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1

Completion technology  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that current economic conditions in the oil patch have provided a climate for continuous search for more economical completion designs and tools. Aside from more cost-effective completion tools, there are several ways to reduce related costs. For example, inadequate communication of technical requirements between operator and service company results in a tremendous amount of needless expense. This article explains the concerns of completion tool manufacturers and service companies so operating companies can better understand their required inputs and internal workings. The essence of the article is that well completion and production costs can be improved through better communication.

Longbottom, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

3

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

Stephen Wolhart

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Progress Report No. 1. During the next six months, efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation as documented in Technical Progress Report No. 2. This report details work done with Anadarko and ChevronTexaco in the Table Rock Field in Wyoming.

None

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

AEO Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

Maish, A.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sandia/DOE geothermal drilling and completion technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs 25% by 1982 and 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has managed this technology development program since October 1977, and this paper presents an overview of the program. A statement of program goals and structure is given. The content of the FY-79 program is presented and recent results of R and D projects are given. Plans for development of an advanced drilling and completion system are discussed.

Barnette, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Slimhole Drilling, Logging, and Completion Technology - An Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using slim holes (diameter < 15 cm) for geothermal exploration and small-scale power production can produce significant cost savings compared to conventional rotary-drilling methods. In addition, data obtained from slim holes can be used to lower the risks and costs associated with the drilling and completion of large-diameter geothermal wells. As a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories has worked with industry since 1992 to develop and promote drilling, testing, and logging technology for slim holes. This paper describes the current status of work done both in-house and contracted to industry. It focuses on drilling technology, case histories of slimhole drilling projects, data collection and rig instrumentation, and high-temperature logging tools.

FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1978-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drill bits, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seam Well Completion Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas September 2003 DOE/NETL-2003/1193 Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (Strategic Center for Natural Gas) DOE/NETL-2003/1193 September 2003 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

23

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

24

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLIMATE ACTION PLANNING TOOL FORMULAS AND ASSUMPTIONS Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions The Climate Action Planning Tool calculations use the following formulas and assumptions to generate the business-as-usual scenario and the greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals for the technology options. Business-as-Usual Scenario All Scope 1 (gas, oil, coal, fleet, and electricity) and Scope 2 calculations increase at a rate equal to the building growth rate. Scope 3 calculations (commuters and business travel) increase at a rate equal to the population growth rate. Assumptions New buildings will consume energy at the same rate (energy use intensity) as existing campus buildings. Fleet operations will be proportional to total building area.

26

StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

u' m .,. . Society of Petroleum Engineers u I SPE 49259 StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells R.M. Graves, SPE, Colorado School of Mines; and D.G. O'Brien, PE, SPE, Solutions Engineering Copyr@ht 1998, Scdety of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prapared for presentation at the 1998 SPE Annual Technicar Conference and Exhibition bald in New Orteans, Lcuisiana, 27-30 September 1998, This paper waa selected for presentation by en SPE Program Commiftee folrowing review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(a). Contents of the paper, as prasented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The materiar, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the .%ciety of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers prasented at SPE meetings

27

DOE/Fossil Energy`s drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D: A technologies/products overview  

SciTech Connect

An overview of natural gas drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D sponsored by the US Department of Energy is reported in this paper. Development of high rate-of-penetration drilling systems and underbalanced drilling technologies are detailed among other RD&D activities. The overview serves as a technology transfer medium and is intended to accelerate the deployment of the products and technologies described.

Duda, J.R.; Yost, A.B. II

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geothermal completion technology life cycle cost model (GEOCOM). Volume I. Final report. Volume II. User instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just as with petroleum wells, drilling and completing a geothermal well at minimum original cost may not be the most cost-effective way to exploit the resource. The impacts of the original completion activities on production and costs later in the life of the well must also be considered. In order to evaluate alternate completion and workover technologies, a simple computer model has been developed to compare total life-cycle costs for a geothermal well to total production or injection. Volume I discusses the mechanics of the model and then presents detailed results from its application to different completion and workover questions. Volume II is the user instruction manual.

Anderson, E.R.; Hoessel, W.C.; Mansure, A.J.; McKissen, P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

30

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to the to the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Household Expenditures Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Oil and Gas Supply Module

31

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

32

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 This report presents major assumptions of NEMS that are used to generate the projections in the AEO2006. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

33

Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Holmes, Michael

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, and (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2003, DOE/EIA- M062(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003).

35

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY: A SUMMARY REPORT OF ACTIVITIES COMPLETED AT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FROM 2005 TO 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy??s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT??s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project??s 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Michael Holmes

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M068(2003) April 2003. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

37

The disciplined use of simplifying assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplifying assumptions --- everyone uses them but no one's programming tool explicitly supports them. In programming, as in other kinds of engineering design, simplifying assumptions are an important method for dealing with complexity. Given a complex ...

Charles Rich; Richard C. Waters

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

39

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 August 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

40

Hierarchy of Mesoscale Flow Assumptions and Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present research proposes a standard nomenclature for mesoscale meteorological concepts and integrates existing concepts of atmospheric space scales, flow assumptions, governing equations, and resulting motions into a hierarchy useful in ...

P. Thunis; R. Bornstein

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

42

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to the Annual Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3

43

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

44

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 as of 4/4/2000 1. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 4-Speed Automatic" should be .045 instead of .030. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 5-Speed Automatic" should be .065 instead of .045. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 2. Table 28 should be labeled: "Alternative-Fuel Vehicle Attribute Inputs for Compact Cars for Two Stage Logit Model". (Change made on 3/6/2000) 3. The capital costs in Table 29 should read 1998 dollars not 1988 dollars. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 4. Table 37 changed the label "Year Available" to "First Year Completed." Changed the second sentence of Footnote 1 to read "these estimates are costs of new projects

45

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

46

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA- 7, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

47

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

48

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Module Energy Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 21 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Module The LFMM International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the LFMM IEM computes BRENT and WTI prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, and generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail. The IEM also provides, for each year of the projection period, endogenous and

49

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

50

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

51

Supply-side Resources & Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling 146/19/2013 #12;6/19/2013 8 Commercial w/Limited PNW availability Proposed resources: ­ Biogas technologies Raft River Geothermal (ID)Biogas technologies Landfill Wastewater treatment Animal, commercial

52

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA- M068(2004). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

53

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

54

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M068(2008). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

55

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

56

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administrati...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy...

57

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Table 41  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

> Forecasts >Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook> Download Report Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF...

58

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20031 (AEO2003), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2003 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and International Affairs, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

59

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of AEO99 Cases Summary of AEO99 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.57 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $29.35 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated Residential: 1999 Technology

60

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.106

62

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

63

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

64

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

65

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

67

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

68

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2000, DOE/EIA-M062(2000), January 2000.

69

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by obtaining market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation Report: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO62/1, January 1999.

70

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

71

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M060(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

72

Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2317&D2). Remedial actions performed in the Balance of Site (BOS) Laboratory Area of EU Z2-33 and two small areas in EU Z2-42 are described in Sects. 5 through 10 of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-33; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe RAs performed in the EU Z2-33 BOS Laboratory Area and two small areas in EU Z2-42. Approximately 18 acres in EU Z2-33 are addressed in this PCCR. Based on the results of the DVS evaluation and RAs performed, all 18 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. Three Federal Facility Agreement sites are addressed and recommended for no further action within this acreage, including: (1) K-1004-L Recirculating Cooling Water Lines Leak Sites; (2) K-1044 Heavy Equipment Repair Shop; and (3) K-1015-A Laundry Pit. Remedial actions for EU Z2-33 were developed in response to DVS characterization results described in the EU Z2-33 Technical Memorandum (Appendix A) and to support reindustrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park as a commercial industrial park. Remediation criteria were designed for the protection of a future industrial worker who normally would not have the potential for exposure to soil below 10ft bgs. Accordingly, the Zone 2 ROD required land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likel

Bechtel Jacobs

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

74

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

75

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

76

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

77

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

78

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

79

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).119 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

80

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

COMPLETE LISTING:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPLETE LISTING: COMPLETE LISTING: DISPOSITION AUTHORITIES FROZEN UNDER THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MORATORIUM MARCH 2008 Listed below are all the disposition authorities which are under the moratorium on the destruction of health related records as of March 2008. All records scheduled under these authorities at Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters and field sites should be preserved past their normal retention periods unless an headquarters organization or a field site has obtained permission to remove records scheduled under the authority from the moratorium. Questions about the moratorium and what records should be preserved under it should be directed to Marsha Lawn on 301-903-3721 or at Marsha.Lawn@hq.doe.gov. ENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS SCHEDULE Item Series Title

82

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

83

Completion milestones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southeastern Environmental Resources Alliance (SERA) is a joint effort between the US Department of Energy, the states of Georgia and South Carolina, and Westinghouse US Department of Energy, the states of Georgia Savannah River Company (WSRC). The original proposal for SERA, submitted under the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), is based on improving the competitiveness of manufacturers within Georgia and South Carolina by addressing the costs associated with environmental and waste management issues. By using the many technologies available through the national laboratories, universities, the Savannah River Site, and the commercial sector, SERA will improve the competitive position of companies that would otherwise have no access to those technologies. This Start-Up Plan details the steps SERA will take to begin effective operations by June 1, 1995, and will focus on the short-term needs of the program. This plan will serve as a supplement to the original SERA proposal, and will address the major milestones included in the Department of Energy`s Cooperative Agreement. Also documented are the planning processes that SERA will use to ensure the long-term viability of the program. The planning process will include additional work elements that are referenced by the original proposal, but, for the purposes of program start-up, are not immediately addressed. The major milestones and schedules are provided for each goal.

Westbury, G.D.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

85

Completed EISs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completed EISs Completed EISs Number of EISs in report: 294 Number Title Prog Office Ops Office Federal Register Notices Notice Date Citation Agency Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility, Bonneville County, Idaho (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0471 5/20/2011 EPA 76 FR 29240 Adopted American Centrifuge Plant in Piketon, Pike County, Ohio (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0468 5/20/2011 EPA 76 FR 29240 Adopted Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Mason County, Washington (Adopted) EE DOE/EIS-0456 10/8/2010 EPA 75 FR 62386 NOA FEIS 11/29/2010 DOE 75 FR 73059 ROD Genesis Solar Energy Project, California (also identified as NextEra - Ford Dry Lake Solar Project) (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0455 11/23/2009 BLM 74 FR 61167 NOI 4/9/2010 BLM 75 FR 18204 NOA DEIS 8/27/2010 EPA 75 FR 52736 NOA FEIS 8/30/2010 BLM 75 FR 52966 NOA FEIS 12/17/2010 EPA 75 FR 78992

86

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions October 17, 2006 Simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants fuelled by natural gas are among the bulk-emission and efficient gas turbine technology made combined-cycle gas turbine power plants the "resource of choice

87

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

88

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Market...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs. The key assumptions underlying the coal production modeling are: As capacity...

89

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the...

90

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

91

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

92

Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVoCS 2006 Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking Nick Moffat1 Systems Assurance using CSP. In our formulation, an assumption-commitment style property of a process SYS takes the form-Guarantee, CSP, Model Checking, Compositional Reasoning 1 Introduction The principle of compositional program

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Preliminary Review of Models, Assumptions, and Key Data used in Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is in response to a request by Ming Zhu, DOE-EM to provide a preliminary review of existing models and data used in completed or soon to be completed Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses (PA/CA) documents, to identify codes, methodologies, main assumptions, and key data sets used.

Arthur S. Rood; Swen O. Magnuson

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

95

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to AEO2013 Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual

96

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2012 Assumptions to AEO2012 Release Date: August 2, 2012 | Next Release Date: August 2013 | Full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 [1] (AEO2012), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in AEO2012 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA) of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the

97

Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental assumption in Lubrication Theory. Derivation of thin film flow equations from Navier-Stokes equations. Importance of fluid inertia effects in thin film flows. Some fluid physical properties

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Prognostic Evaluation of Assumptions Used by Cumulus Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a spectral-type cumulus parameterization that includes moist downdrafts within a three-dimensional mesoscale model, various disparate closure assumptions are systematically tested within the generalized framework of dynamic control, static ...

Georg A. Grell

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Computational soundness for standard assumptions of formal cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This implementation is conceptually simple, and relies only on general assumptions. Specifically, it can be thought of as a 'self-referential' variation on a well-known encryption scheme. 4. Lastly, we show how the ...

