Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Showcases new content added to the AFDC including: Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies, and an upcoming Deisel Exhaust Fluid Locator.

2

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

3

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

4

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

5

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

6

Clean coal technology: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses a project carried out under the US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulphur coal-fired boilers under typical boilers conditions in the United States. The project was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc., who served as a co-funder and as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the flue gas through a catalyst bed where the Nox and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The results of the CCTDP project confirmed the applicability of SCR for US coal-fired power plants. In part as a result of the success of this project, a significant number of commercial SCR units have been installed and are operating successfully in the United States. By 2007, the total installed SCR capacity on US coal-fired units will number about 200, representing about 100,000 MWe of electric generating capacity. This report summarizes the status of SCR technology. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs., 10 photos.

NONE

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems...

8

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxice Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2000/1111 2000/1111 Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal- Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment August 1998 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center Morgantown, WV/Pittsburgh, PA 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respon- sibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

10

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

Center for Catalytic Science and Technology Recent Highlights from the Center for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Catalytic Science and Technology CCST Research Areas Electrocatalysts and hydrogen processing for PEM fuel cells Selective oxidation and selective hydrogenation Biomass to fuels and chemicals phosphates prepared in ionic liquids A straightforward, cost-effective and scalable synthesis

Firestone, Jeremy

19

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation,...

22

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction...

24

Chapter 22 - Heterogeneous Catalytic Reduction for Water Purification: Nanoscale Effects on Catalytic Activity, Selectivity, and Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reductive catalysis is a promising water treatment technology that employs heterogeneous metal catalysts (e.g., Pd nanoparticles on a support) to convert dihydrogen to adsorbed atomic hydrogen in order to promote reactions with functional groups in various contaminants. Reductive catalysis has several potential advantages, including high selectivity for a given target, fast rates under mild conditions, and low production of harmful by-products. The technology has been applied mostly for remediation of groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbons and for treatment of nitrate, but recent studies have expanded the range of target contaminants to include perchlorate and N-nitrosamines. Palladium-based catalysts hold tremendous promise for their ability to selectively destroy several drinking water contaminants, and some compounds that exhibit slow reaction kinetics with Pd alone are rapidly degraded when a second, promoter metal is added to the catalyst. However, there is a lack of information about the long-term sustainability of these catalytic treatment processes, which is a major consideration in their possible adoption for remediation applications. Recent research has focused on the nanoscale characterization of these heterogeneous catalysts in order to develop an improved understanding of their mechanisms of deactivation and the pathways for regeneration. Two examples of studies from the authors laboratories, involving (i) hydrodehalogenation of iodinated X-ray contrast media with Ni or Pd catalysts and (ii) selective reduction of nitrate with a regenerable Pd-In/alumina catalyst, are discussed in this chapter.

Timothy J. Strathmann; Charles J. Werth; John R. Shapley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

engineering controls Metal oxides in lean adsorption rich reduction cycles NO x Sorption (NO x Traps) Disadvantages Typical Usage Method Pioneering Science and Technology...

26

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using...

28

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chapter 10 - Regenerative catalytic oxidizer technology for VOC control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The regenerative catalytic oxidizer (RCO) technology has evolved significantly as an efficient method to control volatile organic compounds. The RCO technology favors using oxide catalysts because it allows for easy compensation of lower activity by an increase in the catalyst amount or temperature. Heat transfer and accumulation properties of ceramic packing material strongly influence RCO performance. The rate of heat transfer affects the temperature gradients along the bed length that, in turn, determine the volume of material required to preheat the gas to the temperature of catalytic or thermal oxidation. During the catalyst operation, it gradually becomes less active and must be eventually replaced. The factors affecting the catalyst lifetime include high temperature, catalytic poisons, and masking agents. Compounds of halogens and sulfur are the most common catalyst poisons. Temperature control, poison tolerant catalysts, and gas-flow pretreatment are used to reduce the impact of catalyst deactivation. This chapter also presents the behavior of an RCO when the catalyst deactivates, and proposes strategies ensuring the required performance during the entire catalyst lifetime.

V.O. Strots; G.A. Bunimovich; C.R. Roach; Yu.Sh. Matros

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Technology Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Current Research Portfolio Behavior Based...

34

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Selective Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems Optimization A patented EGR-SCR approach was shown to readily meet the 2010 EPA requirments for NOx and PM emisisons...

37

HYBRID SELECTIVE NON-CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SNCR)/SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) DEMONSTRATION FOR THE REMOVAL OF NOx FROM BOILER FLUE GASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pennsylvania Electric Energy Research Council, (PEERC), New York State Electric and Gas and GPU Generation, Inc. jointly funded a demonstration to determine the capabilities for Hybrid SNCR/SCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction/Selective Catalytic Reduction) technology. The demonstration site was GPU Generation's Seward Unit No.5 (147MW) located in Seward Pennsylvania. The demonstration began in October of 1997 and ended in December 1998. DOE funding was provided through Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96256 with T. J. Feeley as the Project Manager. EPRI funding was provided through agreements TC4599-001-26999 and TC4599-002-26999 with E. Hughes as the Project Manager. This project demonstrated the operation of the Hybrid SNCR/SCR NO{sub x} control process on a full-scale coal fired utility boiler. The hybrid technology was expected to provide a cost-effective method of reducing NO{sub x} while balancing capital and operation costs. An existing urea based SNCR system was modified with an expanded-duct catalyst to provide increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency from the SNCR while producing increased ammonia slip levels to the catalyst. The catalyst was sized to reduce the ammonia slip to the air heaters to less than 2 ppm while providing equivalent NO{sub x} reductions. The project goals were to demonstrate hybrid technology is capable of achieving at least a 55% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions while maintaining less than 2ppm ammonia slip to the air heaters, maintain flyash marketability, verify the cost benefit and applicability of Hybrid post combustion technology, and reduce forced outages due to ammonium bisulfate (ABS) fouling of the air heaters. Early system limitations, due to gas temperature stratification, restricted the Hybrid NO{sub x} reduction capabilities to 48% with an ammonia slip of 6.1 mg/Nm{sup 3} (8 ppm) at the catalyst inlet. After resolving the stratification problem, the catalyst did not have sufficient activity in order to continue the planned test program. Arsenic poisoning was found to be the cause of premature catalyst deactivation.

Jerry B. Urbas

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from pulverized-coal utility boilers using medium- to high-sulfur US coal. The prototype SCR facility, built in and around the ductwork of Plant Crist Unit 5, consisted of three large SCR reactor units (Reactors A, B, and C), each with a design capacity of 5,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of flue gas, and six smaller reactors (Reactors D through J), each with a design capacity of 400 scfm of flue gas. The three large reactors contained commercially available SCR catalysts as offered by SCR catalyst suppliers. These reactors were coupled with small-scale air preheaters to evaluate (1) the long-term effects of SCR reaction chemistry on air preheater deposit formation and (2) the impact of these deposits on the performance of air preheaters. The small reactors were used to test additional varieties of commercially available catalysts. The demonstration project was organized into three phases: (1) Permitting, Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Preparation, and Preliminary Engineering; (2) Detail Design Engineering and Construction; and (3) Operation, Testing, Disposition, and Final Report Preparation. Section 2 discusses the planned and actual EMP monitoring for gaseous, aqueous, and solid streams over the course of the SCR demonstration project; Section 3 summarizes sampling and analytical methods and discusses exceptions from the methods specified in the EMP; Section 4 presents and discusses the gas stream monitoring results; Section 5 presents and discusses the aqueous stream monitoring results; Section 6 presents and discusses the solid stream monitoring results; Section 7 discusses EMP-related quality assurance/quality control activities performed during the demonstration project; Section 8 summarizes compliance monitoring reporting activities; and Section 9 presents conclusions based on the EMP monitoring results.

NONE

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium...

40

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts continued towards the synthesis of new pillared clay catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia. The possibility of utilizing hydrocarbons was also investigated.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Characterization and catalytic performance of vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-PILC catalysts issued from different Ti-precursors in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide by ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-pillared clay catalysts (STi-PILCs) issued from different Ti-precursors were investigated for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 in the presence of O2. The STi-PILC...

J. Arfaoui; L. Khalfallah Boudali; A. Ghorbel; G. Delahay

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Selection and evolution of enzymes from a partially randomized non-catalytic scaffold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Selection and evolution of enzymes from a partially randomized non-catalytic scaffold Burckhard Seelig1 & Jack W. Szostak1 Enzymes are exceptional catalysts that facilitate a wide variety- and stereoselectiv- ities. There is considerable interest in developing new enzymes for the synthesis of chemicals

Heller, Eric

43

Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) from size-selected catalytic metal particles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) from size-selected catalytic metal particles-quality synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has demonstrated new possibilities of applications and for the controlled synthesis directly on semiconductor materials. In this technique, it is known that material, size

Maruyama, Shigeo

44

Correlating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this process is a limiting factor in the performance of direct methanol fuel cells, which produce electricityCorrelating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by micelle encapsulation and supported on -Al2O3 during the oxidation of methanol

Kik, Pieter

45

Selective catalytic reduction used at Scanraff to reduce NO{sub x}, particulate emissions from FCCU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes various studies conducted to identify how the Scanraff Refinery in Sweden could best comply with environmental legislation for NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. Initial work identified flue gas from the catalyst regenerator of the fluidized catalytic cracking unit as the largest single source of NO{sub x} emissions. A more detailed study identified process modifications to reduce emissions, including the addition of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit and a ceramic hot-gas filter. For the SCR unit, subtopics discussed include design option selection, SCR size and performance, selection of catalyst, catalyst configuration and performance, contamination, and modification of the waste heat boiler. The description of the hot-gas filtration system includes a comparison with electrostatic precipitator systems, the Schumacher filter, filtration medium, design temperature, and handling.

Brook, P.; Hagger, B.; Wood, J. [Foster Wheeler Energy Limited, Reading (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Highly selective catalytic process for synthesizing 1-hexene from ethylene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ethylene is trimerized to form 1-hexene, at a selectivity of up to about 99 mole percent, by contacting ethylene, at an ethylene pressure of from about 200-1500 psig and at a reaction temperature of from about 0.degree. C. to about 100.degree. C., with a catalyst comprising a tantalum compound (e.g., TaCl.sub.5) and a alkylating component comprising a metal hydrocarbyl compound or a metal hydrocarbyl halide compound (e.g., Sn(CH.sub.3).sub.4).

Sen, Ayusman (State College, PA); Murtuza, Shahid (Chicago, IL); Harkins, Seth B. (Pasadena, CA); Andes, Cecily (State College, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Control of catalytic hydrotreating selectivity with ammonia. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of control of product selectivity in the hydroprocessing of coal liquids and related substances by adding small amounts of ammonia. Quinoline was used in this study and in many others as representative of heterocyclic N compounds found in coal liquids. Coal liquids also contain hydroxy pyridines, but by studies with 8-OH quinoline, a representative compound (Part I), we demonstrated that the OH group was rapidly removed at the beginning of reaction to form quinoline, which reacted in the same manner as quinoline fed as such. In Part II we showed that in a mixture of naphthalene and quinoline, with the addition of ammonia there is an operating region in which complete HDN of quinoline can be achieved, but with greater conversion of naphthalene to tetralin instead of to decalin than was the case in the absence of added ammonia. This is of some significance to coal liquefaction since tetralin is a good hydrogen donor, but decalin is not. In Part III we showed that NH{sub 3} addition to a mixture of quinoline and phenanthrene provides an operating region where complete HDN of quinoline can be achieved with reduced formation of hydrogenated phenanthrenes and cracking to biphenyl. Part IV, a study of the hydrodeoxygenation (DHO) of dibenzofuran in the presence of naphthalene, showed that NH{sub 3} strongly inhibits HDO reactions and its effects on naphthalene here were much the same as in Part II. In Part V it was demonstrated that in the hydrotreating of propylbenzene, the addition of ammonia increased the selectivity towards ring hydrogenation (generally desired for reformulated motor fuels) and away from dealkylation (generally undesired), but the overall reaction rate at a fixed temperature drops substantially.

Satterfield, C.N.; Lee, C.; Gultekin, S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Regenerative catalytic oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers (R.T.O.`s) are an accepted technology for the control of volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP`s). This control technology, when introduced, offered substantial reductions in operating costs, especially auxiliary fuel requirements when compared to existing control technologies such as recuperative thermal and recuperative catalytic oxidizers. While these savings still exist, there is a demand for control of new and/or hybrid technologies, one of which is Regenerative Catalytic Oxidizers (R.C.O.`s). This paper will explore the development of regenerative catalytic oxidation from the theoretical stage through pilot testing through a commercial installation. The operating cost of R.C.O.`s will be compared to R.T.O.`s to verify the savings that are achievable through the use of regenerative catalytic oxidation. In the development of this technology, which is a combination of two (2) existing technologies, R.T.O.`s and catalysis, a second hybrid technology was explored and pilot tested. This is a combination R.C.O. for VOC and HAP control and simultaneous SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) for NOx (Oxides of Nitrogen) control. Based on the pilot and full scale testing, both regenerative catalytic oxidizers and systems which combine R.C.O. with SCR for both VOC and NOx reduction are economically viable and are in fact commercially available. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Gribbon, S.T. [Engelhard Process Emission Systems, South Lyon, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Theory, Investigation, and Stability of Cathode Electro-catalytic Activity„Georgia Institute of Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theory, Investigation, and Stability of Theory, Investigation, and Stability of Cathode Electro-catalytic Activity- Georgia Institute of Technology Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) for

50

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction. 1. Aqueous Solution Ion Exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

selective catalytic reduction; chabazite; SAPO-34; Cu-SAPO-34; diesel engine; emission control; NOx ... NOx storage-reduction (NSR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are leading NOx emission control techniques for such lean-burn diesel engines. ... (8, 47) However, severe intracrystalline mass-transfer limitations for Cu-SSZ-13, due apparently to the small-pore opening structure of Chabazite, complicates such fundamental studies. ...

Feng Gao; Eric D. Walter; Nancy M. Washton; Jnos Szanyi; Charles H. F. Peden

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The selective catalytic cracking of Fischer-Tropsch liquids to high value transportation fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company, investigated a selective catalytic cracking process (FCC) to convert the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) gasoline and wax fractions to high value transportation fuels. The primary tasks of this contract were to (1) optimize the catalyst and process conditions of the FCC process for maximum conversion of F-T wax into reactive olefins for later production of C{sub 4}{minus}C{sub 8} ethers, and (2) use the olefin-containing light naphtha obtained from FCC processing of the F-T wax as feedstock for the synthesis of ethers. The catalytic cracking of F-T wax feedstocks gave high conversions with low activity catalysts and low process severities. HZSM-5 and beta zeolite catalysts gave higher yields of propylene, isobutylene, and isoamylenes but a lower gasoline yield than Y zeolite catalysts. Catalyst selection and process optimization will depend on product valuation. For a given catalyst and process condition, Sasol and LaPorte waxes gave similar conversions and product selectivities. The contaminant iron F-T catalyst fines in the LaPorte wax caused higher coke and hydrogen yields.

Schwartz, M.M.; Reagon, W.J.; Nicholas, J.J.; Hughes, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics over Cu-SSZ-13 from motion of the Cu ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios, at 6, 12 and 35, are synthesized with solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions. By varying Si/Al ratios and Cu loadings, it is possible to synthesize catalysts with one dominant type of isolated Cu2+ ion species. Prior to full dehydration of the zeolite catalyst, hydrated Cu2+ ions are found to be very mobile as judged from EPR. NO oxidation is catalyzed by O-bridged Cu-dimer species that form at relatively high Cu loadings and in the presence of O2. For NH3 oxidation and standard SCR reactions, transient Cu-dimers even form at much lower Cu loadings; and these are proposed to be the active sites for reaction temperatures ? 350 C. These dimer species can be viewed as in equilibrium with monomeric Cu ion complexes. Between ~250 and 350 C, these moieties become less stable causing SCR reaction rates to decrease. At temperatures above 350 C and at low Cu loadings, Cu-dimers completely dissociate to regenerate isolated Cu2+ monomers that then locate at ion-exchange sites of the zeolite lattice. At low Cu loadings, these Cu species are the high-temperature active SCR catalytic centers. At high Cu loadings, on the other hand, both Cu-dimers and monomers are highly active in the high temperature kinetic regime, yet Cu-dimers are less selective in SCR. Brnsted acidity is also very important for SCR reactivity in the high-temperature regime. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Kollar, Marton; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has investigated new metal oxide catalysts for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as CO. Significant progress in catalyst development has been made during the course of the project. We have found that fluorite oxides, CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, and rare earth zirconates such as Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} are active and stable catalysts for reduction Of SO{sub 2} by CO. More than 95% sulfur yield was achieved at reaction temperatures about 450{degrees}C or higher with the feed gas of stoichiometric composition. Reaction of SO{sub 2} and CO over these catalysts demonstrated a strong correlation of catalytic activity with the catalyst oxygen mobility. Furthermore, the catalytic activity and resistance to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} poisoning of these catalysts were significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of transition metals, such as Co, Ni, Co, etc. The resulting transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalyst has superior activity and stability, and shows promise in long use for the development of a greatly simplified single-step sulfur recovery process to treat variable and dilute SO{sub 2} concentration gas streams. Among various active composite catalyst systems the Cu-CeO{sub 2} system has been extensively studied. XRD, XPS, and STEM analyses of the used Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst found that the fluorite crystal structure of ceria was stable at the present reaction conditions, small amounts of copper was dispersed and stabilized on the ceria matrix, and excess copper oxide particles formed copper sulfide crystals of little contribution to catalytic activity. A working catalyst consisted of partially sulfated cerium oxide surface and partially sulfided copper clusters. The overall reaction kinetics were approximately represented by a first order equation.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

Carrado, K.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Simultaneous Removal of NOx and Mercury in Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a 18-month investigation to advance the development of a novel Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR), for the simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and mercury (elemental and oxidized) from flue gases in a single unit operation located downstream of the particulate collectors, are reported. In the proposed LTSCAR, NO{sub x} removal is in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The concomitant capture of mercury in the unit is achieved through the incorporation of a novel chelating adsorbent. As conceptualized, the LTSCAR will be located downstream of the particulate collectors (flue gas temperature 140-160 C) and will be similar in structure to a conventional SCR. That is, it will have 3-4 beds that are loaded with catalyst and adsorbent allowing staged replacement of catalyst and adsorbent as required. Various Mn/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to reduce NO at low temperature using CO as the reductant. It has been shown that with a suitably tailored catalyst more than 65% NO conversion with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity can be achieved, even at a high space velocity (SV) of 50,000 h-1 and in the presence of 2 v% H{sub 2}O. Three adsorbents for oxidized mercury were developed in this project with thermal stability in the required range. Based on detailed evaluations of their characteristics, the mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) adsorbent was found to be most promising for the capture of oxidized mercury. This adsorbent has been shown to be thermally stable to 200 C. Fixed-bed evaluations in the targeted temperature range demonstrated effective removal of oxidized mercury from simulated flue gas at very high capacity ({approx}>58 mg Hg/g adsorbent). Extension of the capability of the adsorbent to elemental mercury capture was pursued with two independent approaches: incorporation of a novel nano-layer on the surface of the chelating mercury adsorbent to achieve in situ oxidation on the adsorbent, and the use of a separate titania-supported manganese oxide catalyst upstream of the oxidized mercury adsorbent. Both approaches met with some success. It was demonstrated that the concept of in situ oxidation on the adsorbent is viable, but the future challenge is to raise the operating capacity beyond the achieved limit of 2.7 mg Hg/g adsorbent. With regard to the manganese dioxide catalyst, elemental mercury was very efficiently oxidized in the absence of sulfur dioxide. Adequate resistance to sulfur dioxide must be incorporated for the approach to be feasible in flue gas. A preliminary benefits analysis of the technology suggests significant potential economic and environmental advantages.

Neville G. Pinto; Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

NO removal by reducing agents and additives in the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of the additives on the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) reaction has been determined in a three-stage laboratory scale reactor. The optimum reaction temperature is lowered and the reaction temperature window is widened with increasing concentrations of the gas additives (CO, CH4). The optimum reaction temperature is lowered and the maximum NO removal efficiency decreases with increasing the concentration of alcohol additives (CH3OH, C2H5OH). The addition of phenol lowers the optimum reaction temperature about 100150C similar to that of the toluene addition. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs: C6H5OH, C7H8) can be utilized in the SNCR process to enhance NO reduction and removed at the same time. A previously proposed simple kinetic model can successfully apply the NO reduction by NH3 and the present additives.

Sang Wook Bae; Seon Ah Roh; Sang Done Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this quarter, progress was made on the following tasks: TPD techniques were employed to study the reaction mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia over iron oxide pillared clay catalyst; and a sulfur dioxide resistant iron oxide/titanium oxide catalyst was developed.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Catalytic Solutions Inc CSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer of the breakthrough catalytic coating technology and the Mixed Phase Catalyst (MPCTM), and also manufacturer of catalytic converters. References: Catalytic...

62

Catalysis looks to the future. Panel on new directions in catalytic science and technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalysts play a vital role in providing society with fuels, commodity and fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and means for protecting the environment. To be useful, a good catalyst must have a high turnover frequency (activity), produce the right kind of product (selectivity), and have a long life (durability), all at an acceptable cost. Research in the field of catalysis provides the tools and understanding required to facilitate and accelerate the development of improved catalysts and to open opportunities for the discovery of new catalytic processes. The aim of this report is to identify the research opportunities and challenges for catalysis in the coming decades and to detail the resources necessary to ensure steady progress. Chapter 2 discusses opportunities for developing new catalysts to meet the demands of the chemical and fuel industries, and the increasing role of catalysis in environmental protection. The intellectual challenges for advancing the frontiers of catalytic science are outlined in Chapter 3. The human and institutional resources available in the US for carrying out research on catalysis are summarized in Chapter 4. The findings and recommendations of the panel for industry, academe, the national laboratories, and the federal government are presented in Chapter 5.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures. Copper oxide in excess of monolayer coverage reduces at temperatures close to the reduction temperature of the unsupported copper oxide. Increased dispersion increases the support effect. Low activity of ceria in NO reduction may be due to its resistance to reduction at low temperatures.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Mercury oxidation over a vanadia-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of the reaction among elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and reactive flue gas components across the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was studied in a laboratory-scale reactor. Prepared vanadia-based SCR catalysts were characterized and analyzed to understand the potential reaction pathways. Mercury oxidation was observed when pro-exposure of the SCR catalyst to HCl, followed by passing through Hg{sup 0}/N{sub 2} in the absence of gas-phase HCl. At testing conditions, Hg{sup 0} was found to desorb from the catalyst surface by adding HCl to the gas stream, which implies that HCl adsorption onto the SCR catalyst is strong relative to the mercury. Surface analysis verified the absorption of HCl onto the SCR catalysts, and the potential reaction pathways were proposed. Indeed, the monomeric vanadyl sites on the catalyst surface were found to be responsible for the adsorption of both Hg{sup 0} and HCl, which means they are active for mercury oxidation. Furthermore, the detailed Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism was proposed to explain the mercury oxidation on the SCR catalyst, where reactive Cl generated from adsorbed HCl reacts with adjacent Hg{sup 0}. 44 refs., 10 figs.

