary objective of this comparative study is to present a snapshot of all major projections made on GHG emissions, oil displacement, or market penetration rates of EV technologies. From the extensive data found in relevant publications, the key assumptions that drive each report's analysis are identified and 'apples-to-apples' comparisons between all major report conclusions are attempted. The general approach that was taken in this comparative study is comprised of six primary steps: (1) Search Relevant Literature - An extensive search of recent analyses that address the environmental impacts, market penetration rates, and oil displacement potential of various EV technologies was conducted; (2) Consolidate Studies - Upon completion of the literature search, a list of analyses that have sufficient data for comparison and that should be included in the study was compiled; (3) Identify Key Assumptions - Disparity in conclusions very likely originates from disparity in simple assumptions. In order to compare 'apples-to-apples,' key assumptions were identified in each study to provide the basis for comparing analyses; (4) Extract Information - Each selected report was reviewed, and information on key assumptions and data points was extracted; (5) Overlay Data Points - Visual representations of the comprehensive conclusions were prepared to identify general trends and outliers; and (6) Draw Final Conclusions - Once all comparisons are made to the greatest possible extent, the final conclusions were draw on what major factors lead to the variation in results among studies.

Ford, Jonathan [Sentech, Inc.; Khowailed, Gannate [Sentech, Inc.; Blackburn, Julia [Sentech, Inc.; Sikes, Karen [Sentech, Inc.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Many-body current formula and current conservation for non-equilibrium fully interacting nanojunctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the electron transport properties through fully interacting nanoscale junctions beyond the linear-response regime. We calculate the current flowing through an interacting region connected to two interacting leads, with interaction crossing at the left and right contacts, by using a non-equilibrium Green function technique. The total current at one interface (the left one for example) is made of several terms which can be regrouped into two sets. The first set corresponds to a very generalized Landauer-like current formula with physical quantities defined only in the interacting central region and with renormalized lead self-energies. The second set characterizes inelastic scattering events occurring in the left lead. We show how this term can be negligible or even vanish due to the pseudo-equilibrium statistical properties of the lead in the thermodynamic limit. The expressions for the different Green functions needed for practical calculations of the current are also provided. We determine the constraints imposed by the physical condition of current conservation. The corresponding equation imposed on the different self-energy quantities arising from the current conservation is derived. We discuss in detail its physical interpretation and its relation with previously derived expressions. Finally several important key features are discussed in relation to the implementation of our formalism for calculations of quantum transport in realistic systems.

H Ness; L K Dash

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fully relativistic surface green function and its application to surface spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect

A fully relativistic layer-KKR formalism was developed and implemented for calculating the single-particle Green function in atomic layers parallel to crystalline surfaces magnetic and non magnetic materials: The method was applied to the calculation surface spectroscopies, such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED), angle-resolve ultraviolet photo emission spectroscopy (UPS), and photoelectron scattering. Numeric tests were performed for non magnetic actinide surfaces and magnetic Fe surface Theoretical angle-resolved UPS spectra are presented for uranium monolayers on Pt(111) and for f.c.c. u(lll) surfaces. We find that u island formation can take place if a peak in the UPS spectra appears just before the Fermi energy immediately as u is deposited on P and we suggest an experimental procedure for testing this prediction. An intensity map photo excited electrons from the 2p{sub 3/2} core states of Fe(110) surface is also show Sizable magnetic anisotropy is found due to the interference between exchange and spin-orbit interaction, which is suitable for studying a possible surface-induced magnetism actinide adlayers.

Tamura, E. [Seaborg (Glenn T.) Inst. for Transactinium Science, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Comparison between hybrid and fully kinetic models of asymmetric magnetic reconnection: Coplanar and guide field configurations  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic reconnection occurring in collisionless environments is a multi-scale process involving both ion and electron kinetic processes. Because of their small mass, the electron scales are difficult to resolve in numerical and satellite data, it is therefore critical to know whether the overall evolution of the reconnection process is influenced by the kinetic nature of the electrons, or is unchanged when assuming a simpler, fluid, electron model. This paper investigates this issue in the general context of an asymmetric current sheet, where both the magnetic field amplitude and the density vary through the discontinuity. A comparison is made between fully kinetic and hybrid kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection in coplanar and guide field systems. The models share the initial condition but differ in their electron modeling. It is found that the overall evolution of the system, including the reconnection rate, is very similar between both models. The best agreement is found in the guide field system, which confines particle better than the coplanar one, where the locality of the moments is violated by the electron bounce motion. It is also shown that, contrary to the common understanding, reconnection is much faster in the guide field system than in the coplanar one. Both models show this tendency, indicating that the phenomenon is driven by ion kinetic effects and not electron ones.

Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah [Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Zenitani, Seiji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Smets, Roch [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole polytechnique, route de Palaiseau, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

A mobile robot based system for fully automated thermal 3D mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is hard to imagine living in a building without electricity and a heating or cooling system these days. Factories and data centers are equally dependent on a continuous functioning of these systems. As beneficial as this development is for our daily life, the consequences of a failure are critical. Malfunctioning power supplies or temperature regulation systems can cause the close-down of an entire factory or data center. Heat and air conditioning losses in buildings lead to a large waste of the limited energy resources and pollute the environment unnecessarily. To detect these flaws as quickly as possible and to prevent the negative consequences constant monitoring of power lines and heat sources is necessary. To this end, we propose a fully automatic system that creates 3D thermal models of indoor environments. The proposed system consists of a mobile platform that is equipped with a 3D laser scanner, an RGB camera and a thermal camera. A novel 3D exploration algorithm ensures efficient data collection that covers the entire scene. The data from all sensors collected at different positions is joined into one common reference frame using calibration and scan matching. In the post-processing step a model is built and points of interest are automatically detected. A viewer is presented that aids experts in analyzing the heat flow and localizing and identifying heat leaks. Results are shown that demonstrate the functionality of the system.

Dorit Borrmann; Andreas Nchter; Marija akulovi?; Ivan Maurovi?; Ivan Petrovi?; Dinko Osmankovi?; Jasmin Velagi?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Prototype Two-Decade Fully-Coupled Fine-Resolution CCSM Simulation  

SciTech Connect

A fully coupled global simulation using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) was configured using grid resolutions of 0.1{sup o} for the ocean and sea-ice, and 0.25{sup o} for the atmosphere and land, and was run under present-day greenhouse gas conditions for 20 years. It represents one of the first efforts to simulate the planetary system at such high horizontal resolution. The climatology of the circulation of the atmosphere and the upper ocean were compared with observational data and reanalysis products to identify persistent mean climate biases. Intensified and contracted polar vortices, and too cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the subpolar and mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere were the dominant biases produced by the model. Intense category 4 cyclones formed spontaneously in the tropical North Pacific. A case study of the ocean response to one such event shows the realistic formation of a cold SST wake, mixed layer deepening, and warming below the mixed layer. Too many tropical cyclones formed in the North Pacific however, due to too high SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific. In the North Atlantic anomalously low SSTs lead to a dearth of hurricanes. Agulhas eddy pathways are more realistic than in equivalent stand-alone ocean simulations forced with atmospheric reanalysis.

McClean, Julie L. [Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Bader, David C [ORNL; Bryan, Frank O. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Maltrud, Matthew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mirin, Arthur A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jones, Philip W [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Ivanova, Detelina P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Kim, Yoo Yin [Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Boyle, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jacob, Robert L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Norton, Nancy [IBM and National Center for Atmospheric Research; Craig, Anthony [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Worley, Patrick H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT  

SciTech Connect

Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: lagg@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

463

MHK Technologies/THOR Ocean Current Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

THOR Ocean Current Turbine THOR Ocean Current Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage THOR Ocean Current Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization THOR Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The THOR ocean current turbine ROCT is a tethered fully submersible hydrokinetic device with a single horizontal axis rotor that operates at constant speed by varying the depth of operation using a patented power feedback control technology Rotor diameters can reach 60 meters for a 2 0MW class turbine and operations can be conducted as deep as 250 meters Arrays of THOR s ROCTs can be located in outer continental shelf areas 15 to 100 miles offshore in well established ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream or the Kuroshio and deliver electrical power to onshore load centers via submarine transmission line

464

Research and development of CWM technology toward clean coal use  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, three subjects were presented from among our technical efforts to develop clean coal applications to improve environmental quality. The three subjects are briefly summarized as follows: development of technology aimed at producing and utilizing exclusively low ash CWM; development of technology to produce CWM from various pond coals; development of technology to upgrade LRC and utilize CWM for both a boiler fuel and a gasification feedstock. We are fully convinced that the first and second of the above technologies have reached the level of practical use through demonstration tests. As to the third, we have almost finished a 10 kg/h coal slurry bench-scale test and have a plan to construct an upgrading pilot plant of 350 kg/h which will be completed in the fall 1994. We will hopefully establish upgrading technology through pilot-scale demonstration testing in 1995. With this technology, not just utilization of LRCs will be expanded, but also highly efficient use of coal will be accelerated. Thus, C0{sub 2} emission will also be strongly reduced. In ending, we would like to stress our efforts on research and development of environmentally friendly technologies as well as COM and CWM technologies based on bituminous and steaming coals.