Herzog, Jonathan, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1 Francis X. Johnson, Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H. Sanstad and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Feedback link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Interactive Data Queries to the AEO99 bullet1.gif...

102

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap assumptions document. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel as a key element in the implementation of the Roadmap Methodology for the INEL Site. The development and identification of these assumptions in an important factor in planning basis development and establishes the planning baseline for all subsequent roadmap analysis at the INEL.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

104

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

105

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

106

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

107

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

108

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20061 (AEO2006), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System

109

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

link.gif (1946 bytes) link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage introduction.gif (4117 bytes) This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 19991 (AEO99), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3

110

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States. States. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 93 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2007) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Primary inputs for the module are varied. One set of key assumptions concerns estimates of domestic technically recoverable oil and gas resources. Other factors affecting the projection include the assumed

111

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

112

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Petroleum Market Module

113

A Comparison of the Free Ride and CISK Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent paper Fraedrich and McBride have studied the relation between the free ride and CISK (conditional instability of the second kind) assumptions in a well-known two-layer model. Here the comparison is extended to a more general case. ...

Torben Strunge Pedersen

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

115

FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9., Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 11.1. Petroleum Product Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.2. Year Round Gasoline Specifications by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.3. Gasolline Sulfur Content Assumptions, by Region and Gasoline Type, Parts per Million (PPM). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version

117

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.9232544°, -91.09694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.9232544,"lon":-91.09694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20021 (AEO2002), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2002 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of

119

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook2001 Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20011 (AEO2001), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2001 were produced with the National Energy

120

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effects of internal gain assumptions in building energy calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of direct solar gains in buildings can be affected by operating profiles, such as schedules for internal gains, thermostat controls, and ventilation rates. Building energy analysis methods use various assumptions about these profiles. The effects of typical internal gain assumptions in energy calculations are described. Heating and cooling loads from simulations using the DOE 2.1 computer code are compared for various internal-gain inputs: typical hourly profiles, constant average profiles, and zero gain profiles. Prototype single-family-detached and multi-family-attached residential units are studied with various levels of insulation and infiltration. Small detached commercial buildings and attached zones in large commercial buildings are studied with various levels of internal gains. The results of this study indicate that calculations of annual heating and cooling loads are sensitive to internal gains, but in most cases are relatively insensitive to hourly variations in internal gains.

Christensen, C.; Perkins, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Science with the Square Kilometer Array: Motivation, Key Science Projects, Standards and Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) represents the next major, and natural, step in radio astronomical facilities, providing two orders of magnitude increase in collecting area over existing telescopes. In a series of meetings, starting in Groningen, the Netherlands (August 2002) and culminating in a `science retreat' in Leiden (November 2003), the SKA International Science Advisory Committee (ISAC), conceived of, and carried-out, a complete revision of the SKA science case (to appear in New Astronomy Reviews). This preface includes: (i) general introductory material, (ii) summaries of the key science programs, and (iii) a detailed listing of standards and assumptions used in the revised science case.

C. Carilli; S. Rawlings

2004-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Horizontal completions challenge for industry  

SciTech Connect

As the technology to drill horizontal wells continues to evolve, the problem of efficiently and cost-effectively completing such wells grows. The economics of applying horizontal technology in high-productivity reservoirs demands both increased production and lower development costs. Such high productivity reservoirs are typical of the Gulf of Mexico, North Sea, South China basin, and other areas. Lowering development costs is achieved by drilling fewer wells and in the offshore environment by reducing the number of platforms and other well structures. Specifically addressed in this article are the problems of achieving high efficiency, long lasting completions while controlling costs in unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Spatz, E.

1988-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009),1 including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2009 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

125

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [1] (AEO2010), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2010 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

126

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20081 (AEO2008), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2008 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The AEO projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

127

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

128

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

129

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

130

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

131

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20001 (AEO2000), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2000 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

132

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA-M060(2004) (Washington, DC, 2004). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

133

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000-Table 1. Summary of the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Cases 0 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated Residential: 2000 Technology

134

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 1. Summary of AEO2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Cases 1 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 3.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $15.10 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.42 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated Residential: 2001 Technology

135

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

136

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

137

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security systems, microwave ovens, set-top boxes, home audio equipment, rechargeable electronics, and VCR/DVDs. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric appliances. The module's output includes number Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central

138

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

139

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below. 75

140

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9),

142

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

143

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

144

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

145

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

146

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

147

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

148

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

149

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1 (AEO2007), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant to formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports. 2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 3 , which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2007 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and

150

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

151

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in Three Cases, 1995-2035 Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2035 (2008 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

152

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

153

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

154

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

155

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7), 7), (Washington, DC, January 2007). Key Assumptions The output of the U.S. economy, measured by GDP, is expected to increase by 2.9 percent between 2005 and 2030 in the reference case. Two key factors help explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 3 indicates, for the Reference Case GDP growth slows down in each of the periods identified, from 3.0 percent between 2005 and 2010, to 2.9 percent between 2010 and 2020, to 2.8 percent in the between 2020 and 2030. In the near term from 2005 through 2010, the growth in nonfarm employment is low at 1.2 percent compared with 2.4 percent in the second half of the 1990s, while the economy is expected to experiencing relatively strong

156

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2030 (2006 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids

157

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

158

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

159

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 3. OPEC Oil Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Table 4. Worldwide Oil Reserves as of January 1, 2002 (Billion Barrels) Printer Friendly Version Region Proved Oil Reserves Western Hemisphere 313.6 Western‘Europe 18.1 Asia-Pacific 38.7

160

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

162

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

163

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

164

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, 7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

165

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

166

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

167

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

168

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

169

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - International...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

percent per year over the forecast periodas advances in both exploration and extraction technologies result in this upward trend (Figure 3). One fixed path for non-OPEC oil...

170

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per vehicle. EIA assumes that credit allowances for PZEVs will be met with conventional vehicle technology, hybrid vehicles will be sold to meet the AT-PZEV allowances, and that...

171

CONTENTS Japan Completes First Offshore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Japan Completes First Offshore Japan Completes First Offshore Production Test .............................1 New Seismic Data Over Known Hydrate Occurrences in the Deepwater Gulf of Mexico .........3 Gas Hydrate Reservoirs in the Offshore Caribbean Region of Colombia ..........................................7 CSEM Survey of a Methane Vent Site, Offshore West Svalbard...12 Pressure Core Analysis Tools Used to Characterize Hydrate- Bearing Sediments from The Nankai Trough ..............................19 Using Noble Gas Signatures to Fingerprint Gas Streams Derived from Dissociating Methane Hydrate .......................................... 23 Announcements ...................... 27 * North Slope Oil and Gas Lands Set Aside for Methane Hydrate Research * 2014 Offshore Technology Conference to Have Sessions on

172

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind.112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

173

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind108. Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind108. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

174

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 13 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 14 for eleven building categories 15 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

175

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 12 . Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost

176

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies May 2,...

177

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

178

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids supply and demand curves (1 curve per year; 2008-2030; approximated, isoelastic fit to previous NEMS results). These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2008 with IEO2007 and the STEO some functionality was removed from IEM while a new algorithm was implemented. Based on the difference between U.S. total petroleum liquids production (consumption) and the expected U.S. total liquids production (consumption) at the current WTI price, curves for global petroleum liquids consumption (production) were adjusted for each year. According to previous operations, a new WTI price path was generated. An exogenous oil supply module, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also used in IEM to provide annual regional (country) level production detail for conventional and unconventional liquids.

179

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.100

180

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Active code completion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Code completion menus have replaced standalone API browsers for most developers because they are more tightly integrated into the development workflow. Refinements to the code completion menu that incorporate additional sources of information have similarly ...

Cyrus Omar; YoungSeok Yoon; Thomas D. LaToza; Brad A. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Completed Sites Listing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 24 states.

183

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

184

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

185

Design assumptions and bases for small D-T-fueled spherical tokamak (ST) fusion core  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in defining the assumptions and clarifying the bases for a small D-T-fueled ST fusion core are presented. The paper covers several issues in the physics of ST plasmas, the technology of neutral beam injection, the engineering design configuration, and the center leg material under intense neutron irradiation. This progress was driven by the exciting data from pioneering ST experiments, a heightened interest in proof-of-principle experiments at the MA level in plasma current, and the initiation of the first conceptual design study of the small ST fusion core. The needs recently identified for a restructured fusion energy sciences program have provided a timely impetus for examining the subject of this paper. Our results, though preliminary in nature, strengthen the case for the potential realism and attractiveness of the ST approach.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Haines, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

COMPLETED: Polymer Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST technologies and concepts have inspired companies such as ExxonMobil and Rhodia to develop microfluidics research facilities. ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Complete Final Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2010 ... Christine Wang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology-- Lincoln. Laboratory ... Lincoln Lauhon, Northwestern University, USA ..... Peter Dudley.

188

A Graphical Approach to Diagnosing the Validity of the Conditional Independence Assumptions of a Bayesian Network Given Data  

SciTech Connect

Bayesian networks have attained widespread use in data analysis and decision making. Well studied topics include: efficient inference, evidence propagation, parameter learning from data for complete and incomplete data scenarios, expert elicitation for calibrating Bayesian network probabilities, and structure learning. It is not uncommon for the researcher to assume the structure of the Bayesian network or to glean the structure from expert elicitation or domain knowledge. In this scenario, the model may be calibrated through learning the parameters from relevant data. There is a lack of work on model diagnostics for fitted Bayesian networks; this is the contribution of this paper. We key on the definition of (conditional) independence to develop a graphical diagnostic method which indicates if the conditional independence assumptions imposed when one assumes the structure of the Bayesian network are supported by the data. We develop the approach theoretically and describe a Monte Carlo method to generate uncertainty measures for the consistency of the data with conditional independence assumptions under the model structure. We describe how this theoretical information and the data are presented in a graphical diagnostic tool. We demonstrate the approach through data simulated from Bayesian networks under different conditional independence assumptions. We also apply the diagnostic to a real world data set. The results indicate that our approach is a reasonable way of visualizing and inspecting the conditional independence assumption of a Bayesian network given data.

Walsh, Stephen J.; Whitney, Paul D.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).117 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

190

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

191

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

192

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable.gif (4875 bytes) renewable.gif (4875 bytes) The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittence, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

193

A Statistical Analysis of the Dependency of Closure Assumptions in Cumulus Parameterization on the Horizontal Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated data from the UCLA cumulus ensemble model are used to investigate the quasi-universal validity of closure assumptions used in existing cumulus parameterizations. A closure assumption is quasi-universally valid if it is sensitive neither ...

Kuan-Man Xu

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Underbalanced completions improve well safety and productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in completion technology, especially the use of and advances in coiled tubing technology, have presented the petroleum industry with methods that were previously unknown or considered too risky. Specifically, coiled tubing drilling and underbalanced drilling have both proven to be effective and acceptable methods in industry today. Several methods have been presented that will allow for the well to be completed underbalanced. By utilizing these methods, the completion process can be carried out while experiencing the same benefits offered by underbalanced drilling. the well can be completed with minimal fluid loss, which will result in reduced formation damage and improved well productivity. This new approach to the completion process provides additional opportunities both for completing new wells and for reentering existing wells.

Walker, T.; Hopmann, M. [Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ultraviolet Complete Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultraviolet complete (UV) quantum gravity theory is formulated in which vertex functions in Feynman graphs are entire functions and the propagating gravitons are described by local, causal propagators. A scalar-tensor action describes classical gravity theory. The cosmological constant problem is investigated in the context of the UV complete quantum gravity.

Moffat, J W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

complete final program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2009 ... Applicable Computing Technologies in Heat Treating: Numerical Modeling and ...... with very low critical cooling rates has been one of the most...

