Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

2

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 FXe 0.1 1 10 100 1000 FNeFKr 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 Air-Like XeKr Enrichment from GasOil source Material Solubility Fractionation Hydrate Fractionation (Non-thermogenic source)...

3

Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL AND NATURAL GAS PROGRAM National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Enhanced Oil Recovery NETL has advanced the science of enhanced...

4

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

5

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

6

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas...

7

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May -October, 2009 May -October, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University, University of Texas, and Oklahoma State University George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Texas Priyank Jaiswal, Oklahoma State University November, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 John Terneus, Program Officer Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy 2 Table of Contents Disclaimer .......................................................................................................... 3

8

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Deepwater Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive Deepwater (and Ultra-Deepwater, 5000 feet of water depth and beyond) is recognized as one of the last remaining areas of the world were oil and natural gas resources remain to be discovered and produced. The architecture of the systems employed to cost-effectively develop these resources in an environmentally safe manner, reflect some of industry’s most advanced engineering accomplishments. NETL is funding research to catalyze further advances that can help Gulf of Mexico discoveries progress to production quickly and safely, and that can help maximize oil and gas recovery from fields that are currently at the edge of industry capabilities. Many of these efforts are focused on subsea production

9

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

10

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

11

INAL Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INAL Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010175 Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (Period ending 06302013) PLANNING OF A MARINE...

12

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice...

13

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf Solicitations Project Summaries Publications News Releases Software/Databases CDs/DVDs EOR Illustrations Welcome to the NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf. Recently released and in-demand reference materials are available directly from this page using the links below. Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Now Available The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) provides easy access to the results of nearly four decades of research supported by the Office of Fossil Energy’s Oil and Natural Gas Program. The database portal provides access to content from dozens of CDs and DVDs related to oil and natural gas research that FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory has published over the years. It

14

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf E&P Focus Newsletter Banner The oil and gas exploration and production R&D newsletter, E&P Focus, highlights the latest developments in R&D being carried out by NETL. E&P Focus promotes the widespread dissemination of research results among all types of oil and gas industry stakeholders: producers, researchers, educators, regulators, and policymakers. Each issue provides up-to-date information regarding extramural projects managed under the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil’s traditional oil and gas program, the EPAct Section 999 Program administered by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA), and in-house oil and gas research carried out by NETL’s Office of Research and Development.

15

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are ...

16

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil. The items envisioned for the IOGCC to undertake are national in scope....

17

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to create a computerized database inventory of compressor engines being used in the oil and natural gas exploration and production industry to evaluate emissions control...

18

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural...

19

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston June, 2008 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

20

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the purpose of predicting how natural gas hydrates affect the safety of deepwater oil and gas E&P operations. In addition, the project is providing data that can be used in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

appear to be a good choice as a replacement for traditional fossil fuelscoal, oil, and natural gas. But the energy output-to-input ratio analysis for the crop-to-fuel...

22

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: FWP 49462  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Submitted by: John A. Veil Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, and gas shales. Figure 1 shows EIA projections of the source of natural gas supplies through 2030 productive oil and gas activities in the country today are shale gas plays. Figure 1 ­ U.S. Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

23

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Authors: Joshua A. Simpson and Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural gas production (produced water). The BTEX sorption isotherms are linear and noncompetitive, suggesting that the removal mechanism is partitioning into the surfactant’s hydrophobic bilayer formed on SMZ. Even though BTEX sorption in batch systems is rapid, chemical equilibrium models do not accurately describe BTEX transport through packed beds of SMZ. Comparison with transport of a nonreactive tracer (tritium) suggests that two-site, diffusive nonequilibrium sorption-desorption controls BTEX transport. We conducted batch experiments with SMZ to determine the nonequilibrium sorption kinetics of each BTEX constituent. The kinetic measurements were used to parameterize a nonequilibrium transport model to predict BTEX removal under varying flow conditions. The accuracy of predictions is being tested using laboratory column experiments with produced water from the San Juan Basin of New Mexico

24

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Authors: Charles B. McComas, PE; J. Daniel Arthur, PE; Gerry Baker; G. Lee Moody; and David B. Cornue, PG, CHMM Venue: American Chemical Society (53rd Pentasectional Meeting) – Halliburton Energy Services Technology Center, Duncan, OK, March 8, 2008 (http://www.acs.org [external site]) Abstract: Research funded by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and conducted under the direction of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission has examined concerns related to air emissions resulting from domestic onshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Current air issues such as ambient air quality standards and non-attainment areas, regulatory compliance and regional inconsistencies, as well as global climate change and carbon sequestration are a few of the subjects perceived to represent potential barriers to energy development. The topic of air quality and how it relates to onshore oil and gas exploration and production activities is examined from the position of environmental sustainability. These concerns can be addressed through reasonable and prudent practices that industry may implement in order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate air emissions. Additionally, air emissions parameters that are not currently regulated (e.g.: CH4 and CO2) may become the subject of increased concern in the future and, therefore, add to the list of issues facing oil and gas exploration and production. Suggestions for further research opportunities with the potential to benefit responsible energy resource development are also presented.

25

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Authors: Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM; Enid J. Sullivan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; and Lynn E. Katz and Kerry A. Kinney, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: About 2.3 billion cubic meters (600 billion gallons) of wastewater (produced water) is generated each year as a byproduct of oil and gas operations in the continental United States. Disposal of this water represents about 10% of the cost of hydrocarbon production. Inexpensive treatment technologies can lower the cost of disposal and generate higher-quality water for other uses. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively sorb a variety of nonpolar organic compounds from water. SMZ was tested as a medium to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from produced water generated during extraction of coalbed natural gas. BTEX removal is necessary prior to surface discharge of produced waters or as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis. We demonstrated in laboratory column experiments that BTEX-saturated SMZ is readily regenerated by air sparging. There was no loss in BTEX sorption capacity, and a minor decrease in hydraulic conductivity, after 50 sorption/regeneration cycles. Based upon the laboratory results, a pilot-scale produced-water treatment system was designed and tested at a reinjection facility in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The SMZ-based system was designed to treat up to 110 liters (30 gallons) of produced water per hour on a continuous basis by running two SMZ columns in series. The system performed as predicted, based on laboratory results, over repeated feed and regeneration cycles during the month-long operation. The BTEX-laden sparge gases were treated with a vapor-phase bioreactor system, resulting in an emissions-free process

26

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Oil and Natural Gas Supply > Events Oil and Natural Gas Supply Events The following is a listing of events of interest to the oil and natural gas community....

27

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs Author: Mohan Kelkar, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. Venue: Tulsa Association of Petroleum Landmen meeting in Tulsa, OK, April 19, 2007 (http://www.landman.org [external site]). Abstract: The Hunton reservoir in Oklahoma represents one of the largest discoveries in Oklahoma in recent history. Since 1995, several Hunton reservoir fields have been exploited by various operators. The principle behind this exploitation remains the same: The wells produce large quantities of water, and along with it, significant quantities of natural gas and sometimes oil. Examination of various fields producing from the Hunton reservoir indicates that the economic success from these fields is not uniform. Some fields produce significant quantities of oil, whereas some fields only produce gas. In some fields, horizontal wells work best, whereas in some other fields, vertical wells do a good job. The water production from the fields ranges from as low as few hundred barrels per day to several thousand barrels per day. In this paper, we present the results from various fields to indicate the parameters needed in a Hunton field to make it economically successful. We restrict our evaluation to parameters that can be easily measured or are readily available. These include log data (gamma ray, resistivity, neutron, and density), initial potential data, production data (oil, gas, and water—if available) and well configuration (vertical or horizontal). By analyzing the recovery of oil and gas according to various reservoir parameters, we developed a methodology for predicting the future success of the field. For example, a clear relationship exists between porosity of the rock and initial hydrocarbon saturation: The higher the oil saturation, the better the recovery factor. Initial potential is critical in determining possible recovery. Horizontal wells cost 1.5 to 2 times more than vertical wells and may not provide the additional recovery to justify the costs. The Hunton formation is extensive in Oklahoma. If we want to extend the success of some of the fields to other areas, we need clear guidelines in terms of what is needed to exploit those fields. This paper provides some of those guidelines based on the examination of the currently producing fields.

28

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Kansas Author: Stan McCool, University of Kansas Center for Research Venue: Tertiary Oil Recovery Projects 18th Improved Oil Recovery Conference, Wichita, KS, April 12,...