Sheng He; Jinsong Zhou; Yanqun Zhu; Zhongyang Luo; Mingjiang Ni; Kefa Cen [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub 2} with urea in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub 2} with urea in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was investigated with in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At T=473 K, the reaction rate for urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was significantly greater than that in commercial NaY zeolite with a larger crystal size. In addition, a dramatic decrease in the concentration of undesirable surface species, including biuret and cyanuric acid, was observed in nanocrystalline NaY compared with commercial NaY after urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} at T=473 K. The increased reactivity for urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} was attributed to silanol groups and extra-framework aluminum species located on the external surface of nanocrystalline NaY. Specifically, NOx storage as nitrate and nitrite on the internal zeolite surface was coupled to reactive deNOx sites on the external surface. Isotopic labeling combined with IR analysis suggest that NN bond formation involved both an N-atom originating from NO{sub 2} and an N-atom originating from urea. This is the first clear example demonstrating that the increased external surface area (up to 40% of total surface area) of nanocrystalline zeolites can be used as a reactive surface with unique active sites for catalysis.

Gonghu Li; Conrad A. Jones; Vicki H. Grassian; Sarah C. Larsen [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Department of Chemistry

2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Oxidation of mercury across selective catalytic reduction catalysts in coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kinetic model for predicting the amount of mercury (Hg) oxidation across selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in coal-fired power plants was developed and tested. The model incorporated the effects of diffusion within the porous SCR catalyst and the competition between ammonia and Hg for active sites on the catalyst. Laboratory data on Hg oxidation in simulated flue gas and slipstream data on Hg oxidation in flue gas from power plants were modeled. The model provided good fits to the data for eight different catalysts, both plate and monolith, across a temperature range of 280-420{sup o}C, with space velocities varying from 1900 to 5000 hr{sup -1}. Space velocity, temperature, hydrochloric acid content of the flue gas, ratio of ammonia to nitric oxide, and catalyst design all affected Hg oxidation across the SCR catalyst. The model can be used to predict the impact of coal properties, catalyst design, and operating conditions on Hg oxidation across SCRs. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Constance L. Senior [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method of making a catalytic metal oxide selective for the conversion of a gas and a coating system for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described of making a catalytic metal oxide selective to catalyzing the conversion of given gas species, comprising: intimately supporting a solid film of catalytic metal oxide on an electrically conducting material, said film having an exposed outer surface spaced no greater than 1,000 angstroms from said conducting material and said conducting material being matched to the composition of said oxide to change the electron state of the exposed outer surface to promote a reaction between given gas species and said oxide, said metal oxide being selected from the group consisting of TiO[sub 2], SnO[sub 2], FeO, SrTiO[sub 3], and CoO, and said conducting material being selected from the group consisting of Au, Pt, TiN, Pd, Rh, Ni, and Co.

Logothetis, E.M.; Soltis, R.E.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION FOR NOx ON MERCURY SPECIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full-scale tests in Europe and bench-scale tests in the United States have indicated that the catalyst, normally vanadium/titanium metal oxide, used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x}, may promote the formation of Hg{sup 2+} and/or particulate-bound mercury (Hg{sub p}). To investigate the impact of SCR on mercury speciation, pilot-scale screening tests were conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The primary research goal was to determine whether the catalyst or the injection of ammonia in a representative SCR system promotes the conversion of Hg{sup 0} to Hg{sup 2+} and/or Hg{sub p} and, if so, which coal types and parameters (e.g., rank and chemical composition) affect the degree of conversion. Four different coals, three eastern bituminous coals and a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, were tested. Three tests were conducted for each coal: (1) baseline, (2) NH{sub 3} injection, and (3) SCR of NO{sub x}. Speciated mercury, ammonia slip, SO{sub 3}, and chloride measurements were made to determine the effect the SCR reactor had on mercury speciation. It appears that the impact of SCR of NO{sub x} on mercury speciation is coal-dependent. Although there were several confounding factors such as temperature and ammonia concentrations in the flue gas, two of the eastern bituminous coals showed substantial increases in Hg{sub p} at the inlet to the ESP after passing through an SCR reactor. The PRB coal showed little if any change due to the presence of the SCR. Apparently, the effects of the SCR reactor are related to the chloride, sulfur and, possibly, the calcium content of the coal. It is clear that additional work needs to be done at the full-scale level.

Dennis L. Laudal; John H. Pavlish; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Gregory F. Weber; Everett Sondreal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Final technical report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most advanced and proven technology for NO{sub x} control for stationary sources is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). In SCR, NO{sub x} is reduced by NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The commercial catalysts are based on V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2}, and the vanadium-based catalysts are patented by the Japanese (Mitsubishi). However, there are three main advantages for the vanadium-based SCR catalyst: (a) a tendency to be poisoned in the flue gas; (b) oxidation of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, this is a particularly severe problem due to the higher sulfur content of American coals compared with coals used in Japan (from Australia) and in Europe; (c) environmental problems involved in the disposal of the spent catalyst (due to the toxicity of vanadium). In order to overcome these problems, in addition to the undesirable dominance by the Japanese patent position, the authors have studied in this project a new type of catalyst for the SCR reaction; namely, pillared clays, which have adjustable, unique structures and acidity. Three types of catalysts were developed and tested for this reaction, i.e. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clays, delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clays, and ion-exchanged pillared clays. The project was divided into sixteen tasks, and will be reported as such.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Chen, J.P.; Hausladen, M.C.; Cheng, L.S.; Kikkinides, E.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis, biomass is heated with catalysts to create bio-oils, which are then used to produce biofuel blendstocks.

73

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past quarter, progress was made in three tasks. The poisoning effects of alkali metals (as Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}0 and Cs{sub 2}O) on iron oxide pillared clay (Fe-Bentonite) catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3} were investigated. The effects of sulfur dioxide and water vapor on the performance of the high activity catalyst, that is, Ce-doped Fe-Bentonite pillared clay (Ce-Fe-Bentonite) were examined. In addition, an iron ion-exchanged titania pillared clay (Ti-PILC) was prepared and its catalytic activity for the SCR of NO with NH{sub 3} was studied, which showed a high activity and a high S0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}0 resistance at high temperatures (i.e., above 400{degree}C).

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Practical Issues when Selecting PV Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation highlighting practical considerations for photovoltaic technologies and strategies for future reductions in cost and increases in efficiency.

Kurtz, S.

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Studies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Studies Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Studies August 4, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Seven universities have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct advanced turbine technology studies under the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program. The universities - located in Georgia, Texas, North Dakota, Louisiana, California, and New York - will investigate the technology needed for the clean and efficient operation of turbines using coal-derived systhesis gas (syngas) and high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels. This technology is crucial to developing advanced coal-based power generation processes, such as

77

Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Studies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Studies Seven Universities Selected To Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Studies August 4, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Seven universities have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct advanced turbine technology studies under the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program. The universities - located in Georgia, Texas, North Dakota, Louisiana, California, and New York - will investigate the technology needed for the clean and efficient operation of turbines using coal-derived systhesis gas (syngas) and high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels. This technology is crucial to developing advanced coal-based power generation processes, such as

78

Technology Pathway Selection Effort | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

lindauercaafiworkshop.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production Thermochemical Conversion Proceeses to Aviation Fuels...

79

Technological development and innovation : selected policy implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technological development is one of the main drivers in economic progress throughout the world and is strongly linked to the creation of new industries, jobs, and wealth. This thesis attempts to better understand how a ...

Benson, Christopher L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Comparative analyses for selected clean coal technologies in the international marketplace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean coal technologies (CCTs) are being demonstrated in research and development programs under public and private sponsorship. Many of these technologies could be marketed internationally. To explore the scope of these international opportunities and to match particular technologies with markets appearing to have high potential, a study was undertaken that focused on seven representative countries: Italy, Japan, Morocco, Turkey, Pakistan, the Peoples' Republic of China, and Poland. The results suggest that there are international markets for CCTs and that these technologies can be cost competitive with more conventional alternatives. The identified markets include construction of new plants and refurbishment of existing ones, especially when decision makers want to decrease dependence on imported oil. This report describes potential international market niches for U.S. CCTs and discusses the status and implications of ongoing CCT demonstration activities. Twelve technologies were selected as representative of technologies under development for use in new or refurbished industrial or electric utility applications. Included are the following: Two generic precombustion technologies: two-stage froth-flotation coal beneficiation and coal-water mixtures (CWMs); Four combustion technologies: slagging combustors, integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors (AFBCs), and pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBCs); and Six postcombustion technologies: limestone-injection multistage burner (LIMB) systems, gas-reburning sorbent-injection (GRSI) systems, dual-alkali flue-gas desulfurization (FGD), spray-dryer FGD, the NOXSO process, and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. Major chapters of this report have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Investigation of a series of transition metal oxides and precious metal based catalysts for ammonia selective oxidation at low temperatures

83

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last Quarterly Technical Progress Report the authors reported the synthesis and (partial characterization) and SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO) activity for a delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PILC). The SCR activity for this PILC was substantially higher than that of the commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst. During the past quarter, the authors first completed the characterization of the delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PILC catalyst. Both physical characterization (micropore probing by adsorption and Moessbauer spectroscopy) and chemical characterization (by IR spectroscopy) were performed. Since the synthesis of this PILC sample was undertaken under a specific set of conditions and it is known that the PILC properties depend strongly on the synthesis conditions, they then proceeded to examine in a systematic manner the dependence of the catalytic properties of the PILC on its synthesis conditions. Four parameters in the synthesis were studied: Fe precursors, pH of the pillaring solution, concentration of the pillaring solution, and the starting clay. Finally, the effect of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoter on the SCR activity of the pillar clay was studied. Results are reported.

Chen, J.P.; Li, W.B.; Hausladen, M.C.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Diverse Levels of Sequence Selectivity and Catalytic Efficiency of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure was determined by molecular replacement with MOLREP of the CCP4 suite using the structure of the free PTP1B catalytic domain [Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry 1PTY] as the search model. ... Library I contains five random residues N-terminal to pY, ASXXXXXpYAABBRM-resin [where B is ?-alanine and X is F2Y (used as a Tyr surrogate), norleucine (Nle or M, used as a replacement of Met), or any of the 19 proteinogenic amino acids except for Tyr, Met, or Cys]. ... From the home page, users can launch simple or complex searches and browse high-throughput data sets by disease, tissue or cell line. ...

Nicholas G. Selner; Rinrada Luechapanichkul; Xianwen Chen; Benjamin G. Neel; Zhong-Yin Zhang; Stefan Knapp; Charles E. Bell; Dehua Pei

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

86

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

87

Study of mercury oxidation by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst in a pilot-scale slipstream reactor at a utility boiler burning bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the cost-effective mercury control technologies in coal-fired power plants is the enhanced oxidation of elemental mercury in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) followed by the capture of the oxidized mercury in the wet scrubber. This paper is the first in a series of two in which the validation of the SCR slipstream test and Hg speciation variation in runs with or without SCR catalysts inside the SCR slipstream reactor under special gas additions (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 3}) are presented. Tests indicate that the use of a catalyst in a SCR slipstream reactor can achieve greater than 90% NO reduction efficiency with a NH{sub 3}/NO ratio of about 1. There is no evidence to show that the reactor material affects mercury speciation. Both SCR catalysts used in this study exhibited a catalytic effect on the elemental mercury oxidation but had no apparent adsorption effect. SCR catalyst 2 seemed more sensitive to the operational temperature. The spike gas tests indicated that HCl can promote Hg{sup 0} oxidation but not Cl{sub 2}. The effect of Cl{sub 2} on mercury oxidation may be inhibited by higher concentrations of SO{sub 2}, NO, or H{sub 2}O in real flue-gas atmospheres within the typical SCR temperature range (300-350{sup o}C). SO{sub 2} seemed to inhibit mercury oxidation; however, SO{sub 3} may have some effect on the promotion of mercury oxidation in runs with or without SCR catalysts. 25 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bobby Chen; Jiang Wu; Hong Cui; John Smith; Chi-Kuan Chen; Paul Chu; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based and pillared interlayer clay-based catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated...

Oh, Hyuk Jin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research August 14, 2013 - 1:44pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Ten university projects to conduct advanced turbine technology research under the Office of Fossil Energy's University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for additional development. Developing gas turbines that run with greater cleanness and efficiency than current models is of great benefit both to the environment and the power industry, but development of such advanced turbine systems requires significant advances in high-temperature materials science, an understanding of combustion phenomena, and development of innovative

90

Alan Bishop selected to lead LANL Science, Technology & Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science, Technology & Engineering directorate Science, Technology & Engineering directorate Alan Bishop selected to lead LANL Science, Technology & Engineering directorate Bishop has been acting in that role since Aug. 29, 2011. August 17, 2012 Alan Bishop Alan Bishop Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, August 17, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charles McMillan announced today that after a yearlong, nationwide search, Alan Bishop has been selected to be the Laboratory's next Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology, and Engineering (PADSTE). Bishop has been acting in that role since Aug. 29, 2011. Over the course of a distinguished 30-year career as a research scientist and leader, Bishop has more than 700 publications in archival journals and

91

Developing a framework for energy technology portfolio selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today the increased consumption of energy in world in addition to the risk of quick exhaustion of fossil resources has forced industrial firms and organizations to utilize energy technology portfolio management tools viewed both as a process of diversification of energy sources and optimal use of available energy sources. Furthermore the rapid development of technologies their increasing complexity and variety and market dynamics have made the task of technology portfolio selection difficult. Considering high level of competitiveness organizations need to strategically allocate their limited resources to the best subset of possible candidates. This paper presents the results of developing a mathematical model for energy technology portfolio selection at a R&D center maximizing support of the organization's strategy and values. The model balances the cost and benefit of the entire portfolio.

Hamid Davoudpour; Maryam Ashrafi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400--650{degree}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2} formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650{degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams, The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Williams, R.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ethanol/gasoline blends over a silver/alumina catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lean gasoline engines running on ethanol/gasoline blends and equipped with a silver/alumina catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ethanol provide a pathway to reduced petroleum consumption through both increased biofuel utilization and improved engine efficiency relative to the current stoichiometric gasoline engines that dominate the U.S. light duty vehicle fleet. A pre-commercial silver/alumina catalyst demonstrated high NOx conversions over a moderate temperature window with both neat ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol. Selectivity to NH3 increases with HC dosing and ethanol content in gasoline blends, but appears to saturate at around 45%. NO2 and acetaldehyde behave like intermediates in the ethanol SCR of NO. NH3 SCR of NOx does not appear to play a major role in the ethanol SCR reaction mechanism. Ethanol is responsible for the low temperature SCR activity observed with the ethanol/gasoline blends. The gasoline HCs do not deactivate the catalyst ethanol SCR activity, but they also do not appear to be significantly activated by the presence of ethanol.

Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL; Fisher, Galen [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Annual technical report, September 30, 1993--September 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay catalyst was prepared for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} at above 300{degrees}C. The delaminated pillard clay was characterized by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy) chemical analysis, XRD (X-ray diffraction) structure and line broadening analyses, micropore size probing, and Moessbauer analysis. These analyses showed that the catalyst contained fragmented Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay forming {open_quotes}house-of-cards{close_quotes} structure with dispersed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles approximately 170 {angstrom} in size. The SCR activity of the delaminated pillard clay was higher than the commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst, and also higher than the undelaminated pillard clay and supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, under conditions with SO{sub 2}. Infrared measurements of adsorbed NH{sub 3} showed strong Bronsted acidity which was caused possibly by interactions between Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and clay.

Chen, J.P.; Hausladen, M.C.; Yang, R.T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) an attractive option for NO{sub x} control in coal-fired power plants?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economics have been estimated for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on power plant boilers burning high sulfur bituminous coals. Costs are based on an SCR unit installed in the hot flue gas on the high-dust side of a 500 MW greenfield plant with a capacity factor of 65%. Uncontrolled NO{sub x} emissions are 1.0 lb/10{sup 6} Btu, with 80% removal of the inlet NO{sub x}. At a space velocity of 2,500/hr and a catalyst price of $370/ft{sup 3}, the total capital requirement is $55/kW. Recent improvements indicate that space velocity can be increased by about 30%, to about 3250/hr. Incorporating this value reduces total capital to about $50/kW. With a 4-year catalyst life, the levelized cost (on a current dollar basis) is 3.4 mills/kWh,m or $870/ton of NO{sub x} removed.

Baldwin, A.L.; Smith, D.N. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Mann, A.N.; McIlvried, H.G.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400-650 {degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought {open_quotes}Claus-alternative{close_quotes} for coal-fired power plant applications.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Catalytic distillation : design and application of a catalytic distillation column.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Catalytic Distillation (CD) is a hybrid technology that utilizes the dynamics of si- multaneous reaction and separation in a single process unit to achieve a (more)

Nieuwoudt, Josias Jakobus (Jako)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DOE signs Record of Decision selecting Hot Isostatic Pressing Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 Danielle Miller (208) 526-5709 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 28, 2009 DOE signs Record of Decision selecting Hot Isostatic Pressing Technology for Treatment of High Level Waste The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has signed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the treatment of high level waste calcine at the Department�s Idaho Site, meeting a legal commitment to the State of Idaho for a decision no later than the end of 2009. DOE today announced its decision to treat high-level waste (HLW) calcine using an industrially mature manufacturing process known as hot isostatic pressing (HIP). DOE selected this technology to treat roughly 5,750 cubic yards of highly radioactive waste generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel to recover uranium. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel was terminated by a DOE policy decision in 1992.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past quarter, progress has been made in four tasks as summarized below: Task 1: A delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay was synthesized and carefully characterized. The chemical composition was measured by ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The structural changes in the clay as well as the iron oxide particle sizes were characterized by X-ray diffraction techniques. Task 2: The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR, i.e., NO reduction with NH{sub 3}) activities of the delaminated pillared clay were tested and compared with four other most active SCR catalysts: a commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst, a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay, and two supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts (on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}). The delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay exhibited the highest SCR activities. Catalyst stability test showed that the delaminated sample was also stable. Task 3: To further increase the SCR activity of the delaminated pillared clay, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was doped as a promoter by incipient wetness. Task 4: Deactivation effects of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the SCR activities of the delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay were studied, and compared with other SCR catalysts. The delaminated clay catalyst showed the least deactivation.

Chen, J.P.; Cheng, L.S.; Hausladen, M.C.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ambient Temperature Hydrocarbon Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx Using Atmospheric Pressure Nonthermal Plasma Activation of a Ag/Al2O3 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient Temperature Hydrocarbon Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx Using Atmospheric Pressure Nonthermal Plasma Activation of a Ag/Al2O3 Catalyst ... This low temperature activity provides the basis for applying nonthermal plasmas to activate emission control catalysts during cold start conditions, which remains an important issue for mobile and stationary applications. ... (14, 15) Therefore, the combination of heterogeneous catalysis with plasmas has attracted interest due to the combined possible advantages of having a fast and low-temperature reaction from atmospheric nonthermal plasma and high product selectivity from heterogeneous catalysis. ...

Cristina E. Stere; Wameedh Adress; Robbie Burch; Sarayute Chansai; Alexandre Goguet; William G. Graham; Fabio De Rosa; Vincenzo Palma; Christopher Hardacre

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low-level radioactive waste technology: a selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography of 447 references contains scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information relevant to low-level radioactive waste technology. The bibliography focuses on environmental transport, disposal site, and waste treatment studies. The publication covers both domestic and foreign literature for the period 1952 to 1979. Major chapters selected are Chemical and Physical Aspects; Container Design and Performance; Disposal Site; Environmental Transport; General Studies and Reviews; Geology, Hydrology and Site Resources; Regulatory and Economic Aspects; Transportation Technology; Waste Production; and Waste Treatment. Specialized data fields have been incorporated into the data file to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the Measured Radionuclides field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the Measured Parameters field. In addition, each document referenced in this bibliography has been assigned a relevance number to facilitate sorting the documents according to their pertinence to low-level radioactive waste technology. The documents are rated 1, 2, 3, or 4, with 1 indicating direct applicability to low-level radioactive waste technology and 4 indicating that a considerable amount of interpretation is required for the information presented to be applied. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. Indexes are provide for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) subject category, (4) title, (5) geographic location, (6) measured parameters, (7) measured radionuclides, and (8) publication description.

Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Hyder, L.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Iron oxide and chromia supported on titania-pillared clay for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TiO{sub 2}-pillard clay (PILC) with high surface area, large pore volume, and large interlayer spacing was used as the support for mixed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3}. The Fe/Cr ratio was varied at a fixed total amount of oxide dopant of 10% (wt). The Fe-Cr/TiO{sub 2}-PILC with Fe/Cr=3 showed the highest activity. Compared with commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts, the activity (on a per gram basis) of the doped pillared clay was approximately twice as high under H{sub 2}O- and SO{sub 2}-free conditions and was approximately 40% higher under conditions with H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In addition, its activity for SO{sub 2} oxidation was only 20%-25% of that of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts. TPD of NH{sub 3} on the Fe-Cr/TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst showed that both M=O and M-OH (M=Fe or Cr) were necessary for the SCR reaction. In situ IR spectra of NH{sub 3} showed that there was a higher Bronsted acidity than the Lewis acidity on the surface under reaction conditions and that there existed a direct correlation between the SCR activity and the Bronsted acidity among pillared clays with different Fe/Cr ratios. These results, along with the transient response to O{sub 2}, indicated that a similar mechanism to that on the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst was operative. The TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay used as the support also contributed to the high activity of the Fe-Cr catalyst. The TiO{sub 2} pillars combined with the tetrahedral SiO{sub 2} surfaces of the clay apparently gave rise to a high dispersion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 52 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Cheng, L.S.; Yang, R.T. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Ning Chen [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Correlating catalytic methanol oxidation with the structure and oxidation state of size-1 selected Pt nanoparticles2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), which produce electricity from11 liquid fuel without1 Correlating catalytic methanol oxidation with the structure and oxidation state of size-1 * Corresponding author: roldan@ucf.edu9 Keywords: platinum; methanol oxidation; operando; XAS; EXAFS; alumina

Kik, Pieter

107

System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effect of chromium oxide as active site over TiO2-PILC for selective catalytic oxidation of NO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study introduced TiO2-pillared clays (TiO2-PILC) as a support for the catalytic oxidation of NO and analyzed the performance of chromium oxides as the active site of the oxidation process. Cr-based catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. It was found that the 10 wt.% chromium doping on the support achieved the best catalytic activity. At 350C, the NO conversion was 61% under conditions of GHSV = 23600 hr?1. The BET data showed that the support particles had a mesoporous structure. H2-TPR showed that Cr(10)TiP (10 wt.% Cr doping on TiO2-PILC) clearly exhibited a smooth single peak. EPR and XPS were used to elucidate the oxidation process. During the NO + O2 adsorption, the intensity of evolution of superoxide ions (O2?) increased. The content of Cr3+ on the surface of the used catalyst was 40.37%, but when the used catalyst continued adsorbing NO, the Cr3+ increased to 50.28%. Additionally, O?/O? increased markedly through the oxidation process. The NO conversion decreased when SO2 was added into the system, but when the SO2 was removed, the catalytic activity recovered almost up to the initial level. FT-IR spectra did not show a distinct characteristic peak of SO42?.