197

Complete Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

198

Complete Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

199

Complete Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

200

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 and 27) including incremental fuel 6 and 27) including incremental fuel efficiency improvement, incremental cost, first year of introduction, and fractional horsepower change. These assumed technology characterizations are scaled up or down to approximate the differences in each attribute for 6 Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) size classes of cars and light trucks. The vehicle sales share module holds the share of vehicle sales by import and domestic manufacturers constant within a vehicle size class at 1999 levels based on National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration data. 32 EPA size class sales shares are projected as a function of income per capita, fuel prices, and average predicted vehicle prices based on endogenous calculations within the MTCM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

202

Comparison of risk-dominant scenario assumptions for several TRU waste facilities in the DOE complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain a risk management perspective, the DOE Rocky Flats Field Office (RFFO) initiated a survey of other DOE sites regarding risks from potential accidents associated with transuranic (TRU) storage and/or processing facilities. Recently-approved authorization basis documents at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been based on the DOE Standard 3011 risk assessment methodology with three qualitative estimates of frequency of occurrence and quantitative estimates of radiological consequences to the collocated worker and the public binned into three severity levels. Risk Class 1 and 2 events after application of controls to prevent or mitigate the accident are designated as risk-dominant scenarios. Accident Evaluation Guidelines for selection of Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are based on the frequency and consequence bin assignments to identify controls that can be credited to reduce risk to Risk Class 3 or 4, or that are credited for Risk Class 1 and 2 scenarios that cannot be further reduced. This methodology resulted in several risk-dominant scenarios for either the collocated worker or the public that warranted consideration on whether additional controls should be implemented. RFFO requested the survey because of these high estimates of risks that are primarily due to design characteristics of RFETS TRU waste facilities (i.e., Butler-type buildings without a ventilation and filtration system, and a relatively short distance to the Site boundary). Accident analysis methodologies and key assumptions are being compared for the DOE sites responding to the survey. This includes type of accidents that are risk dominant (e.g., drum explosion, material handling breach, fires, natural phenomena, external events, etc.), source term evaluation (e.g., radionuclide material-at-risk, chemical and physical form, damage ratio, airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, leakpath factors), dispersion analysis (e.g., meteorological assumptions, distance to receptors, plume meander, deposition, and other factors affecting the calculated {chi}/Q), dose assessments (specific activities, inhalation dose conversion factors, breathing rates), designated frequency of occurrence, and risk assignment per the DOE Standard 3011 methodology. Information from the sites is being recorded on a spreadsheet to facilitate comparisons. The first response from Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions for the Savannah River Site (SRS) also provided a detailed analysis of the major differences in methods and assumptions between RFETS and SRS, which forms much of the basis for this paper. Other sites responding to the survey include the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Hanford, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Marx, D.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

204

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

205

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Making abstract interpretations complete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Completeness is an ideal, although uncommon, feature of abstract interpretations, formalizing the intuition that, relatively to the properties encoded by the underlying abstract domains, there is no loss of information accumulated in abstract computations. ...

Roberto Giacobazzi; Francesco Ranzato; Francesca Scozzari

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Completed DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completed) Completed) Project Number Title Document ID SLM / ORG Author / Phone / Email Status / Review Date P1020-2002REV National Phenomena hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE-STD-1020-2012 James O'Brien (HS-30) P1066-1999REV Fire Protection and Emergency Services Program and Design Criteria (revision to DOE-STD-1066-99) DOE-STD-1066-2012 James O'Brien (HS-30)

208

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Detachments of Complete Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detachment of a graph $G$ is formed by splitting each vertex into one or more subvertices, and sharing the incident edges arbitrarily among the subvertices. In this paper we consider the question of whether a graph $H$ is a detachment of some complete ...

Keith Edwards

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Sound (and Complete) Model of Contracts Matthias Blume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sound (and Complete) Model of Contracts Matthias Blume Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago blume@tti-c.org David McAllester Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago mcallester@tti-c.org Abstract

McAllester, David

211

Technology I, II, and III: Criteria for Understanding and Improving the Practice of Instructional Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In an earlier era of instructional technology, researchers proposed a set of criteria to help practitioners understand what assumptions about their work could help them (more)

McDonald, Jason K 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

213

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

214

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

215

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

216

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

217

Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008: Hydrogen, Fuel ...  

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Sunita Satyapal ... fossil, nuclear, and renewable sources. 14%. Technology Validation. Validate complete

218

Heterogeneous Correlation Modeling Based on the Wavelet Diagonal Assumption and on the Diffusion Operator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article discusses several models for background error correlation matrices using the wavelet diagonal assumption and the diffusion operator. The most general properties of filtering local correlation functions, with wavelet formulations, are ...

Olivier Pannekoucke

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Microwave Properties of Ice-Phase Hydrometeors for Radar and Radiometers: Sensitivity to Model Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified framework is presented for assessing the qualitative sensitivities of computed microwave properties, satellite brightness temperatures, and radar reflectivities to assumptions concerning the physical properties of ice-phase ...

Benjamin T. Johnson; Grant W. Petty; Gail Skofronick-Jackson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document provides key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions related to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions were extracted from a number of NGNP Project sources such as licensing related white papers, previously issued requirement documents, and preapplication interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

Wayne Moe

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Technology Transfer - Contact NETLs ORD Technology ...  

For inquiries regarding a specific technology or group of technologies, please complete this form and submit to techtransfer@netl.doe.gov : For any ...

222

Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

JEA successfully completes world's largest CFB demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) has successfully completed an eighth year landmark demonstration project that continues in baseload commercial operation. It scales up atmospheric fluidized-bed technology demonstration to the near-300-MW size, providing important data on a technology that can achieve > 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% NOx reduction at relatively high efficiencies and at costs comparable to those of conventional pulverized coal plants. The article recounts the history of the project. Performance tests showed a blend of coal and petcoke were most efficient as a feedstock. 3 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Appendix G: Major Assumptions for the Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases/ Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Download Report - Entire AEO2001 (PDF) - AEO2001 by Chapters (PDF) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Acronyms bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts Related Links bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO2001 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 (Only available on the Web) - Regional and more detailed AEO 2001 Reference Case Results - 1998, 2000 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Forecast Homepage bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage Appendix G Major Assumptions for the Forecasts Component Modules Major Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2001

225

Code Completion From Abbreviated Input  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abbreviation Completion is a novel technique to improve the efficiency of code-writing by supporting code completion of multiple keywords based on non-predefined abbreviated input - a different approach from conventional ...

Miller, Robert C.

226

On the use of the parabolic concentration profile assumption for a rotary desiccant dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

The current work describes a model for a desiccant dehumidifier which uses a parabolic concentration profile assumption to model the diffusion resistance inside the desiccant particle. The relative merits of the parabolic concentration profile model compared with widely utilized rotary desiccant wheel models are discussed. The periodic steady-state parabolic concentration profile model developed is efficient and can accommodate a variety of materials. These features make it an excellent tool for design studies requiring repetitive desiccant wheel simulations. A quartic concentration profile assumption was also investigated which yielded a 2.8 percent average improvement in prediction error over the parabolic model.

Chant, E.E. [Univ. of Turabo, Gurabo (Puerto Rico); Jeter, S.M. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Ombudsman  

... complete fairness in the transfer of federally funded technologies into the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy.

229

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

User_CompleteSF182  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completing an External Training Request (SF-182) Completing an External Training Request (SF-182) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Job Aid: Completing an External Training Request (SF-182) Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of completing an external training request form (SF-182). Complete an External Training Request (SF-182) - 11 Steps Task A Task A. Complete an External Training Request (SF-182) From the Home page, click the External Requests easy link. Click New Request to create a new training request form. Before completing the request form, it is recommended that you review the form to determine the required fields, indicated by red asterisks. This will assist you to determine the information you need to

232

External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Complete  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 History File Checklist 11_0613 Page 1 of 5 2 History File Checklist 11_0613 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: ISD History File Checklist Document Number: ISDF-012 Rev. 11_0613 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ADM, QAM, ISD, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDF-044 Course Feasibility Assessment, ISDF-045 Analysis Project Plan, ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 Script Template (Web), ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template (ILT), ISDF-005 WBT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-009 Design-Development Review Checklist, ISDF-010 After Action Report Template, ISDF-011 ISD

234

DEACTIVATION COMPLETION AND TURNOVER Deactivation Completion and Turnover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPLETION AND TURNOVER COMPLETION AND TURNOVER Deactivation Completion and Turnover Overview of Turnover Turnover Checklists End-Points Closeout Method End-Point Files Description Examples of End-Point Closeout Methods Closeout Method Subjects of This Chapter Achieving consensus that deactivation is complete can involve several parties including the deactivation contractor, the Field Office, DOE Headquarters, the post-deactivation contractor, regulators, and stakeholders.  Overview of Turnover  Turnover Checklists and Documents  End-Points Closeout and Verification Overview of Turnover When facility deactivation activities are complete, some of the possibilities for the subsequent receiving organization include:  In cases of facilities that are contaminated, turnover to a remediation organization for managing

235

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

236

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

Phillip Mills

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015 and resource assumptions through 2030. The GWOB model provides annual country level oil production detail for eight conventional and unconventional oils.

238

GRI baseline projection: Methodology and assumptions 1996 edition. Topical report, January-December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report documents the methodology employed in producing the 1996 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection. DRI/McGraw-Hill`s Energy Group (DRI) maintains an energy modeling system for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that is used to produce an annual projection of the supply and demand for energy by regions in the United States. The 1996 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection is produced using several different models. The models analyze various pieces of the U.S. energy markets and their solutions are based on a framework of exogenous assumptions provided by GRI. The report describes the integration and solution procedures of the models and the assumptions used to produce the final projection results.

Rhodes, M.R.; Baxter, R.P.; Nottingham, R.P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

GRI baseline projection: Methodology and assumptions 1995 edition. Topical report, January-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the methodology employed in producing the 1995 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection. DRI/McGraw-Hill`s Energy Group (DRI) maintains an energy modeling system for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that is used to produce an annual projection of the supply and demand for energy by regions in the United States. The 1995 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection is produced using several different models. The models analyze various pieces of the U.S. energy markets and their solutions are based on a framework of exogeneous assumptions provided by GRI. The report describes the integration and solution procedures of the models and the assumptions used to produce the final projection results.

Baxter, R.P.; Silveira, T.S.; Harshbarger, S.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ad Building demolition, recycling completed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ad Building demolition, recycling completed Ad Building demolition, recycling completed Ad Building demolition, recycling completed Demolition of the Administration Building helps Los Alamos meet an NNSA directive to reduce its structural footprint, modernize its infrastructure, and provide workers with safe, energy-efficient facilities. October 11, 2011 Demolition of the administration building Demolition of the Administration Building Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Project finished under budget, ahead of schedule LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 11, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed demolition of its former Administration Building. Demolition of the 316,500-square-foot building that was home to seven Laboratory directors was completed five months ahead of the original schedule and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion More...

242

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of national energy consumption by fuel typeenergy consumption in homes under differing assumptions, scenarios, and policies. At the national

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. Koomey. 1994. Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions andunits) Table A 3 : Number of Appliances in Existing Homes (sector, including appliances and heating, ventilation, and

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Biofuels Biofuels Biotechnology and Medecine Biotechnology & Medicine Chemistry Developing World Energy Efficient Technologies Energy Environmental Technologies...

245

Characterization of wind technology progress  

SciTech Connect

US DOE`s Wind Energy Program, NREL, and Sandia periodically re-evaluate the state of wind technology. Since 1995 marked the conclusion of a number of DOE-supported advanced turbine design efforts, and results from the next major round of research are expected near the latter part of the century, this paper discusses future trends for domestic wind farm applications (bulk power), incorporating recent turbine research efforts under different market assumptions from previous DOE estimates. Updated cost/performance projections are presented along with underlying assumptions and discussions of potential alternative wind turbine design paths. Issues on market valuation of wind technology in a restructured electricity market are also discussed.

Cadogan, J B [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Cohen, J M; Johnson, B L [Princeton Economic Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Power Technologies Data Book  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared by NREL's Energy Analysis Office, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts and comparisons, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, conversion factors, and selected congressional questions and answers.

Goldstein, L.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting. DE-AC03-76SF00098 #12;i ABSTRACT This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

249

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M060(2008) (Washington, DC, 2008). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

250

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

251

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 3. Coal-Related  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia Eastern Interior Western Fraction of underground coal production at: Gassy mines 0.885 0.368 0.971 0.876 0.681 Nongassy mines 0.115 0.632 0.029 0.124 0.319 Production from mines with degasification systems (fraction of underground production) 0.541 0.074 0.810 0.067 0.056 Emission factors (kilograms methane per short ton of coal produced) Underground Mining Gassy mines 6.047 5.641 27.346 2.988 6.027 Nongassy mines 0.362 0.076 15.959 0.285 0.245 Degassified mines 4.085 37.724 22.025 0.310 0.000 Surface Mining 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 Post-Mining, underground-mined 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 Post-Mining, surface-mined 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 Methane recovery at active coal mines

252

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M060(2010) (Washington, DC, 2010). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs.