29

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-04NT15510  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-04NT15510 Final Report A Systems Approach has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due

30

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Authors: Mark White and Pete McGrail Venue: The 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies will be held November 16-20, 2008 at The Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. The Conference will be organized by MIT in collaboration with the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG), with major sponsorship from the US Department of Energy. http://mit.edu/ghgt9/ . Abstract: Under high pressure and low temperature conditions small nonpolar molecules (typically gases) can combine with water to form crystalline structures known as clathrate hydrates. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) form nearly identical clathrate structures (sI), with the CO2 hydrate being thermodynamically favored. Vast accumulations of methane hydrates have been found in suboceanic deposits and beneath the arctic permafrost. Because of the large volumetric storage densities, clathrate hydrates on the deep ocean floor have been suggested as a sequestration option for CO2. Alternatively, CO2 hydrates can be formed in the geologic settings of naturally occurring accumulations of methane hydrates. Global assessments of natural gas resources have shown that gas hydrate resources exceed those of conventional resources, which is indicative of the potential for clathrate hydrate sequestration of CO2. Recovery of natural gas from hydrate-bearing geologic deposits has the potential for being economically viable, but there remain significant technical challenges in converting these natural accumulations into a useable resource. Currently, conventional methods for producing methane hydrates from geologic settings include depressurization, thermal stimulation, and inhibitor injection. Although CO2 clathrates generally are not naturally as abundant as those of CH4, their occurrence forms the foundation of an unconventional approach for producing natural gas hydrates that involves the exchange of CO2 with CH4 in the hydrate structure. This unconventional concept has several distinct benefits over the conventional methods: 1) the heat of formation of CO2 hydrate is greater than the heat of dissociation of CH4 hydrate, providing a low-grade heat source to support additional methane hydrate dissociation, 2) exchanging CO2 with CH4 will maintain the mechanical stability of the geologic formation, and 3) the process is environmentally friendly, providing a sequestration mechanism for the injected CO2. The exchange production technology would not be feasible without the favorable thermodynamics of CO2 hydrates over CH4 hydrates. This situation yields challenges for the technology to avoid secondary hydrate formation and clogging of the geologic repository. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of producing natural gas and sequestering CO2 using the direct exchange technology in geologic media. These experiments have duplicated numerically using the STOMP-HYD simulator, which solves the nonisothermal multifluid flow and transport equations for mixed hydrate systems in geologic media. This paper describes the design (via numerical simulation) of a pilot-scale demonstration test of the CO2 exchange production and sequestration technology for a geologic setting beneath the arctic permafrost, involving a gas-hydrate interval overlying a free-gas interval (i.e., Class 1 Hydrate Accumulation).

31

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Authors: Michael D. Vanden Berg, Stephanie Carney, Michael D. Laine, Craig D. Morgan, Utah Geological Survey; and Paul B. Anderson, consulting geologist. Venue: Poster Session: Responsible Development, Sustainability, and Climate Science—Groundwater and Site Remediation, June 9, 2009, American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Denver, CO, June 7 to 10, 2009. http://www.aapg.org/denver/ [external site] Abstract: Saline water disposal is the single most pressing issue with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Conventional oil and gas fields in the basin provide 67% of Utah’s total crude oil production and 71% of Utah’s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 175% in the last 10 years. As petroleum production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of fresh water sources. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that petroleum and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. Researchers have begun efforts to re-map the base of the moderately saline aquifer within the Uinta Basin using more robust data and more sophisticated GIS techniques than previous efforts. Below this base, they believe that saline water can be injected without damage to the overlying freshwater reservoirs. Water chemistry data are being collected from wells of operators and governmental agencies. These ground-truth data are supplemented with water chemistry information calculated from geophysical logs. In addition to the new GIS-based map, the researchers are constructing cross sections showing the stratigraphic position of the moderately saline to very saline transition and its relationship to potential seals and disposal zones in the Uinta Basin. A potentially suitable disposal zone for large volume saline water disposal is the fresh to slightly saline Bird’s-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formation’s Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft above the kerogen-rich Mahogany zone. A significant concern is that saline water disposal into the Bird’s-Nest by conventional gas producers may hinder oil shale development by creating unforeseen economic and technical hurdles. With increased saline water disposal, the water quality in the Bird’s-Nest could degrade and create additional water disposal problems for oil shale development companies. Researchers have examined this aquifer in outcrop, core, and geophysical logs and have gained a better understanding of its areal extent, thickness, and zones of differing water chemistry

32

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Authors: Sean P. Trisch, Wayne D. Pennington, and Roger Turpening, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI. Venue: Seismological Society of America’s annual meeting in Waikaloa, Kona, HI., April 11–13, 2007 Abstract: Imaging of the Earth’s crust is increasingly being accomplished through the use of borehole-based sensors. Experience gained in recent crosswell seismic surveys may assist endeavors to image the near-borehole environment near plate boundaries or other places of scientific interest. A high-resolution crosswell seismic data set was collected over a Silurian (Niagaran) reef in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The survey was optimized for both reflection imaging purposes and the gathering of a wide range of incidence angles. The reflection image was intended to aid in interpretation of the reef structure at a level of detail never before possible with seismic methods. The survey was also conducted to maximize data available for study of the dependence of amplitudes with angle-of-incidence. Prestack angle data were processed to half-degree intervals and utilized for enhanced interpretation of the seismic image through partial stacks and through amplitude variation with angle (AVA) analyses. Frequencies as high as 3,000 Hz (the limit of the source sweep) were recorded, with a predominant signal at about 2,000 Hz; the well separation was 600 m, and the target reef is at 1,400–1,525 m depth. Many of the interfaces present within the area have small reflection amplitudes at narrow angles that increase substantially near the critical angle. Analyses were performed on various interfaces in the seismic section to compare with Zoeppritz-equation solutions, using rock data acquired through an extensive library of seismic and well logging data available for the area. These models were then compared with the actual AVA character acquired at the interface and matched as closely as possible. Through this analysis and match process, various rock property estimates were inferred or refined.

33

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

site Abstract: About 1.5 billion standard cubic feet of CO2 is injected into US oil fields each day, resulting in the recovery of about 200,000 barrels per day of oil, but...

34

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Mohamed Toema (speaker), Sarah Nuss-Warren, and Kirby S. Chapman, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory; James McCarthy and Thomas McGrath, Innovative Environmental Solutions Inc. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: The researchers are conducting a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of field gas-fired four-stroke cycle rich burn engines equipped with non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology. Engine emissions and operating parameters are being monitored on three engines over an extended period. In addition, a mapping study was conducted on one engine. The NSCR was operated at various controlled air-to-fuel (AF) ratios while emission measurements were conducted and engine operating parameters monitored. NOx, CO, and oxygen were measured using both EPA reference method technology and the portable analyzer used in the long-term study. In the mapping study, ammonia, formaldehyde, CO, NOx, and speciated hydrocarbon emissions were recorded in real-time using an extractive FTIR system. This paper focuses on the engine mapping phase. The mapping tests demonstrated a trade-off between NOx emissions and CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbon emissions. Richer engine operation (lower AF) decreases NOx emissions at the expense of higher CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbons. Leaner operation has the opposite effect. The results to date of the semi-continuous monitoring are presented in a separate paper.

35

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults...

36

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques to Determine Potential Oil-Prone Areas in the Mississippian Leadville Limestone, Northern Paradox Basin, Utah...

37

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

possibility. This view began to change in recent years with the realization that this unconventional resource could possibly be developed with existing conventional oil and gas...

38

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to provide lean injection gas for reservoir energy, to provide fuel for potential viscous oil thermal recovery, or to supplement future export gas. The associated fresh water...

39

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Geology, Mining, and Minerals. Venue: Society of Petroleum Engineers Asia Pacific Oil & Gas Conference in Jakarta, Indonesia, October 30November 1, 2007 (http:...

40

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Kirby S. Chapman (speaker), Mohamed Toema, and Sarah Nuss-Warren, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: This paper describes work on a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology, including a catalyst and air-to-fuel ratio controller (AFRC), applied to four-stroke cycle rich-burn engines. Emissions and engine data were collected semi-continuously with a portable emissions analyzer on three engines in the Four Corners area. In addition, periodic emissions measurements that included ammonia were conducted several times. Data collected from October 2007 through August 2008 show significant variation in emissions levels over hours, days, and longer periods of time, as well as seasonal variation. As a result of these variations, simultaneous control of NOx to below a few hundred parts per million (ppm) and CO to below 1,000 ppm volumetric concentration was not consistently achieved. Instead, the NSCR/AFRC systems were able to simultaneously control both species to these levels for only a fraction of the time the engines were monitored. Both semi-continuous emissions data and periodically collected emissions data support a NOx-CO trade-off and a NOx-ammonia tradeoff in NSCR-equipped engines.