Jingxin Zhang; Shule Zhang; Wei Cai; Qin Zhong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

110

Catalytic nanoporous membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

5, 35333559, 2005 Catalytic conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement technique, employing selective gas- phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde it the second most abundant organic trace gas after methane. Methanol can play an important role in upper tropoACPD 5, 3533­3559, 2005 Catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde S. J. Solomon et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

CONRAD EA

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

113

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect...

Gupta, Saurabh

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

X. SELECTED ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES FOR FACULTY H. Technology Transfer (Patent) Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X. SELECTED ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES FOR FACULTY H. Technology Transfer (Patent) Policy 1. Introduction a. Relation of Technology Transfer to the Mission of the College A significant aspect available for public use and benefit. This "technology transfer" is accomplished in many ways, including

Kasman, Alex

115

Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia over Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay (PILC) catalysts were prepared and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by ammonia. They were also characterized for surface area, pore size distribution, and by XRD, H{sub 2}-TPR, and FT-IR methods. The Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts showed high activities in the reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen. SO{sub 2} further increased the catalytic activities at above 350 C, whereas H{sub 2}O decreased the activity slightly. The catalysts were about twice as active as commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Moreover, compared to the commercial catalyst, the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts had higher N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O product selectivities (e.g., 0--1% vs 9% N{sub 2}O at 400 C) and substantially lower activities (by 74--88%) for SO{sub 2} oxidation to SO{sub 3} under the same reaction conditions. The activity was further increased to over three times that of the vanadia-based catalyst when Ce was added. The high activity and low N{sub 2}O selectivity for the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts were attributed to their low activity in the oxidation of ammonia, as compared with vanadia catalysts. XRD patterns of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC were similar to those of TiO{sub 2}-PILC, showing no peaks due to iron oxide, even when the iron content reached 20.1%. The TPR results indicated that iron in the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts with lower iron contents existed in the form of isolated Fe{sup 3+} ions. The activities of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts were consistent with their surface acidities, which were identified by FT-IR of the NH{sub 3}-adsorbed samples. The enhancement of activities by H{sub 2}O + SO{sub 2} was attributed to the increase of surface acidity resulting from the formation of surface sulfate species of iron.

Long, R.Q.; Yang, R.T. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Review Article Selected Technologies for Measuring Acquired Genetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Emerging microfluidic technologies are begin- ning to facilitate single-cell genetic analysis of tar- get-Liss, Inc. Key words: molecular epidemiology; microfluidics; digital PCR; BEAMing; single-cell genetic

California at Berkeley, University of

117

DOE Selects Contractor for California Energy Technology Engineering Center Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive $25.7 million task order for cleanup activities at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) to North Wind of Idaho Falls, Idaho.

118

Cumulative energy demand for selected renewable energy technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculation of Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) of various energy systems and the computation of their Energy Yield Ratio (EYR) suggests that one single renewable energy technology cannot be said to be the ... Due ...

Dirk Grzenich; Jyotirmay Mathur

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

PILC-based monolithic catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by methane in oxygen excess  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work was the study and development of aluminum-pillared clay (Al-PILC)-based monolithic Pd catalysts for reducing \\{NOx\\} emissions from natural gas-fired power plants using methane as a selective reductant. During preparation of the support, the same raw material used to synthesize the pillared clays was used as a permanent inorganic binder. This confers high surface area and acidity to the extrudates, in addition to high hydrothermal resistance and mechanical strength. The influence of the method used for active phase incorporation on the physico-chemical properties and DeNOx activity and selectivity was studied. Conclusions were drawn from the use of different solution pH values and precursors in relation to the isoelectric point of the solid. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, and NH3 and CO chemisorption.

F. Mohino; P. Avila; P. Salerno; A. Bahamonde; S. Mendioroz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Catalytic distillation extends its reach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1980s, catalytic distillation processes have been selected by more than a hundred operators for various applications. Since such a unit performs both reaction and distillation simultaneously, a combined column can replace a separate, fixed-bed reactor and distillation column, thereby eliminating equipment and reducing capital costs. And, compared to the conventional approach, catalytic distillation may also improve other factors, such as reactant conversion, selectivity, mass transfer, operating pressure, oligomer formation and catalyst fouling. The constant washing of the catalyst by liquid flowing down the column and the distillation of high-boiling foulants results in extended catalyst life. Four selective hydrogenation applications of catalytic distillation are discussed: Butadiene selective hydrogenation combined within an MTBE unit; Pentadiene selective hydrogenation; C{sub 4} acetylene conversion; and Benzene saturation.

Rock, K.; McGuirk, T. [Catalytic Distillation Technologies, Houston, TX (United States); Gildert, G.R. [Catalytic Distillation Technologies, Pasadena, TX (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Catalytic Conversion of Biomass-derived Feedstock (HMF) into...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Catalytic Conversion of Biomass-derived Feedstock...

123

DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 5)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce its selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities. Fourteen...

124

DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology Research Call (Round 6)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce four selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

125

DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity Announcement and Laboratory Call  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to announce the selection of sixteen (16) applications in response to the Solid-State...

126

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ion-exchanged pillared clays: A new class of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons and by ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} is presently performed with vanadia-based catalysts for flue gas applications. Hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). SCR of NO by hydrocarbons can also find important applications for lean-burn (i.e., O{sub 2}-rich) gasoline and diesel engines where the noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective in the presence of excess oxygen. Pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) have been studied extensively for a number of catalyzed reactions. We have found high activities of PILCs for SCR of NO by NH{sub 3} (26.28). Pillared clays have considerable Bronsted acidity (27, 28), and the protons can be exchanged with metal cations. The Bronsted acidity of TiO{sub 2}-PILC, in particular, remains high after heat treatment at temperatures as high as 400{degrees}C (27-29). In this note, we report first results on the activities of cation-exchanged pillared clays for SCR of NO by both hydrocarbon and NH{sub 3}. 37 refs., 3 figs.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DRIFT study of manganese/titania-based catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese oxides and iron-manganese oxides supported on TiO{sub 2} were prepared by the sol-gel method and used for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3}. Based on the previous study, Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} and Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} were then selected to carry out the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) investigation for revealing the reaction mechanism. The DRIFT spectroscopy for the adsorption of NH{sub 3} indicated the presence of coordinated NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} on both of the two catalysts. When NO was introduced, the coordinated NH{sub 3} on the catalyst surface was consumed rapidly, indicating these species could react with NO effectively. When NH{sub 3} was introduced into the sample preadsorbed with NO + O{sub 2}, SCR reaction would not proceed on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2}. However, for Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} the bands due to coordinated NH{sub 3} on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were formed. Simultaneously, the bidentate nitrates were transformed to monodentate nitrates and NH{sub 4}{sup +} was detected. NO{sub 2} from the oxidation of NO on catalyst could react with NH{sub 4}{sup +} leading to the reduction of NO. Therefore, it was suggested that the SCR reaction on Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} could also take place in a different way from the reactions on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} proposed by other researchers. Furthermore, the SCR reaction steps for these two kinds of catalysts were proposed. 29 refs., 9 figs.

Zhongbiao Wu; Boqiong Jiang; Yue Liu; Haiqiang Wang; Ruiben Jin [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY 1 Auction-based Network Selection in a Market-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY 1 Auction-based Network Selection in a Market--Digital Marketplace is a market-based framework in which a network selection mechanism is facilitated through) currently dominate the market thus enabling users to connect to many of the available wireless access

Atkinson, Robert C

131

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH-TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH- TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT for characterizing selected properties of suspended sediments in rivers are being augmented and in some cases of quantifiably accurate data for use primarily in sediment-flux computations. Turbidity is the most common

132

IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed the anode field of fuel cell stack is considered partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas. We present a model-based control analysis and design

Peng, Huei

133

" Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" 3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1.3,0.5,1.5 , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",762,13727,2064,1.8 ," Microwave Drying",270,14143,2140,2.5

134

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Environmental Control Technologies - NOx Control Technologies Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology for the Control of NOx Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief [PDF-247KB] Southern Company Services, Pensacola, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Innovative Clean Coal Technologies (ICCT) Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers Volume 1, Final Report [PDF-29MB] (Oct 1996) Volume 2, Appendices A-N [PDF-20.2MB] (Oct 1996) Volume 3, Appendices O-T [PDF-17.9MB] (Oct 1996) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Demonstration Of Selective Catalytic Reduction For The Control Of NOx Emissions From High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.1MB] (Nov 2002)

135

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants June 11, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The projects, totaling nearly $14.4 million, will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Pre-combustion processes convert fossil fuels into a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and CO2 prior to combustion. The CO2 is then separated and the

136

Solid-State Lighting Issue 27: Selected Business and Technology News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid-February to Mid-May 2005) 7: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid-February to Mid-May 2005) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Novel or Interesting LED Applications/Uses D. Market Information E. Overviews F. Research Results G. Selected Events of Interest H. Government Activities, Funding News and Opportunities Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · 911EP, Inc. has filed a patent infringement lawsuit against four companies over the use of its LED technology in emergency lighting products. · Agilent's market strategy is discussed in a feature article at CompoundSemiconductor magazine.

137

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Catalytic Coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of conservation of energy we cannot directly turn a quantum system with a definite energy into a superposition of different energies. However, if we have access to an additional resource in terms of a system with a high degree of coherence, as for standard models of laser light, we can overcome this limitation. The question is to what extent coherence gets degraded when utilized. Here it is shown that coherence can be turned into a catalyst, meaning that we can use it repeatedly without ever diminishing its power to enable coherent operations. This finding stands in contrast to the degradation of other quantum resources and has direct consequences for quantum thermodynamics, as it shows that latent energy that may be locked into superpositions of energy eigenstates can be released catalytically.

Johan berg

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessing selected technologies and operational strategies for improving the environmental performance of future aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aviation industry is expected to grow at a rate of 4-5% in the next 20 years. Such a growth rate may have important impacts on local air quality, climate change and community noise. This work assesses selected technologies ...

Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fuel Cell Project Selected for First Ever Technology-to-Market SBIR Award  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EERE recently announced the selection of 40 small businesses for new Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards that total nearly $6.3 million, including a first-of-its-kind award under a new EERE SBIR technology-to-market topic.

142

Solid-State Lighting Issue 26: Selected Business and Technology News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid-December 2004 to Early February 2005) 6: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid-December 2004 to Early February 2005) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Novel or Interesting LED Applications/Uses D. Market Information E. Overviews F. Research Results G. Selected Events of Interest H. Government Funding News and Opportunities Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · Adaptive Micro Systems was featured in an article in Business Journal titled "Lighting the way." · Aixtron announced its new board of directors in advance of its merger with Genus.

143

DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advance Technologies for the Co-Production Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The

144

Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed state-of-the-art passive catalytic technology designed to reduce NOx released during vehicle cold start portion of the FTP-75 cycle

145

Solid-State Lighting Issue 10: Selected Business & Technology News (July -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS 0: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (July - Mid-October, 2001) A selection of news appears in this section. Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News · BCC to issue market research report on compound semiconductors in December. · Cermet and Isonics to jointly develop pure zinc-64 oxides for blue LED substrates. · Color Kinetics among fastest growing companies in New England. · Color Kinetics issued patent on intelligent power technology. · Cree introduces first UV LED (InGaN on SiC) for illumination market (405/395 nm versions). · Cree introduces 3-inch off-axis n-type SiC wafers.

146

Solid-State Lighting Issue 11: Selected Business & Technology News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS 1: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid-October 2001 to early February 2002) A selection of news appears in this section. Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News · Arima Optoelectronics will expand ultra-high-brightness LED production. · AXT producing brighter AlInGaN HB-LEDs; company expanding fab facilities in China. · BMDO changing its name to the Missile Defense Agency (MDA). · Brown University/Agilent/Lumileds researchers create a monolithic dual-wavelength InGaN LED. · Cermet receives BMDO contracts to develop bulk GaN substrate and GaN FET technology.

147

Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of NO by Hydrocarbons Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis...

148

Solid-State Lighting Issue 18: Selected Business & Technology News (Late  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8/2003 8/2003 | Table of Contents | Abstracts | Credit and Disclaimer | ISSUE 18: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Late May - Late July 2003) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Novel or Interesting LED Applications/Uses D. Market Information E. Overviews F. Research Results G. Selected Events of Interest H. Government Funding News and Opportunities Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · AXT announced that it is discontinuing optoelectronics production. · Carmanah has sold $25,000 worth of their solar illuminated bus stops to Chicago's Regional Transportation Agency.

149

Solid-State Lighting Issue 16: Selected Business & Technology News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1/2003 1/2003 | Table of Contents | Abstracts | Credit and Disclaimer | ISSUE 16: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (December 2002 - Mid-March 2003) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Novel or Interesting LED Applications/Uses D. Market Information E. Overviews F. Research Results G. Selected Events of Interest H. Government Funding News and Opportunities Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · Aculight and Zia Laser demonstrated an external cavity laser containing a quantum dot-based gain chip.

150

Solid-State Lighting Issue 25: Selected Business and Technology News (Mid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2/2004 2/2004 | Table of Contents | Abstracts | Credit and Disclaimer | ISSUE 25: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid July - November 2004) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Novel or Interesting LED Applications/Uses D. Market Information E. Overviews F. Research Results G. Selected Events of Interest H. Government Funding News and Opportunities Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · Agilent is reportedly considering building a high-brightness LED manufacturing center in Kwangju, southern Korea.

151

Solid-State Lighting Issue 17: Selected Business & Technology News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24/2003 24/2003 | Table of Contents | Abstracts | Credit and Disclaimer | ISSUE 17: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (Mid-March to Late May 2003) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Novel or Interesting LED Applications/Uses D. Market Information E. Overviews F. Research Results G. Selected Events of Interest H. Government Funding News and Opportunities Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · Aixtron has sold a MOCVD platform to Shanghai LanBao for manufacturing blue LEDs. · Aixtron has sold a GaN MOCVD reactor to RPI for ultra high brightness LED research.

152

Solid-State Lighting Issue 15: Selected Business & Technology News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9/2002 9/2002 | Table of Contents | Abstracts | Credit and Disclaimer | ISSUE 15: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (September - November 2002) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Research Results D. Government Activities and Funding News E. Overview Articles Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · Amtech Lighting Services will provide LED traffic signals for City of Dallas, TX. · ATMI received a $9.46 million ONR grant to develop AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on 4-inch GaN and SiC substrates, part of DARPA’s Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Technology Initiative.

153

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

157

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

159

Low-level radioactive waste technology: a selected, annotated bibliography. [416 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography of 416 references represents the third in a series to be published by the Hazardous Materials Information Center containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information relevant to low-level radioactive waste technology. The bibliography focuses on disposal site, environmental transport, and waste treatment studies as well as general reviews on the subject. The publication covers both domestic and foreign literature for the period 1951 to 1981. Major chapters selected are Chemical and Physical Aspects; Container Design and Performance; Disposal Site; Environmental Transport; General Studies and Reviews; Geology, Hydrology, and Site Resources; Regulatory and Economic Aspects; Social Aspects; Transportation Technology; Waste Production; and Waste Treatment. Entries in each of the chapters are further classified as a field study, laboratory study, theoretical study, or general overview involving one or more of these research areas.

Fore, C.S.; Carrier, R.F.; Brewster, R.H.; Hyder, L.K.; Barnes, K.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Application of Multi-criteria Decision Aids for Selection of Off-Grid Renewable Energy Technology Solutions for Decentralised Electrification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter demonstrates a multi-stakeholder approach for selection and ranking of renewable energy technologies for decentralised electrification in India ... a wider scale. Innovative hybrids and smart mini-grids

Dattakiran Jagu; D. Pugazenthi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 4)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce 13 selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

162

FOUR SBIR-STTR GRANTS SELECTED FOR AWARD FOR SSL TECHNOLOGY (FY15 PHASE I RELEASE 1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has selected for award four Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) proposals targeting advances in solid...

163

DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 3)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce eight selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

164

Catalytic dense membranes of doped Bi4V2O11 (BIMEVOX) for selective partial oxidation: chemistry of defects vs. catalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), which determine the selectivity, either to mild oxidation products (acrolein, hexadiene, CO like methanol, acrolein and the like (acrylonitrile, acrylic acid), maleic anhydride, phthalic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

WATER AND WASTEWATER POLISHING USING 3M SELECTIVE SEPARATION REMEDIATION CARTRIDGE TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3M has developed technology for selectively removing trace levels of dissolved contaminant materials from liquids using systems operating at flow rates up to 50 gallons per minute. This technology combines active particle chemistries with a particle-loaded membrane to achieve a new medium for liquid waste processing--a spiral wound filter cartridge. This technology has shown success by generating high decontamination factors and reducing contaminants to part per trillion levels. The spiral wound cartridge offers simplified installation, convenient replacement, and clean, easy disposal of a concentrated waste. By incorporating small, high surface area particles (5 to 80 microns) into a sturdy, yet porous, membrane greater removal efficiencies of even trace contaminants can be achieved at higher flow rates than with conventional column systems. In addition, the captive-particle medium prevents channeling of liquids and insures uniform flow across the sorbing particle surface. The cartridges fit into standard, commercially-available housings and whole system capital costs are substantially lower than those of column or reverse osmosis systems. Developmental work at high degrees of water polishing have included removal of mercury from contaminated wastewater, various radionuclides from process water, and organometallic species from surface water discharges. Laboratory testing and on-site demonstration data of these applications show the levels of success that have been achieved thus far.

Hoffmann, K. M.; Scanlan, T. J.; Seely, D. C.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects September 18, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of projects for negotiation of award of up to $7.3 million to 14 research teams, with a cost-shared value of over $18 million, under the DOE's competitive solicitation for Advanced Water Power Projects. The projects will advance commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of new technologies that can harness renewable energy from oceans and rivers. These efforts will further the President's Advanced Energy Initiative, which dramatically increases clean-energy research

170

DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects DOE Selects Projects for Up to $7.3 Million for R&D Clean Technology Water Power Projects September 18, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of projects for negotiation of award of up to $7.3 million to 14 research teams, with a cost-shared value of over $18 million, under the DOE's competitive solicitation for Advanced Water Power Projects. The projects will advance commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of new technologies that can harness renewable energy from oceans and rivers. These efforts will further the President's Advanced Energy Initiative, which dramatically increases clean-energy research

171

Rich catalytic injection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cumene by catalytic distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic distillation, a combination of catalytic reaction and distillation in a single column, has several advantages when used in a process to make cumene from benzene and propylene. An extremely high purity cumene is obtained in high yield. The catalytic distillation principle was used in an earlier process to make MTBE. A unit, started up up in Houston refinery in 1981, operated successfully for four years. Since then, three other MTBE units of this design have gone into service.

Shoemaker, J.D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Additive manufacturing technology and material selection for direct manufacture of products based on computer aided design geometric feature analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents research into the development of an algorithm developed in a Visual Basic programming environment that aids in the selection of materials processed using additive manufacturing (AM) technologies. AM technologies such as selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modelling (FDM) have limitations on the materials available to them and each system has factors that limit the geometric freedom of the components that they can produce. Thus, materials capable of being processed on these types of technology can be selected through a method of traversing the geometric features of a computer aided design (CAD) model and performing an analysis of each individual feature's attributes. The algorithm developed for this research uses data based on minimum feature size and a model bounding box as criteria in the selection of suitable materials. Through integration with an existing commercially available CAD software package, a component can be automatically analysed for its geometric feature properties and attributes, returning suitable AM systems and material information for selection by the operator. A number of case studies are presented that highlight the successful operation of the AM technology and material selection tool that has been developed.

Paul C. Smith; Mihaela-Elena Lupeanu; Allan E.W. Rennie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPEs technology refines coal by employing a novel catalyst to crack the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild catalytic gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPEs catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to fluidize the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A PdCu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mass production of high efficiency selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells employing phosphorus ink technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Phosphorus ink technology has been demonstrated as a simple and cheap method to realize selective emitter (SE) crystalline silicon solar cells through mass production in a professional photovoltaic company. We have achieved an average conversion efficiency (?) of 19.01% with peak ? of 19.27% for the SE solar cells based on commercial-grade p-type silicon substrate, much higher than that of the homogeneous emitter counterparts whose average ? is 18.56%. The standard deviation of the performance for these SE solar cells is also smaller, indicating better repeatability of the phosphorus ink SE technology. Moreover, the SE silicon solar cells can well adapt to various Ag pastes while preserving high cell performance, which offers an opportunity to choose a cheap Ag paste as front metallization material. With the aid of PC1D, we have shown that the ? of the SE solar cells can be further improved as the sheet resistance in the illuminated area increases from the present value of 70 to 120?/?.

Sihua Zhong; Wenzhong Shen; Feng Liu; Xiang Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8, 2010 8, 2010 DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The research is aimed at making use of the nation's abundant coal and biomass resources to produce affordable power, fuels and chemicals in a safe and environmentally clean manner. In addition, the production of fuels and chemicals from coal-biomass feedstocks has the added benefit of reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions.

178

Catalytic distillation structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Opportunities and Challenges for Selected Emerging Technologies in Cancer Epidemiology: Mitochondrial, Epigenomic, Metabolomic, and Telomerase Profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from Life Technologies, Rockville...validation procedure before being...immunoblotting, were applied. First...whether the handling of cells...the RPPA technology are extremely...precision of the technology because sample handling and preparation...

Mukesh Verma; Muin J. Khoury; and John P.A. Ioannidis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy Recovery System for Fluid Catalytic Cracking Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the power and heat recovery processes and equipment for modern fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) units made possible by improvements in catalyst fines removal technology and the availability of erosion resistant high temperature...

Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CATALYTIC MICROWAVE PYROLYSIS OF BIOMASS FOR RENEWABLE PHENOLS AND FUELS .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Bio-oil is an unstable intermediate and needs to be upgraded before its use. This study focused on improving the selectivity of bio-oilby catalytic pyrolysis of (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

1756 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 55, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2006 Electric Motor Drive Selection Issues for HEV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1756 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 55, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2006 Electric Motor Drive--Comparison, electric propulsion, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). I. INTRODUCTION SELECTION of traction motors for hybrid of electric motors adopted or under serious consideration for HEVs as well as for EVs include the dc motor

183

Catalytic distillation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

184

Catalytic distillation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Catalytic Combustion Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents experimental data on the effect of catalytic additives on the combustion characteristics of ammonium nitrate and perchlorate and the explosives of different classes. Burning rates are determ...