253

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 4: Conservation Supply Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thirds of commercial savings are in lighting systems. New technologies like light-emitting diodes and improved lighting, recent advances in solid- state lighting--light-emitting diodes (LED) and organic light-emitting diodes. The availability of new lights such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and improved emerging technologies

254

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: News Release - U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies Methane Hydrates May Exceed the Energy Content of All Other Fossil Fuels Combined; Could...

256

Lyme Carditis with Transient Complete Heart Block  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrating complete heart block Volume XI, no . 2 : Maywith Transient Complete Heart Block Katherine W. D. Dolbecsecond-degree to first-degree heart block before complete

Dolbec, Katherine W D; Higgins, George L; Saucier, John R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup...

258

CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

SciTech Connect

The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

Ian Palmer; John McLennan

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Sensitivity of economic performance of the nuclear fuel cycle to simulation modeling assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparing different nuclear fuel cycles and assessing their implications require a fuel cycle simulation model as complete and realistic as possible. In this thesis, methodological implications of modeling choices are ...

Bonnet, Nicphore

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

262

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

263

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

264

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

265

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - National Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 National Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

266

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

267

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

268

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

269

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference 2008 Pledges: Methodology and Assumptions Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2008 Washington International Renewable Energy Conference (WIREC) was held in Washington, D.C., from March 4-6, 2008, and involved nearly 9,000 people from 125 countries. The event brought together worldwide leaders in renewable energy (RE) from governments, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to discuss the role that renewables can play in alleviating poverty, growing economies, and passing on a healthy planet to future generations. The conference concluded with more than 140 governments, international organizations, and private-sector representatives pledging to advance the uptake of renewable energy. The U.S. government authorized the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the carbon dioxide (CO2) savings that would result from the pledges made at the 2008 conference. This report describes the methodology and assumptions used by NREL in quantifying the potential CO2 reductions derived from those pledges.

Babiuch, B.; Bilello, D. E.; Cowlin, S. C.; Mann, M.; Wise, A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four origin, gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, status as a Vietnam-era veteran, or disability

272

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

273

A Comparative Study on Emerging Electric Vehicle Technology Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Numerous organizations have published reports in recent years that investigate the ever changing world of electric vehicle (EV) technologies and their potential effects on society. Specifically, projections have been made on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these vehicles and how they compare to conventional vehicles or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Similar projections have been made on the volumes of oil that these vehicles can displace by consuming large amounts of grid electricity instead of petroleum-based fuels. Finally, the projected rate that these new vehicle fleets will enter the market varies significantly among organizations. New ideas, technologies, and possibilities are introduced often, and projected values are likely to be refined as industry announcements continue to be made. As a result, over time, a multitude of projections for GHG emissions, oil displacement, and market penetration associated with various EV technologies has resulted in a wide range of possible future outcomes. This leaves the reader with two key questions: (1) Why does such a collective range in projected values exist in these reports? (2) What assumptions have the greatest impact on the outcomes presented in these reports? Since it is impractical for an average reader to review and interpret all the various vehicle technology reports published to date, Sentech Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted a comparative study to make these interpretations. The primary objective of this comparative study is to present a snapshot of all major projections made on GHG emissions, oil displacement, or market penetration rates of EV technologies. From the extensive data found in relevant publications, the key assumptions that drive each report's analysis are identified and 'apples-to-apples' comparisons between all major report conclusions are attempted. The general approach that was taken in this comparative study is comprised of six primary steps: (1) Search Relevant Literature - An extensive search of recent analyses that address the environmental impacts, market penetration rates, and oil displacement potential of various EV technologies was conducted; (2) Consolidate Studies - Upon completion of the literature search, a list of analyses that have sufficient data for comparison and that should be included in the study was compiled; (3) Identify Key Assumptions - Disparity in conclusions very likely originates from disparity in simple assumptions. In order to compare 'apples-to-apples,' key assumptions were identified in each study to provide the basis for comparing analyses; (4) Extract Information - Each selected report was reviewed, and information on key assumptions and data points was extracted; (5) Overlay Data Points - Visual representations of the comprehensive conclusions were prepared to identify general trends and outliers; and (6) Draw Final Conclusions - Once all comparisons are made to the greatest possible extent, the final conclusions were draw on what major factors lead to the variation in results among studies.

Ford, Jonathan [Sentech, Inc.; Khowailed, Gannate [Sentech, Inc.; Blackburn, Julia [Sentech, Inc.; Sikes, Karen [Sentech, Inc.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume 5 Number 1 R esearchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Environ- mental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) have completed the first...

275

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Slant hole completion test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

Mann, R.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

SRS - Area Completion Projects - ARF/IRF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/16/2012 4/16/2012 SEARCH GO spacer Administrative Record File/Information Repository File Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting Documentation General Information and Technologies Public Involvement Home SRS Home Area Completion Projects Administrative Record File/Information Repository File (ARF/IRF) Index of documents contained in the ARF/IRF is available at the University of South Carolina Libraries - Aiken and Columbia on microfilm and/or CD. This index is in PDF (portable document format) which requires Adobe Acrobat Reader software to be installed on your computer. Disclaimer - The scanning process used to transfer documents into the portable document format may unintentionally create minor inaccuracies in the text. The viewer is warned that minor spelling errors may occur and numerical data may be missing decimal points or exponential values. Should the viewer have any questions regarding a particular section of text, an accurate hardcopy is always available from the Area Completion Project Document Control at the Savannah River Site, Debbie Rice at 803-725-3885.

278

NGPL Louisiana station nears completion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction on a 3,600-hp compressor station on the Louisiana line of Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America near Henry, La., was scheduled for completion later this month. The Louisiana line extends some 205 miles along the Gulf Coast between New Caney, Tex., and the Henry hub area. The new compressor station will be located about 44 miles west of the Henry hub. Work began on the $5.1 million expansion project in Cameron Parish, La., in May following Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) certification. By mid-September, the compressor building, service building, and meter house has been erected, final compressor inspections were under way, and gas piping tie-ins had been completed, according to NGPL. Powered by three 1,200-hp Solar Saturn gas-fired centrifugal engines, the station is designed to increase the capacity of the Louisiana line east of the Stingray pipeline system by up to 220 MMcfd. Current capacity for east bound flows is approximately 900 MMcfd.

Not Available

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fossil Energy Techline, DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and represents a summary of carbon sequestration news covering the past month. Readers are referred to the actual article(s) for complete information. It is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory to provide information on recent activities and publications related to carbon sequestration. It covers domestic, international, public sector, and private sector news.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. 50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside July 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - Doctors have a new way of thinking about how to treat heart and skeletal muscle diseases. Body builders have a new way of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Standard assumptions and methods for solar heating and cooling systems analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of inputs, assumptions, analytical methods, and a reporting format is presented to help compare the results of residential and commercial solar system analyses being performed by different investigators. By the common use of load data, meteorological data, economic parameters, and reporting format, researchers examining, for example, two types of collectors may more easily compare their results. For residential heating and cooling systems, three locations were selected. The weather data chosen to characterize these cities are the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY). A house for each location was defined that is typical of new construction in that locale. Hourly loads for each location were calculated using a computerized load model that interacts with the system specified inputs characterizing each house. Four locations for commercial cooling analyses were selected from among the existing sites for which TMYs were available. A light commercial (nominal 25-ton cooling load) office building was defined and is used in all four locations. Hourly cooling and heating loads were computed for each city and are available on magnetic tape from the Solar Energy Research Insititute (SERI).

Leboeuf, C.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NETL: News Release - DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2, 2005 August 2, 2005 DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal Technology Project Eight Year Demonstration Project Results in One of World's Cleanest Coal-Based Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy and JEA, the public utility of Florida, have achieved a significant milestone in the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program by completing a project in which JEA's Northside Generating Station was converted into one of the cleanest burning coal-fired power plants in the world. MORE INFO Read the final project report [PDF-438KB] As part of the 8-year, $320 million cost-shared project, JEA installed state-of-the-art technology known as circulating fluidized bed combustion in a 300?megawatt combustor-triple the size of any previous

283

Geothermal innovative technologies catalog  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Technology Search  

home \\ technologies \\ search. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: Software: Patents: Technology Search. ... Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, ...

285

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design.

286

Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers successfully transferred 130 containers of remote-handled transuranic waste – each weighing up to 15 tons – to a facility for repackaging and shipment to a permanent disposal location. As part of a project funded by $90 million from the Recovery Act, the final shipment of the containers from the Materials and Fuels Complex recently arrived at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act More Documents & Publications EIS-0203-SA-03: Supplement Analysis

287

Technology Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security & Defense Homeland Security & Defense Information Technology & Communications Information Technology & Communications Sensors, Electronics &...

288

Technology disrupted  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Papatheodorou, Y. [CH2M Hill (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

290

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

291

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409,"HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"  

SciTech Connect

This paper revises and extends EPRI report EA-3409, ''Household Appliance Choice: Revision of REEPS Behavioral Models.'' That paper reported the results of an econometric study of major appliance choice in new residential construction. Errors appeared in two tables of that report. We offer revised versions of those tables, and a brief analysis of the consequences and significance of the errors. The present paper also proposes several possible extensions and re-specifications of the models examined by EPRI. Some of these are judged to be highly successful; they both satisfy economic intuition more completely than the original specification and produce a better quality fit to the dependent variable. We feel that inclusion of these modifications produces a more useful set of coefficients for economic modeling than the original specification. This paper focuses on EPRI's models of residential space heating technology choice. That choice was modeled as a nested logit structure, with consumers choosing whether to have central air conditioning or not, and, given that choice, what kind of space heating system to have. The model included five space heating alternatives with central cooling (gas, oil, and electric forced-air; heat pumps; and electric baseboard) and eight alternatives without it (gas, oil, and electric forced-air; gas and oil boilers and non-central systems; and electric baseboard heat). The structure of the nested logit model is shown in Figure 1.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J. E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agreements for Commercializing Technology Agreements for Commercializing Technology NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a partner seeks highly-specialized or technical services to complete a project. An ACT agreement also authorizes participating contractor-operated DOE laboratories, such as NREL, to partner with businesses using more flexible terms that are aligned with industry practice. The agreement type used depends on the business, and the specific partnership selected is determined on a case-by-case basis. Benefits The benefits of Agreements for Commercializing Technology include: Intellectual Property Rights. ACT provides a more flexible framework for negotiation of intellectual property rights to facilitate moving technology from the laboratory to the marketplace as quickly as possible.

295

Frac packs: A specialty option or primary completion technique?  

SciTech Connect

High permeability fracture treatments have taken place at Alaska`s North Slope, in the North Sea, and most recently, in the unconsolidated Miocene formations of the Gulf of Mexico -- where gravel pack completions have historically been used to prevent sand production. In the Gulf of Mexico, attempts were made as early as the mid-1960s to hydraulically fracture sands. However, some of these early treatments failed because of improper techniques, poor candidate selection and lack of understanding of rock property mechanics. Recent developments in fracturing technology, and the use of this technology to fracture through damage has achieved more favorable results than gravel packing and sandstone acidizing, and has led to widespread use of these fracture treatments. The procedure for fracturing high permeability formations is called frac packing. These frac pack treatments are typically used to remove near-wellbore damage that occurs from drilling and completion operations.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of geothermal-well-completion systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a three year study concerning the completion of geothermal wells, specifically cementing, are reported. The research involved some specific tasks: (1) determination of properties an adequate geothermal well cement must possess; (2) thorough evaluation of current high temperature oilwell cementing technology in a geothermal context; (3) basic research concerning the chemical and physical behavior of cements in a geothermal environment; (4) recommendation of specific cement systems suitable for use in a geothermal well.

Nelson, E.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Flawed Assumptions, Models and Decision Making: Misconceptions Concerning Human Elements in Complex System  

SciTech Connect

The history of high consequence accidents is rich with events wherein the actions, or inaction, of humans was critical to the sequence of events preceding the accident. Moreover, it has been reported that human error may contribute to 80% of accidents, if not more (dougherty and Fragola, 1988). Within the safety community, this reality is widely recognized and there is a substantially greater awareness of the human contribution to system safety today than has ever existed in the past. Despite these facts, and some measurable reduction in accident rates, when accidents do occur, there is a common lament. No matter how hard we try, we continue to have accidents. Accompanying this lament, there is often bewilderment expressed in statements such as, ''There's no explanation for why he/she did what they did''. It is believed that these statements are a symptom of inadequacies in how they think about humans and their role within technological systems. In particular, while there has never been a greater awareness of human factors, conceptual models of human involvement in engineered systems are often incomplete and in some cases, inaccurate.