42

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates Authors:...

43

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final Report Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County Submitted by: Lea County Government 100 N. Main Lovington, NM 88260 And New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM 87801 Report Authors: Cecilia E. Nelson, Principal Investigator Lea County Government and Ashok Kumar Ghosh, Ph.D., P.E. Principal Researcher, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Report Date: September 20, 2011 Reporting Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United

44

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

project DE-FC26-06NT42950, Harsh-Environment Electronics Packaging for Downhole Oil & Gas Exploration, is to develop new packaging techniques for downhole electronics that...

45

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 1% to a higher level. The success of...

46

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(speaker); Hunter, Robert B., Arctic Slope Regional Corp. Venue: 9th Annual Far North Oil & Gas Forum, Calgary, Alta., November 26-27, 2007 (http:www.insightinfo.com...

47

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of methane from hydrate and associated free-gas accumulations in areas of existing oil and gas infrastructure on the Alaska North Slope. The project will develop and test...

48

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http:www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an...

49

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the fresh to slightly saline Birds-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formations Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft...

50

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Authors: Danielle Lehle and Michael D. Vanden Berg, Utah Geological Survey. Venue: Economic Geology of the Rocky Mountain Region session, May 11, 2009, Geological Society of America-Rocky Mountain Section annual meeting, Orem, Utah, May 11-13, 2009. http://www.geosociety.org/sectdiv/rockymtn/09mtg/index.htm [external site] Abstract: The upper Green River formation’s oil shale deposits located within the Uinta Basin of Utah and the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado contain remarkably similar stratigraphic sequences despite being separated by the Douglas Creek arch. Individual horizons, as well as individual beds, can be traced for hundreds of miles within and between the two basins. However, changes in the topography-controlled runoff patterns between the basins, as well as changes in localized climate conditions throughout upper Green River time, created significant differences between basin-specific deposits. These variations affected the richness and thickness of each oil shale zone, resulting in basin-specific preferred extraction techniques (i.e., in-situ in Colorado and mining/retort in Utah). Colorado’s oil-shale resource was mapped and quantified by the USGS in the late 1970s, whereas this study is the first attempt at quantifying Utah’s overall resource by specific oil shale horizon. This presentation focuses on the Mahogany zone (MZ) and the stratigraphically lower R-6 zone; subsequent work will define other important horizons.

51

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf...

52

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin, Pecos Co. West Texas: comparison with the Barnett Shale...

53

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0000408 Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0000408 Final Report October 2009 - September 2012 Post Retort, Pre Hydro-treat Upgrading of Shale Oil Submitted by: Ceramatec Inc 2425 S. 900 W. Salt Lake City, UT 84119 Prepared by: John H. Gordon, PI Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 25, 2013 Office of Fossil Energy Final Report: October 2009 - September 2012 Ceramatec Inc, 1 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em- ployees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

54

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in shales Natural fractures in shales: Origins, characteristics and relevance for hydraulic fracture treatments Authors: J. F. Gale and J. Holder Venue: 2008 American...

55

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics Application to Methane Hydrates in Natural Systems Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union...

56

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies have provided strong indications that it is possible to produce large volumes of gas from natural hydrate deposits at high rates for long times from gas hydrate...

57

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 (https:www.confmanager.commain.cfm?cid680&nid5792 external site). Abstract: Gas hydrate may contain significant natural gas resources in both onshore arctic and...

58

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from natural gas hydrates, plugging pipelines, stability and safety of drilling of platforms, as well as how dissociation of gas hydrates and sequestration of CO2 within the...

59

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

Unknown

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project This presentation is related to the NETL project DE-FC26-05NT15551, Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production...

62

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis of the composition of volatile hydrocarbons, including methane, ethane, and propane and fixed natural gases (i.e., O2, CO2, and N2+Ar) from headspace void gas and gases...

63

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Authors: D. Xing, NETL; R. Erick, NETL and University of Pittsburgh Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; K. Trickett, J. Eastoe, M. Hollamby, and K.Mutch, Bristol University School of Chemistry; S. Rogers and R. Heenan, ISIS STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK; and D. Steytler, University of East Anglia School of Chemical Sciences, Norwich, UK. Venue: May 20, 2009, ISASF-ENSIC 9th International Symposium on Supercritical Fluids, Bordeaux, France, May 18-20, 2009. http://www.issf2009.cnrs.fr/ [external site] Abstract: About 1.5 billion standard cubic feet of CO2 is injected into US oil fields each day, resulting in the recovery of about 200,000 barrels per day of oil, but the low viscosity of CO2 results in viscous fingering and poor volumetric sweep efficiency. If the viscosity of dense CO2 could be increased by a factor of 2-20, much less CO2 would be required to recover the oil. Further, there would be no need for the injection of alternating slugs of water into the reservoir to reduce the relative permeability of the CO2. Researchers have identified two polymeric thickeners for CO2: a fluoroacrylate-styrene copolymer and a vinyl acetate-styrene copolymer. They have also hypothesized that it is possible to increase the viscosity (thicken) dense, high-pressure CO2 via the self-assembly of CO2-soluble surfactants into rod-like micelles. Three semi-fluorinated surfactants have been synthesized in order to test this concept; one with a monovalent cation and a single twin-tail, Na+1((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1, and two with a divalent cation and two twin-tails, Ni+2(((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1)2 and Co+2(((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1)2. Phase behavior results indicate that all three surfactants are soluble to at least 5 wt% in CO2 at 295K and pressures less than 20 MPa. SANS results indicate that only the surfactants with divalent metal ions and two twin tails form cylindrical micelles in CO2. No viscosity enhancement was detected for the surfactant with the monovalent cation. Falling cylinder viscometry results will illustrate the degree of “CO2 thickening” that was achieved by the formation of rod-like micelles at relatively high shear rates. The mobility of the surfactant solution flowing through Berea sandstone was also provided to determine the effectiveness of the thickener at extremely low shear rates characteristic of enhanced oil recovery projects. The performance of the copolymeric and surfactant thickeners will be compared. The strategy for the development of CO2-soluble non-fluorous surfactants capable of forming rod-like micelles will also be presented.

64

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin, Pecos Co. West Texas: comparison with the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin Authors: Julia F. W. Gale Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: This study describes the several sets of natural fractures in a Barnett Shale core from Pecos County, including partly open fractures, fractures associated with chert layers and early, deformed fractures. These are compared with fractures previously described in the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin. The basic fracture attributes are discussed in terms of their implications for hydraulic fracture treatments. The steep, narrow, calcite-sealed fractures that are present in many Barnett cores in the Fort Worth Basin are important because of their likely tendency to reactivate during hydraulic fracture treatments. Larger open fractures are possibly present, clustered on the order of several hundred feet apart. In the core studied from the Delaware Basin there is evidence that a greater number of narrower fractures may be open. Thus, their importance for completions may be rather different than those in the Fort Worth Basin

65

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Alternative Tri-axial Testing System for CO2-Rock Interaction Experiments An Alternative Tri-axial Testing System for CO2-Rock Interaction Experiments An Alternative Tri-axial Testing System for CO2-Rock Interaction Experiments Authors: Zhengwen Zeng (speaker), Xuejun Zhou, and Hong Liu, University of North Dakota. Venue: 43rd U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium and 4th U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium, Asheville, NC, June 28-July 1, 2009. http://www.armasymposium.org/ [external site] Abstract: Carbon dioxide (CO2)-rock interaction has become an important topic in recent years due to the potential energy and environmental benefits offered by injecting CO2 into deep geological formations for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and carbon sequestration. In both cases, CO2 reacts with formation rocks under deep geological formation conditions. The reaction will change the petrophysical, geomechanical, and geochemical properties of the rock. Consequently, rock integrity and fluid flow characteristics will be changed. How to quantitatively describe this CO2-rock interaction process is critical to the success of both EOR and sequestration projects. Experimental investigation under reservoir conditions is a direct way to develop the quantitative models to describe this process. This type of experiment involves real-time measurements for petrophysical, geomechanical, and geochemical parameters. Existing tri-axial testing systems can meet part of the requirements. An alternative triaxial testing system has been developed for this purpose. This paper introduces the principles, measurements, data processing, and the calibration and verification of the system

66

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Technologies Oil and Natural Gas Supply Oil and natural gas are the lifeblood of our economy, accounting for more than 60 percent of the energy consumed in the United...