A. P. Glaskova

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Catalytic distillation structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes recent progress on a collaborative project between scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at PNNL and at Ford Motor Company, involving investigations of laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We are investigating SCR catalysts with reduced ammonia slip, increased low temperature activity, and increased product selectivity to N2. More recent recognition that high temperature performance, under regimes that sometimes cause deactivation, also needs to be improved is driving current work focused on catalyst materials modifications needed to achieve this enhanced performance. We are also studying materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we examine the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measure the kinetic parameters to update Fords HC adsorption model.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Kim, Do Heui; Li, Xiaohong S.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

FTIR and kinetic studies of the mechanism of Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of FTIR spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide by ammonia were conducted on Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay (Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC) catalyst. It was found that No molecules were absorbed on the fresh Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst and then oxidized by O{sub 2} to adsorbed NO{sub 2} and nitrate species. These NO{sub x} adspecies could be reduced by NH{sub 3} at high temperatures. NH{sub 3} molecules could also be adsorbed on the Broensted acid and Lewis acid sites on the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst to generate, respectively, NH{sup +}{sub 4} ions and coordinated NH{sub 3} species. These NH{sub 3} adspecies were active in reacting with NO, NO + O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, but the reaction rates of NH{sub 3} + NO + O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} were much higher than that of NNO + NH{sub 3}. However, under reaction conditions, the surface of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC was mainly covered by NH{sup +}{sub 4} ions and coordinated NH{sub 3}, and no NO{sub x} adspecies were detected. This is in agreement with the zero-order for the SCR reaction with respect to NH{sub 3}. A possible reaction scheme for the SCR reaction on Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC was proposed. NO reduction initially involved the reaction between NO{sub 2} and pairs of NH{sub 3} adspecies to form an active intermediate, which finally reacted with gaseous or weakly adsorbed NO to produce N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O.

Long, R.Q.; Yang, R.T.

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

Richard S. Tuthill

2004-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Optimal Deployment Plan of Emission Reduction Technologies for TxDOT's Construction Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

District Yoakum District Dallas District Fort Worth District Corpus Christi District 8 Therefore, the primary target pollutant in this study is NOx. Typical NOx reduction technologies are ? Selective catalytic reduction, ? Lean NOx catalysts... Repower and Rebuild Exhaust Gas Recirculation Crankcase Emission Control Fuel Technologies Low-Sulfur and Ultra Low-Sulfur Diesel Natural Gas Biodiesel Hydrogen Fuel Additive Hydrogen Enrichment 17 Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Technologies...

Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fuel Cell Project Selected for First Ever Technology-to-Market...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

cell electric vehicles to enable significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. In addition to this technology-to-market award, two fuel cell projects were...

193

Using Pinch Technology to Explore Trade-Offs Between Energy Cost, Capital Cost, Process Modifications, and Utility Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING PINCH TECHNOLOGY TO EXPLORE TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN ENERGY COST, CAPITAL COST, PROCESS MODIFICATIONS, AND UTILITY SELECTION A.S. McMullan, Consultant and H.D. Spriggs, President Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Virginia ABSTRACT Process... (3), predict payback targets in retrofit situations (4), and design flexible heat exchanger networks (5). The most recent developments enable the process designer to explore the interactions and trade-offs between design variables, prior...

McMullan, A. S.

194

Application of interval 2-tuple linguistic MULTIMOORA method for health-care waste treatment technology evaluation and selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The management of health-care waste (HCW) is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing countries. Selection of the best treatment technology for HCW can be viewed as a complicated multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem which requires consideration of a number of alternatives and conflicting evaluation criteria. Additionally, decision makers often use different linguistic term sets to express their assessments because of their different backgrounds and preferences, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. In response, this paper proposes a modified MULTIMOORA method based on interval 2-tuple linguistic variables (named ITL-MULTIMOORA) for evaluating and selecting HCW treatment technologies. In particular, both subjective and objective importance coefficients of criteria are taken into consideration in the developed approach in order to conduct a more effective analysis. Finally, an empirical case study in Shanghai, the most crowded metropolis of China, is presented to demonstrate the proposed method, and results show that the proposed ITL-MULTIMOORA can solve the HCW treatment technology selection problem effectively under uncertain and incomplete information environment.

Hu-Chen Liu; Jian-Xin You; Chao Lu; Meng-Meng Shan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technology selection and architecture optimization of in-situ resource utilization systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses an approach to exploring the conceptual design space of large-scale, complex electromechanical systems that are technologically immature. A modeling framework that addresses the fluctuating architectural ...

Chepko, Ariane (Ariane Brooke)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products Background Many industrial processes contribute large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the earth's atmosphere. In an effort to reduce the amount of CO 2 released to the atmosphere, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding efforts to develop CO 2 capture and storage technologies. In addition to permanent storage of CO 2 in underground reservoirs, some

197

Microfluidic enabling technologies for measurement of the selective permeability of the mucus barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mucus is a biological hydrogel which lines the wet (non-keratinized) epithelia of the body. Mucus provides a gateway between the cells of the epithelium and the outside world, and is postulated to provide a selective ...

Li, Leon Daliang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mobile biometric device (MBD) technology : summary of selected first responder experiences in pilot projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mobile biometric devices (MBDs) capable of both enrolling individuals in databases and performing identification checks of subjects in the field are seen as an important capability for military, law enforcement, and homeland security operations. The technology is advancing rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate through an Interagency Agreement with Sandia sponsored a series of pilot projects to obtain information for the first responder law enforcement community on further identification of requirements for mobile biometric device technology. Working with 62 different jurisdictions, including components of the Department of Homeland Security, Sandia delivered a series of reports on user operation of state-of-the-art mobile biometric devices. These reports included feedback information on MBD usage in both operational and exercise scenarios. The findings and conclusions of the project address both the limitations and possibilities of MBD technology to improve operations. Evidence of these possibilities can be found in the adoption of this technology by many agencies today and the cooperation of several law enforcement agencies in both participating in the pilot efforts and sharing of information about their own experiences in efforts undertaken separately.

Aldridge, Chris D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

CSD: Research: Catalytic Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Science Catalytic Science The DOE Chemical Energy program supports basic research in the area of chemical transformations or conversions which are fundamental to new or existing concepts of energy production and storage. A further goal of the program is to identify and develop environmentally benign approaches to the synthesis of chemicals via routes requiring a minimal consumption of energy. These objectives lead naturally to an emphasis on catalysis. Novel homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts are constantly being sought to enable the synthesis of desired products from nontraditional reactants, often with the aim of minimizing the production of toxic intermediates or byproducts, or to enable the more efficient production of products via existing reaction pathways. To this end, efforts are undertaken to

200

Bi2V1-xMexO5.5-(Me = Ta, Ni) Membranes for Selective Oxidation of C1-C3 Alkanes in a Catalytic Dense Membrane Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reactors are studied for increasing yields or checking purity of hydrogen or syngas production BINIVOX is able to oxidise methane (conversion ca. 22-25 mol%) to syngas at low temperature (650�C of C1-C3 alkanes, syngas #12;3 1. Introduction Among other applications, catalytic dense membrane

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the following selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities....

202

DOE Announces Selection of National Laboratory Center for Solid-State Lighting R&D and Seven Projects for Core Technology Research in Nanotechnology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the selection of the National Laboratory Center for Solid-State Lighting...

203

DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology (Round 6), Product Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the following selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities...

204

LIST of Selected Applicants for CAFT "Advances in Experimental Designs for Development of Technologies in Agriculture"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technologies in Agriculture" (October 23, 2013 ­ November 12, 2013) S.No. Name & Post/Discipline Institute Agricultural Statistics Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru College of Agriculture & Research Institute (PAJANCOA &RI Office, Navsari Agricultural University, Eru Char Rasta, Navsari, Gujrat-396450 (M): 07600049176 akshay

Rodriguez, Carlos

205

Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effect of K and Ca on catalytic activity of Mn-CeO x /Ti-PILC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mn-CeO x /Ti-pillared clay (PILC) is an attractive catalyst for selective catalytic... x at low temperature because of its low cost. The poison...

Boxiong Shen; Lidan Deng; Jianhong Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Complexes to be Employed in the Catalytic Depolymerization of Lignin Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is an earth-abundant biopolymer that is grossly underutilized as a value stream in current biomass conversion technologies because there exist no economic and technically feasible routes for lignin depolymerization and upgrading to fuels and chemicals. The development of new mild and selective catalytic routes to depolymerize this recalcitrant biopolymer is required to more effectively utilize lignin. To that end, our group aims to synthesize and characterize a collection of organometallic catalysts to promote atom-economical catalytic lignin deconstruction. These catalysts have been screened against dimeric lignin model compounds in order to gain mechanistic insights into their modes of action. In addition, experimental efforts have been coupled with quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate solution behavior of the catalysts as well as the mechanisms of lignin depolymerization. Detailed synthetic procedures, as well as spectroscopic and crystallographic characterization and DFT calculations will be presented.

Chmely, S. C.; Kim, S.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Database for Reviewing and Selecting Radioactive Waste Treatment Technologies and Vendors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several attempts have been made in past years to collate and present waste management technologies and solutions to waste generators. These efforts have been manifested as reports, buyers' guides, and databases. While this information is helpful at the time it is assembled, the principal weakness is maintaining the timeliness and accuracy of the information over time. In many cases, updates have to be published or developed as soon as the product is disseminated. The recently developed National Low-Level Waste Management Program's Technologies Database is a vendor-updated Internet based database designed to overcome this problem. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program's Technologies Database contains information about waste types, treatment technologies, and vendor information. Information is presented about waste types, typical treatments, and the vendors who provide those treatment methods. The vendors who provide services update their own contact information, their treatment processes, and the types of wastes for which their treatment process is applicable. This information is queriable by a generator of low-level or mixed low-level radioactive waste who is seeking information on waste treatment methods and the vendors who provide them. Timeliness of the information in the database is assured using time clocks and automated messaging to remind featured vendors to keep their information current. Failure to keep the entries current results in a vendor being warned and then ultimately dropped from the database. This assures that the user is dealing with the most current information available and the vendors who are active in reaching and serving their market.

P. C. Marushia; W. E. Schwinkendorf

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Database for Reviewing and Selecting Radioactive Waste Treatment Technologies and Vendors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several attempts have been made in past years to collate and present waste management technologies and solutions to waste generators. These efforts have been manifested as reports, buyers guides, and databases. While this information is helpful at the time it is assembled, their principal weakness is maintaining the timeliness and accuracy of the information over time. In many cases, updates have to be published or developed as soon as the product is disseminated. The recently developed National Low-Level Waste Management Programs Technologies Database is a vendor-updated Internet based database designed to overcome this problem. The National Low-Level Waste Management Programs Technologies Database contains information about waste types, treatment technologies, and vendor information. Information is presented about waste types, typical treatments, and the vendors who provide those treatment methods. The vendors who provide services update their own contact information, their treatment processes, and the types of wastes for which their treatment process is applicable. This information is queriable by a generator of low-level or mixed low-level radioactive waste who is seeking information on waste treatment methods and the vendors who provide them. Timeliness of the information in the database is assured using time clocks and automated messaging to remind featured vendors to keep their information current. Failure to keep the entries current results in a vendor being warned and then ultimately dropped from the database. This assures that the user is dealing with the most current information available and the vendors who are active in reaching and serving their market.

Schwinkendorf, William Erich; Marushia, Patrick Charles

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Demonstration and Transfer of Selected New Technologies for Animal Waste Pollution Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report April 2009 D e m o n s tr a t i o n and Transfer of Selected New Technolo g i e s for Animal Waste Pollution Control TSSWCB Project 03-10 Final Report Prepared by: Dr. Saqib Mukhtar, Texas AgriLife Extension Service... ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............7 Technolo g y De monstr a t i o n s and Methodol o g y ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Geotube ? Dewater i n g System...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Gregory, Lucas

213

A decision model for information technology selection using AHP integrated TOPSIS-Grey: The case of content management systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Content Management System (CMS) is an information system that allows publishing, editing, modifying content over internet through a central interface. By the evolution of internet and related communication technologies, CMS has become a key information technology (IT) for organizations to communicate with its internal and exterior environment. Just like any other IT projects, the selection of CMS consists of various tangible and intangible criteria which contain uncertainty and incomplete information. In this paper the selection of CMS among available alternatives is regarded as a multi criteria decision making problem. A decision model which consists of seven criteria and four alternatives is built, AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) integrated Grey-TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) method is proposed, and applied in a Turkish foreign trade company. In the proposed model, the weights of the criteria are determined by AHP method and the alternatives are evaluated by Grey-TOPSIS. Due to the uncertainties, grey numbers are used for evaluations of the alternatives. One at a time sensitivity analysis is also provided in order to monitor the robustness of the method. Besides, the effects of using different distance functions, such as Manhattan, Euclidian and Minkowski distance functions on the results are examined.

Basar Oztaysi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four: business administration, wind farm management, aircraft maintenance, tooling production, quality and safety or selected program track focus. Transfer students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses

215

Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection: Process Performance Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the details of implementing a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) hydrogen production plant to deploy with the Next General Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP). Technical requirements and specifications are included, and a conceptual plant design is presented. The following areas of interest are outlined in particular as a baseline for the various technology comparisons: (1) Performance Criteria - (a) Quantity of hydrogen produced, (b) Purity of hydrogen produced, (c) Flexibility to serve various applications, (d) Waste management; (2) Economic Considerations - (a) Cost of hydrogen, (b) Development costs; and (3) Risk - (a) Technical maturity of the S-I process, (b) Development risk, (c) Scale up options.

Benjamin Russ

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cumene by Catalytic Distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The novel concept of Catalytic Distillation has been commercialized in the CRandL MTBE process, in which combined reaction and distillation provide energy savings over conventional processes. This concept has now been extended to production of cumene from benzene and propylene. In this case the advantages of the technique are not only energy savings but significant reductions in by-product losses and capital requirements. In this paper the development of the process is discussed and the economics of commercial operation are presented.

Jones, E.M.; Mawer, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Atomically precise (catalytic) particles synthesized by a novel cluster deposition instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a new high vacuum instrument which is dedicated to the preparation of well-defined clusters supported on model and technologically relevant supports for catalytic and materials investigations. The instrument is based on deposition of size selected metallic cluster ions that are produced by a high flux magnetron cluster source. The throughput of the apparatus is maximized by collecting and focusing ions utilizing a conical octupole ion guide and a linear ion guide. The size selection is achieved by a quadrupole mass filter. The new design of the sample holder provides for the preparation of multiple samples on supports of various sizes and shapes in one session. After cluster deposition onto the support of interest, samples will be taken out of the chamber for a variety of testing and characterization.

Yin, C.; Tyo, E. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kuchta, K. [Extrel CMS, LLC, 575 Epsilon Dr. Suite 2, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15238-2838 (United States)] [Extrel CMS, LLC, 575 Epsilon Dr. Suite 2, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15238-2838 (United States); Issendorff, B. von [Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Freiburg, Stefan-Meier Str. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Freiburg, Stefan-Meier Str. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Vajda, S., E-mail: vajda@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University, 9 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radioanalytical technology for 10 CFR Part 61 and other selected radionuclides: Literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive literature review and assessment was conducted to identify and evaluate radioanalytical technology and procedures used for measuring 10CFR61 radionuclides and other long-lived isotopes. This review evaluated radiochemical procedures currently in use at a number of laboratories in the US, as well as identifying new advanced methods and techniques which could be adapted for routine radiochemical analyses of low-level radioactive waste. The 10CFR61 radionuclides include {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Cl, {sup 59,63}Ni, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and TRU isotopes with half lives greater than 5 years. Other low-level radionuclides of interest include {sup 7,10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 93}Mo, {sup 109,113m}Cd, and {sup 121m,126}Sn, which may be present in various types of waste streams from nuclear power stations.

Thomas, C.W.; Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Catalytic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the development of biomass conversion technologies, it isefficient and selective biomass conversion technologies is athe conversion of both carbohydrate components of biomass.

Dee, Sean Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Technolog  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Production of renewable jet fuel range alkanes and commodity chemicals from integrated catalytic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, carbohydrate hydrolysis and dehydration, and catalytic upgrading of platform chemicals. The technology centersProduction of renewable jet fuel range alkanes and commodity chemicals from integrated catalytic and subsequently upgrading these two platforms into a mixture of branched, linear, and cyclic alkanes of molecular

California at Riverside, University of

222

Micro Catalytic Combustor with Pd/Nano-porous Alumina for High-Temperature Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the mixture temperature at the combustor inlet is set to 630 o C. Thermal conductivity of the ceramic wall Keywords: Catalytic combustion, Pd/nano-porous alumina, Ceramic tape casting, Thermophotovoltaic Abstract: A micro-scale catalytic combustor using high-precision ceramic tape-casting technology has been developed

Kasagi, Nobuhide

223

Catalytic study of SOFC electrode materials in engine exhaust gas Pauline Briaulta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cathode materials, besides LSCF demonstrated a lower catalytic activity towards hydrocarbon partial corresponding to a composition of exhaust gas. A screening of four cathode materials was done, some well selected as the electrolyte material. Chemical stability tests and catalytic activity studies in the gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

224

Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuelbio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Catalytic steam gasification of coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic steam gasification of coals ... SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ... SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ...

P. Pereira; G. A. Somorjai; H. Heinemann

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The catalytic oxidation of propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OP PROPANE A Thesis By Charles Frederick Sandersont * * June 1949 Approval as to style and content recommended: Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering THE CATALYTICi OXIDATTON OF PROPANE A Thesis By Charles... Frederick ;Sandersonit * June 1949 THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OP PROPANE A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Major...

Sanderson, Charles Frederick

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Test results of a catalytic combustor for a gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A catalytically assisted low \\{NOx\\} combustor has been developed which has the advantage of catalyst durability. Combustion characteristics of catalysts at high pressure were investigated using a bench scale reactor and an improved catalyst was selected. A combustor for multi-can type gas turbine of 10MW class was designed and tested at high-pressure conditions using liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel. This combustor is composed of a burner system and a premixed combustion zone in a ceramic type liner. The burner system consists of catalytic combustor segments and premixing nozzles. Catalyst bed temperature is controlled under 1000C, premixed gas is injected from the premixing nozzles to catalytic combustion gas and lean premixed combustion is carried out in the premixed combustion zone. As a result of the combustion tests, \\{NOx\\} emission was lower than 5ppm converted at 16% O2 at a combustor outlet temperature of 1350C and a combustor inlet pressure of 1.33MPa.

Y Ozawa; T Fujii; Y Tochihara; T Kanazawa; K Sagimori

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development of a catalytically assisted combustor for a gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A catalytically assisted low \\{NOx\\} combustor has been developed which has the advantage of catalyst durability. This combustor is composed of a burner section and a premixed combustion section behind the burner section. The burner system consists of six catalytic combustor segments and six premixing nozzles, which are arranged alternately and in parallel. Fuel flow rate for the catalysts and the premixing nozzles are controlled independently. The catalytic combustion temperature is maintained under 1000C, additional premixed gas is injected from the premixing nozzles into the catalytic combustion gas, and lean premixed combustion at 1300C is carried out in the premixed combustion section. This system was designed to avoid catalytic deactivation at high temperature and thermal or mechanical shock fracture of the honeycomb monolith. In order to maintain the catalyst temperature under 1000C, the combustion characteristics of catalysts at high pressure were investigated using a bench scale reactor and an improved catalyst was selected for the combustor test. A combustor for a 20MW class multi-can type gas turbine was designed and tested under high pressure conditions using LNG fuel. Measurements of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbon were made and other measurements were made to evaluate combustor performance under various combustion temperatures and pressures. As a result of the tests, it was proved that \\{NOx\\} emission was lower than 10ppm converted at 16% O2, combustion efficiency was almost 100% at 1300C of combustor outlet temperature and 13.5ata of combustor inlet pressure.

Yasushi Ozawa; Tomoharu Fujii; Mikio Sato; Takaaki Kanazawa; Hitoshi Inoue

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Projects selected in todays announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants. The projects selected for negotiation of awards include: Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will further develop and validate the Aquantis Current Plane ocean current turbine technology. The project will validate analytical design tools and develop the technology's direct drive component. DOE share: up to $750,000; Duration: up to 2 years Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will first develop a bottom habitat survey methodology and siting study approach in accordance with all relevant regulatory agencies in the southeast Florida region; then they will determine the most suitable areas for mooring marine and hydrokinetic facilities based on the

231

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 10, 2013 May 10, 2013 CX-010285: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advancing Low Temperature Combustion and Lean Burning Engines for Light-and Heavy-Duty Vehicles CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 10, 2013 CX-010284: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction of an Autogas Refueling Network CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 8, 2013 CX-010287: Categorical Exclusion Determination Understanding Nitrous Oxide Selective Catalytic Reduction Mechanism and Activity on Copper/Chabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 05/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

232

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

233

MODULE 2: TEACHING & ASSESSMENT Selection of face-to-face sessions, technology workshops and/or online activities: May  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to disciplinary groupings. Completion will be recorded by the STIA Facilitators, and reported to Summer Sessions technology workshop options for STIA Certificate Intenders #12;

Akhmedov, Azer

234

Lean Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-low Emissions at High Temperature in Gas-Turbine Burners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This illustrates the weak point of current catalytic combustion technology: the unavailability of catalytic systems stable at the temperature of the gas turbine inlet temperature. ... The possible feeds are methane, gaseous fuels, and gasified biomasses. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Fabrizio DAlessandro; Giovanna Pacchiarotta; Alberto Rubino; Mauro Sperandio; Pierluigi Villa; Arturo Manrique Carrera; Reza Fakhrai; Gianluigi Marra; Annalisa Congiu

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

235

Advanced product recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Third quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed form the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its industry and commercialization advisor, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner, Tufts, plans to develop and scale-up an advanced, byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, catalytic process for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, they have planned a structured program including: market/process/cost/evaluation; lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and utility review. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Regenerative thermal oxidation and alternative technologies for VOC control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal oxidation technologies have been used successfully to control VOC`s for many years but the recent 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have spurred improvements in the established processes and development of economic alternatives. The combination of the regulatory maze and confusion in the selection of the best technology for a particular application has created a potential nightmare for those companies facing a need to reduce their VOC EMISSIONS. The relative advantages and disadvantages of regenerative, recuperative and catalytic oxidizers will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the economic justification for regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO). Control efficiencies of more than 99% have been demonstrated for RTO`s on a multitude of industrial process exhaust streams. Lowest evaluated cost over a fifteen to twenty year effective equipment life is a key selection criteria. This paper describes the underlying principles of thermal oxidation, and discusses the applicability of these and other emerging technologies for VOC control.

Biedell, E.L. [REECQ, Somerville, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Technology innovations and experience curves for nitrogen oxides control technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the regulatory history for nitrogen oxides (NOx) pollutant emissions from stationary sources, primarily in coal-fired power plants. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) is one of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the 1970 Clean Air Act where National Ambient Air Quality Standards were established to protect public health and welfare. Patent data are used to show that in the cases of Japan, Germany, and the United States, innovations in NOx control technologies did not occur until stringent government regulations were in place, thus 'forcing' innovation. It is demonstrated that reductions in the capital and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of new generations of high-efficiency NOx control technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR), are consistently associated with the increasing adoption of the control technology: the so-called learning-by-doing phenomena. The results show that as cumulative world coal-fired SCR capacity doubles, capital costs decline to {approximately} 86% and O&M costs to 58% of their original values. The observed changes in SCR technology reflect the impact of technological advance as well as other factors, such as market competition and economies of scale. 38 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Sonia Yeh; Edward S. Rubin; Margaret R. Taylor; David A. Hounshell [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Catalytic Device International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Catalytic Device International LLC Catalytic Device International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Catalytic Device International LLC Place Pleasanton, California Product California-based, firm focused on portable, heat-on-demand products. References Catalytic Device International LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Catalytic Device International LLC is a company located in Pleasanton, California . References ↑ "Catalytic Device International LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Catalytic_Device_International_LLC&oldid=343285" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

239

Catalytic Deoxygenation of Tall Oil Fatty Acids Over a Palladium-Mesoporous Carbon Catalyst: A New Source of Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic deoxygenation of tall oil fatty acids (TOFA) was demonstrated over palladium catalysts supported on mesoporous carbon at 300C using dodecane as a solvent. Maximally 95% selectivity to linear C17 hy...