FORSYTHE,JAMES C.; WENNER,CAREN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

299

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

300

Faience Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

Nicholson, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

There are no technology records available that match the search query. Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords.

303

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test test Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Energy ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES Aerosol Sealing Aerosol Remote Sealing System Clog-free Atomizing and Spray Drying Nozzle Air-stable Nanomaterials for Efficient OLEDs Solvent Processed Nanotube Composites OLEDS with Air-stable Structured Electrodes APIs for Online Energy Saving Tools: Home Energy Saver and EnergyIQ Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost Dynamic Solar Glare Blocking System Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Electrochromic Windows with Multiple-Cavity Optical Bandpass Filter Electrochromic Window Technology Portfolio Universal Electrochromic Smart Window Coating

304

Performance of 50 Completed ATP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... semiconductors. The low-cost blue light emitting diode (LED) produced with new silicon carbide crystal technology. Benefits ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 foot diameter cyanate ester / fiberglass laminated antenna 3 foot diameter cyanate ester / fiberglass laminated antenna 3 foot diameter cyanate ester / fiberglass laminated antenna Composites PDF format (145 kb) Polymer composite materials are composed of fibers in an organic matrix and can be useful in applications that require a high strength-to-weight ratio. Sandia's MS&T staff will work with you from part design, through mold and tooling design, and on through fabrication. The department is capable of fabricating small and large complex parts and will help you choose the most economical technique for your composite needs. Capabilities: The Center has a comprehensive program on the mechanical engineering design, tooling and fixturing, lay-out, complete processing of the composite structure, and technology transfer of composite structures for a

306

Context-Sensitive Query Auto-Completion ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Query auto completion is known to provide poor predictions of the users query when her input prefix is very short (e.g., one or two characters). In this paper we show that context, such as the users recent queries, can be used to improve the prediction quality considerably even for such short prefixes. We propose a context-sensitive query auto completion algorithm, NearestCompletion, which outputs the completions of the users input that are most similar to the context queries. To measure similarity, we represent queries and contexts as high-dimensional term-weighted vectors and resort to cosine similarity. The mapping from queries to vectors is done through a new query expansion technique that we introduce, which expands a query by traversing the query recommendation tree rooted at the query. In order to evaluate our approach, we performed extensive experimentation over the public AOL query log. We demonstrate that when the recent users queries are relevant to the current query she is typing, then after typing a single character, NearestCompletions MRR is 48 % higher relative to the MRR of the standard MostPopularCompletion algorithm on average. When the context is irrelevant, however, NearestCompletions MRR is essentially zero. To mitigate this problem, we propose HybridCompletion, which is a hybrid of NearestCompletion with MostPopularCompletion. HybridCompletion is shown to dominate both NearestCompletion and MostPopularCompletion, achieving a total improvement of 31.5 % in MRR relative to MostPopular-Completion on average.

Ziv Bar-yossef; Naama Kraus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies May 2, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the completion of a successful, unprecedented test of technology in the North Slope of Alaska that was able to safely extract a steady flow of natural gas from methane hydrates - a vast, entirely untapped resource that holds enormous potential for U.S. economic and energy security. Building upon this initial, small-scale test, the Department is launching a new research effort to conduct a long-term production test in the Arctic as well as research to test additional technologies that could be used to locate,

308

Power Plant Wastewater Treatment Technology Review Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing power plant water management options means screening an increasing number of wastewater treatment technologies. This report provides engineers with detailed information on treatment process performance, economics, and applications to complete rapid, yet meaningful, technology screening evaluations.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

310

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Non-Noble Metal Water Electrolysis Catalysts; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

311

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

BSA 08-04: High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

312

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Receive Technology Updates. Get email notifications about new or improved technologies in your area of interest. Subscribe

313

Synagro Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip TX 77057 Product Synagro, a residuals mangement company, also provides complete biogas cogeneration systems. References Synagro Technologies Inc.1 LinkedIn Connections...

314

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY GRADUATE SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY GRADUATE SCHOOL FEE WAIVER APPLICATION Applicant ____/____/______ *************************************************************************************** Send completed form to: Office of the Dean of Graduate Studies, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 23087

Greer, Julia R.

315

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

316

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Biotechnology and Medicine DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS CANCER CANCER PROGNOSTICS 14-3-3 Sigma as a Biomarker of Basal Breast Cancer ANXA9: A Therapeutic Target and Predictive Marker for Early Detection of Aggressive Breast Cancer Biomarkers for Predicting Breast Cancer Patient Response to PARP Inhibitors Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Analysis Using Selected Gene Expression Comprehensive Prognostic Markers and Therapeutic Targets for Drug-Resistant Breast Cancers Diagnostic Test to Personalize Therapy Using Platinum-based Anticancer Drugs Early Detection of Metastatic Cancer Progenitor Cells

317

NNSA Completes Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Completes Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization Completes Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Completes Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization Program Press Release NNSA Completes Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization

318

NIST Complete hemispherical infrared laser-based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A custom instrument, the Complete Hemispherical infrared Laser-based Reflectometer ... using light input from a selection of lasers covering the ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present December 7, 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Before, during, and after pictures of the K-33 building decontamination,...

320

Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Completed in 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2. Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Completed in 2003; Ending Region & State: Begins in State - Region: Pipeline/Project Name: FERC Docket ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

JOBAID-LAUNCHING AND COMPLETING ASSIGNED SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of launching and completing assigned surverys.

322

China National Machinery Industry Complete Engineering Corporation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

construction project, trading, military equipment manufacturing, real estate and waste-to-energy project development. References China National Machinery Industry Complete...

323

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

324

Technology Development Advances EM Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The unique nature of many of EM's remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve work and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program.

325

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Completes 10MW Thin Film Solar Power Plant for SempraT. ; (2008) Concentrating Solar PowerTechnology, Cost, and2009). Concentrating solar power plants of the southwest

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Federal Technology Portal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov BTP and FEMP Technology Portal March 15, 2012 2 eere.energy.gov Background * This presentation was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at the request of the U.S. Department of Defense Tri-Services and the Federal Energy Management Program. * It incorporates initial feedback from representatives of the Interagency Task Force Technology Deployment Working Group. 3 eere.energy.gov Technology Readiness Levels 9. Actual system "flight proven" through successful mission operations 8. Actual system completed and "flight qualified" through test and demonstration 7. System prototype demonstration in a operational environment

327

Federal Technology Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BTP and FEMP Technology Portal March 15, 2012 2 eere.energy.gov Background * This presentation was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at the request of the U.S. Department of Defense Tri-Services and the Federal Energy Management Program. * It incorporates initial feedback from representatives of the Interagency Task Force Technology Deployment Working Group. 3 eere.energy.gov Technology Readiness Levels 9. Actual system "flight proven" through successful mission operations 8. Actual system completed and "flight qualified" through test and demonstration 7. System prototype demonstration in a operational environment

328

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the U.S. residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (McMenamin et al. 1992). In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70 % of electricity consumption and 30 % of natural gas consumption in the U.S. residential sector (EIA 1993). Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific

J. Hwang; Francis X. Johnson; Richard E. Brown; James W. Hanford; Jonathan G. Koomey

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies  

SciTech Connect

To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies. 10 refs., 8 figs., 32 tabs.

Delene, J.G.; Hudson, C.R. II.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Emerging Grid Reliability Improvement Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial phase of a planned comprehensive Eastern Interconnection (EI) segmentation study is complete. As part of the preparations for completion of the EI study, and to carry out a similar effort for the Western Interconnection (WI), it was necessary to first investigate the potential of other technologies to compete with segmentation. This report discusses emerging grid reliability improvement technologies, providing a perspective on the pros and cons of segmentation, the grid shock absorber concept...

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Gravel packing feasible in horizontal well completions  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of horizontal wells in unconsolidated formations depends on proper equipment selection and installation method balanced with reservoir objectives, formation parameters, and costs. The guidelines for designing these completions are based on generalized field experience, including horizontal cases where applicable.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Ashton, J.P. (Baker Sand Control, Houston, TX (US))

1990-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Context-sensitive query auto-completion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Query auto completion is known to provide poor predictions of the user's query when her input prefix is very short (e.g., one or two characters). In this paper we show that context, such as the user's recent queries, can be used to improve the prediction ... Keywords: context-awareness, query auto-completion, query expansion

Ziv Bar-Yossef; Naama Kraus

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Introducing complete graphs in molecular connectivity studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical model of the molecular polarizability of fifty-four organic compounds, of the lattice enthalpy of twenty metal halides, and of the partition coefficient of twenty-five organic compounds has been used to test four different complete graph, ... Keywords: Mathematical model, algorithms, chemical graphs, complete graphs, core electrons, molecular connectivity, polarizability

Lionello Pogliani

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Performance of 50 Completed ATP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Prototypes and pilot models of flat fluorescent ... Distributed Multi-agent-based optimization technology. ... on a generic mathematical model of thermal ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

Technology Transfer: Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map About Us About Technology Transfer Contact Us Available Technologies Advanced Materials Biofuels Biotechnology and Medicine Developing World Energy Environmental Technologies Imaging and Lasers Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Nanotechnology and Microtechnology Software and Information Technology For Industry Licensing Overview Frequently Asked Questions Partnering with Berkeley Lab Licensing Interest Form Receive New Tech Alerts For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Forms Record of Invention (Word doc -- please do not use earlier PDF version of the form) Software Disclosure and Abstract (PDF, use Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader 9 and up ONLY to complete the form) Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Empolyment Export Control FAQs for Researchers

336

Foolproof completions for high rate production wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operators, especially those managing production from deepwater reservoirs, are striving to produce hydrocarbons at higher and higher rates without exposing the wells to completion failure risk. To avoid screen failures, recent studies have favored gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does not stop formation fines migration, and, over time, fines accumulation in the GP will lead to increasing completion skin. Although, and not always, the skin can be removed by acidizing, it is not practical to perform repeated acid treatments on deepwater wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful HPF is not a trivial exercise, and frequently, there is a steep learning curve for such a practice. This work explains the importance to HPF completions of the well trajectory through the interval to be hydraulically fractured, for production, not execution, reasons. A new model quantifies the effect of the well inclination on the connectivity between the fracture and the well via perforations. Guidelines based on the maximum target production rate, including forecasts of multiphase flow, are provided to size the HPF completion to avoid common completion failures that may result from high fluid rate and/or fines movement. Skin model will be developed for both vertical and deviated wells. Once the HPF is properly designed and executed, the operators should end up with a long term low skin good completion quality well. The well will be safely produced at the maximum flow rates, with no need for well surveillance and monitoring.

Tosic, Slavko

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

339

CCN predictions using simplified assumptions of organic aerosol composition and mixing state: A synthesis from six different locations  

SciTech Connect

An accurate but simple quantification of the fraction of aerosol particles that can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is needed for implementation in large-scale models. Data on aerosol size distribution, chemical composition, and CCN concentration from six different locations have been analyzed to explore the extent to which simple assumptions of composition and mixing state of the organic fraction can reproduce measured CCN number concentrations. Fresher pollution aerosol as encountered in Riverside, CA, and the ship channel in Houston, TX, cannot be represented without knowledge of more complex (size-resolved) composition. For aerosol that has experienced processing (Mexico City, Holme Moss (UK), Point Reyes (CA), and Chebogue Point (Canada)), CCN can be predicted within a factor of two assuming either externally or internally mixed soluble organics although these simplified compositions/mixing states might not represent the actual properties of ambient aerosol populations, in agreement with many previous CCN studies in the literature. Under typical conditions, a factor of two uncertainty in CCN concentration due to composition assumptions translates to an uncertainty of {approx}15% in cloud drop concentration, which might be adequate for large-scale models given the much larger uncertainty in cloudiness.

Ervens, B.; Wang, J.; Cubison, M. J.; Andrews, E.; Feingold, G.; Ogren, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Zhang, Q.; Coe, H.; Flynn, M.; Allan, J. D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tools & Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Weprovide leadership for transforming workforce development through the power of technology. It develops corporate educational technology policy and enables the use of learning tools and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Available Technologies  

The technologys subnanometer resolution is a result of superior ... Additional R&D will be required ... U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF SCIENCE ...

342

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Statistical Approaches and Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... during the PCR amplification process This is highly affected by DNA quantity and quality ... PCR inhibitors present in the sample may reduce PCR ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides thelist of completed EM cleanup projects from various sites across the country from 2005 topresent, along with the each projects performance related to cost, schedule, and...