67

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Author: Bruce W. Ohme, Honeywell Inc., Plymouth, MN. Venue: HITEN 2007 (High-Temperature Electronics Network conference), St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, U.K., September 17–19, 2007, (http://science24.com/event/hiten2007 [external site]). Abstract: Electronics are used in modern oil and gas exploration to collect, log, and/or process data such as heading and inclination, weight on the bit, vibration, seismic/acoustic response, temperature, pressure, radiation, and resistivity of the strata. High-temperature electronics are needed that can operate reliably in deep-well conditions (up to 250oC). Under its Deep Trek program, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded two projects led by Honeywell. The first project, launched in 2003 and being completed this year, established a production-level integrated circuit manufacturing process, components, and design tools specifically targeting high-temperature environments (up to 250oC). The second project, launched in 2006 and expected to be completed in 2008, will develop rugged packaging suitable for downhole shock and vibration levels that will be used to house and demonstrate components developed in the earlier project. This paper will describe updated results from both of these projects, including previously unreported results obtained from prototype testing of a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC); a high-temperature, single-poly, floating-gate EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory); and a 12-bit, successive-approximation ADC. Also, a multi-chip module being developed as a complete downhole processing unit will be discussed

68

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synergy among Surfactants in Solution Synergy among Surfactants in Solution Synergy among Surfactants in Solution and on Particles in Suspensions Authors: Shaohua Lu and Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University, New York, NY. Venue: 81st ACS (American Chemical Society) Colloid & Surface Science Symposium, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, June 24–27, 2007 (http://www.engr.udel.edu/Colloids2007/) [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant mixtures are widely used in detergent, personal care, enhanced oil recovery, and flotation applications. Adsorption of nonionic/cationic/anionic (ex: n-dodecyl-â-D-maltoside(DM), and sodium dodecyl sulfonate) on solids such as alumina was studied in this work at different solution conditions of pH, mixing ratio and salt contents along with the wettability and zeta potential. Solution interactions were studied by analytical ultracentrifuge, surface tension, small-angle neutron scattering, and cryoTEM. It was found that surfactant adsorption is dramatically affected under certain pH conditions. The effects of pH, however, are reduced by synergistic interactions in the case of nonionic/anionic mixtures. Surface tension results reveal a negative interaction parameter, suggesting that there are synergistic interactions between them. Importantly, only one peak indicative of one type of micelle was identified using analytical ultracentrifugation in the case of the above anionic/nonionic mixtures, while two types of aggregates were observed in the case of nonionic/nonionic mixtures. The above information on surfactant aggregation helps to reveal the mechanisms of interactions between surfactants, as well as their efficient application in various industrial processes.

69

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-hydrate concentration and uncertainty estimation from electrical resistivity logs: examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico Gas-hydrate concentration and uncertainty estimation from electrical resistivity logs: examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico Carbon isotope evidence (13C and 14C) for fossil methane-derived dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps Authors: Pohlman, J.W. (speaker), Coffin, R.B., and Osburn, C.L., U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Bauer, J.E., College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Venue: Goldschmidt 2007 Atoms to Planets conference in Cologne, Germany, August 19-24, 2007 http://www.the-conference.com/conferences/2007/gold2007/ [external site]. Abstract: No abstract available yet. Related NETL Project: The proposed research of the related NETL project DE-AI26-05NT42496, “Conducting Scientific Studies of Natural Gas Hydrates to Support the DOE Efforts to Evaluate and Understand Methane Hydrates,” is to conduct scientific studies of natural gas hydrates to support DOE efforts to evaluate and understand methane hydrates, their potential as an energy resource, and the hazard they may pose to ongoing drilling efforts. This project

70

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Authors: J. Phirani. & K. K. Mohanty Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.ichg.org/showcontent.aspx?MenuID=287 [external site]. Abstract: Large quantities of natural gas hydrate are present in marine sediments. This research is aimed at assessing production of natural gas from these deposits. We had developed a multiphase, multicomponent, thermal, 3D simulator in the past, which can simulate production of hydrates both in equilibrium and kinetic modes. Four components (hydrate, methane, water and salt) and five phases (hydrate, gas, aqueous-phase, ice and salt precipitate) are considered in the simulator. The intrinsic kinetics of hydrate formation or dissociation is considered using the Kim–Bishnoi model. Water freezing and ice melting are tracked with primary variable switch method (PVSM) by assuming equilibrium phase transition. In this work, we simulate depressurization and warm water flooding for hydrate production in a hydrate reservoir underlain by a water layer. Water flooding has been studied as a function of well spacing, well orientation, and injection temperature. Results show that depressurization is limited by the supply of heat of hydrate formation. Warm water flooding can supply this heat of formation. Gas production rate is higher for the water flooding than depressurization. Optimum configuration for wells and water temperature are identified.

71

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics – Application to Methane Hydrates in Natural Systems Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2008 – Special Session H06: Particle Tracking Simulation of Fluid Flow and Mass Transport. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm08/ Abstract: A discrete element model is presented for the simulation, at the grain scale, of gas migration in brine-saturated deformable media. The model rigorously accounts for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating grain forces due to pore fluid pressures, and surface tension between fluids. The coupled model permits investigating an essential process that takes place at the base of the hydrate stability zone: the upward migration of methane in its own free gas phase. The ways in which gas migration may take place were elucidated: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium; and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. Results indicate that the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment is the grain size, and that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding hydrates in natural systems. The results predict that, in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins that follow a fracture-network pattern, and the hydrate concentration in this type of accumulations will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with field observations of methane hydrates in natural

72

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Authors: Fred Sabins, Kevin Edgely, and Larry Watters, CSI Technologies, LLC, Houston, TX. Venue: 2007 Drilling Engineering Association Workshop, Moody Gardens Hotel, Galveston, TX, June 19-20, 2007 (http://www.dea-global.org) [external site]). Abstract: Successful laboratory and field testing of Ultra-Seal® R and Pre-Stressed Cement will be presented. The application of these materials can dramatically reduce the costs of re-establishing annular seal integrity in deep, hot wells, thereby significantly lowering life-cycle well costs. CSI Technologies chose two cement types for further field testing in the third phase of the project to develop a “supercement” for work in high-temperature/high-pressure (HT/HP) wells. HT/HP wells often encounter problems with isolation of production zones due to cement failures. This can result in expensive repair jobs and costly shut-ins of high-volume wells. CSI determined that resin and magnesium oxide cements showed very good mechanical properties and bonding characteristics and are controllable at HT/HP conditions. The resin cement has been used successfully in more than 50 field plugging jobs and in one HT/HP squeeze job. CSI developed a second supercement formulation that is Portland cement- based and functions by generating substantial expansion during the curing process. This material functions in the confined wellbore environment by developing significant cement matrix compressive stress during cure, resulting in a compressive pre-load. In practice, the compressive pre-load functions to elevate the effective tensile strength of the material because the compressive stress must be relieved before the material can experience tensile stress. Additionally, the pre-load functions to keep the material tightly bound to the wellbore tubulars, thereby reducing the tendency of repeated stress cycles to form a microannulus.

73

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Authors: Mark Wassell, Martin Cobern, Carl Perry, Jason Barbely, and Daniel Burgess, APS Technology, Inc. Venue: Drilling Engineering Association’s 2007 DEA Workshop in Galveston, TX, June 19-20, 2007 Abstract: Testing of an active drilling vibration damper (AVD) system at TerraTek Laboratory, under conditions designed to induce vibration, demonstrated that the use of the AVD reduced vibration, maintained more consistent weight-on-bit, and increased rate of penetration (ROP). These tests demonstrated that the AVD is likely to provide significant time and cost savings, particularly in deep wells. The results of these tests will be outlined. Related NETL Project: The goal of the related NETL project DE-FC26-02NT41664, “Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System,” is to improve ROP and reduce the incidence of premature equipment failures in deep hard rock drilling environments by reducing harmful drillstring vibration.

74

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (OTC 19672) Authors: Jonny Rutqvist (speaker), George J. Moridis, and Tarun Grover Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: This study investigated coupled multiphase flow, themal, thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of oceanic Hydrate Bearing Sediments (HBS), during depressurization-induced gas production in general, and potential wellbore in-stability and casing deformation in particular. The project investigated the geomechanical changes and wellbore stability for two alternative cases of production using a horizontal well in a Class 3 deposit and a vertical well in a Class 2 deposit. The research compared the geomechanical responses and the potential adverse geomechanical effects for the two different cases. Analysis shows that geomechanical responses during depressurization-induced gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits is driven by the reservoir-wide pressure decline (Delta P), which in turn is controlled by the induced pressure decline near the wellbore. Because any change quickly propagates within the entire reservoir, the reservoir wide geomechanical response can occur within a few days of production induced pressure decline.