Bartosz Rozmys?owicz; Pivi Mki-Arvela; Siswati Lestari

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hydroprocess catalyst selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexibility in residuum hydroprocessing becomes a requirement as fuel oil demand weakens, crude slates tend to be heavier, and variability in crude oil cost and supply become the norm. One means of providing flexibility is to incorporate residuum hydrotreating ahead of a heavy oil catalytic cracking unit which converts heavier components into lighter, more valuable products. Alternatively, significant conversion of the residuum to lighter products can be achieved by the operation of the residuum hydrotreater at a higher severity to facilitate hydrocracking reactions. This paper focuses on the design and selection of catalytic systems in the framework of a unified reactor modeling scheme for such residuum hydroprocessing applications.

Adams, C.T.; DelPaggio, A.A. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (USA)); Schaper, H.; Stork, W.H.J. (Koninklijke Shell, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Lab.); Shiflett, W.K. (Criterion Catalyst Co. L.P., Houston, TX (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

Benedek, K. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

624 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 9, NO. 2, MARCH/APRIL 2003 Optoelectronic Interconnection Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optoelectronic Interconnection Technology in the HOLMS System Paul Lukowicz, Member, IEEE, Jürgen Jahns, Member. Süllau, J. F. Snowdon, M. Wirz, and G. Tröster Invited Paper Abstract--The High-Speed Optoelectronic and economical by developing optoelectronic packaging tech- nology compatible with standard electronic assembly

Jahns, Jürgen

243

Catalytic converter applications for two stroke, spark-ignited marine engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When catalytic converters are used for cleansing of exhaust gas from two-stroke marine engines, new issues must be brought up in combination with prior technology. Therefore, a study was made of V6, 2600cc engine having a large volume of hydrocarbon emissions with respect to three issues: (1) To what degree seawater effects catalytic converter performance and possible countermeasures; (2) Effects attained on cleansing level and catalyst temperature; (3) Finding abatement levels for catalyst deterioration and exhaust emission output in the marine mode. It was found that physical adsorption was a significant factor in catalytic degradation resulting from direct contact with seawater. The cleansing levels obtained when a marine engine is equipped with a catalyst converter were found by clarifying the extent of effects of catalyst volume, performance and temperature. The reduction obtained in exhaust emission allowing for a deterioration factor, is shown in a catalytic converter heated to the maximum temperature of 960 C.

Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Isogawa, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Naoto

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Role of Carbon in Catalytically Stabilized Transition Metal Sulfides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since WWII considerable progress has been made in understanding the basis for the activity and the selectivity of molybdenum and tungsten based hydrotreating catalysts. Recently, the focus of investigation has turned to the structure of the catalytically stabilized active catalyst. The surface of the catalytically stabilized MoS2 has been shown to be carbided with the formula MoSxCy under hydrotreating conditions. In this paper we review the basis for this finding and present new data extending the concept to the promoted TMS (transition metal sulfides) systems CoMoC and NiMoC. Freshly sulfided CoMoS and NiMoS catalyst have a strong tendency to form the carbided surface phases from any available carbon source.

Kelty,S.; Berhault, G.; Chianelli, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Function of Novel Highly Dispersed Tungsten Oxide Catalysts on Mesoporous Silica . Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel Highly Dispersed Tungsten Oxide...

246

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Catalytic steam reforming of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hot effluent from the catalytic steam reforming of a major portion of a fluid hydrocarbon feed stream in the reformer tubes of a primary reformer, or said effluent after secondary reforming thereof, is mixed with the hot effluent from the catalytic steam reforming of the remaining portion of the feed discharged from the reformer tubes of a primary reformer-exchanger. The combined gas steam is passed on the shell side of the reformer-exchanger countercurrently to the passage of feed in the reformer tubes thereof, thus supplying the heat for the reforming of the portion of the feed passed through the reformer tubes of the reformerexchanger. At least about 2/3 of the hydrocarbon feed stream is passed to the reformer tubes of said primary reformer, heated by radiant heat transfer and/or by contact with combustion gases, at a steam/hydrocarbon mole ratio of about 2-4/1. The remainder of said feed stream is passed to the reformer tubes of said reformer -exchanger at a steam/hydrocarbon mole ratio of about 3-6/1. The reformer shell of the reformer-exchanger is internally insulated by a refractory lining or by use of a double shell with passage of water or a portion of the feed material between the inner and outer shells. There is no significant difference between the pressure inside and outside of the reformer tubes of said primary reformer-exchanger.

Fuderer, A.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Submitted Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Utilization takes place during catalytic decomposition. This thesis focuses on the utilization of char as a catalyst

249

Microsoft Word - 41890_PW_Catalytic Combustion_Factsheet_Rev01_12-03.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion DE-FC26-03NT41890 I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS A. Prime: United Technologies Corporation through its Pratt and Whitney Division B. Sub-award: Precision Combustion, Incorporated II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objectives: Create an Implementation Plan and Integration Study for rich catalytic combustion as applied to industrial gas turbines fired on both natural gas and coal derived synthesis gas. The overall goal is a combustion system that will be capable of NOx less than 2 ppmvd. at 15% oxygen in an F-class gas turbine without exhaust gas after-treatment. B. Background/relevancy: The objective of the Turbines (HEET) program is to create the necessary technology base leading to Vision 21 (V21) goals. V21

250

Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed...

251

Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

252

TCS 2014 Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

TCS 2014 Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels and Biobased Products TCS 2014 Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels and Biobased Products...

253

Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels This fact sheet provides an overview of the...

254

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

Parise, R.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Selective Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems Optimization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A patented EGR-SCR approach was shown to readily meet the 2010 EPA requirments for NOx and PM emisisons through independent testing programs.

257

New Developments in Titania-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. deer10chapman.pdf More Documents & Publications The Utility of...

258

Renewable Chemical Commodity Feedstocks from Integrated Catalytic Processing of Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrogen is from large steam reformers and...amounts of undesired methane are produced, which...such as by the reforming of biomass-derived...aqueous-phase reforming of biomass-derived...Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies...Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived...

Tushar P. Vispute; Huiyan Zhang; Aimaro Sanna; Rui Xiao; George W. Huber

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Light duty diesel aftertreatment system consisting of a DOC and selective catalytic reduction catalyst on filter (SCRF), close coupled to the engine with direct gaseous ammonia delivery is designed to reduce cold start NOx and HC emissions

260

Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tandem Catalytic Conversion of Glucose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural with an Immobilized Enzyme and a Solid Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tandem Catalytic Conversion of Glucose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural with an Immobilized Enzyme and a Solid Acid ... Conversion of cellulosic biomass to renewable chemicals such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is of high current interest. ... The materials were studied and compared in the selective dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). ...

Hua Huang; Carl A. Denard; Ricardo Alamillo; Anthony J. Crisci; Yurun Miao; James. A. Dumesic; Susannah L. Scott; Huimin Zhao

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lattice Boltzmann simulation of catalytic reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lattice Boltzmann model is developed to simulate finite-rate catalytic surface chemistry. Diffusive wall boundary conditions are established to account for catalytic reactions in multicomponent mixtures. Implementation of wall boundary conditions with chemical reactions is based on a general second-order accurate interpolation scheme. Results of lattice Boltzmann simulations for a four-component mixture with a global catalytic methane oxidation reaction in a straight channel are in excellent agreement with a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver in terms of both the flow field and species concentrations.

S. Arcidiacono; J. Mantzaras; I. V. Karlin

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Glycoside hydrolases: Catalytic base/nucleophile diversity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glycoside Glycoside Hydrolases: Catalytic Base/Nucleophile Diversity Thu V. Vuong, David B. Wilson Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, 458 Biotechnology Building, Ithaca, New York 14850; telephone: 607-255-5706; fax: 607-255-2428; e-mail: dbw3@cornell.edu Received 1 April 2010; revision received 27 May 2010; accepted 2 June 2010 Published online 15 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22838 ABSTRACT: Recent studies have shown that a number of glycoside hydrolase families do not follow the classical catalytic mechanisms, as they lack a typical catalytic base/ nucleophile. A variety of mechanisms are used to replace this function, including substrate-assisted catalysis, a network of several residues, and the use of non-carboxylate residues or exogenous nucleophiles. Removal of the catalytic base/ nucleophile

265

Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: The structure and catalytic activity of tungsten oxide clusters formed via sublimation of monodispersed cyclic (WO3)3 onto FeO(111)Pt(111) surface has been studied...

266

Microsecond Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Alkanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKMAN A. D. , PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS BY DIRECT CATALYTIC-OXIDATION OF METHANE...PFEFFERLE D. L. , CATALYSIS IN COMBUSTION , CATALYSIS...a-alu-mina monoliths coated with Rh (for syngas) (1, 2) or with Pt (for olefins...

Duane A. Goetsch; Lanny D. Schmidt

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

light duty diesel solutions for the US market Technology Strategy Lowest system cost Engine technology selection Aftertreatment technology selection Control approach & OBD...

269

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Biotechnology and Medicine DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS CANCER CANCER PROGNOSTICS 14-3-3 Sigma as a Biomarker of Basal Breast Cancer ANXA9: A Therapeutic Target and Predictive Marker for Early Detection of Aggressive Breast Cancer Biomarkers for Predicting Breast Cancer Patient Response to PARP Inhibitors Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Analysis Using Selected Gene Expression Comprehensive Prognostic Markers and Therapeutic Targets for Drug-Resistant Breast Cancers Diagnostic Test to Personalize Therapy Using Platinum-based Anticancer Drugs Early Detection of Metastatic Cancer Progenitor Cells

270

Treating isopropyl alcohol by a regenerative catalytic oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regenerative catalytic oxidizer (RCO) can be conveniently used to control emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), because of their thermal recovery efficiency (TRE), low fuel cost and high oxidation. In this work, catalysts with various metal weight loadings were prepared by depositionprecipitation, wet impregnation and incipient impregnation to treat isopropyl alcohol (IPA). We used the excellent catalytic performance in a pilot RCO to test IPA oxidation performance under various conditions. The best catalyst was selected and its TRE, bed temperature variations, pressure drops and selectivity of the catalyst were more widely discussed. The results demonstrate that the optimal catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation with 20wt.% metal on ceramic honeycomb (CH). 20wt.% CuCo/(CH) catalyst was the best catalyst used in a RCO because it was effective in treating IPA, with a CO2 yield of up to 95% at a heating zone temperature (Tset)=400C under various conditions. It also had the largest tolerance of variations in inlet IPA concentration and gas velocity (Ug). This 20wt.% CuCo/(CH) catalyst in a RCO performed well in terms of TRE, pressure drop and selectivity to CO2. The TRE range in a RCO was from 87.8 to 91.2% under various conditions, and decreased as Ug increased in a fixed Tset. The pressure drop increased with Ug and Tset. The selectivity to CO2 increased to over 95% at 300C, and that to propene remained at 25% from 200 to 400C. Finally, the stability test results indicated that the 20wt.% CuCo/(CH) catalyst was very stable at various CO2 yields and temperatures.

Jie-Chung Lou; Shih-Wei Huang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fractionation Hydrogen Acid, Caustic, Enzymes Wastewater Treatment Insoluble solids Biogas + Sludge Process Heat and Power Integration Corn Stover Hydrocarbon Biofuels (i.e....

272

VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of the catalytic bed.

Tom Barton

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Five NOx-Control Projects to Combat Acid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 5, 2004 November 5, 2004 DOE Selects Five NOx-Control Projects to Combat Acid Rain and Smog Industry Partners to Focus on Reducing Emissions While Cutting Energy Costs PITTSBURGH, PA - Continuing efforts to cut acid rain and smog-producing nitrogen oxides (NOx) have prompted the U.S. Department of Energy to partner with industry experts to develop advanced NOx-control technologies. With the selection of five new NOx-control projects, the Energy Department continues as a leader in developing advanced technologies to achieve environmental compliance for the nation's fleet of coal-fired power plants. Although today's NOx-control workhorses, such as low-NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction (SCR), have been successfully deployed to address existing regulations, proposed regulations will require deeper cuts in NOx emissions, at a greater number of generating facilities. Many of the smaller affected plants will not be able to cost-effectively use today's technologies; these are the focus of the advanced technologies selected in this announcement.

274

Catalytic gasification of tars from a dumping site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work deals with catalytic gasification, pyrolysis and non-catalytic gasification of tar from an industrial dumping site. ... were carried out in a vertical stainless steel gasification reactor at 800C. Crus...

Luk Gaparovi?; Luk ugr

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electric Power Esearch Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process, the DOE PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), and support for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. The test configuration utilized in the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process included the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA), the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter (PJFF), and a new Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor installed at the ECTC. During this testing, O&M support was also required to conclude the test efforts under the EPRI Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. This included the on-site development efforts for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. In the DOE PRDA project with the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), the effects of the increased particulate loading to the unit were monitored throughout the month. Also, the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tantalum pillard montmorillonite: II. Acidic and catalytic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acidic and catalytic properties of a series of Ta-PILCs synthesized with a different initial tantalum content were characterized by adsorption of gaseous probe molecules (TPD of ammonia and FTIR spectra of absorbed pyridine) and by the test reaction of 1-butanol dehydration. A large increase of acidity was noted in Ta-PILCs compared to Na-montmorillonite or tantalum oxide. Cross-linking pillars and silica layers of the clay induce stronger Lewis and new Bronsted sites. The lack of basic sites formation is evidenced by the dehydration of 1-butanol to butene selectivity (100%). The incorporation of the tantalum oxide between the montmorillonite sheets produce, within Ta-PILC, acid centers of the same nature as observed for the silicon-tantalum mixed oxides. 32 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Guiu, G.; Grange, P. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)] [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Catalytic wet oxidation of phenolic wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possible catalyst deactivation problems High capital, low operating Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) Feasible only at high organic concentra- tions High Fast reaction, complete oxidation Severe reaction conditions, canosion problems... of milder reaction conditions and is much less energy intensive. Thus, catalytic wet oxidation would be an alternative to solvent extraction, supercritical water oxidation, homogeneous oxidation, and incineration. It should also be feasible at low...

Thomas, Brook James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Catalytic Partial Oxidation Pilot Plant Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Corporation, 585 North Dairy Ashford Street, Houston, Texas 77079 ... This is accomplished in this study with a new reactor system named the catalytic hot oxygen reactor (CHOR). ... Studying the integration of the reactor with the rest of the plant and developing detailed process economics in parallel with the system development are necessary. ...

Vasilis Papavassiliou; Perry Pacouloute; KT Wu; Raymont Drnevich; Dionisios Vlachos; John Hemmings; Leo Bonnel

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

A 25kWe low concentration methane catalytic combustion gas turbine prototype unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Low concentration methane, emitted from various industries e.g. coal mines and landfills into atmosphere, is not only an important greenhouse gas, but also a wasted energy resource if not utilized. In the past decade, we have been developing a novel VAMCAT (ventilation air methane catalytic combustion gas turbine) technology. This turbine technology can be used to mitigate methane emissions for greenhouse gas reduction, and also to utilize the low concentration methane as an energy source. This paper presents our latest research results on the development and demonstration of a 25kWe lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine prototype unit. Recent experimental results show that the unit can be operated with 0.8 vol% of methane in air, producing about 1921kWe of electricity output.

Shi Su; Xinxiang Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Petroleum Gas Oil?Ethanol Blends Used as Feeds: Increased Production of Ethylene and Propylene over Catalytic Steam-Cracking (CSC) Hybrid Catalysts. Different Behavior of Methanol in Blends with Petroleum Gas Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum Gas Oil?Ethanol Blends Used as Feeds: Increased Production of Ethylene and Propylene over Catalytic Steam-Cracking (CSC) Hybrid Catalysts. ... Recently developed hybrid catalysts used in the catalytic steam cracking (CSC, formerly called selective deep catalytic cracking or SDCC(1, 2) and also thermal catalytic cracking or TCC(3, 4)) of hydrocarbon heavy feedstocks (naphthas and gas oils) are very efficient in the production of light olefins, particularly ethylene and propylene with a product propylene-to-ethylene ratio close to 1.0. ...

A. Muntasar; R. Le Van Mao; H. T. Yan

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Idle catalytic reformer can be converted to isomerization unit or jet-fuel treater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the economic advantages in conversion of catalytic reformers idled by reduced demand or rendered obsolete by replacement with modern technology. An older semi-regenerative reformer can be converted to a modern C4 or C5/C6 isomerization unit or to a kerosene hydrotreater to meet jet fuel specifications. Reactor design parameters operating conditions, and equipment sizing required for the highly endothermic reforming process are discussed.

Cobb, D.D.; Chapel, D.G.

1985-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanofermentation System Technology Assistance Program Licensing Staff Search For Technologies Available Technologies Licensing Opportunity Announcements Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Technology Licensing | Technology Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial readiness. TIP projects are proposed by ORNL scientists and engineers and selected competitively based on their potential for near-term societal or economic impact. TIP technologies are advanced through research and development and outreach to industry. TIP is funded by UT-Battelle licensing royalties. When a technology enters the TIP process, it is initially made unavailable

283

Catalytic pyrolysis of straight-run gasoline on a promoted vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years the catalytic pyrolysis has been studied of various hydrocarbon materials - from gaseous (ethane, propane and n-butane) to heavy petroleum fractions with an end boiling point higher than 500/sup 0/C. The process indices for all the raw materials studied were significantly better than those from thermal pyrolysis. Improvement of operational properties for the vanadium catalyst for pyrolysis involved the selecting a better acceptor and the use of promotor additives which inhibit coke formation.

Chernykh, S.P.; Adel'son, S.V.; Rudyk, E.M.; Zhagfarov, F.G.; Motorina, I.A.; Nikonov, V.I.; Mukhina, T.N.; Barabanov, N.L.; Pyatiletov, V.I.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandian Selected for Outstanding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergySandian Selected for Outstanding Engineer Award Sandian Selected for Outstanding Engineer Award Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office Parallel...

285

Plasma catalytic reforming of methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This article describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius), and a high degree of dissociation and a substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (40% H2, 17% CO2 and 33% N2, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (23 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H2 with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content (?1.5%) with power densities of ?30 kW (H2 HHV)/l of reactor, or ?10m3/h H2 per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

L Bromberg; D.R Cohn; A Rabinovich; N Alexeev

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Selective hydrocracking of light naphtha cuts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the production of high-quality automotive gasolines, technology has been developed for a combined ''isoreforming'' process, in which hydrocracking of a heavy straight-run naphtha cut to give a high-octane component with an octane number of 84-86 (MM) is combined with catalytic reforming of the residual fraction from hydrocracking. The ''isoreforming'' technology can be used to produce AI-93 automotive gasolines with aromatic hydrocarbon contents of 45-49% by weight, without TEL, in yields of 78-82% by weight on the original feed. The authors also discuss a catalytic upgrading process for light straight-run naphtha distillates or raffinates from catalytic reforming. The influence of the depth of reaction in hydrocracking n-paraffins in the straight-run 62-105 degrees C cut on the yield of the C5-EP cut and its octane number is investigated.

Koslov, I.T.; Khavkin, V.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Plasma catalytic reforming of methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Alexeev, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Baikov Inst. of Metallurgy

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Method and apparatus for a catalytic firebox reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic firebox reactor employing an exothermic catalytic reaction channel and multiple cooling conduits for creating a partially reacted fuel/oxidant mixture. An oxidation catalyst is deposited on the walls forming the boundary between the multiple cooling conduits and the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, on the side of the walls facing the exothermic catalytic reaction channel. This configuration allows the oxidation catalyst to be backside cooled by any fluid passing through the cooling conduits. The heat of reaction is added to both the fluid in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel and the fluid passing through the cooling conduits. After discharge of the fluids from the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, the fluids mix to create a single combined flow. A further innovation in the reactor incorporates geometric changes in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel to provide streamwise variation of the velocity of the fluids in the reactor.

Smith, Lance L. (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Ulkarim, Hasan (Hamden, CT); Castaldi, Marco J. (Bridgeport, CT); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

Emerging Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emerging Technologies Program Emerging Technologies Program Pat Phelan Program Manager patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov (202)287-1906 April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers * Solve technical barriers and test innovations to prove effectiveness * Measure and validate energy savings ET Mission: Accelerate the research, development and commercialization of emerging, high impact building technologies that are five years or less to market ready. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

291

QGESS: Specification for Selected Feedstocks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

011812 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Program Performance and Benefits 2 Specification for Selected Feedstocks Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies January...

292

Nanoscale Science and Technology for Electronics, Photonics and Renewable Energy Applications: Selected Papers from NGC2009 & CSTC2009 conference (http://asdn.net/ngc2009/)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Information (electronic and photonic) and renewable energy (solar energy, fuel cells, batteries, etc.) technologies ... environmental impact resulting from the consumption of such energy sources has been long-sta...

Anatoli Korkin; Predrag Krstic; Zoran Miskovic; Hongbin Yu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Diesel emission control: Catalytic filters for particulate removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European diesel engine industry represents a vital sector across the Continent, with more than 2 million direct work positions and a turnover of over 400 billion Euro. Diesel engines provide large paybacks to society since they are extensively used to transport goods, services and people. In recent years increasing attention has been paid to the emissions from diesel engines which, like gasoline engine emissions, include carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Diesel engines also produce significant levels of particulate matter (PM), which consists mostly of carbonaceous soot and a soluble organic fraction (SOF) of hydrocarbons that have condensed on the soot.Meeting the emission levels imposed for NOx and PM by legislation (Euro IV in 2005 and, in the 2008 perspective, Euro V) requires the development of a number of critical technologies to fulfill these very stringent emission limits (e.g. 0.005g/km for PM). This review is focused on these innovative technologies with special reference to catalytic traps for diesel particulate removal.