346

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieves milestone, completing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the upgrade that will make the device the most advanced fusion facility of its kind on earth. Completion of the first quadrant entailed some anxious moments. Riding on the...

347

Querying partially sound and complete data sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When gathering data from multiple data sources, users need uniform, transparent access to data. Also, when extracting data from several independent, often only partially sound and complete data sources, it is useful to present users with meta-information ...

Alberto O. Mendelzon; George A. Mihaila

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Organization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contacts Organization Chart for the Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Technologies and Deployment, Technology Managers Advanced Combustion Engines, Technology...

349

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Information Technology Validation Search Search Help Technology Validation EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Technology Validation Printable Version Share this resource...

350

Complete Reducibility in Euclidean Twin Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Completely reducible subcomplexes of spherical buildings was defined by J.P. Serre and are used in studying subgroups of reductive algebraic groups. We begin the study of completely reducible subcomplexes of twin buildings and how they may be used to study subgroups of algebraic groups over a ring of Laurent polynomials and Kac-Moody groups by looking at the Euclidean twin building case.

Dawson, Denise K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Foothills pipeline project prebuild being completed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

September 1982 marked the completion of the 395-mile eastern leg of the Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline project; the western leg went into service in October 1981. The design capacities are, respectively, 1.075 billion and 240 million CF/day. Phase 11 of the project will consist of installing the northern, large-diameter sections in Alberta, British Columbia, the Yukon, and Alaska, along with additional facilities on the two completed legs.

Stewart, M.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Can Oil Float Completely Submerged in Water?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Droplet formation in a system of two or more immiscible fluids is a celebrated topic of research in the fluid mechanics community. In this work, we propose an innovative phenomenon where oil when injected drop-wise into a pool of water moves towards the air-water interface where it floats in a fully submerged condition. The configuration, however, is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. The droplet contour is analyzed using edge detection. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number established the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also showed the temporal variation of the gap thickness

Nath, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Souvick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this final technical report, UTSI summarizes work completed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95231. This work began on the contract effective date, September 15, 1995 and is continuing on a very small basis to complete the groundwater remediation as of this date. The work scope required UTSI to continue to maintain the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility and keep it in readiness for anticipated testing. This effort was terminated in September 1998 by DOE stop-work letter. Work continued on reporting, environmental restoration and on the High Temperature Superconductivity work that was underway. The work included preparing reports on the MHD POC tests that had been completed just prior to this contract initiation under an earlier contract with DOE Chicago. These four reports are summarized herein. This report summarizes the environmental restoration work performed under the contract, including groundwater monitoring and remediation, removal of wastes from the facility, removal of asbestos from the cooling tower and actions in compliance with the license to discharge water into Woods Reservoir. This report covers work in support of the DOE High Temperature Superconductivity program including: (1) Assistance to DOE in preparing a development plan; (2) Cooperation with industry, national laboratories and other universities to promote the commercialization of thin film superconductors (coated conductors); (3) Process Evaluations; (4) Process Diagnostic Development; and (5) Process Economics. The assistance to DOE task included convening an advisory board composed of all the major participants in the DOE program and preparing a draft development plan and Research and Development Roadmap leading to commercialization of the coated conductor technology. Under this program, cooperative agreements and cooperative work was undertaken with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Midwest Superconductivity, Inc., EURUS Technologies, Inc., Westinghouse Electric Company, and others. In the process evaluation task, four studies were completed by faculty, staff and students. Summaries of these studies are included in this report. In process diagnostic development, three studies were completed, all emphasizing diagnostics that are applicable to real time control of manufacturing processes. In Process Economics, one study was completed that estimated the manufacturing cost of superconducting wire produced by two of the process thought to be most promising.

Joel W. Muehlhauser

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Property:CompletionNotes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CompletionNotes CompletionNotes Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CompletionNotes Property Type Text Description List of data that still needs to be researched and entered for the NEPA document Subproperties This property has the following 2 subproperties: C CA-96062042 D DOI-BLM-CA-ES-2013-002+1793-EIS Pages using the property "CompletionNotes" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + 8/2: Data reviewed for completion C CA-017-05-051 + 8/9 Data entry complete. Attached FONSI does not seem to be fully related to the attached EA. The FONSI is for a geothermal well and slimhole exploration project and the EA is for a pipeline project. Need to add Public Health and Safety as a resource 8/22/13 - The 'FONSI/DR is actually for EA CA-170-02-15 Bassalt Canyon..dated Jan 2002 KW 8/26/13 - I deleted the FONSI from this page. Filename is incorrect for the file and stands as "CA-017-05-51-EA-DR -FONSI.pdf," Andrew Gentile. Unable to find Final EA or FONSI online. When RMP added, add "Inyo National Forest "Land and Resource Management Plan" (LRMP) 1988"

355

Chemistry - Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

356

Technology Analysis - Heavy Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the GPRA benefits estimates for EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program's heavy vehicle technology research activities. Argonne researchers develop the benefits analysis using four...

357

Available Technologies  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Thermal management for: microelectronic devices; solar cells and solar energy management systems ; refrigerators

358

Available Technologies  

Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. Monitoring and Imaging; Remediation; Modeling; Imaging & Lasers.

359

Program on Technology Innovation: Nuclear Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the economic value of advanced nuclear reactor and fuel system technologies in addressing global warming in a carbon-constrained world. Under a range of reasonable assumptions, the projected value of advanced nuclear technology options is in the trillions of dollars even in scenarios that take into account competing technologies such as carbon capture and storage (CCS).

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECEMBER 2012 DECEMBER 2012 Pathway for readying the next generation of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT -OVERVIEW 2 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT-OVERVIEW 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT-OVERVIEW 3 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

362

GeoEnergy technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the GeoEnergy Technology Program is to improve the understanding and efficiency of energy extraction and conversion from geologic resources, hence maintaining domestic production capability of fossil energy resources and expanding the usage of geothermal energy. The GeoEnergy Technology Program conducts projects for the Department of Energy in four resource areas--coal, oil and gas, synthetic fuels and geothermal energy. These projects, which are conducted collaboratively with private industry and DOE`s Energy Technology Centers, draw heavily on expertise derived from the nuclear weapons engineering capabilities of Sandia. The primary technologies utilized in the program are instrumentation development and application, geotechnical engineering, drilling and well completions, and chemical and physical process research. Studies in all four resource areas are described.

NONE

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Drilling technology/GDO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

Kelsey, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NETL: Deepwater Technology Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture | Safety & Environmental | Other UDW Technology | Completed DW Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10121-4306-01 All Electric Subsea Autonomous High Integrity Pressure Protection System (HIPPS) Architecture GE Global Research 10121-4401-02 Ultra-Deepwater Riser Concepts for High Motion Vessels Stress Engineering Services, Inc. 10121-4405-02 Ultra-deepwater Dry Tree System for Drilling and Production in the Gulf of Mexico Det Norske Veritas 10121-4505-01 Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel Nautilus International, LLC 09121-3500-01 Intelligent Production System for Ultra-Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer for Lateral Production Control and Optimization

365

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

366

Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act-funded demolition completed Recovery Act-funded demolition completed Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition The building was the largest of the 24 demolished at LANL's historic Technical Area 21. January 19, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430

367

Coiled tubing enables rapid CO{sub 2} completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Bravo Dome field of northeastern New Mexico, Amoco has doubled their expected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) production and reduced completion costs by 7.5% using coiled tubing in conjunction with other technologies. Amoco initially expected to produce an average 2.6 MMcfd per well. Instead, six months after completing the 31-well package, the company is producing an average 5.1 MMcfd. Important elements contributing cost and time savings on the project were: Log analysis to select perforations and help prevent water production, and lost circulation; the mobility and flexibility of coiled tubing; using cement for low-cost lost circulation control; using thermoplastic film to prevent proppant flowback; fracture designs optimized for each well; and forming an alliance between Amoco and vendors and developing of mutual trust. Amoco and other producing companies use about 95% of the CO{sub 2} produced at Amoco`s Bravo Dome field for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects in the Permian Basin area. Amoco sells 5% of the purest product to companies in the US food industry. While the low price of CO{sub 2}, about one-fourth that of methane, furnished part of the impetus for Amoco to implement the cost-cutting methods at Bravo Dome, the methods can be applied in many completion applications and are discussed in this paper.

Payton, R.; Baker, R.; Turner, D.; Bertrand, B.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NP-complete Problems and Physical Reality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can NP-complete problems be solved efficiently in the physical universe? I survey proposals including soap bubbles, protein folding, quantum computing, quantum advice, quantum adiabatic algorithms, quantum-mechanical nonlinearities, hidden variables, relativistic time dilation, analog computing, Malament-Hogarth spacetimes, quantum gravity, closed timelike curves, and "anthropic computing." The section on soap bubbles even includes some "experimental" results. While I do not believe that any of the proposals will let us solve NP-complete problems efficiently, I argue that by studying them, we can learn something not only about computation but also about physics.

Scott Aaronson

2005-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Completion fluids: a generic overview. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This work defines how clean completion fluids should be obtained onsite by implementing cleaner operational practices and using progressive solids removal steps, so that final fine filtration can be effective. Several current final filtration techniques are discussed and evaluated. Due to the variability in solids loading during completion operations, a number of solids removal steps are recommended to enhance the filtration process toward a solids-free system. In order of descending particle size removal, the equipment needed includes a shale shaker, settling tank, desilter, centrifugal separator, and final polishing filters. 25 references.

Ammerer, N.H.; Hashemi, R.; Jewell, J.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Retrofitting Urban Arterials Into Complete Streets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speeds reduce mobility and increase costs for all vehicles Required to design to Level of Service C with Federal highway standards and guidelines Slower speeds reduce mobility and increase costs for all in Complete Streets Conflicts with National Guidelines #12;ITE New Recommended Practice Designing Walkable

Bertini, Robert L.

371

Complete Orders, Categories and Lattices of Approximations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present article deals with the problem whether and how the bilattice orderings of knowledge ⩽$_k$ and truth ⩽$_t$ might enrich the theory of rough sets. Passing to the chief idea of the paper, we develop a bilattice-theoretic generalisation ... Keywords: *-autonomous category, Chu construction, Nelson lattice, approximation, bilattice, complete partial order, rough set

Marcin Wolski

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NNSA Completes B61 Warhead Refurbishment | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B61 Warhead Refurbishment NNSA Completes B61 Warhead Refurbishment June 30, 2006 Washington, DC NNSA Completes B61 Warhead Refurbishment NNSA completed a six-year effort...

373

Power Technologies Data Book 2003 Edition  

SciTech Connect

The 2003 edition of this report, prepared by NREL's Energy Analysis Office, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts and comparisons, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, conversion factors, and selected congressional questions and answers.

Aabakken, J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Fourth Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, prepared by NREL's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.

Aabakken, J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

New technology for the independent producer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology transfer conference consisted of the following six sessions: reservoir characterization; drilling, testing and completion; enhanced oil recovery; 3-d seismic and amplitude variation with offset (AVO); biotechnology for field applications; and well logging technology. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Third Edition  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared by NREL's Energy Analysis Office, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.

Aabakken, J.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Processing Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013... relevant polymers and hybrid nanocomposite material systems. ... technology to perform lightweight manufacturing of car components.

379

Technology Transfer  

A new search feature has been implemented, which allows searching of technology transfer information across the Department of Energy Laboratories.

380

Technology Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... get started on understanding accessibility in elections and voting technology. ... bibliography was created by the Georgia Tech Research Institute ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Technology Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Book:PrefaceTechnology as the Strategic AdvantageWhen I began writing this book I struggled with the direction I wanted it to take. Is this book to be about business, technology, or even the business of technology? I ...