75

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand (OTC 19536) Authors: Timothy J. Kneafsey (speaker), Yongkoo Seol, Arvind Gupta, and Liviu Tomutsa Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] Abstract: Methane hydrate was formed in moist sand under confining stress in a long, x-ray transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane hydrate saturations. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes, caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas permeability was measured in each test for dry sand, moist sand, frozen sand, and hydrate-bearing sand. Results of these measurements are presented. Water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing sand, and the changes in water saturation were observed using CT scanning. Inverse modeling will be performed using these data to extend the relative permeability measurements

76

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Authors: Maša Prodanovic (speaker), Javad Behseresht, Yao Peng, Steven L. Bryant, Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: A spectrum of behavior is encountered in methane hydrate provinces, especially ocean sediments, ranging from essentially static accumulations where the pore space is filled with hydrate and brine, to active seeps where hydrate and methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). The grain-scale models of drainage and fracturing presented demonstrate key processes involved in pressure-driven gas phase invasion of a sediment. A novel extension of invasion percolation to infinite-acting, physically representative networks is used to evaluate the connectivity of water in a gas-drained sediment. A novel implementation of the level set method (LSM) is used to determine the capillarity-controlled displacement of brine by gas from sediment and from fractures within the sediment. The discrete element method (DEM) is extended to model the coupling between the pore fluids and the solid, and thereby predict the onset of sediment fracturing by gas phase pressure under in situ loading conditions. The DEM grain mechanics model accounts for the different pressure of brine and methane gas in a “membrane” two-fluid model. The fluid-fluid configuration from LSM can be mapped directly to the pore space in DEM, thereby coupling the drainage and mechanics models. The type of behavior that can emerge from the coupled processes is illustrated with an extended LSM model. The extension computes grain displacement by the gas phase with a simple kinematic rule.

77

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone: Modeling Multiphase Flow and Sediment Mechanics at the Pore-Scale Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2008 – Special Session H06: Particle Tracking Simulation of Fluid Flow and Mass Transport. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm08/ Abstract: Two competing processes were simulated, capillary invasion and fracture opening, by which free methane gas penetrates the Hydrate Stability Zone (HSZ). In situ conditions were predicted in which the methane propagates fractures and flows all the way through the HSZ and into the ocean, bypassing hydrate formation. In the fully coupled model, the discrete element method was used to simulate the sediment mechanics, and pore fluid pressures and surface tension between the gas and brine were accounted for by incorporating additional sets of pressure forces and adhesion forces. Results indicate that given enough capillary pressure, the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport is the grain size, and show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion and widespread hydrate formation, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain sediments. The fracturing threshold was calculated as a function of grain size, capillary pressure, and seafloor depth, and place these results in the context of naturally-occurring hydrate

78

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) during hydrate formation and loading tests (OTC 19559) Authors: Seiji Nakagawa (speaker), Timothy J. Kneafsey, and George J. Moridis Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] Abstract: An on-going effort on conducting laboratory triaxial compression tests on synthetic methane hydrate-bearing sediment cores is presented. Methane hydrate is formed within a sand pack inside a test cell under controlled temperature and confining stress, and triaxial compression tests are performed while monitoring seismic properties. A unique aspect of the experiment is that the formation and dissociation of hydrate in a sediment core, and the failure of the sample during loading tests, can be monitored in real time using both seismic waves and x-ray CT imaging. For this purpose, a specially designed triaxial (geomechanical) test cell was built. This cell allows for conducting seismic wave measurements on a sediment core using compressional and shear (torsion) waves. Concurrently, CT images can be obtained through an x-ray-transparent cell wall. These are used to determine the porosity distribution within a sample owing to both original sand packing and formation of hydrate in the pore space. For interpreting the results from both seismic measurements and geomechanical tests, characterization of sample heterogeneity can be critically important. In this paper, the basic functions of the test cell are presented, with the results of preliminary experiments using non-hydrate bearing sandpack and sandstone core. These measurements confirmed that (1) clear x-ray images of gas-fluid boundaries within a sediment/rock core can be obtained through a thick aluminum test cell wall, (2) the test cell functions correctly during loading tests, and (3) both compressional and shear waves can be measured during a loading test. Further experiments using methane-hydrate-bearing samples will be presented at the conference

79

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Authors: George J. Moridis, Jonny Rutqvist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Venue: 2007 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 30–May 1, 2007 (http://www.otcnet.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The thermal and mechanical loading of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and a significant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences on the integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and the bounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled with insufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence of predictive capabilities, has resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBS when locating offshore production platforms. These factors can also impede the development of hydrate deposits as gas resources. For the analysis of the geomechanical stability of HBS, project researchers developed and used a numerical model that integrates a commercial geomechanical code into a simulator describing the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transport, and thermodynamic behavior in geologic media. The geomechanical code includes elastoplastic models for quasi-static yield and failure analysis and viscoplastic models for time-dependent (creep) analysis. The hydrate simulator can model the non-isothermal hydration reactions (equilibrium or kinetic), phase behavior, and flow of fluids and heat in HBS, and can handle any combination of hydrate dissociation mechanisms. The simulations can account for the interdependence of changes in the hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical properties of the HBS, in addition to swelling/shrinkage, displacement (subsidence), and possible geomechanical failure. Researchers investigated in three cases the coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS systems. The first involves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper, conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting the HBS. The second case involves mechanical loading caused by the weight of structures placed on HBS at the ocean floor, and the third describes system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit. The results indicate that the stability of HBS in the vicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially near the ocean floor where the sediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Conversely, the increased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floor increases the stability of hydrates, while gas production from oceanic deposits minimally affects the geomechanical stability of HBS under the conditions that are deemed desirable for production.

80

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Authors: Paul La Pointe, FracMan Technology Group, Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA; Robert D. Benson, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; and Claudia Rebne, Legacy Energy, Denver, CO. Venue: American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting in Snowbird, UT, October 7-9, 2007. Abstract: A 3D9C survey was carried out over a 6 square mile portion of the Roadrunner and Towaoc fields on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation in southwestern Colorado. This survey was jointly funded by DOE and the Southern Ute tribe’s Red Willow Corporation to promote development of Ismay algal mound plays in the Paradox Basin within Ute Mountain Tribal lands and elsewhere in the Paradox Basin. Multicomponent data were utilized to better delineate the external mound geometry as well as to estimate internal mound reservoir parameters such as matrix permeability, saturation, and porosity. Simple cross-plotting of various multicomponent attributes against reservoir properties did not provide the desired predictive accuracy, in part due to sub-optimal frequency content in components derived from the shear wave data. However, a multivariate statistical analysis greatly improved the predictive accuracy. These multivariate regressions were then used to prescribe reservoir properties for a static reservoir model, which in turn formed the basis for a dynamic reservoir simulation model of the project area to assess the usefulness of the multivariate relations developed. This poster presentation will illustrate the workflow used to carry out the multivariate modeling, key maps of the reservoir properties that were derived, the static model, and results from the dynamic simulation used to assess the usefulness of the approach. Results from wells drilled based on the seismic data also will be presented.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Authors: Winters, W.J., (U.S. Geological Survey, speaker), Gomes, M., Giosan, L., Johnson, J., Kastner, M., Torres, M.E., Long, P.E., Schaef, H.T., Rose, K., and the NGHP-01 Shipboard Scientific Party. Venue: India’s Directorate General of Hydrocarbons’ International Conference on Gas Hydrates in Nodia (New Delhi), India, February 6–8, 2008 (http://www.dghindia.org/site/pdfattachments/upcomingevents/Updated_Programme_gAS[1].pdf [PDF-external site]). Abstract: The scientific goals of the NGHP Expedition 01 physical properties program are to a) constrain baseline index properties of host sediment; b) ground-truth well-log, seismic, and other shipboard data sets; c) relate textural characteristics to gas hydrate occurrence and small-scale porous media effects; and d) relate index properties and textural analyses to gas hydrate occurrence and regional sedimentologic interpretations. During the shipboard phase of NGHP-01, baseline bulk physical properties, such as water content, grain density, bulk density, and porosity, were determined on more than 1,800 sediment samples from 14 sites located in four study areas. Overall, physical properties change more significantly near the seafloor, then at a much more gradual rate with depth. The transition depth varies between sites but can range from about 12 to as deep as 200 meters beneath the seafloor. In addition, shear strength, electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal conductivity, and acoustic velocity measurements were conducted to further characterize the sediment. These measurements, when combined with sedimentologic and geochemical studies, delineate the role of the host sediment in hydrate formation and occurrence and are used in modeling the response of hydrate-bearing sediment to natural change or drilling operations. Strong correlation typically exists between physical properties determined from shipboard analyses and well-log studies. More than 500 shore-based grain-size analyses have been conducted that indicate that most sediment is characterized as clayey silt to silty clay with a median grain size that is near or slightly greater than the silt-clay boundary. Grain-size analyses are being conducted on samples identified by infrared imaging as having high concentrations of gas hydrate in recovered core samples. These analyses will be used to study porous-media effects and geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in situ.