Debora Fino

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mercury Emissions Control Technologies (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case assumes that states will comply with the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency's new Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) regulation. CAMR is a two-phase program, with a Phase I cap of 38 tons of mercury emitted from all U.S. power plants in 2010 and a Phase II cap of 15 tons in 2018. Mercury emissions in the electricity generation sector in 2003 are estimated at around 50 tons. Generators have a variety of options to meet the mercury limits, such as: switching to coal with a lower mercury content, relying on flue gas desulfurization or selective catalytic reduction equipment to reduce mercury emissions, or installing conventional activated carbon injection (ACI) technology.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

High pressure test results of a catalytic combustor for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, the use of gas turbine systems, such as combined cycle and cogeneration systems, has gradually increased in the world. But even when a clean fuel such as LNG (liquefied natural gas) is used, thermal NO{sub x} is generated in the high temperature gas turbine combustion process. The NO{sub x} emission from gas turbines is controlled through selective catalytic reduction processes (SCR) in the Japanese electric industry. If catalytic combustion could be applied to the combustor of the gas turbine, it is expected to lower NO{sub x} emission more economically. Under such high temperature and high pressure conditions, as in the gas turbine, however, the durability of the catalyst is still insufficient. So it prevents the realization of a high temperature catalytic combustor. To overcome this difficulty, a catalytic combustor combined with premixed combustion for a 1,300 C class gas turbine was developed. In this method, catalyst temperature is kept below 1,000 C, and a lean premixed gas is injected into the catalytic combustion gas. As a result, the load on the catalyst is reduced and it is possible to prevent the catalyst deactivation. After a preliminary atmospheric test, the design of the combustion was modified and a high pressure combustion test was conducted. As a result, it was confirmed that NO{sub x} emission was below 10 ppm (at 16 percent O{sub 2}) at a combustor outlet gas temperature of 1,300 C and that the combustion efficiency was almost 100%. This paper presents the design features and test results of the combustor.

Fujii, T.; Ozawa, Y.; Kikumoto, S.; Sato, M. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Yuasa, Y.; Inoue, H. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Carbon Dioxide Conversion to Valuable Chemical Products over Composite Catalytic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is an experimental study on catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Catalysts having different catalytic functions were synthesized and combined in different ways to enhance selectivity to desired products. The combined catalyst system possessed the following functions: methanol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, water-gas-shift and hydrogenation. Results showed that the methods of integrating these catalytic functions played important role in achieving desired product selectivity. It was speculated that if methanol synthesis sites were located adjacent to the C-C chain growth sites, the formation rate of C2 oxygenates would be enhanced. The advantage of using high temperature methanol catalyst PdZnAl in the combined catalyst system was demonstrated. In the presence of PdZnAl catalyst, the combined catalyst system was stable at temperature of 380oC. It was observed that, at high temperature, kinetics favored oxygenate formation. Results implied that the process can be intensified by operating at high temperature using Pd-based methanol synthesis catalyst. Steam reforming of the byproduct organics was demonstrated as a means to provide supplemental hydrogen. Preliminary process design, simulation, and economic analysis of the proposed CO2 conversion process were carried out. Economic analysis indicates how ethanol production cost was affected by the price of CO2 and hydrogen.

Dagle, Robert A.; Hu, Jianli; Jones, Susanne B.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Frye, John G.; White, J. F.; Jiang, Juyuan; Wang, Yong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Experts reveal catalyst-selection methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refining catalyst selection procedure were discussed in detail at Oil and Gas Journal`s International Catalyst Conference, Feb. 1--2, in Houston. Marathon Oil Co.`s James P. Wick revealed details of Marathon`s program for review and optimization of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and hydrotreating catalysts. And renowned FCC expert Del Tolen outlined a step-by-step procedure for choosing an FCC catalyst. The paper describes Marathon`s program and Tolen`s selection process.

NONE

1996-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Synthesis and Characterization of Transition Metal Complexes Useful for the Catalytic Deconstruction of Lignin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is an earth-abundant biopolymer that is grossly underutilized as a source of fuels and value-added chemicals. However, lignin is an intractable heteropolymer, which makes it difficult to deconstruct and upgrade in many chemically selective biomass conversion routes. The development of new catalytic routes to depolymerize this recalcitrant biopolymer is required to more effectively utilize lignin. To that end, our group aims to synthesize and characterize a collection of inorganic and organometallic catalysts to promote atom-economical catalytic lignin depolymerization. These catalysts have been screened against a continuum of model compounds and biomass-derived lignin for their usefulness in the deconstruction of these substrates. In addition, we have coupled our experimental efforts with quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate the mechanisms of catalysts to identify the mechanisms of lignin depolymerization. Detailed synthetic procedures, as well as spectroscopic and crystallographic characterization and DFT calculations will be presented.

Chmely, S. C.; Kim, S.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Integrated Catalytic Process for Biomass Conversion and Upgrading to C12 Furoin and Alkane Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Catalytic Process for Biomass Conversion and Upgrading to C12 Furoin and Alkane Fuel ... Accordingly, this work was directed at accomplishing the following three goals: (a) to investigate possible glucose isomerization to fructose by organocatalysis; (b) to establish an efficient, economical, integrated catalytic process for converting inexpensive biomass feedstocks such as fructose (currently at ?$32 per 100 g) to DHMF through generation of the high-purity HMF intermediate; and (c) to identify a bifunctional HDO catalyst system that can convert C12 DHMF to n-C12H26 alkane more selectively for achieving higher atom efficiency. ... Specifically, 2,5-dimethylfuran (derived from lignocellulosic biomass through 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural) and acrolein (produced from glycerol, a side product of biodiesel production) were converted into the key intermediate p-xylene (a precursor of terephthalic acid). ...

Dajiang (D. J.) Liu; Eugene Y.-X. Chen

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In addition, Pt-mesoporous silica core-shell structured NPs (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}) were prepared, where the individual Pt NP is encapsulated by the mesoporous silica layer. The Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} catalysts showed promising catalytic activity in high temperature CO oxidation. The design of catalytic structures with tunable parameters by rational synthetic methods presents a major advance in the field of catalyst synthesis, which would lead to uncover the structure-function relationships in heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

Somorjai, G.A.

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI?s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. Also, several installation activities were initiated this month for the testing of a new EPRI/ADA Technologies sorbent sampling system in December. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

None

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Printing 3D Catalytic Devices | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printing 3D Catalytic Devices Ames Laboratory scientist Igor Slowing discusses using 3D printers to create new materials, including catalysts...

303

Catalytic distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Catalytic Distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is investigated in this thesis. The solvent, ethylene glycol, is proposed as a means of (more)

Safinski, Tomasz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Single Supported Atoms Participate in Catalytic Processes | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Functional Materials for Energy Single Supported Atoms Participate in Catalytic Processes December 04, 2014 Pathways for NO oxidation on single Pt atoms supported on the (010)...

305

3D Printing of nanostructured catalytic materials | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3D Printing of nanostructured catalytic materials Over the last couple of decades, scientists have been able to develop a tremendous control over the synthesis and properties of...

306

The Effects of Trace Contaminants on Catalytic Processing of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks . Abstract: Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to...

307

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - ALTA for Cyclone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers The primary goal of this project was to evaluate a technology called advanced layered technology application (ALTA) as a means to achieve NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MMBtu in a cyclone boiler. Reaction Engineering International (REI) conducted field testing and combustion modeling to refine the process design, define the optimum technology parameters, and assess system performance. The ALTA NOx control technology combines deep staging from overfire air, rich reagent injection (RRI), and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR). Field testing was conducted during May-June 2005 at AmerenUE's Sioux Station Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone boiler unit that typically burns an 80/20 blend of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. Parametric testing was also conducted with 60/40 and 0/100 blends. The testing also evaluated process impacts on balance-of-plant issues such as the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, slag tapping, waterwall corrosion, ammonia slip, and heat distribution.

308

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

DOE Announces Webinars on Integrating Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, a Site Selection Tool for Utility-Scale PV, and More  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts.

310

Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S. [Catalytica Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments initiative is one of 25 Area of Interest 4 Selections  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CLEAN CITIES RECOVERY ACT AWARDS CLEAN CITIES RECOVERY ACT AWARDS FOR ALTERNATIVE AND ADVANCED VEHICLES North Central Texas Council of Governments' North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology. The project will deploy refueling stations and alternative fuel vehicles in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The project includes a portfolio of different technologies and fuels, including B20 (three stations), ethanol E85 (three stations), compressed natural gas (three stations and 97 vehicles), electricity (four recharging sites and 34 vehicles), and 251 hybrid electric vehicles. In addition to the city fleets, high mileage and high visibility fleets are included, such as Coca-Cola, Sysco, Frito Lay, school districts, and taxis. DOE estimates that this project will help displace approximately 1.3 million gallons of petroleum annually.

313

Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Extraction of Hydrogen from Bioethanol Reforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gas-shift catalytic membrane reactor, and (2) a multi-layer design for bioethanol reforming. A two-dimensional model is developed to describe reaction and diffusion in the catalytic membrane coupled with plug-flow equations in the retentate and permeate volumes using...

Kuncharam, Bhanu Vardhan

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Year/PAD District Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Table 8. Capacity and Fresh Feed Input to Selected Downstream Units at U.S. Refineries, 2011 - 2013 (Barrels per Calendar Day) Reformers Capacity Inputs 2011 2,396,787 5,794,214 1,687,745 2,093,849 4,952,455 1,466,627 2,570,970 3,346,457 93,700 673,300 41,500 37,932 490,729 18,030 PADD I 188,389 266,950 373,897 1,176,972 254,000 350,063 1,017,616 223,751 PADD II 664,852 812,244 1,318,440 2,933,842 841,285 1,183,318 2,570,348 744,638 PADD III 1,243,427 1,629,967 80,350 185,800 28,200 63,362 158,192 18,214 PADD IV 96,649 120,190 530,400 824,300 522,760 459,175 715,570 461,995 PADD V 377,652 517,106 2012 2,499,293 5,611,191 1,706,540 2,173,336 4,901,284 1,528,708 2,614,571 3,246,874 74,900 489,300 20,000

315

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

February 2000 Advanced Technology Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF COMMERCE Economic Assessment Office Technology Administration Advanced Technology Program National .................................................................................................6 V. IIH Focused Program Project Selection Process information infrastructure in healthcare. A discussion of the ATP "white paper" process4 notes differences

317

Fluid catalytic cracking of heavy petroleum fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is claimed for fluid catalytic cracking of residuum and other heavy oils comprising of gas oil, petroleum residue, reduced and whole crudes and shale oil to produce gasoline and other liquid products which are separated in various streams in a fractionator and associated vapor recovery equipment. The heat from combustion of coke on the coked catalyst is removed by reacting sulfur-containing coke deposits with steam and oxygen in a separate stripper-gasifier to produce a low btu gas stream comprising of sulfur compounds, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from about 1100/sup 0/F. To about 2200/sup 0/F. The partially regenerated catalyst then undergoes complete carbon removal in a regeneration vessel. The regenerated catalyst is recycled for re-use in the cracking of heavy petroleum fractions. The liquid products are gasoline, distillates, heavy fuel oil, and light hydrocarbons.

McHenry, K.W.

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

Jones, E.M. Jr.

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture, comprising and feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in a liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure, consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

Jones, E.M. Jr.

1985-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catatlyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture, comprising and feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in a liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure, consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Catalytic cartridge SO/sub 3/ decomposer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO/sub 3/ decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety. A fusion reactor may be used as the heat source.

Galloway, T.R.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effect of electronic structures on catalytic properties of CuNi alloy and Pd in MeOH-related reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the catalytic properties of a CuNi solid solution and Pd for methanol-related reactions and associated valence electronic structures. Calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that the CuNi alloy has a similar valence electronic structure to Pd and hence they exhibited similar CO selectivities in steam reforming of methanol and decomposition of methanol. Samples prepared by various processes were found to have similar CO selectivities. We conjecture that alloying of Cu and Ni dramatically alters the valence electronic structures, making it similar to that of Pd so that the alloy exhibits similar catalytic properties to Pd. First-principles slab calculations of surface electronic structures support this conjecture.

Tsai, An-Pang [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Kimura, Tomofumi; Suzuki, Yukinori; Kameoka, Satoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shimoda, Masahiko [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ishii, Yasushi [Department of Physics, Chuo University, Kasuga, Tokyo 112-8551 (Japan)

2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Laser Technology: Additive Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective Laser Sintering, and in general Additive Manufacturing Processes are becoming mature technologies; in the ... systems that are even utilized for direct parts manufacturing. However, the parts final user...

Srichand Hinduja; Lin Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

Murph, S.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: business administration, energy management, wind farm management, automation and controls, aircraft, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses over for WSU credit. Laboratory

327

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design.

328

Sequential tasks performed by catalytic pumps for colloidal crystallization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gold-platinum catalytic pumps immersed in a chemical fuel are used to manipulate silica colloids. The manipulation relies on the electric field and the fluid flow generated by the pump. Catalytic pumps perform various tasks, such as the repulsion of colloids, the attraction of colloids, and the guided crystallization of colloids. We demonstrate that catalytic pumps can execute these tasks sequentially over time. Switching from one task to the next is related to the local change of the proton concentration, which modifies the colloid zeta potential and consequently the electric force acting on the colloids.

Ali Afshar Farniya; Maria J. Esplandiu; Adrian Bachtold

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LTCC multi-chip module LTCC multi-chip module A high density LTCC multi-chip module Electronic Packaging PDF format (150 kb) The Electronic Packaging technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging Department are a resource for all aspects of microelectronic packaging. From design and layout to fabrication of prototype samples, the staff offers partners the opportunity for concurrent engineering and development of a variety of electronic packaging concepts. This includes assistance in selecting the most appropriate technology for manufacturing, analysis of performance characteristics and development of new and unique processes. Capabilities: Network Fabrication Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC) Thick Film Thin Film Packaging and Assembly Chip Level Packaging MEMs Packaging

331

JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

Catalyst Cartography: 3D Super-Resolution Mapping of Catalytic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalyst Cartography: 3D Super-Resolution Mapping of Catalytic Activity Thanks to a groundbreaking new method, scientists have created the first 3D super-resolution maps of...

333

In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying...

334

Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three ap...

Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dynamic Electronic Control of Catalytic Converters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

336

FCC Tail Gas olefins conversion to gasoline via catalytic distillation with aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of every refiner is to continually improve profitability by such means as increasing gasoline production, increasing gasoline octane pool and in cases where fuel balance becomes a problem, decreasing refinery fuel gas production. A new refinery process is currently being developed which accomplish these goals. Chemical Research and Licensing Company (CR and L) developed Catalytic Distillation technology in 1978 to produce MTBE. They have since used the Catalytic Distillation technique to produce cumene. CR and L has further developed this technology to convert olefin gases currently consumed as refinery fuel, to high octane gasoline components. The process, known as CATSTILL, alkylates olefin gases such as ethylene, propylene and butylene, present in FCC Tail Gas with light aromatics such as benzene, toluene and xylene, present in reformate, to produce additional quantities of high octane gasoline components. A portable CATSTILL demonstration plant has been constructed by Brown and Root U.S.A., under an agreement with CR and L, for placement in a refinery to further develop data necessary to design commercial plants. This paper presents current data relative to the CATSTILL development.

Partin, E.E. (Brown and Root U.S.A., Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

Helfritch, Dennis J. (Baltimore, MD)

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

Marks, Tobin Jay [Northwestern University

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effects of dispersion and support on adsorption, catalytic and electronic properties of cobalt/alumina CO hydrogenation catalysts: (Technical progress report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continued investigation of dispersion and metal-support interactions and their effects upon the adsorption, activity/selectivity, and electronic properties of the metal in cobalt/alumina (and to a lesser extent on iron/alumina) catalysts is proposed. The objectives of this research are to determine the effects of surface structure and metal dispersion on the adsorption and catalytic properties of cobalt, and determine the effects of metal-support interactions, i.e., effects of decorating support species on metal crystallites and of direct electronic interactions between metal clusters and the support, on the adsoprtion, catalytic and electronic properties of cobalt supported on alumina.

Bartholomew, C.H. Jr.

1986-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

343

Integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with solid oxide fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review was conducted for coal gasification technologies that integrate with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to achieve system efficiencies near 60% while capturing and sequestering >90% of the carbon dioxide [1-2]. The overall system efficiency can reach 60% when a) the coal gasifier produces a syngas with a methane composition of roughly 25% on a dry volume basis, b) the carbon dioxide is separated from the methane-rich synthesis gas, c) the methane-rich syngas is sent to a SOFC, and d) the off-gases from the SOFC are recycled back to coal gasifier. The thermodynamics of this process will be reviewed and compared to conventional processes in order to highlight where available work (i.e. exergy) is lost in entrained-flow, high-temperature gasification, and where exergy is lost in hydrogen oxidation within the SOFC. The main advantage of steam gasification of coal to methane and carbon dioxide is that the amount of exergy consumed in the gasifier is small compared to conventional, high temperature, oxygen-blown gasifiers. However, the goal of limiting the amount of exergy destruction in the gasifier has the effect of limiting the rates of chemical reactions. Thus, one of the main advantages of steam gasification leads to one of its main problems: slow reaction kinetics. While conventional entrained-flow, high-temperature gasifiers consume a sizable portion of the available work in the coal oxidation, the consumed exergy speeds up the rates of reactions. And while the rates of steam gasification reactions can be increased through the use of catalysts, only a few catalysts can meet cost requirements because there is often significant deactivation due to chemical reactions between the inorganic species in the coal and the catalyst. Previous research into increasing the kinetics of steam gasification will be reviewed. The goal of this paper is to highlight both the challenges and advantages of integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with SOFCs.

Siefert, N.; Shamsi, A.; Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Process: Catalytic Reforming Catalytic Cracking Catalytic Hydrocracking Delayed and Fluid Coking Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Process: Catalytic Reforming Catalytic Cracking Catalytic Hydrocracking Delayed and Fluid Coking Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 2,563 2,667 2,739 2,807 2,705 2,609 2010-2013 PADD 1 176 178 180 173 156 167 2010-2013 East Coast 166 164 163 161 140 153 2010-2013 Appalachian No. 1 9 14 16 12 15 14 2010-2013 PADD 2 642 638 668 695 677 615 2010-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 426 411 426 460 450 399 2010-2013 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 67 62 70 72 72 57 2010-2013 Okla., Kans., Mo.

345

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

346

Chapter 15 - Catalytic Thermochemical Processes for Biomass Conversion to Biofuels and Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass is the most abundant and biorenewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. Thermochemical conversion technologies (pyrolysis, gasification and hydrothermal liquefaction) are a promising option for transforming biomass feedstocks into liquid oils and chemicals. In the article, for the thermal process of biomass for biofuels and chemicals, the effect of reaction conditions, reactors, solvents and catalysts on the yield and distribution of the products are reviewed. Fast pyrolysis of cellulose is primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity and has undergone many pilot tests. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts and has been profiled as being CO2-neutral, having a high potential to provide power, chemicals and fuels. Catalytically hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass produces a very complex mixture of liquid products; therefore, novel technology for separation and extraction of downstream products from hydrothermal liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass need to be developed.

Lin Mei Wu; Chun Hui Zhou; Dong Shen Tong; Wei Hua Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, \\{H4PVMo11O40\\} gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity.

Jizhe Zhang; Miao Sun; Xin Liu; Yu Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Livermore's Crawford selected for California Council on Science...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Crawford selected for California Council on Science and Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

349

Synthesis and characterization of supported heteropolymolybdate nanoparticles between silicate layers of Bentonite with enhanced catalytic activity for epoxidation of alkenes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} The PVMo and nanocomposite catalyst (PVMo/Bentonite) as catalyst for epoxidation of alkenes. {yields} The composite catalyst showed higher catalytic activity than parent heteropolymolybdate (PVMo). {yields}The use of ultrasonic irradiation increased the conversions and reduced the reaction times. {yields} The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a green and eco-friendly oxidant in this catalytic system. -- Abstract: A new heterogeneous catalyst (PVMo/Bentonite) consisting of vanadium substituted heteropolymolybdate with Keggin-type structure Na{sub 5}[PV{sub 2}Mo{sub 10}O{sub 40}].14H{sub 2}O (PVMo) supported between silicate layers of bentonite has been synthesized by impregnation method and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that PVMo was finely dispersed into layers of bentonite as support. The PVMo/Bentonite used as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for epoxidation of alkenes. Various cyclic and linear alkenes were oxidized into the corresponding epoxides in high yields and selectivity with 30% aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The catalyst was reused several times, without observable loss of activity and selectivity. The obtained results showed that the catalytic activity of the PVMo/Bentonite was higher than that of pure heteropolyanion (PVMo).

Salavati, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinsalavati@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), 19395-4697, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), 19395-4697, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasouli, Nahid [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), 19395-4697, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), 19395-4697, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Selection Criteria for Demonstration Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selection Criteria: Selection Criteria: Energy Savings: * If a building were to apply this technology, how much energy could it save compared to a "typical" existing building? How much energy could it save compared to a typical "new" building built to the latest (IECC 2007) code? Provide references, calculations, and documentation. * If the technology is a drop-in replacement, how much energy could it save compared to "typical" new equipment? Provide references, calculations, and documentation. Market & Job Creation Potential: * What is the market potential for this technology? * What types of buildings is this technology best suited for? What types of buildings is this technology ill-suited for? * How many US buildings that could potentially benefit from/utilize this technology? What % of U.S.

351

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 1. System requirement definition and system analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic Inc. was awarded a contract to conduct a preliminary system design and cost analysis for a brackish water desalination project to be located in Brownsville, Texas. System analyses and economic analyses were performed to define the baseline solar energy desalination system. The baseline system provides an average daily product water capacity of 6000 mT. The baseline system is optimal relative to technological risk, performance, and product water cost. Subsystems and their interfaces have been defined and product water cost projections made for commercial plants in a range of capacities. Science Applications, Inc. (SAI), subcontractor to Catalytic, had responsibility for the solar power system. This, the final report, summarizes the work performed under the Phase I effort.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Technology Reviews | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Reviews Technology Reviews Technology Reviews November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Selecting a distributed energy (DE) technology for a specific application depends on many factors. Considerations include the amount of power needed, the duty cycle, space constraints, thermal needs, emission regulations, fuel availability, utility prices, and interconnection issues. The following technology reviews include descriptions of a variety of DE and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, providing (when available) such parameters as efficiency, size, and projected cost to install and maintain. Behavior of Capstone and Honeywell Microturbine Generators During Load Changes, 38 pp, Feb. 2004 Catalogue of CHP Technologies, Dec. 2012 Cost Analysis of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Control Alternatives for

353

Catalytic roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol on Co/MgO catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: The catalytic roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol were investigated over Co/MgO catalysts. Catalysts with different Co0/(Co0+Co2+) fraction were prepared through calcination and/or reduction at different temperatures, and the Co0 fraction was quantified by TPR and in-situ XPS. High temperature calcination of Co/MgO allowed us to prepare catalysts with more non-reducible Co2+ incorporated in the MgO lattice, while lower calcination temperatures allowed for the preparation of catalysts with higher Co0/(Co0+Co2+) fractions. The catalytic tests on Co0, non-reducible Co2+, and reducible Co2+ indicated that Co0 is much more active than either reducible or non-reducible Co2+ for C-C cleavage and water gas shift reaction. In addition, catalysts with a higher Co0 surface fraction exhibited a lower selectivity to CH4.

Karim, Ayman M.; Su, Yu; Engelhard, Mark H.; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

354

Commercialization of clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

Bharucha, N. [Dept. of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra (Australia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agreements for Commercializing Technology Agreements for Commercializing Technology NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a partner seeks highly-specialized or technical services to complete a project. An ACT agreement also authorizes participating contractor-operated DOE laboratories, such as NREL, to partner with businesses using more flexible terms that are aligned with industry practice. The agreement type used depends on the business, and the specific partnership selected is determined on a case-by-case basis. Benefits The benefits of Agreements for Commercializing Technology include: Intellectual Property Rights. ACT provides a more flexible framework for negotiation of intellectual property rights to facilitate moving technology from the laboratory to the marketplace as quickly as possible.