Shibata, Kazuhiro

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Technologies Technologies November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Distributed energy (DE) technologies consist primarily of energy generation and storage systems placed at or near the point of use. DE provides consumers with greater reliability, adequate power quality, and the possibility to participate in competitive electric power markets. DE also has the potential to mitigate congestion in transmission lines, control price fluctuations, strengthen energy security, and provide greater stability to the electricity grid. The use of DE technologies can lead to lower emissions and, particularly in combined heat and power (CHP) applications, to improved efficiency. Example of a thermally activated energy conversion technology (TAT) -- a type of distributed energy technology. Distributed energy technologies consist primarily of energy generation and storage systems placed at or near the point of use. This gas engine-driven heat pump is operating on a rooftop.

466

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants to someone by Lubricants to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research Materials Technologies Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is

467

Diversity and Technological Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a tractable model to study the equilibrium diversity of technological progress and shows that equilibrium technological progress may exhibit too little diversity (too much conformity), in particular ...

Acemoglu, Daron

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Technology Readiness Assessment Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Review: Web Server Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......The introduction to this section discusses artificial intelligent and object technology. Two applications, both from the Boeing Defense and Space Group, were large complex developments which combined object technology and artificial intelligence. The......

Jon Crowcroft

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Technology Performance Exchange  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem: Perceived fiscal risk associated with the installation of unfamiliar technologies impedes adoption rates for cost-effective, energy-saving products. Impact of Project: Enable end users to quickly and

471

Safeguards over sensitive technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safeguards Over Sensitive Technology Safeguards Over Sensitive Technology DOE/IG-0635 January 2004 Program Results and Cost Details of Finding ....................................................................... 1 Recommendations and Comments ........................................... 6 Appendices Prior Reports .............................................................................. 9 Objective, Scope, and Methodology ........................................ 11 Management Comments .......................................................... 12 SAFEGUARDS OVER SENSITIVE TECHNOLOGY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Background Aspects of sensitive technology protection, along with related impacts on national security, have been addressed in various formats by the Department of Energy and several other Federal agencies. For example:

472

Long Term Innovative Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Bryan Pivovar on DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop - Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010

473

Consumer Vehicle Technology Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

474

Geothermal drilling technology update  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Membrane Technology Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Charles Page (Air Products & Chemicals, Inc.) for the Membrane Technology Workshop held July 24, 2012

476

Technology and Terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology and Terrorism ... The linkage of chemistry and terrorism is an uncomfortable bond for members of the chemical profession. ...

MADELEINE JACOBS

1995-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

477

Deployment of Emerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the FUPWG Deployment of Emerging Technologies. Presented by Brad Gustafson, Department of Energy, held on November 1, 2006.

478

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

479

States & Emerging Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

480

Journal of Peasant Studies 37(4), 2010, forthcoming [version that was sent to the journal for production] Franco et al_EU biofuels_JPS_prodn-corr, 21/07/2010 Assumptions in the European Union biofuels policy:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biofuel project is an agro-industrial development and politically contested policy process where governments increasingly become global actors. European Union (EU) biofuels policy rests upon arguments about societal benefits of three main kinds namely, environmental protection (especially greenhouse gas savings), energy security and rural development, especially in the global South. Each argument involves optimistic assumptions about what the putative benefits mean and how they can be fulfilled. After examining those assumptions, we

unknown authors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions fully" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Energy Technology Engineering Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Engineering Center Technology Engineering Center 41 00 Guardian Street, Suite # 160 Simi Valley, CA 93063 Memorandum for: Gregory H. Woods General Council January 30, 2013 FROM: John Jones EL\= Federal Proje� irector Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) Project Office SUBJECT: Annual National Environmental Policy Act {NEPA) Planning Summary Attached is the 2013 Annual NEPA Planning Summary for the ETEC Project Office.