82

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments Authors: Naehr, T.H., Asper, V., Garcia, O., Kastner, M., Leifer, I., MacDonald, I.R., Solomon, E., Yvon-Lewis, S., and Zimmer, B. Venue: AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19 2008 -- Session OS25: Methane Flux from Naturally Occurring Marine Gas Hydrates http://www.agu.org Abstract: The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 µmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle.

83

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Technology-Based Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are converting previously uneconomic oil and natural gas resources into proved reserves and production. The Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin is a success story of horizontal drilling, fracturing, and completion technologies. The recent, highly productive oil field discoveries within the Bakken Formation did not come from venturing out into deep uncharted waters heretofore untapped by man, nor from blazing a trail into pristine environs never open to drilling before. Instead, success came from analysis of geologic data on a decades-old producing area, identification of uptapped resources, and application of the new drilling and completion technology necessary to exploit them. In short, it came from using technology

84

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approaches (CERA) Related to Hydraulic...

85

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

Unknown

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

Unknown

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY02. Activities were maintained at recent record levels. Strategic planning from multiple sources within the framework of the organization gives PTTC the vision to have even more impact in the future. The Houston Headquarters (HQ) location has strived to serve PTTC well in better connecting with producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database, exhibit at more trade shows and a new E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience. All considered, the PTTC network has proven to be an effective way to reach domestic producers locally, regionally and nationally.

Unknown

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Coalbed Natural Gas Produced-Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead DE-FC26-05NT15551...

89

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback confirms that producers are taking action with the information they receive. RLO Directors captured examples demonstrating how PTTC activities influenced industry activity. Additional follow-up in all regions explored industry's awareness of PTTC and the services it provides. PTTC publishes monthly case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' and monthly Tech Connections columns in the ''American Oil and Gas Reporter''. Email Tech Alerts are utilized to notify the O&G community of DOE solicitations and demonstration results, PTTC key technical information and meetings, as well as industry highlights. Workshop summaries are posted online at www.pttc.org. PTTC maintains an active exhibit schedule at national industry events. The national communications effort continues to expand the audience PTTC reaches. The network of national and regional websites has proven effective for conveying technology-related information and facilitating user's access to basic oil and gas data, which supplement regional and national newsletters. The regions frequently work with professional societies and producer associations in co-sponsored events and there is a conscious effort to incorporate findings from DOE-supported research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects within events. The level of software training varies by region, with the Rocky Mountain Region taking the lead. Where appropriate, regions develop information products that provide a service to industry and, in some cases, generate moderate revenues. Data access is an on-going industry priority, so all regions work to facilitate access to public source databases. Various outreach programs also emanate from the resource centers, including targeted visits to producers.

Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Donald Duttlinger

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

In pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) functions as a cohesive national organization that implements industry's directives through active regional programs. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) organization includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. PTTC relies on 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) as its main program delivery mechanism to industry. Through its regions, PTTC connects with independent oil and gas producers--through technology workshops, resources centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY98, and its strategy for achieving further growth in the future.

Unknown

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

Unknown

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas Supply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Oil and Natural Gas Supply Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Additional Information Onsite operations and water quality testing of the...

96

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

97

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization efficiently has an impact on business economics as the focus remains on proven applicable technologies, which target cost reduction and efficiency gains.

Donald Duttlinger

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FE0001243 FE0001243 Topical Report DEVELOPMENT OF CFD-BASED SIMULATION TOOLS FOR IN SITU THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALE/SANDS Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February 2012 Office of Fossil Energy TOPICAL REPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF CFD_BASED SIMULATION TOOLS FOR IN SITU THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALE/SANDS Authors: Michal Hradisky and Philip J. Smith DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Reporting Period: October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2011 Report Issued: February 2012 Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380

99

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41330  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 (October 2009 - March 2010) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities Principal Author: John T. Balczewski Chevron Energy Technology Company 1400 Smith Street Houston, TX 77002 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2010 Office of Fossil Energy i DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

100

Oil and Natural Gas - Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search NETL Oil and Natural Gas Document Information Oil & Natural Gas Document Repository Results will be shown in two categories. "Document Database Results" provides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

INAL Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010175  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INAL INAL Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010175 Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (Period ending 06/30/2013) PLANNING OF A MARINE METHANE HYDRATE PRESSURE CORING PROGRAM FOR THE WALKER RIDGE AND GREEN CANYON AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Project Period (10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 (suggested 30 March 2014)) Submitted by: Gary D. Humphrey, Project PI Signature Fugro GeoConsulting, Inc DUNS #: 118972301 6100 Hillcroft Houston, TX 77081-1009 e-mail: GHumphrey@Fugro.com Phone number: (713) 369-5600 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Submission Date: July 31, 2013 Executive Summary This research effort will focus on developing a site characterization program for naturally occurring gas

102

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT15458  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NT15458 NT15458 Final Report Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood Submitted by: Darrel Schmitz, Lewis R. Brown, F. Leo Lynch (posthumous), Brenda L. Kirkland, Krystal M. Collins, and William K. Funderburk Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Geosciences Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 39762 Denbury Resources, Inc. 5320 Legacy Drive Plano, TX 75024 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of

103

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41330  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R19 R19 (April 2010 - September 2010) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities Principal Author: John T. Balczewski Chevron Energy Technology Company 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road, CHVPKD San Ramon, CA 94583 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 2010 Office of Fossil Energy i DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

104

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41330  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project...

105

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report DEVELOPMENT OF CFD-BASED SIMULATION TOOLS FOR IN SITU THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALESANDS Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155...

106

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12152012 DE-FE0003537 Goal...

107

Sesamol: a natural antioxidant for frying oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn what factors limit sesamols effectiveness during frying and how researchers are using multiple technologies to address those factors. Sesamol: a natural antioxidant for frying oil Publications aocs articles book books cdrom cdroms detergent

108

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas the Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas The Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas (OTC 19435) Authors: George J. Moridis (speaker), Matthew T. Reagan, and Keni Zhang Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: Recent numerical studies have provided strong indications that it is possible to produce large volumes of gas from natural hydrate deposits at high rates (in excess of 10 MMSCFD) for long times by depressurization-induced dissociation of hydrates. Of the various factors that can adversely affect the production potential of hydrates, low temperatures have one of the strongest negative impacts. These can be caused by low initial temperatures, increasing stability of the hydrate (as defined by the deviation between the temperature of the deposit and the equilibrium temperature at the reservoir pressure), and by an advanced stage of dissociation (a strongly endothermic reaction) when substantial amounts of hydrates remain. The reasons for the production decline include a reduction in the rate of the hydrate dissociation at lower temperatures and the evolution of flow restrictions in the vicinity of the well caused by the formation of hydrate and/or ice in the vicinity of the wellbore. The latter is caused by continuous cooling, and is the reason why large amounts of gas that may have been released in the reservoir in the course of earlier dissociation cannot be easily recovered.