Cooper Smith

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Completion techniques for geothermal-geopressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are covered: oil well completions, water well completions, sand control techniques, geopressured oil and gas wells, and geopressured water well completion. The conclusions for a geothermal-geopressured water well completion and needed research are included. (MHR)

Boyd, W.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record year for environmental cleanup Record year for environmental cleanup Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup Personnel conducted more field investigations and cleanup campaigns than ever and completed a record number of Lab shipments to WIPP. December 16, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

385

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (completed May 31, 2011)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (Completed May 31, 2010) Description NeuCo, Inc. (which acquired original participant Pegasus Technologies), a developer of power plant control and optimization technologies, demonstrated the capability to optimize mercury speciation and control of emissions from an existing power plant. This demonstration took place at an 890 megawatt (MW) utility boiler in Jewett,

386

Report of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling and completion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussions, conclusions, and recommendations of the Workshop on Advanced Geothermal Drilling and Completion Systems are summarized. The purpose of the workshop was to identify new drilling and completion systems that have the potential for significantly reducing the cost of geothermal wells, and to provide recommendations as to the research and development tasks that are required to develop these advanced systems. Participants in the workshop included representatives from private industry, universities, and government who were organized into four working groups as follows: Rock Drilling Technology, Surface Technology, Borehole Technology, and Directional Drilling Technology. The Panel on Rock Drilling Technology was charged with identifying advanced concepts for breaking rock that could result in instantaneous penetration rates three to five times higher than those of conventional rotary drilling. The Panel on Surface Technology discussed improvements in surface equipment and operating procedures that could contribute to reduced well costs. The Panel on Borehole Technology discussed problems associated with establishing and maintaining a stable borehole for the long-term production of geothermal wells. The Panel on Directional Drilling Technology addressed problems encountered in drilling deviated wells in geothermal reservoirs.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Technology Transfer Reporting Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

form is to be completed by the TTO for individual inquiry/case activity during the quarter as required form is to be completed by the TTO for individual inquiry/case activity during the quarter as required by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000. Mouse over definitions and descriptions appear over text/check boxes where appropriate. After completing this form, click on the submit button. *If you have no TTO activity for the quarter, please fill in your name, FY and quarter, lab or facility and check the box "No Quarterly Activity". Initial Ombuds Contact: ____________________ Type: Inquiry Case Ombuds Name: __________________________ Time Spent: (Hours) ______________ Final Ombuds Involvement: _________________ Laboratory or Facility: AMES ANL BNL LBNL INL KCP LANL NREL LLNL NBL NETL PNNL NNSS ORNL PXSO SRNL

388

SRS - Area Completion Projects - Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2013 5/2013 SEARCH GO spacer Administrative Record File/Information Repository File Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting Documentation General Information and Technologies Public Involvement Home SRS Home Area Completion Projects Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting Documentation * Federal Facility Agreement -The document that directs the comprehensive remediation of the Savannah River Site Appendix Affected by Modification: Appendix D Issuance of EPA and SCDHEC approved Revision.0 Appendix D for Fiscal Year 2013 (Print Date: 08/27/2013). The SCDHEC provided a comment on the Revision 0 Appendix D for Fiscal Year 2013 (Print Date: 08/27/2013) on Spetember 26, 2013. The EPA provided conditional approval, pending resolution of the SCDHEC's comment, of theRevision 0 Appendix D for Fiscal Year 2013 (Print Date: 08/27/2013) on October 30, 2013.

389

Based Technology for CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS)- Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS)- Based Technology for CO 2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases DE-FE0007567 Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC. CONSOL Energy Inc. Nexant Inc. Western Kentucky University HiGee USA Inc. Presented by Shiaoguo (Scott) Chen DOE Carbon Capture Technology Meeting, July 8-11, 2013, Pittsburgh, PA 2 Acknowledgements Funded by U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory under Agreement No. DE-FE0007657 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

390

Technology '90  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security Technologies for and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety & Security Technologies Study Started in 2005 with OCRWM Funding. OCRWM funding ended in 2009. EM gave CVSA funding to finish the report. CVSA Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee Examined current and emerging technologies for safety and security of radioactive material shipments Site visits Product reviews HMCRP HM-04 report on emerging technologies Safety & Security Technologies Study Completed several site visits to look at current technologies being used. Technologies were broken down into five categories. 1. Inspection Technologies 2. Security Technologies 3. Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and

392

The Role Of Modeling Assumptions And Policy Instruments in Evaluating The Global Implications Of U.S. Biofuel Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of current U.S. biofuel law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) is to reduce dependence on imported oil, but the law also requires biofuels to meet carbon emission reduction thresholds relative to petroleum fuels. EISA created a renewable fuel standard with annual targets for U.S. biofuel use that climb gradually from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36 billion gallons (or about 136 billion liters) of biofuels per year by 2022. The most controversial aspects of the biofuel policy have centered on the global social and environmental implications of its potential land use effects. In particular, there is an ongoing debate about whether indirect land use change (ILUC) make biofuels a net source, rather sink, of carbon emissions. However, estimates of ILUC induced by biofuel production and use can only be inferred through modeling. This paper evaluates how model structure, underlying assumptions, and the representation of policy instruments influence the results of U.S. biofuel policy simulations. The analysis shows that differences in these factors can lead to divergent model estimates of land use and economic effects. Estimates of the net conversion of forests and grasslands induced by U.S. biofuel policy range from 0.09 ha/1000 gallons described in this paper to 0.73 ha/1000 gallons from early studies in the ILUC change debate. We note that several important factors governing LUC change remain to be examined. Challenges that must be addressed to improve global land use change modeling are highlighted.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards, and Codes in Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

394

Microsoft Word - CRC nearing completion.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Begins Final Efforts to Consolidate Tank Farm Begins Final Efforts to Consolidate Tank Farm Control Rooms Into One State-of-the-Art Facility AIKEN, S.C. (June 25, 2013) - Nearly a decade of work to consolidate six control rooms into a single facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farms is nearing completion with the recent closure of two F Tank Farm control rooms. Signing off the command and control functions of the 1F and 74F control rooms last

395

Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions  

SciTech Connect

With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

True, W.R.

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 News Stories (and older) 6 News Stories (and older) 12.21.2005___________________________________________________________________ Genzyme acquires gene therapy technology invented at Berkeley Lab. Read more here. 07.19.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Symyx, a start up company using Berkeley Lab combinatorial chemistry technology licensed by the Technology Transfer Department and developed by Peter Schultz and colleagues in the Materials Sciences Division, will be honored with Frost & Sullivan's 2005 Technology Leadership Award at their Excellence in Emerging Technologies Awards Banquet for developing enabling technologies and methods to aid better, faster and more efficient R&D. Read more here. 07.11.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Nanosys, Inc., a Berkeley Lab startup, is among the solar nanotech companies investors along Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park hope that thinking small will translate into big profits. Read more here.

397

Slant Hole Completion Test, Cozzette and Paludal production testing  

SciTech Connect

The Slant Hole Completion Test has been successful in providing good technology transfer to the oil and gas industry. The gas-producing rate from the Cozzette horizontal open-hole interval was significantly greater than from offset vertical wells. The source of water production from the Cozzette is not presently understood. Diagnosis of the water production mechanism is vital to economic exploitation of the Cozzette gas resource using horizontal well technology. Stimulation in a high-angle cased and cemented wellbore, such as the Paludal 2, 3 and 4 intervals in SHCT No. 1, is more difficult because of high near-wellbore stress that results in higher treating pressures. Low gas production potential following the Paludal 2, 3 and 4 stimulation may result from damage to the natural fracture system resulting from casing cementing operations. Comparison of gas production rates in SHCT No. 1 and MWX No. 1 following similar stimulations in the Paludal 3 and 4 intervals, indicate there is no advantage to a hydraulic fracture treatment in a slant wellbore when compared to a vertical wellbore.

Mann, R.L.; Malinowsky, M.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

NETL: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are designed to: enhance domestic oil and natural gas supplies through advanced exploration and production technology; examine water related concerns; investigate...

399

Technology Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Novel Solvent Extraction Process With Bottom Gas Injection for Liquid Waste ... Membrane Technology for Treatment of Wastes Containing Dissolved Metals:...

400

Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... These wastes are found in the market. ... Cherian1; Michael Kirksey1; Sandwip Dey2; 1Spheric Technologies Inc; 2Arizona State University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transmission Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electronically (shift-by-wire) and performed by a hydraulic system or electric motor. In addition, technologies can be employed to make the shifting process smoother than...

402

Complete Mie-Gruneisen Equation of State  

SciTech Connect

The Mie-Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) is frequently used in hydro simulations to model solids at high pressure (up to a few Mb). It is an incomplete EOS characterized by a Gruneisen coefficient, {Lambda} = -V({partial_derivative}{sub e}P){sub V}, that is a function of only V. Expressions are derived for isentropes and isotherms. This enables the extension to a complete EOS. Thermodynamic consistency requires that the specific heat is a function of a single scaled temperature. A complete extension is uniquely determined by the temperature dependence of the specific heat at a fixed reference density. In addition we show that if the domain of the EOS extends to T = 0 and the specific heat vanishes on the zero isotherm then {Lambda} a function of only V is equivalent to a specific heat with a single temperature scale. If the EOS domain does not include the zero isotherm, then a specific heat with a single temperature scale leads to a generalization of the Mie-Gruneisen EOS in which the pressure is linear in both the specific energy and the temperature. Such an EOS has previously been used to model liquid nitromethane.

Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model Share Description As our attention turns to new cars that run partially or completely on electricity, how can we redesign our electric grid...

404

Metering Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are looking to replace meters that only measure kilowatt-hours with advanced meters with greater features and functions. This White Paper describes the smart metering technology that is already available or will be available in the near future. It also provides a high-level overview of the wired and wireless communication technologies used in the metering industry.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

BSA 11-30: Enhanced Alkane production by Aldehyde Decarbonylase Fusion Constructs; BSA 12-36: Oil Accumulation in Plant Leaves; Find a Technology.

406

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

There are 9 technologies tagged "cancer". BSA 01-02: ... a limited-liability company founded by the Research Foundation for the State University of ...

407

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Courtesy of ZCorp The Rapid Prototyping Laboratory (RPL) supports internal design, manufacturing, and process development with three rapid prototyping (RP) technologies:...

408

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parts Brazing large complex parts The joining and heat-treating technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging department include brazing, heat-treating, diffusion...

409

PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Restoration Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1166 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

410

Ozark 260-mile gas line system completed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gathering gas in the Arkoma basin of Oklahoma and Arkansas for transport to market, the 260-mile Ozark gas line system runs from southwest of McAlester, Okla., to Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America's station at Searcy, Ark. The recently completed mainline has an initial capacity of 170 million CF/day with a maximum operating pressure of 1200 psig and a delivery pressure of 700 psig at the NGPL station. The 20-in. pipeline is API 5LX-Grade X60, 0.281-in. wall thickness for Class 1 areas, 0.344 for Class 2 areas, 0.406 for Class 3 areas, and API 5LX-Grade X52, 0.500-in. wall thickness for river crossings.

Dixon, R.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Ombudsman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ombudsman Ombudsman Ombudsman Program Policy The Department of Energy and its management and operating contractors (M & O Contractors) engaging in technology partnership activities, share a mutual objective to ensure complete fairness in the transfer of federally funded technologies into the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. This includes an interest in open lines of communication and the early identification of issues, complaints and disputes between contractors and their existing or potential partners. The Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program provides an independent point of contact for concerns about technology transfer i SRS Sign ssues, complaints and disputes. The mission of the Ombudsman Program is to elevate to the appropriate SRNS officials the information needed to identify and resolve problems thereby improving satisfaction with SRNS practices and reducing the occasion for formal disputes and litigation. The Ombudsman will not be involved in the merits of cases that are the subject of ongoing dispute resolution or litigation, or investigation incidents thereto. The Ombudsman is not established to be a super-administrator, re-doing what specialized officials have already done. Rather, the Ombudsman is to ensure that appropriate SRNS officials consider all pertinent information when deciding the company's position on a technology transfer complaint. To request forms or acquire additional information contact: Michael Wamstad, 803-725-3751 or mike.wamstad@srs.gov.

412

ER-12-1 completion report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

414

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research

415

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

416

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand of oil and gas resources is high and the forecasts show a trend for higher requirements in the future. More unconventional resource exploitation along with an increase in the total recovery in current producing fields is required. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed. The economic impact of smart well technology has been studied thoroughly. Five field cases were used to evaluate the economics of smart well technology in various production environments. Real field data along with best estimate of smart well technology pricings were used in this research. I have used different comparisons between smart well cases and conventional completion to illustrate the economic differences between the different completion scenarios. Based on the research, I have realized that all the smart well cases showed a better economic return than conventional completions. The offshore cases showed a good economic environment for smart well technology. Large onshore developments with smart well technology can also provide a lucrative economic return. These situations can increase the overall economic return and ultimate recovery which will assist in meeting some of the oil demand around the globe.

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NREL: Technology Deployment - Climate Action Planning Tool -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and technology options. Contact Us Complete the form below if you need help with the beta version of the tool. * Required field First name: Last name: Organization: *E-mail...