482

Argonne superconductor technology licensed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne superconductor technology licensed ... American Superconductor Corp. of Cambridge, Mass., has obtained the exclusive rights to develop and market high-temperature superconductor technology developed at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. ... The Argonne technology produces superconducting ceramic coatings by oxidizing an appropriate metallic precursor. ...

RON DAGANI

1988-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

483

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

Perkins, Richard A.

484

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2009 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2009 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress in accordance with 15 USC Sec 3710(g)(2) for an annual summary on the implementation of technology transfer

Perkins, Richard A.

485

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2008 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2008 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress transfer authorities established by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106

Perkins, Richard A.

486

Science, Technology and Civilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE rise of science and technology is a unique element of our civilization. In earlier times, technology played ... element of our civilization. In earlier times, technology played a relatively small part, and science almost none; and it is worth briefly looking at the two ancient civilizations, those ...

R. V. JONES

1962-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

487

Science &Technology Facilities Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Science & Technology Facilities Council invite you to The ESA Technology Transfer Network SpaceTech2012Science &Technology Facilities Council Innovations Issue 31 October 2012 This issue: 1 STFC International prize for `no needles' breast cancer diagnosis technique 6 CEOI Challenge Workshop ­ Current

488

Department of Energy Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir Models 42 #12;Page 2.21. Energy Storage 43 2.22. Focusing Solar Collector 43 2.23. Digitizing technology towa^ls energy technology problems in general, at Risø and in the Depart- ment, was made manifestRisa-R-482 Department of Energy Technology Annual Progress Report 1 January - 31 December 1982 Ris

489

Review: LAN Technologies Explained  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Book Review Review: LAN Technologies Explained Reviewed by Peter...Glamorgan University LAN Technologies Explained Philip Miller and...data to HTML, building an intranet, creating a single and multi-source...Networks Star rating ??? LAN Technologies Explained Philip Miller and......

Peter Hodson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW .............................. TECH- 2 SBIR AND STTR

491

Department of Science, Technology, &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Science, Technology, & Society #12;Understanding the relationship between technology and society is crucial to becoming a successful leader in any field. #12;Our Students The University of Virginia Department of Science, Technology, and Society offers a comprehensive

Acton, Scott

492

New Technology Demonstration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

493

Technology Forecasting Scenario Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Forecasting and Scenario Development Newsletter No. 2 October 1998 Systems Analysis was initiated on the establishment of a new research programme entitled Technology Forecasting and Scenario and commercial applica- tion of new technology. An international Scientific Advisory Panel has been set up

494

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Digg

495

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Technology and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Technology and System Level...

496

EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstration...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Steven L. Krahn Director, Waste Processing Office of Engineering and Technology April 2008 EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstrations Introduction ...

497

Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This document is a guide for those...

498

Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant materials.

Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL] [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Fully kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnction in semi-collisional plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The influence of Coulomb collisions on the dynamics of magnetic reconnection is examined using fully kinetic simulations with a Monte-Carlo treatment of the Fokker-Planck collision operator. This powerful first-principles approach offers a bridge between kinetic and fluid regimes, which may prove useful for understanding the applicability of various fluid models. In order to lay the necessary groundwork, the collision algorithm is first carefully bench marked for a homogeneous plasma against theoretical predictions for beam-plasma interactions and electrical resistivity. Next, the collisional decay of a current layer is examined as a function of guide field, allowing direct comparisons with transport theory for the parallel and perpendicular resistivity as well as the thermoelectric force. Finally, the transition between collisional and collision less reconnection is examined in neutral sheet geometry. For modest Lundquist numbers S {approx}< 1000, a distinct transition is observed when the thickness of the Sweet-Parker layers falls below the ion inertia length {delta}{sub sp} {approx}< d,. At higher Lundquist number, deviations from the Sweet-Parker scaling are observed due to the growth of plasmoids (secondary-islands) within the elongated resistive layer. In certain cases, this instability leads to the onset of fast reconnection sooner than expected from {delta}{sub sp} {approx} d, condition. After the transition to fast reconnection, elongated electron current layers are formed which are unstable to the formation of new plasmoids. The structure and time-dependence of the electron diffusion region in these semi-collisional regimes is profoundly different than reported in two-fluid simulations.

Daughton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roytershteyn, Vadim S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bowers, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karimabadi, Homa [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z