109

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef Authors: Brian Toelle, Chaoqing Yang (speaker), and Tracee Imai, Schlumberger Ltd. Venue: Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists 2007 Annual Meeting, Lexington, KY, September 16–18, 2007 (http://www.uky.edu/KGS/esaapg07/ [external site]). Abstract: The Northern Silurian Reef trend of the Michigan Basin was developed within the stratigraphic unit historically referred to as the Niagaran Brown. Within the past few years this unit was renamed the Guelph Formation. Over 700 reefs make up this trend, with some of these being over 300 acres in size and having produced more than 5 million barrels of oil. Estimates of the total amount of hydrocarbons produced for the entire trend have been reported to be as much as nearly a half a billion barrels. The U.S. Department of Energy has funded a study of an ongoing enhanced oil recovery project being conducted on a reef within this trend and entailing CO2 injection. The Charlton 30/31 reef, located in Otsego County, MI, like many other reefs in the play, was discovered and developed during the 1970s and 1980s. This field has completed its primary production phase, during which six wells produced 2.6 million of the field’s estimated 7 million barrels of oil in place. This reservoir is characterized as a low-porosity, low-permeability limestone matrix with irregular dolomitized intervals providing a secondary network of higher porosity and permeability, which controls fluid flow throughout the reservoir. The estimated average porosity in this reef is just slightly over 6 percent. As part of this study, the reservoir attributes identified at the Charlton 30/31 reef were extended to the entire Northern Reef Trend in order to determine its CO2 sequestration capacity. Additionally, the potential oil recovery has been estimated.

110

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques to Determine Potential Oil-Prone Areas in the Mississippian Leadville Limestone, Northern Paradox Basin, Utah Authors: David E. Eby, Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr., and Craig D. Morgan Venue: Rocky Mountain Section AAPG Conference, Colorado Convention Center, July 9-11, 2008, http://www.aapg.org/ Abstract: Potential oil-prone areas for the Mississippian Leadville Limestone were identified in the northern Paradox Basin (Paradox fold and fault belt), Utah, based on hydrocarbon shows using low-cost epifluorescence techniques. The trapping mechanisms for Leadville producing fields are usually anticlines bounded by large, basement-involved normal faults. Epifluorescence microscopy is a technique used to provide information on diagenesis, pore types, and organic matter (including “live” hydrocarbons) within sedimentary rocks. It is a rapid, non-destructive procedure that uses a petrographic microscope equipped with reflected-light capabilities, a Hg-vapor light, and appropriate filtering.

111

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Authors: C.J. Rawn, R. Sassen, S.M. Ulrich, E.A. Payzant, B.C. Chakoumakos, and T.J. Phelps Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates, Fairmont Hotel, Vancouver, Canada July 6-10, 2008. http://www.icgh.org/ [external site]. Abstract: Clathrate hydrates of methane and other small alkanes occur widespread as terrestrial components in marine sediments of the continental margins and in permafrost sediments of the arctic. Quantitative study of natural clathrate hydrates is hampered by the difficulty in obtaining pristine samples, particularly from submarine environments. Bringing samples of clathrate hydrate from the seafloor at depths without compromising their integrity is not trivial. Most physical property measurements are based on studies of laboratory-synthesized samples. Here we report x-ray powder diffraction measurements of a natural gas hydrate sample from the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The first data were collected in 2002 and revealed ice and structure II gas hydrate. In the subsequent time the sample has been stored in liquid nitrogen. Recently new x-ray powder diffraction data have been collected as a function of temperature. Rietveld refinements on this new data show that there is approximately 50 wt % gas hydrate with structure type II and 50% ice at -140, -130, -115, -100, and -85oC. The Rietveld refinements on the data sets collected at -70 and -55oC show the amount of structure type II hydrate decreasing to approximately 40% and 37%, respectively. The Rietveld refinement of the data set collected at -40oC shows a sharp decrease in the amount of structure type II hydrate to approximately 9%. Rietveld refinements on the data sets collected at -25 and -10oC indicated that the structure type II hydrate is still present at 7 and 3%, respectively

112

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Unified Imaging Procedure for 2-D Land Multichannel Seismic Data a Unified Imaging Procedure for 2-D Land Multichannel Seismic Data Towards a Unified Imaging Procedure for 2-D Land Multichannel Seismic Data Authors: Jaiswal, Priyank, Zelt, C.A., Rice University, and Dasgupta, R., Oil India Limited Venue: 70th EAGE Conference and Exhibition, Rome, Italy, June 11-14, 2008 (http://www.eage.org/events/index.php?eventid=57&Opendivs=s2 [external site). Abstract: This project demonstrates that imaging of 2-D multichannel seismic data can be effectively accomplished by a combination of travel-time inversion and pre-stack depth migration (PSDM); this combined method is referred to as unified imaging. Unified imaging begins with inversion of direct arrivals for estimating a velocity model that is used in static corrections and stacking velocity analysis. The interval velocity model (from stacking velocities) is used for PSDM. The stacked data and the PSDM image are interpreted for common horizons and the corresponding wide-aperture reflections are identified in the shot gathers. Using the interval velocity model the stack interpretations are inverted as zero-offset reflections for constraining the corresponding interfaces in depth; the interval velocity model is maintained stationary. A coefficient of congruence, j, is defined which measures the discrepancy between the horizons from the PSDM image and their counterparts from the zero-offset inversion. A value of unity for j implies that the interpreted and inverted horizons are consistent to within the interpretational uncertainties and the unified imaging is said to have converged at this point. For j greater than unity, the interval velocity model and the horizon depths are updated by jointly inverting the direct arrivals with the zero-offset and the wide-aperture reflections. The updated interval velocity model is used again for both PSDM and zero-offset inversion. Interpretations of the new PSDM image are the updated horizons depths. The unified imaging is applied to seismic data from the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India. Wide-aperture and zero-offset data from three geologically significant horizons are used. Three runs of joint inversion and PSDM are required in a cyclic manner for j to converge to unity. A joint interpretation of the final velocity model and the final depth image reveal the presence of a triangle zone that appears to be promising for exploration.

113

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

114

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry in protecting our environment while exploring for and producing natural gas and oil. They are joined by Anadarko and other industry sponsors from GPRI to identify and...

115

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil through specific project efforts...

116

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a computerized database inventory of compressor engines used in the oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) industry. This database will be used to evaluate...

117

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Transmission, Distribution, & Refining The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative DE-NT-0004654 Goal The goal of the Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI)...

118

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy...

119

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuels Combined; Could Ensure Decades of Affordable Natural Gas and Cut America's Foreign Oil Dependence April 25, 2012 Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for...

120

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and technological support system for water resources planning and management related to oil and gas development on the North Slope of Alaska. Such a system will aid in developing...

122

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach Last Reviewed 2172012 DE-FC26-06NT42937 Goal The primary goal of...

123

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

124

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Natural Gas Projects & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approaches (CERA) Related to Hydraulic Fracturing and Geologic Sequestration of CO2 Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 DE-FE0000880 Goal The goal of this project is to enhance the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) by adding new components relevant to environmental topics associated with hydraulic fracturing (HF), and by management of myriad data regarding oil and natural gas well histories, brine disposal, production, enhanced recovery, reporting, stripper wells, and other operations to enhance the protection of ground water resources. The FracFocus website will be maintained to ensure transparent reporting of HF additives. A

125

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Data Series: Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 ...

126

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology’s Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level Technology’s Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level DE-FC26-06NT15567 Goal The goal of the project is to assist State governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil through specific project efforts to address current issues. The issues addressed are national in scope. However, significant regional differences among States make “one-size-fits-all” programs unacceptable. One of the strengths of IOGCC is its ability to address these national issues while maintaining more local flexibility. There are two basic thrusts of these efforts: 1) research and 2) transfer of findings to appropriate constituencies. IOGCC is carrying out three projects consistent with the overarching strategies:

127

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research on...

128

"U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Summary Data Tables, 2011" "Contents" "Table 1: Changes to Proved Reserves, 2011" "Table 2: Principal Tight Oil Plays: Oil...

129

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MN 55441 Background Electronic data acquisition systems are necessary to make deep oil and gas drilling and production cost effective, yet the basic electronic components...

130

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of shallow reservoirs. This makes Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Little is known about how to produce conventional oil...

131

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be exported to other CBM areas in the US. Benefits The opportunity to resolve the oil and gas industrys growing problem with producing, handling, and treating produced...

132

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corbicula fluminea), and surveys of the resident invertebrate community (both at the oil production site of the submerged former brine pit site and a reference site. . Both the...

133

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data integration for improved reservoir characterization. The overall goal is additional oil recovery by locating critical reservoir features such as flow channels, barriers, and...

134

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 662013 DE-08NT0005643 Goal The goal of this project is to determine the geomechanical properties...