356

Science Accelerator : Your Selections  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Your Selections Back To Previous Page Selections - of First Page Previous Page Next Page Last Page Back To Previous Page You have 0 selections. Click the checkboxes clipping.addClipping on the results or alert results pages to add to your selections. Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site. U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website Policies/Important Links Science Accelerator science.gov WorldWideScience.org Deep Web Technologies Email Results Use this form to email your search results * Email this to: * Your Name: Comments: URL only?: Number of results: 10 20 50 100 200 All Email Format: HTML TEXT * Required field Print Results

357

Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Emissions performance comparison of conventional catalytic converter with multi-channel catalytic converter (ceramic fiber insulation layers introduced into ceramic monolith of three-way catalytic converter)

358

Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

Vajda, Stefan (Lisle, IL), Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Elam, Jeffrey W. (Elmhurst, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Winans, Randall A. (Downers Grove, IL); Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz (Roggentin, GR)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

Vajda, Stefan (Lisle, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Elam, Jeffrey W. (Elmhurst, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Winans, Randall A. (Downers Grove, IL); Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz (Roggentin, GR)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

test test Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Energy ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES Aerosol Sealing Aerosol Remote Sealing System Clog-free Atomizing and Spray Drying Nozzle Air-stable Nanomaterials for Efficient OLEDs Solvent Processed Nanotube Composites OLEDS with Air-stable Structured Electrodes APIs for Online Energy Saving Tools: Home Energy Saver and EnergyIQ Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost Dynamic Solar Glare Blocking System Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Electrochromic Windows with Multiple-Cavity Optical Bandpass Filter Electrochromic Window Technology Portfolio Universal Electrochromic Smart Window Coating

362

The relationship between technology integration reading instruction and reading achievement in high performing campuses as reported by PEIMS and third grade classroom teachers in selected South Texas school districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and evolving technologies (International Society for Technology in Education[ISTE], 2000). The technological revolution centers on computer information, communication, and multimedia technologies and is often i n t e r p r e t e d a s t h e b e g i n n i...

Bauer, Hilaria

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Catalytic Co - PA 40  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Co - PA 40 Catalytic Co - PA 40 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Catalytic Co. (PA.40 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.40-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 PA.40-1 Site Operations: Prime contractor for construction of the Fernald facility. Records indicate one time shipment of a very small quantity (4 lbs) of uranium metal to this site. PA.40-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Construction contractor - Potential for residual contamination from the very small quantity of uranium shipped to this site is considered remote PA.40-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None - as a construction contractor Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal - Believed to be a Souvenier. PA.40-1

364

Imaging Catalytic Surfaces by Multiplexed Capillary Electrophoresis With Absorption Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique for in situ imaging and screening heterogeneous catalysts by using multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with absorption detection was developed. By bundling the inlets of a large number of capillaries, an imaging probe can be created that can be used to sample products formed directly from a catalytic surface with high spatial resolution. In this work, they used surfaces made of platinum, iron or gold wires as model catalytic surfaces for imaging. Various shapes were recorded including squares and triangles. Model catalytic surfaces consisting of both iron and platinum wires in the shape of a cross were also imaged successfully. Each of the two wires produced a different electrochemical product that was separated by capillary electrophoresis. Based on the collected data they were able to distinguish the products from each wire in the reconstructed image.

Michael Christodoulou

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

Eteman, Shahrokh

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi,Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partners to someone by Partners to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on AddThis.com... Goals Research & Development Testing and Analysis Workplace Charging Partners Ambassadors Resources Community and Fleet Readiness Workforce Development Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics Partners The interactive map below highlights Workplace Charging Challenge Partners across the country who are installing plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure for their employees. Select a worksite to learn more about

369

Geothermal innovative technologies catalog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported herein are the details and the results of laboratory and bench scale experiments that were conducted at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92147 during the period of October 1, 1992, to December 31, 1995. The program results described herein build on the previous technology base and investigating additional methods to improve the economics of producing transportation fuels from coal. This included purely physical parameters, coal treatment and variation in solvent to coal ratio, the use of syngas to replace part of the hydrogen as the reducing gas, the use of dispersed catalyst in addition to and replacing the supported catalyst, and the co-processing of coal with plastic waste material. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from direct coal liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. The report includes the results of an economic assessment of the various process strategies that were evaluated during this program. A summary of the technical/economic evaluations is given in Volume I, Section II of this report. The experimental details of the eleven run of the program are given in Volume I, Section III and Volume II of this report. The details of the technical evaluations are given in the Volume III of the report.

Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.H.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Use of Pd membranes in catalytic reactors for steam methane reforming for pure hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review analyzes publications on experimental studies and mathematical modeling in the field of development of a catalytic reformer (mainly, steam methane conversion) with a fixed catalytic bed. The specif...

A. B. Shigarov; V. D. Meshcheryakov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - atpase catalytic domain Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

impressive progress has been made in understanding of the catalytic mechanism of F-type ATP synthase, which is the key enzyme in the energy metabolism of Summary: of the catalytic...

373

Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic...

374

Utilization and Mitigation of VAM/CMM Emissions by a Catalytic Combustion Gas Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system configured with a catalytic combustion gas turbine generator unit is introduced. The system has ... Heavy Industries, Ltd., such as small gas turbines, recuperators and catalytic combustors, and catalyti...

K. Tanaka; Y. Yoshino; H. Kashihara; S. Kajita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Process analysis of syngas production by non-catalytic POX of oven gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A non-catalytic POX of oven gas is proposed to solve the problem of secondary pollution due to solid wastes produced from the great amount of organic sulfur contained in oven gas in the traditional catalytic p...

Fuchen Wang; Xinwen Zhou; Wenyuan Guo

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

377

High Performance Catalytic Heat Exchanger for SOFC Systems - FuelCell Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Heat Catalytic Heat Exchanger for SOFC Systems-FuelCell Energy Background In a typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation system, hot (~900 °C) effluent gas from a catalytic combustor serves as the heat source within a high-temperature heat exchanger, preheating incoming fresh air for the SOFC's cathode. The catalytic combustor and the cathode air heat exchanger together represent the largest opportunity for cost

378

Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Factsheet overview of how project will develop a unique, feul-flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbines

379

Decision support system to select cover systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this technology is to provide risk managers with a defensible, objective way to select capping alternatives for remediating radioactive and mixed waste landfills. The process of selecting containment cover technologies for mixed waste landfills requires consideration of many complex and interrelated technical, regulatory, and economic issues. A Decision Support System (DSS) is needed to integrate the knowledge of experts from scientific, engineering, and management disciplines to help in selecting the best capping practice for the site.

Bostick, K.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Task 3.9 -- Catalytic tar cracking. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tar produced in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas stream cleanup filters, and pressure swing adsorption systems. Catalytic cracking of tars to smaller hydrocarbons can be an effective means to remove these tars from gas streams and, in the process, generate useful products, e.g., methane gas, which is crucial to the operation of molten carbonate fuel cells. The objectives of this project are to investigate whether gasification tars can be cracked by synthetic nickel-substituted micamontmorillonite, zeolite, or dolomite material; and whether the tars can be cracked selectively by these catalysts to produce a desired liquid and/or gas stream. Results to date are presented in the cited papers.

Young, B.C.; Timpe, R.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Catalytic reactive separation system for energy-efficient production of cumene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an atmospheric pressure, reactive separation column packed with a solid acid zeolite catalyst for producing cumene from the reaction of benzene with propylene. Use of this un-pressurized column, where simultaneous reaction and partial separation occur during cumene production, allow separation of un-reacted, excess benzene from other products as they form. This high-yielding, energy-efficient system allows for one-step processing of cumene, with reduced need for product purification. Reacting propylene and benzene in the presence of beta zeolite catalysts generated a selectivity greater than 85% for catalytic separation reactions at a reaction temperature of 115 degrees C and at ambient pressure. Simultaneously, up to 76% of un-reacted benzene was separated from the product; which could be recycled back to the reactor for re-use.

Buelna, Genoveva (Nuevo Laredo, MX); Nenoff, Tina M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Biodiversity of Catalytic Super-Brownian Motion Klaus Fleischmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biodiversity of Catalytic Super-Brownian Motion Klaus Fleischmann Weierstra?-Institut f that the reactant has an infinite local biodiversity or genetic abundance. This contrasts the finite local biodiversity of the equilibrium of classical super-Brownian motion. Another question we address

Klenke, Achim

383

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium* Ljubisa R on the gasification in air and 3.1 kPa steam of North Dakota lignitic chars prepared under slow and rapid pyrolysis of calcium is related to its sintering via crystallite growth. (Keywords: coal; gasification; catalysis

384

Catalytic Domain of Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C (PLC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalytic Domain of Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C (PLC) MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF RESIDUES WITHIN THE ACTIVE SITE AND HYDROPHOBIC RIDGE OF PLC 1* (Received for publication, November 20, 1997 Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN, United Kingdom Structural studies of phospholipase C 1 (PLC

Williams, Roger L.

385

Catalytic gasification of automotive shredder residues with hydrogen generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a clean and new energy carrier to generate power through the Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. Hydrogen can be effectively turned out through the catalytic gasification of organic material such as automotive shredder residues (ASR). The main objective of this manuscript is to present an analysis of the catalytic gasification of ASR for the generation of high-purity hydrogen in a lab-scale fixed-bed downdraft gasifier using 15wt.% NiO/Al2O3 catalysts at 760900K. In the catalytic gasification process, reduction of Ni(II) catalyst into Ni(0) has been confirmed through XANES spectra and consequently EXAFS data shows that the central Ni atoms have NiO and NiNi bonds with bond distances of 2.030.05 and 2.460.05, respectively. ASR is partially oxidized and ultimately converts into hydrogen rich syngas (CO and H2) and increases of the reaction temperature are favored the generation of hydrogen with decomposition of the CO. As well, approximately 220kgh?1 of ASR would be catalytically gasified at 760900K and 46.2atm with the reactor volume 0.27m3 to obtain approximately 3.42נ105kcalh?1 of thermal energy during over 87% syngas generation with the generation of 100kW electric powers.

Kuen-Song Lin; Sujan Chowdhury; Ze-Ping Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Production of Syngas by Direct Catalytic Oxidation of Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DESORPTION AT HIGH-TEMPERATURES...of abundant natural gas into liquid...a 50-mI high-pressure Autoclave...atmospheric pressure, and the...with very high CH4 yields...Contact times of gases within the...catalytic combustors and reactors...

D. A. Hickman; L. D. Schmidt

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Scaling behavior of optimally structured catalytic microfluidic reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study of catalytic microfluidic reactors we show that, when optimally structured, these reactors share underlying scaling properties. The scaling is predicted theoretically and verified numerically. Furthermore, we show how to increase the reaction rate significantly by distributing the active porous material within the reactor using a high-level implementation of topology optimization.

Okkels, F; Bruus, Henrik; Okkels, Fridolin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nanostructured Molybdenum Carbide: Sonochemical Synthesis and Catalytic Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be a useful technique to generate nanophase transition metals.7,8 Recently, molybdenum and tungsten carbides of metal salts.5,6 Sonochemical decomposition of transition metal carbonyl compounds has also been provenNanostructured Molybdenum Carbide: Sonochemical Synthesis and Catalytic Properties Taeghwan Hyeon

Suslick, Kenneth S.

389

Small gas turbine technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Gas Turbine Technology: Small gas turbine, in the power range up to 500 kW, requires a recuperated thermodynamic cycle to achieve an electrical efficiency of about 30%. This efficiency is the optimum, which is possible for a cycle pressure ratio of about 41. The cycle airflow is function of the power requirement. To increase the efficiency, in view to reduce the CO2 emission, it is mandatory to develop a more efficient thermodynamic cycle. Different thermodynamic cycles were examined and the final choice was made for an Intercooled, Recuperated cycle. The advantage of this cycle, for the same final electrical efficiency of about 35%, is the smaller cycle airflow, which is the most dimensional parameter for the important components as the heat exchanger recuperator and the combustion chamber. In parallel with the thermodynamic cycle it is necessary to develop the High Speed Alternator technology, integrated on the same shaft that the gas turbine rotating components, to achieve the constant efficiency at part loads, from 50% up to 100%, by the capacity to adjust the engine speed at the required load. To satisfy the stringent requirement in pollutant emissions of \\{NOx\\} and CO, the catalytic combustion system is the most efficient and this advance technology has to be proven. The major constraints for the small gas turbine technology development are the production cost and the maintenance cost of the unit. In the power range of 0500 kW the gas turbine technology is in competition with small reciprocating engines, which are produced in large quantity for automotive industry, at a very low production cost.

Andre Romier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rev. 1 Rev. 1 October 2004 through March 2005 for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880 Prepared by W. R. Laster (407)736-5796 Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826-2399 i DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would

391

Catalytically upgraded landfill gas as a cost-effective alternative for fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential use of landfill gas as feeding fuel for the so-called molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) imposes the need for new upgrading technologies in order to meet the much tougher feed gas specifications of this type of fuel cells in comparison to gas engines. Nevertheless, MCFC has slightly lower purity demands than low temperature fuel cells. This paper outlines the idea of a new catalytic purification process for landfill gas conditioning, which may be supposed to be more competitive than state-of-the-art technologies and summarises some lab-scale results. This catalytic process transforms harmful landfill gas minor compounds into products that can be easily removed from the gas stream by a subsequent adsorption step. The optimal process temperature was found to be in the range 250400C. After a catalyst screening, two materials were identified, which have the ability to remove all harmful minor compounds from landfill gas. The first material was a commercial alumina that showed a high activity towards the removal of organic silicon compounds. The alumina protects both a subsequent catalyst for the removal of other organic minor compounds and the fuel cell. Due to gradual deactivation caused by silica deposition, the activated alumina needs to be periodically replaced. The second material was a commercial V2O5/TiO2-based catalyst that exhibited a high activity for the total oxidation of a broad spectrum of other harmful organic minor compounds into a simpler compound class acid gases (HCl, HF and SO2), which can be easily removed by absorption with, e.g. alkalised alumina. The encouraging results obtained allow the scale-up of this LFG conditioning process to test it under real LFG conditions.

W. Urban; H. Lohmann; J.I. Salazar Gmez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks ... 4 Here we report the preliminary results of continuous-flow reactor studies with wet biomass feedstocks using new catalyst systems developed specifically for these processing conditions. ... Developing catalysts for this processing environment has also been an important factor in making this processing technology viable.2 Previous reports of continuous reactor tests with biomass feedstocks provide preliminary short-term processing results,8,9 but also show the problems of long-term operation of the process with the contaminants inherent in biomass. ...

Douglas C. Elliott; Gary G. Neuenschwander; Todd R. Hart; R. Scott Butner; Alan H. Zacher; Mark H. Engelhard; James S. Young; David E. McCready

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Status of Solar Thermal Electric Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric technology was evaluated as a future source of power for United States utilities. The technology status was developed using an ... configuration was selected for each of the major solar col...

Richard J. Holl; Edgar A. DeMeo

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006): Technology Profiles |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006): Technology Profiles Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006): Technology Profiles Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on renewable energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting market and performance data for over a dozen technologies from publications from 1997 - 2004. The technologies covered are: biomass, geothermal, concentrating solar power (CSP), wind, hydro, solar buildings, reciprocating engines, microturbines, fuel cells, batteries, advanced energy storage, and super conducting power technology. Depending on the technology, data may go as far back as 1980 and projections may go as far into the future as 2020.

396

CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD AND MAXIMUM OPERATING ELECTRIC STRESSES FOR SELECTED HIGH VOLTAGE INSULATIONS Investigation of Aged Polymeric...

397

Emerging Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Emerging Technologies (ET) Program of the Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports applied research and development (R&D) for technologies, systems, and models that contribute to building energy consumption.

398

Forecasting wireless communication technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of the paper is to present a formal comparison of a variety of multiple regression models in technology forecasting for wireless communication. We compare results obtained from multiple regression models to determine whether they provide a superior fitting and forecasting performance. Both techniques predict the year of wireless communication technology introduction from the first (1G) to fourth (4G) generations. This paper intends to identify the key parameters impacting the growth of wireless communications. The comparison of technology forecasting approaches benefits future researchers and practitioners when developing a prediction of future wireless communication technologies. The items of focus will be to understand the relationship between variable selection and model fit. Because the forecasting error was successfully reduced from previous approaches, the quadratic regression methodology is applied to the forecasting of future technology commercialisation. In this study, the data will show that the quadratic regression forecasting technique provides a better fit to the curve.

Sabrina Patino; Jisun Kim; Tugrul U. Daim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government...

400

Tools & Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Weprovide leadership for transforming workforce development through the power of technology. It develops corporate educational technology policy and enables the use of learning tools and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

402

Fluid catalytic cracking feed hydrotreatment and its severity impact on product yields and quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feed hydrotreatment and its severity increase on product yields and quality obtained in a commercial and a laboratory MAT FCC units. The hydrotreatment of Ural heavy vacuum gas oil reduces not only sulfur, nitrogen, Conradson carbon and metals content in the FCC feed but also increases the mononuclear aromatic hydrocarbons content by 8% absolute at almost no change in the total aromatics content. Regardless of this 8% increase of the mononuclear aromatics in the hydrotreated FCC feed the conversion increase in both commercial and laboratory MAT units was only 2%. The severity increase in the FCC feed hydrotreater leads to a higher conversion in the FCC, higher hydrogen transfer rate that results in higher isobutane/butylenes ratio, lower gasoline olefins content, and higher gasoline motor octane number. The hydrotreatment of the Ural heavy vacuum gas oil exhibited the same changes in FCC catalyst selectivities: lower coke and LCO selectivities and higher gasoline selectivity in both commercial riser FCC unit that has between 2 and 3s time on stream, and the fixed bed reactor MAT unit, that has 30s time on stream.

Dicho S. Stratiev; Ivelina K. Shishkova; Dimitar S. Dobrev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An investigation of urea decomposition and selective non-catalytic removal of nitric oxide with urea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of urea-water solution decomposition, for gas temperatures between 550 and 650 K, the highest concentrations were for NH3 and HNCO. On the other hand, the concentrations of CO2 were highest for gas temperatures of about 500 - 550 K. For temperatures above...

Park, Yong Hun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Kinetic modeling of nitric oxide removal from exhaust gases by Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for increased pressure predict a wider temperature range at which significant nitric oxide can be removed and also in the case of RAPRENOx process the levels of N20 (a by-product in the case of the RAPRENOx process) are significantly lower. The accounting...

Chenanda, Cariappa Mudappa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Flow reactor experiments on the selective non-catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?CO, and H, O are initially present in exhaust stream [57]. .. . . . 42 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Reaction path diagram for RAPRENOx process [63]. .. . Reduction of nitric oxide as a function of temperature, concentration of oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water... the influence of carbon monoxide [89]. . . . . . . . . 58 Fig. 28 Effect of residence time on the NOxOUT process as a function of temperature, NO(initial)=125ppm, 0-ratio of 4 [90]. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Fig. 29 Ammonia slip as a function...

Gentemann, Alexander M.G.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Modeling of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using four modern catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ammonia and Oxygen Exponents for V Catalyst........................ 36 Table 6.20 Experimental Data at 150 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28].................................. 40 Table 6.21 Experimental Data at 200 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst... [28].................................. 40 Table 6.22 Experimental Data at 250 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28].................................. 40 Table 6.23 Experimental Data at 300 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28...

Sharma, Giriraj

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 on titanium pillared montmorillonite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acidity of a titanium pillared montmorillonite (Ti-PILC) has been modified by two methods of...3 with or without SO2 has been investigated. For the three titanium pillared clays, a high resistance to SO2 pres...

H. L. del Castillo; A. Gil; P. Grange

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of innovative CeMn/Ti-pillared-clay (CeMn/Ti-PILC) catalysts combining the advantages of PILCs and CeMn were investigated for elemental mercury (Hg0) capture at 100350 C in the absence of HCl in the flue gas. ...

R. T. Yang; J. P. Chen; E. S. Kikkinides; L. S. Cheng; J. E. Cichanowicz

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in B100 * Potential NaK emissions control effects - Ash accumulation in DPF - Alkali absorption into monolith walls * possible weakening of monolith - Catalyst poisoning...

410

Study of the Factors Affecting the Selectivity of Catalytic Ethylene Oligomerization .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over the past decade, advances in ethylene oligomerization have witnessed explosive growth of interest from both commercial and academic standpoint, with chromium metal invariably being (more)

Albahily, Khalid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The catalytic oxidation of ethylene and butenes with air: total aldehyde production and selectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of startup, variation in ca. talyst composition, or by pretreat- ment of tl e catalyst, inadvertently, with a deactivating agent. Pretreate. ent of the catalyst with hydrogen gas be- fore a run proved to have an adverse effect on the forma- tion... for epoinp;, these investi- . gators concluded tliat hydroxylation is not an important factor in the oxidation of 2-butane under tne conditions considered. At 375 0 a slow reaction occurred and the r te of oxidation' increased at l. i, her tcr...

Burns, John Cunningham

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction over Ag/Al2O3 Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DRIFT spectroscopy used together with flow reactor experiments to investigate the role of H2 for SCR over Ag/Al2O3

413

Growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes from size-selected catalytic metal particles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that alcohols (e.g. methanol, ethanol) are a rather favorable carbon source that can synthesize large amounts correlation to that of the produced SWNTs [12]. However, since most of their nanoparticles were prepared for producing very high purity nanoparticles [13]. We have previously demonstrated the synthesis of size

Maruyama, Shigeo

414

New Developments in Titania-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

415

Energy and technology review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory publishes the Energy and Technology Review Monthly. This periodical reviews progress mode is selected programs at the laboratory. This issue includes articles on in-situ coal gasification, on chromosomal aberrations in human sperm, on high speed cell sorting and on supercomputers.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Exploration Technologies Technology Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Exploration Technologies Needs Assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the program's research and development.

417

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic

418

Select Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dosanjh » Select Dosanjh » Select Publications Select Publications Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2013 Richard A. Barrett, Shekhar Borkar, Sudip S. Dosanjh, Simon D. Hammond, Michael A. Heroux, X. Sharon Hu, Justin Luitjens, Steven G. Parker, John Shalf, Li Tang, "On the Role of Co-design in High Performance Computing", Transition of HPC Towards Exascale Computing, E.H. D'Hollander et. al (Eds.), IOS Press, 2013, ( November 1, 2013) Download File: Codesign-Paper.pdf (pdf: 867 KB) Rolf Riesen, Sudip Dosanjh, Larry Kaplan, "The ExaChallenge Symposium", IBM Research Paper, August 26, 2013, Download File: ExaChallenge2012.pdf (pdf: 1.4 MB) S. Dosanjh, R. Barrett, D. Doerfler, S. Hammond, K. Hemmert, M. Heroux, P. Lin, K. Pedretti, A. Rodrigues, T. Trucano, J.Juitjens, "Exascale Design

419

Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Best practices, project resources, and other tools on energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

420

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems To support trends in the electric generating industry of moving from seasonal to year-round operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for control of NOx and mercury, as well as extending the time between generating unit outages, Fossil Energy Research Corporation (FERCo) is developing technology to determine SCR catalyst activity and remaining life without requiring an outage to obtain and analyze catalyst samples. FERCo intends to use SCR catalyst performance results measured with their in situ device at Alabama Power’s Plant Gorgas during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons, along with EPRI’s CatReactTM catalyst management software, to demonstrate the value of real-time activity measurements with respect to the optimization of catalyst replacement strategy. Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute are co-funding the project.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Triglycerides to Non-ester Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Triglycerides to Non-ester Biofuels ... Results derived from soybean oil, jatropha oil, and tung oil show that certain biofuel fractions met JP-8 specifications and Navy distillate specifications. ... Therefore, tung-oil-derived CH biofuel will have added value as a blend stock for existing FT jet fuels and emerging biofuels such as those produced from the UOP/ENI EcofiningTM process to meet fuel specifications by increasing density and aromatic content. ...