419

Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisors logic, which mimics human experts decision-making process. TGS Advisors recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter hydrogen and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially

423

Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Sandia Cooler's innovative, compact design combines a fan and a finned metal heat sink into a single element, efficiently transferring heat in microelectronics and reducing energy use. Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Learn More

425

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

This book adds an important nuance to the traditional historiographical assumption that trade in the Early Modern period was mostly conducted between family and those of the same  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book adds an important nuance to the traditional historiographical assumption that trade group. Rather, it is the assertion of this book, that there were very real and quite important trade relationships between merchants of different groups, and the book uses a case study of the Sephardim

van den Brink, Jeroen

427

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26,...

428

Complexity of the positive semidefinite matrix completion problem ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This follows directly from Lemma 2.2 combined with Theorem. 3.2: By Lemma 2.2 , ..... The real positive defi- nite completion problem: cycle completability.

429

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre...

430

October 25, 2001, DOE letter reporting completion of commitment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The following commitment is proposed for closure: 229 Complete dissolution of RFETS scrub alloy at SRS. - September 2001 Dissolution of the scrub alloy was completed on September...

431

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) DOE's...

432

Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act American Recovery and...

433

NNSA Successfully Completes W87 Refurbishment | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Successfully Completes W87 Refurbishment NNSA announced the successful completion at the Pantex Plant outside of Amarillo, Texas, of efforts to refurbish the W87 nuclear warhead...

434

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a...

435

Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program Completes Work at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ridge Environmental Management Program Completes Work at Bethel Valley Burial Grounds Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program Completes Work at Bethel Valley Burial Grounds...

436

Digital Materiality: Preserving Access to Computers as Complete Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. 1982. Living with a Computer. The Atlantic (July).Preserving Access to Computers as Complete Environmentsthat account for the computer as a complete artifact and

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy Resources to New Mexico Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean...

438

Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D D e e f f i i n n i i t t i i o o n n o o f f E E M M C C o o m m p p l l e e t t i i o o n n a a n n d d D D O O E E S S i i t t e e C C l l o o s s u u r r e e This fact sheet defines critical points in the cleanup process, specifies where the Office of Environmental Management (EM) programmatic responsibility ends, and clarifies the responsibilities of other Program Secretarial Offices managing a site after EM's mission is complete. Accordingly, these definitions serve as the framework for developing or revising strategic plans, site baselines, and implementation plans. Environmental Management (Cleanup) includes those activities necessary to evaluate and mitigate a release or threat of release of a hazardous substance that may pose a risk to human health or the environment. Cleanup activities may include source term

439

Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Multi-Path Transportation Futures * Idling Studies * EDrive Vehicle Monthly Sales Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Technology Analysis truck Heavy vehicle techologies are one subject of study. Research Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation Heavy Vehicle Technologies Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study Idling Studies Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Reports Propane Vehicles: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities (pdf; 525 kB) Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities (pdf; 696 kB) Regulatory Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles (pdf; 1.02 MB)

440

Fabrication Technology  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Fabrication Technology thrust area is to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), to conduct the future business of LLNL. The specific goals continue to be to (1) develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability; (3) document findings and models in journals; (4) transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance the collective understanding of fabrication processes. The strategy to ensure success is changing. For technologies in which they are expert and which will continue to be of future importance to LLNL, they can often attract outside resources both to maintain their expertise by applying it to a specific problem and to help fund further development. A popular vehicle to fund such work is the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with industry. For technologies needing development because of their future critical importance and in which they are not expert, they use internal funding sources. These latter are the topics of the thrust area. Three FY-92 funded projects are discussed in this section. Each project clearly moves the Fabrication Technology thrust area towards the goals outlined above. They have also continued their membership in the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Center, a multidisciplinary research and graduate program established to provide the new technologies needed by high-technology institutions in the US. As members, they have access to and use of the results of their research projects, many of which parallel the precision engineering efforts at LLNL.

Blaedel, K.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in Illinois. Led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project is the first demonstration-scale project in the United States to use CO2 from an industrial source and inject it into a saline reservoir. The CO2 is being captured from an ethanol production facility operated by the Archer Daniels Midland Company in Decatur, Ill., and is being injected

442

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The programming and website for the advanced Technology Information System (TIS) have been completed. Over and above the LSDDP-TIS, the new system provides information on DOE's baseline technologies, technology data contained in DOE's databases, technologies assessed at FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program (TAP), as well as links to other selected D&D sites with valuable technology information. The new name for the website is Gateway for Environmental Technology (GET). A super-vacuum type blasting system was tested for decontamination of 12-in pipe internal surfaces. The system operates on compressed air and propels grit media at high speed at wall surfaces. It is equipped with a vacuum system for collecting grit, dust, and debris. This technology was selected for further development. The electret ion chamber (EIC) system for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces has been calibrated and is ready for demonstration and deployment. FIU-HCET is working with representatives from Fernald, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River to procure a demonstration and deployment site. Final arrangements are ongoing for the mock-up design for the glove box and tank size reduction technology assessments, including designing of support bases for tanks, a piping support system, and a mobilization plan for glove boxes and tanks from storage site to the PermaCon.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The programming and website for the advanced Technology Information System (TIS) have been completed. Over and above the LSDDP-TIS, the new system provides information on DOE's baseline technologies, technology data contained in DOE's databases, technologies assessed at FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program (TAP), as well as links to other selected D&D sites with valuable technology information. The new name for the website is Gateway for Environmental Technology (GET). A super-vacuum type blasting system was tested for decontamination of 12-in pipe internal surfaces. The system operates on compressed air and propels grit media at high speed at wall surfaces. It is equipped with a vacuum system for collecting grit, dust, and debris. This technology was selected for further development. The electret ion chamber (EIC) system for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces has been calibrated and is ready for demonstration and deployment. FIU-HCET is working with representatives from Fernald, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River to procure a demonstration and deployment site. Final arrangements are ongoing for the mock-up design for the glove box and tank size reduction technology assessments, including designing of support bases for tanks, a piping support system, and a mobilization plan for glove boxes and tanks from storage site to the PermaCon.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Direct conversion technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Technology meets aggregate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

Wilson, C.; Swan, C. [INNERT Co. (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Market-analysis system for conservation technologies. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

A prototype market analysis methodology to provide DOE decision makers guidance in evaluating and selecting strategies that promote energy conservation technologies is discussed. The methodology, named MASCOT (Market Analysis System for COnservation Technologies), was designed for the residential water heating market. However, the basic logic can be extended to other market segments, such as space heating and conditioning, and the commercial sector. MASCOT forecasts the market performance of any arbitrary set of technologies that the user chooses. The methodology captures the time-varying effects of technological and economic changes in the market, determines the critical features for new water heating technologies, calculates the likely energy impacts from the use of the actual technologies, and provides information concerning the sensitivity of the results to assumptions about market conditions, technology characteristics, and the factors underlying market penetration. (PSB)

Morris, P.A.; Thapa, M.N.; Bauman, D.S.; Froker, D.B.

1981-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review on Facebook Tweet...

448

National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries. Here youll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the ...

449

Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Evaluation of Smart Gun Technologies preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Smart Gun Technology Project has a goal to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing {open_quote}smart{close_quote} technologies. Smart technologies are those that can in some manner identify an officer. This report will identify, describe, and grade various technologies as compared to the requirements that were obtained from officers. This report does not make a final recommendation for a smart gun technology, nor does it give the complete design of a smart gun system.

Weiss, D.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Methane Hydrates May Exceed the Energy Content of All Other Fossil Fuels Combined; Could Ensure Decades of Affordable Natural Gas and Cut Americas Foreign Oil Dependence

452

Draft Final Phase II Report: Review of Life Cycle and Technology Applications of the Office of Environmental Managements Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A1-1 A1-1 APPENDIX 1 Charge Summary Issue Suggested Activities Expected Output/ Work Product Notes Charge 1 Modeling for Life-Cycle Analysis This task entails reviewing the modeling approaches for determining tank waste remediation life-cycle costs at both SRS and Hanford. This includes evaluating assumptions in system plans for completing tank waste missions at Hanford and SRS, as well as the rigor of the models for identifying activities and costs through the end of each site's program. Recommendation(s) At Hanford, LAW vitrification capital and operating costs are potentially substantially greater than competing technologies. A second LAW vitrification plant is currently part of the baseline in order to treat the balance of the

453

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects The NREL...

454

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Capabilities The...

455

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal News...

456

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

457

Building Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: About on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

458

Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

459

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

Blaedel, K.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

PNNL: Available Technologies - Browse Technologies by Portfolio  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Browse Technologies by Portfolio. Select a technology portfolio to view ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Idaho National Laboratory - Technology Transfer - Technologies ...  

Idaho National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing ... Fossil Energy; Information Technology; Manufacturing ; Materials; National Security; Non-Nuclear ...

462

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

463

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

464

NETL: Technology Transfer - Available Technologies for Partnership  

Technology Transfer Available Technologies for Partnership Software and Modeling. Month Posted. Partnership Opportunity. Patent Information. 12/2011: ...

465

Healthy technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the biggest struggles user experience teams face is breaking through traditional notions of product strategy, planning and development to bring actionable awareness to the bigger picture around delivering full experiences that people really care ... Keywords: design management, design process, ethnography, experience, healthy technology, industry, lifecycle, metaphor, platform, reliability, research, security, strategy, sustainability

Ashwini Asokan; Michael .J. Payne

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Technologies Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaporation systems n Potential mining applications (produced water) nIndustry applications for which silicaLicensable Technologies Applications: n Cooling tower systems n Water treatment systems n Water needed n Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) n Enables

467

Manufacturing technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Vacuum Technology  

SciTech Connect

The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

Biltoft, P J

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Technological Change and Its Effects on Mitigation Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report emphasizes that understanding the way technologies evolve and penetrate the market is essential to understanding methods of addressing global climate change. The focus of this chapter is on the ways in which technological change is captured by climate change policy modelers, with particular attention on two idealized approaches: top-down and bottom-up. The conclusion is that in order to understand the implications of large-scale economic models of the climate change problem, it is essential to understand first the assumptions that have been made regarding the path of technological progress.

Edmonds, James A.; Roop, Joseph M.; Scott, M. J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pervasive Information Technology Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pervasive Information Technology. Pervasive information technology is the trend towards increasingly ubiquitous connected ...

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

471

Impact of common completion and workover activities on the effective costs of geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of completion practices on production and maintenance costs are considered. To evaluate alternative completion and workover technologies, a simple model has been developed that compares total well cost to total production or injection. The model is discussed briefly and results from its application to different completion and workover strategies are emphasized. The model development project had three aspects: (1) the establishment of a data base for the cost and effectiveness of various geothermal completion and workover activities; (2) the development of a computer model to specific cases. The data collected include geothermal production characteristics; initial costs and completion practices for representatives wells; estimated costs and effectiveness of common workover equipment and operations; the frequencies of and times required to perform workovers; etc. The model facilitates comparisons of completion and workover alternatives. The results discussed include an analysis of the impact of variations in well lifetime. A comparison of mechanical descaling of geothermal wells to chemical scale inhibition indicates that for certain conditions chemical inhibition is more cost effective. Results of an analysis of injectivity decline are also presented, as are studies of original well cost, initial flow, and productivity decline for production wells. Other results involving underreaming, changing casing profiles, perforating, and hydraulic fracturing are also discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Mansure, A.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com//w/images/6/63/RE_C Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers Screenshot References: Renewable Energy Technology Costs and Drivers[1] Summary "Provided herein is a preliminary, high-level summary of future and projected cost estimates for 1) Biofuels, 2) Solar (PV & CSP), and 3) Vehicle Batteries. Cost estimates are dependent on various assumptions and

473

Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you with additional clarification on: 1) the specific activities that must be accomplished before an environmental cleanup project is complete; and 2) the specific activities that need to be accomplished before the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) responsibility for a site, or portions of a site, is complete. Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion More Documents & Publications EM SSAB Conference Calls - January 27, 2011 Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet

474

"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic...

475

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOEs Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all...

476

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

477

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomassorganic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastesthat can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

479

Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible. A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible. Operators use multiple technologies to remove waste from underground storage tank RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection and its tank farm contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), recently

480

Apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds is described in which is utilized in combination with a moveable welder for forming a partially completed weld, and an ultrasonic generator mounted on a moveable welder in which is reciprocally moveable along a path of travel which is laterally disposed relative to the partially completed weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bitsoi, Rodney J. (Ririe, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pace, David P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology assumptions complete" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.