Lixiong Li; Edward Coppola; Jeffrey Rine; Jonathan L. Miller; Devin Walker

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Micro-Scale Catalytic Reactor for Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-Scale Catalytic Reactor for Syngas Production ... The H2 yield (?H2) was evaluated as moles of H2 produced per mole of CH4 converted in the reforming channel. ... In particular, the maximum temperature moves from a location close to the reactor center (for MCH4-sr/MCH4-co = 2) toward the reactor inlet producing in the case of MCH4-sr/MCH4-co =2.75 decreasing temperature profiles without a maximum. ...

S. Vaccaro; L. Malangone; P. Ciambelli

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Catalytic Graphitization of Carbon Aerogels by Transition Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic Graphitization of Carbon Aerogels by Transition Metals ... Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol?gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. ... Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1800 C. ...

F. J. Maldonado-Hdar; C. Moreno-Castilla; J. Rivera-Utrilla; Y. Hanzawa; Y. Yamada

2000-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs July 2010 V. 1.2 Prepared by the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Additional technical support provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Federal Energy Management Program. Authors: Bryan Urban and Kurt Roth, Ph.D. ii Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Why Use Cool Roofs .............................................................................................................. 3

427

Effects of Current upon Electrochemical Catalytic Reforming of Anisole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reforming of anisole (as model compound of bio-oil) was performed over the NiCuZn-Al2O3 catalyst, using a recently-developed electrochemical catalytic reforming (ECR). The influence of the current on the anisole reforming in the ECR process has been investigated. It was observed that anisole reforming was significantly enhanced by the current approached over the catalyst in the electrochemical catalytic process, which was due to the non-uniform temperature distribution in the catalytic bed and the role of the thermal electrons originating from the electrified wire. The maximum hydrogen yield of 88.7% with a carbon conversion of 98.3% was obtained through the ECR reforming of anisole at 700C and 4 A. X-ray diffraction was employed to characterize catalyst features and their alterations in the anisole reforming. The apparent activation energy for the anisole reforming is calculated as 99.54 kJ/mol, which is higher than ethanol, acetic acid, and light fraction of bio-oil. It should owe to different physical and chemical properties and reforming mechanism for different hydrocarbons.

Jia-xing Xiong; Tao Kan; Xing-long Li; Tong-qi Ye; Quan-xin Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Preface: Special Issue on Catalytic Control of Lean-Burn Engine Exhaust Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Catalysis Today includes original research articles based on select presentations from the Mobile Emissions Control Symposium at the 22nd North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meeting held in Detroit in June 2011, with a particular focus on catalyzed diesel emissions control. The Symposium was dedicated to the memory of Dr. Haren Gandhi, a visionary technology leader and a passionate environmental advocate.

Yezerets, Aleksey; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos; Nova, Isabella; Epling, Bill

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

ARPA-E Project Selections  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Selections Project Selections September 23, 2010 These projects have been selected for negotiation of awards; final award amounts may vary. Lead Research Organization (Partner Organizations) Amount Lead Organization Location (City, State) Technology Focus - Application: Project Title Project Description 1) Innovative Cybersecurity Solutions Grid Protection Alliance (University of Illinois, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PJM Interconnection, AREVA T&D) $3,215,000 Chattanooga, TN SIEGate: Secure Information Exchange for Electric Grid Operations The Grid Protection Alliance will research, develop, and commercialize a Secure Information Exchange Gateway (SIEGate) that provides secure communication of data between control centers.

430

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 3.9 catalytic tar cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tar produced in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment, including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas stream cleanup filters, and pressure-swing absorption systems. Catalytic cracking of tars to smaller hydrocarbons can be an effective means of removing these tars from gas streams and, in the process, generating useful products, such as methane gas, which is crucial to operation of molten carbonate fuel cells. Aerosol tars are not readily removed from gas streams by conventional means and, as a consequence, often end up plugging filters or fouling fuel cells, turbines, or sorbents. Catalytic cracking of these tars to molecular moieties of C{sub 10} or smaller would prevent the problems commonly attributed to the tars. As an example, the moving Bourdon fixed-bed gasifier, by virtue of its efficient countercurrent heat exchange and widespread commercial use, may offer the lowest-cost integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system if tar generation and wastewater contamination can be minimized. We evaluate the potential of selected catalysts to minimize tar accumulation and maximize char conversion to useful liquid and/or gaseous products. Owing to the potential for production of extremely toxic nickel carbonyl gas, care must be exercised in the use of a NISMM catalyst for cracking tars at high temperatures in reducing atmospheres such as those produced by coal gasification. We observed a fifty percent or more of tar produced during steam gasification of Beulah lignite at temperatures of 400{degrees}-800+{degrees}C when cracked by either dolomite or zeolite maintained at a temperature of 50{degrees}C-100{degrees}C below that of the reactor.

Timpe, R.C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

432

Technology Roadmaps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Thispage contains links to DOE's Technology Roadmaps, multi-year plans outlining solid-state lighting goals, research and development initiatives aimed at accelerating technology advances and...

433

Technology Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In presenting this chapter on technology development, it must be stated that attempts to make an up-to-date technology survey are restricted, unfortunately, by the proprietary nature of recent advances, detail...

B. E. Conway

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL's geothermal team develops publications, including technical reports and conference papers, about geothermal resource assessments, market and policy analysis, and geothermal research and development (R&D) activities. In addition to the selected documents available below, you can find resources on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program Web site or search the NREL Publications Database. For additional geothermal documents, including those published since 1970, please visit the Office of Science and Technology Information Geothermal Legacy Collection. Policymakers' Guidebooks Five steps to effective policy. Geothermal Applications Market and Policy Analysis Program Activities R&D Activities Geothermal Applications

435

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

about 10 wt% moisture and size reduced to 2-6 millimeters to produce an acceptable biomass pyrolysis feedstock. * The biomass feedstock is rapidly converted in the absence of...

436

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

10 wt% moisture, and the size is reduced to 2-6 millimeters to produce an acceptable biomass pyrolysis feedstock. * The biomass feedstock is rapidly heated to approximately...

437

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Mohamed Toema (speaker), Sarah Nuss-Warren, and Kirby S. Chapman, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory; James McCarthy and Thomas McGrath, Innovative Environmental Solutions Inc. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: The researchers are conducting a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of field gas-fired four-stroke cycle rich burn engines equipped with non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology. Engine emissions and operating parameters are being monitored on three engines over an extended period. In addition, a mapping study was conducted on one engine. The NSCR was operated at various controlled air-to-fuel (AF) ratios while emission measurements were conducted and engine operating parameters monitored. NOx, CO, and oxygen were measured using both EPA reference method technology and the portable analyzer used in the long-term study. In the mapping study, ammonia, formaldehyde, CO, NOx, and speciated hydrocarbon emissions were recorded in real-time using an extractive FTIR system. This paper focuses on the engine mapping phase. The mapping tests demonstrated a trade-off between NOx emissions and CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbon emissions. Richer engine operation (lower AF) decreases NOx emissions at the expense of higher CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbons. Leaner operation has the opposite effect. The results to date of the semi-continuous monitoring are presented in a separate paper.

438

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on AddThis.com... Current Opportunities Past Opportunities Recovery Act Selected Awards Requests for Information Related Opportunities

439

Technology Help Desk 412 624-HELP [4357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Help Desk 412 624-HELP [4357] http://technology.pitt.edu Microsoft Word 2010 Quick can use the mouse to select text in a variety of ways. #12;Get Help The Technology Help Desk at 412 additional options. The Table Tools and Drawing/Picture Tools tabs only appear when a table or picture

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile catalytic converters Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile catalytic converters Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IEEE International Symposium on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Catalytic ozonation of phenol in water with natural brucite and magnesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural brucite and magnesia were applied as catalysts in catalytic ozonation of phenol in this work. It was found that both brucite and magnesia had remarkable accelerations on degradation of phenol and removal of COD in water. On this basis, effective and feasible routes for catalytic ozonation of phenol in water were proposed. The influence of initial pH value, radical scavengers and reaction temperature were investigated. The results revealed that there were different ozonation mechanisms in two systems: molecular ozone direct oxidation mechanism was proved in catalytic ozonation with brucite, and hydroxyl radical mechanism was demonstrated to play a main role in catalytic ozonation with magnesia.

Kun He; Yu Ming Dong; Zhen Li; Lin Yin; Ai Min Zhang; Yi Chun Zheng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Catalytic microwave torrefaction and pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellet to improve biofuel quality .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aims of this dissertation were to understand the effects of torrefaction as pretreatment on biomass pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis for improving biofuel quality, and (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent catalytic site Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yeshiva University Collection: Materials Science 11 Chemo-Mechanical Coupling in F1-ATPase Revealed by Catalytic Site Occupancy during Catalysis Summary: Chemo-Mechanical...

444

Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of synthesis gas employing a catalytic membrane reactor wherein the membrane comprises a mixed metal oxide material.

Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Atomic Hydrogen in Condensed Form Produced by a Catalytic Process:? A Future Energy-Rich Fuel?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic Hydrogen in Condensed Form Produced by a Catalytic Process:? A Future Energy-Rich Fuel? ... Energy Fuels, 2005, 19 (6), ...

Shahriar Badiei; Leif Holmlid

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

Problems in Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons and Detailed Simulation of Combustion Processes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation research consists of two parts, with Part I on the kinetics of catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons and Part II on aspects on the (more)

Xin, Yuxuan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Production of high-octane gasoline on a semi-industrial catalytic reforming plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments have been carried out on the catalytic reforming at a pressure of 20 atm of a wide, straight-run gasoline fraction on an experimental industrial plant.

A. P. Fedorov; G. N. Maslyanskii

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced catalytic materials--1996 Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 44 Surface Science Perspectives The unhappy marriage of transition and noble metal atoms: A new Summary: to enhance catalytic activity? (A perspective on: When adding...

449

Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation and comparison of the measurements of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using the European Particle Measurement Programme (PMP) system and catalytic stripper

450

New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) Light, combined with a novel rhodium catalyst, enables greener production of chemical feedstocks from biorenewables. A key...

451

Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

Bieber, Michael

452

Local investigation of the electronic properties of size-selected Au nanoparticles by scanning tunneling spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Transition metal carbides such as TiC have shown great potential as catalytic supports due to their hardness the electronic, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties displayed by small metallic nanopar- ticles have been- tronic properties of size-selected Au nanoparticles supported on ultrathin titanium carbide films

Kik, Pieter

453

Catalytic process for converting 2-oxazolidinones to their corresponding alkanolamines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention provides a process for recovering alkanolamines, e.g. diisopropanolamine, from their corresponding cyclic reaction products (e.g., oxazolidinones), which products are the result of the reaction of CO/sub 2/ and the alkanolamine, a situation commonly encountered in acid gas removal processes employing the alkanolamines alone or in combination with other liquids such as sulfolane (tetrahydrothiophene-1,1 -dioxide). The process involves hydrolyzing the oxazolidinones in the presence of a small but catalytically effective amount of an amine, preferably from about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on 2-oxazolidinones. Preferably, the amine is the alkanolamine precursor of the corresponding 2-oxazolidinone.

Miller, A. E.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using porous nickel plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H{sup +} and H{sup -} ions, are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a porous nickel plate. Positive ions in a hydrogen plasma generated by dc arc discharge are irradiated to the porous plate, and pair ions are produced from the back of the irradiation plane. It becomes clear that the production quantity of pair ions mainly depends on the irradiation current of positive ions and the irradiation energy affects the production efficiency of H{sup -} ions.

Oohara, W.; Maeda, T.; Higuchi, T. [Department of Electronic Device Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube 755-8611 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Development of a Sustainable Catalytic Ester Amidation Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of a Sustainable Catalytic Ester Amidation Process ... In this paper, and as part of our ongoing interests in the advancement and uptake of green synthesis in a discovery chemistry setting,(17-19) we report our efforts to develop a significantly more sustainable process and demonstrate its applicability to the synthesis of a range of lead-like substrates. ... Overall, consideration of the isolated yields obtained with this new and sustainable coupling protocol indicates that the current method is an extremely viable alternative compared to the previously developed approach. ...

Nicola Caldwell; Craig Jamieson; Iain Simpson; Allan J. B. Watson

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 News Stories (and older) 6 News Stories (and older) 12.21.2005___________________________________________________________________ Genzyme acquires gene therapy technology invented at Berkeley Lab. Read more here. 07.19.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Symyx, a start up company using Berkeley Lab combinatorial chemistry technology licensed by the Technology Transfer Department and developed by Peter Schultz and colleagues in the Materials Sciences Division, will be honored with Frost & Sullivan's 2005 Technology Leadership Award at their Excellence in Emerging Technologies Awards Banquet for developing enabling technologies and methods to aid better, faster and more efficient R&D. Read more here. 07.11.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Nanosys, Inc., a Berkeley Lab startup, is among the solar nanotech companies investors along Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park hope that thinking small will translate into big profits. Read more here.

458

Catalytic ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum wire is experimentally studied by using microcalorimetry and by restricting the flow to the low Reynolds number range so that axisymmetry prevails. The fuels studied are propane, butane, propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen. Parameters investigated include flow velocity, fuel type and concentration, and oxygen concentration. The catalytic ignition temperatures of the various fuels are accurately determined over extensive ranges of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen concentrations. Results show two distinctly opposite ignition trends depending on the nature of the fuel. That is, the ignition temperature of lean propane/air and butane/air mixtures decreases as their fuel concentration is increased, while the reverse trend is observed for lean mixtures of propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen with air. Furthermore, the ignition of propane depends primarily on fuel concentration, while the ignition of carbon monoxide depends on fuel and oxygen concentrations to a comparable extent. These results are explained on the basis of hierarchical surface adsorption strengths of the different reactants in effecting catalytic ignition. Additional phenomena of interest are observed and discussed.

Cho, P.; Law, C.K.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fuel Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies selective catalytic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Layering Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Planar technology requires that thin layers of materials be formed and patterned sequentially, commencing with a flat rigid substrate. The key aspects of each layer are its Thi...

Ivor Brodie; Julius J. Muray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Archive to someone 7 Archive to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Archive on AddThis.com... 2007 Archive #499 Alternative Fuel Models: Gains and Losses December 10, 2007 #498 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy December 3, 2007 #497 Fuel Drops to Third Place in the Trucking Industry Top Ten Concerns November 26, 2007 #496 Diesel Prices in the U.S. and Selected Countries: Cost and Taxes November 19, 2007 #495 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 November 12, 2007

463

Evolution of Domain Architectures and Catalytic Functions of Enzymes in Metabolic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of Domain Architectures and Catalytic Functions of Enzymes in Metabolic Systems Summit architectures and catalytic functions of enzymes constitute the centerpieces of a metabolic network. These types. In contrast, prokaryotic enzymes become more versatile by catalyzing multiple reactions with similar chemical

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

464

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Applications1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Ghosh3 , Huei Peng2 Abstract A fuel processor that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed of the hydrogen in the fuel processor is based on catalytic partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas

Peng, Huei

465

Effect of the Catalyst Load on Syngas Production in Short Contact Time Catalytic Partial Oxidation Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of the Catalyst Load on Syngas Production in Short Contact Time Catalytic Partial Oxidation Reactors ... For safety and environmental protection reasons (to avoid syngas release into the atmosphere), after the analysis section, the reacted gas stream was completely oxidized by forced air in a catalytic honeycomb burner (Figure 2). ...

S. Specchia; L. D. Vella; B. Lorenzut; T. Montini; V. Specchia; P. Fornasiero

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes M Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of various nanotube surface and edge reactions (e.g. adsorption of hydrocarbons and hydrogen onto the surface

Grujicic, Mica

467

Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrogen Using Combinatorial Shici Duan and Selim Senkan*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the single component catalytic materials explored. Introduction Due to their high energy conversionCatalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrogen Using Combinatorial Methods Shici Duan and Selim Senkan using a feed gas composition of 2% C2H5OH and 12% H2O in a helium carrier gas. This systematic

Senkan, Selim M.

468

Engineering a Unimolecular DNA-Catalytic Probe for Single Lead Ion Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering a Unimolecular DNA-Catalytic Probe for Single Lead Ion Monitoring Hui Wang, Youngmi Kim reactions. These catalytic DNAs, or DNAzymes, can be activated by metal ions. In this paper, we take advantage of DNA molecular engineering to improve the properties of DNAzymes by designing a unimolecular

Tan, Weihong

469

Scaling behavior of optimally structured catalytic microfluidic reactors Fridolin Okkels and Henrik Bruus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling behavior of optimally structured catalytic microfluidic reactors Fridolin Okkels and Henrik of catalytic microfluidic reactors we show that, when optimally structured, these reactors share underlying the reactor using a high-level implementation of topology optimization. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.016301 PACS

470

The Catalytic Chemistry of HCN+NO over Na- and Ba-Y, FAU: An...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Catalytic Chemistry of HCN+NO over Na- and Ba-Y, FAU: An In Situ FTIR and TPDTPR Study. The Catalytic Chemistry of HCN+NO over Na- and Ba-Y, FAU: An In Situ FTIR and TPDTPR...

471

Glass Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... WE have received from the Department of Glass Technology, University of Sheffield, a copy of vol. ii. of Experimental Researches ... that department. The papers included have already appeared in the Journal of the Society of Glass Technology. They range over a somewhat wide field of the ...

1920-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

472

NREL: Technology Deployment - Technology Acceleration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assistance to federal and private industry to help address market barriers to sustainable energy technologies. Learn more about NREL's work in the following areas:...

473

Microsoft Word - 41891_SWPC_Catalytic Combustor_Factsheet_Rev01_04-24.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

891_SWPC_CATALYTIC COMBUSTOR_FACTSHEET_REV01_04-24.DOC 891_SWPC_CATALYTIC COMBUSTOR_FACTSHEET_REV01_04-24.DOC Facts Sheet: Catalytic Combustor for Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine (DE-FC26-03NT41891) I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS A. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation B. Caterpillar/Solar Turbine C. Penn State University D. Southern Company Services II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objective: To develop and demonstrate a cost effective, fuel flexible (syngas/natural gas) catalytic combustor that will achieve ultra low NOx emissions (2ppm) at the exit of the gas turbine and without the use of backend cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application. B. Background/Relevancy 1. Background: Catalytic combustion has been shown to achieve lowest emissions in conventional gas turbine application (natural gas only). Available technical data indicate that it can be effective

474

Aviation fuel synthesis by catalytic conversion of biomass hydrolysate in aqueous phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a new route for biomass derived aviation fuel synthesis by catalytic conversion in aqueous phase. Furfural with the yield of 71% was produced by acid hydrolysis of raw corncob, and hydrogenated to 2-methylfuran with obtaining the yield of 89% over Raney Ni catalyst, both of which were implemented under mild reaction conditions. The hydroxyalkylation/alkylation condensation of 2-methylfuran and furfural to C15 intermediate was conducted by using organic and inorganic acid as the catalyst under the reaction condition of 328K and atmospheric pressure. The maximal 95% of the C15 intermediate was gained when using sulfuric acid as the catalyst. 83% of liquid alkanes (C8C15) yield and more than 90% of C14/C15 selectivity were produced by hydrodeoxygenation of the C15 intermediate over 10wt%Ni/ZrO2SiO2 catalyst. During the hydrodeoxygenation process, the catalyst showed excellent stability depended on the 110h of time-on-stream test, due to its significantly decreased carbon deposition.

Tiejun Wang; Kai Li; Qiying Liu; Qing Zhang; Songbai Qiu; Jinxing Long; Lungang Chen; Longlong Ma; Qi Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Ga-MCM-41 synthesis and catalytic activity in the liquid-phase isomerisation of ?-pinene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A procedure to synthesize Ga-MCM-41 materials, using gallium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as gallium and silica sources, respectively, is reported. Samples were synthesized with a silica/gallium ratio of 40, 30, 20 and 10 and subsequently characterised by XRD, N2 adsorption, SEM, DRIFT measurements and acid properties as surface acidity using pyridine (PY) and 2,6-dimethylpyridine (DMPY) as probe molecules, as well as, \\{DRIFTs\\} of absorbed pyridine in gas phase. Materials were tested in the liquid-phase-?-pinene isomerisation reaction. According to the literature, the isomerisation proceeds via two parallel and competing pathways, one yielding monocyclic products and the other yielding polycyclic products depending on the catalysts acid strength. Camphene and limonene were obtained as major products. Camphene and polycyclic products are formed in weak (Lewis acid sites) whereas stronger (Bronsted) acid sites resulted in limonene and monocyclic derivatives. Materials exhibited an interesting catalytic activity in terms of conversion and selectivity to camphene and limonene under mild reaction conditions (353K). The highest conversion values (around 6070%) were achieved after 1h of reaction and further reaction times did not seem to increase, significantly, the materials activity.

Rafael Luque; Juan Manuel Campelo; Tomas David Conesa; Diego Luna; Jose Maria Marinas; Antonio Angel Romero

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

Huffman, Gerald P

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

SIMS methodology for probing the fate and dispersion of catalytically active molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with 520keV A u 400 4 + projectiles operating in event-by-event bombardment/detection mode was applied to investigate pyrolized mixtures of catalyst (vitamin B12) and carbon supports (carbon black). The specimens are alternative cathode materials to platinum for fuel cells. The goal was to understand the effect of temperature on the chemical environment of the catalytically active sites formed on the carbon supports during pyrolysis. The A u 400 4 + projectiles probed the samples one-at-a-time in a stochastic manner and the resulting secondary ions from the individual impacts were recorded separately. The coincidental methodology allows one to compile mass spectra comprising selectively the secondary ions from the impacts on the active sites, extracting the local molecular information of the active sites within a nanodomain (?103nm3). The detection of CoN 4 C x ? suggests Co-N4 be the moiety retained from the pyrolized vitamin B12 in the presence of the carbon black. Variations in the local chemical environment of the active sites as a function of pyrolysis temperature were also observed. Additionally, we could quantify the dispersion of the active sites among the carbon supports, a measure providing a direction for future device optimization.

Chao-Kai Liang; Sun-Tang Chang; Stanislav V. Verkhoturov; Li-Chyong Chen; Kuei-Hsien Chen; Emile A. Schweikert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

479