135

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 DE-NT0005683 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a general scientific, engineering, and technological support system for water resources planning and management related to oil and gas development on the North Slope of Alaska. Such a system will aid in developing solutions to economic, environmental, and cultural concerns. Performers University of Alaska Fairbanks Systems, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7880 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 PBS&J, Inc., Marietta, GA 30067 Background Alaska’s North Slope hosts a phenomenal wealth of natural, cultural, and economic resources. It represents a complex system, not only in terms of its biophysical system and global importance, but also from the standpoint

136

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stripper Well Consortium Stripper Well Consortium DE-FC26-00NT41025 Goal: The goal is to enhance the ability of the domestic production industry to keep stripper wells producing at economic production rates in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. Objective: The objective is to develop and manage an industry-driven consortium that provides a cost-efficient vehicle for developing, transferring, and deploying new technologies into the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy Institute) - Project management Accomplishments: Established a consortium governing structure, constitution and bylaws, Established areas of research focus (reservoir remediation and characterization, well bore cleanup, and surface systems optimization) and rules for proposal submission and selection, and

137

Oil and Water Dispersion Technology Licensing Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Water Dispersion Technology Licensing Opportunity Technology Brief Professor Richard can be achieved by the process of degassing. The removal of dissolved gas, for example in oil dispersions. While laboratory scale degassing is predominantly batch processed and time consuming, Professor

138

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2011 and 2012, more than 50% of new wells produced both oil and natural gas. Despite this phenomenon, many traditional methods for estimating oil and natural gas ...

139

Hurricane effects on oil and natural gas production depend on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

140

Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY Based on the finding of a growing potential...

142

Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-19. Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

143

Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-20. Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

144

Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-22. Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

145

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

146

Volatility in natural gas and oil markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

Meyer, R.F.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska Last Reviewed 3272013 DE-FC26-08NT0005641...

149

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probabilistic, Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems DE-FC26-06NT42930 Goal The project goal is the development...

150

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a component that can efficiently operate at temperatures of 275oC can greatly extend the exploration and operations of the oil industry to deeper reservoirs with higher...

151

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

With the arrival of snow, modes of travel, working, and living are transformed. Oil and gas exploration operations restricted to winter months use ice roads and ice pads in arctic...

152

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will benefit a wide range of industries, as well as the primary stakeholders within the oil and gas industry. Significant gas resources in the U.S. are in deep, HTHP reservoirs. A...

153

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

272012 DE-NT0006556 Goal The objective of this project is to develop improved chemical oil recovery options for the Ugnu reservoir overlying the Milne Point unit in North Slope,...

154

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to...

155

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harsh Environment Electronics Packaging for Downhole Oil & Gas Exploration DE-FC26-06NT42950 Goal The goal is to develop new packaging techniques for downhole electronics that will...

156

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Fourth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABSTRACT This fourth Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation report details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and...

157

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers...

158

Oil shale: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 5:41pm Addthis Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. If you plan to buy a new heating system, ask your local utility or state energy office about the latest technologies on the market. For example, many newer models have designs for burners and heat exchangers that are more efficient during operation and cut heat loss when the equipment is off. Consider a sealed-combustion furnace -- they are safer and more efficient. Long-Term Savings Tip Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels to compare efficiency and

160

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 DE-08NT0005643 Goal The goal of this project is to determine the geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota, and use these results to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in order to improve the ultimate recovery of this vast oil resource. Performer University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7134 Background Compared to the success of producing crude oil from the Bakken Formation in eastern Montana, the horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation technology applied in western North Dakota has been less successful, thus requiring the development of new completion and fracturing technologies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd EditionChapter 4 Olive Oil Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Chapter 4 Olive Oil Composition Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press Downlo

162

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

163

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

312013 Next Release Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

164

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

165

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

166

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

167

The Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 2 Introduction Economic theory suggests that natural gas and crude oil prices should be related ...

168

Technology drives natural gas production growth from shale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... Rapid increases in natural gas production from shale gas formations resulted from widespread application ...

169

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probabilistic, Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems Probabilistic, Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems DE-FC26-06NT42930 Goal The project goal is the development of modules for a web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas exploration and production companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of oil and gas reserves in sensitive areas in the Fayetteville Shale Play in central Arkansas. This decision support tool will rely on creation of a database of existing exploration and production (E&P) technologies that are known to have low ecosystem impact. Performers University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas

170

FE Oil and Natural Gas News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

oil-natural-gas-news Office of Fossil Energy Forrestal oil-natural-gas-news Office of Fossil Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585202-586-6503 en Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-authorizes-additional-volume-proposed-freeport-lng-facility-export Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas

171

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

eia/doe-021698, natural gas, crude oil, natural gas liquids reserves. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 Annual Report. Special Files.

172

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

173

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 4, 2012 January 4, 2012 DOE-Sponsored Online Mapping Portal Helps Oil and Gas Producers Comply with New Mexico Compliance Rules An online mapping portal to help oil and natural gas operators comply with a revised New Mexico waste pit rule has been developed by a team of New Mexico Tech researchers. December 21, 2011 DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of Unconventional Natural Gas Technologies Research projects to study ways for improving the environmental performance of unconventional gas development are being sought by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy. November 22, 2011 DOE Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra-Deepwater The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has selected six

174

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2001 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

175

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2003 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

176

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2000 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

177

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1999 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

178

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

179

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

180

Oil shale technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative project with industrial participants studied oil shale retorting through an integrated program of fundamental research, mathematical model development and operation of a 4-tonne-per-day solid recirculation oil shale test unit. Quarterly, project personnel presented progress and findings to a Project Guidance Committee consisting of company representatives and DOE program management. We successfully operated the test unit, developed the oil shale process (OSP) mathematical model, evaluated technical plans for process scale up and determined economics for a successful small scale commercial deployment, producing premium motor fuel, specility chemicals along with electricity co-production. In budget negotiations, DOE funding for this three year CRADA was terminated, 17 months prematurely, as of October 1993. Funds to restore the project and continue the partnership have not been secured.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 5. International Oil and Natural Gas Reserves as of December ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5. International Oil and Natural Gas Reserves as of December 31, 2001 Oil (million barrels) Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) Oil & Gas World Oil & Gas World

182

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health

183

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. July 30, 2009 DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and

184

Oil Bypass filter technology evaluation final report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-01355 6-01355 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report TECHNICAL REPORT Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding March 2006 Idaho National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-06-01355 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding March 2006 Idaho National Laboratory Transportation Technology Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517

185

New and Underutilized Technology: Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic Bearing Compressors New and Underutilized Technology: Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic Bearing Compressors October 4, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis The...

186

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale...

187

The Weak Tie Between Natural Gas and Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several recent studies establish that crude oil and natural gas prices are cointegrated, so that changes in the price of oil appear to translate into changes in the price of natural gas. Yet at times in the past, and very ...

Ramberg, David J.

188

Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 5:41pm Addthis Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term....

189

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery DE-FC26-03NT15413 Project Goal The overall objective of this project is to understand the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions of reservoir minerals and their dissolved species with externally added reagants (surfactants/polymers) and their effects on solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties, such as adsorption, wettability, and interfacial tension. A further goal is to devise schemes to control these interactions in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the type and nature of different minerals in oil reservoirs. Performer Columbia University, New York, NY Background

191

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado DE-FG26-02NT15451 Project Goal The project is designed to: Promote development of both discovered and undiscovered oil reserves contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, and Navaho native-controlled lands. Promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American oil exploration corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other tribes. Develop the most cost-effective approach to using non-invasive seismic imaging to reduce the risk in exploration and development of algal mound reservoirs on surrounding Native American lands.

192

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals...

193

Solar technology applications to enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

One possible near-term application for solar thermal technologies is the production of steam which could be pumped underground to increase the amount of petroleum which could be recovered from an oil field. This work compares 2 types of solar thermal technologies - solar troughs and central receivers - with conventional means of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) to determine, first, if solar technologies offer a viable EOR option and, second, how they compare with other steam-drive EOR alternatives. It analyzes these options from the technical, economic, institutional, and environmental perspectives. The work concludes that solar EOR is not an economically attractive alternative, largely due to existing technical uncertainties; possible environmental benefits do not appear to be a driving consideration; finally, tax incentives rather than government demonstration programs would seem to be the most effective means of encouraging solar EOR technology. 44 references.

Deleon, P.; Brown, K.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds,Volume 1 Olive Oil in the World Market, Composition, Quality, Oil Seed Extraction Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Food Science acid agricultural analysis analytical aocs april articles biotechnology c

195

Innovative technologies for managing oil field waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, the oil industry generates millions of barrels of wastes that need to be properly managed. For many years, most oil field wastes were disposed of at a significant cost. However, over the past decade, the industry has developed many processes and technologies to minimize the generation of wastes and to more safely and economically dispose of the waste that is generated. Many companies follow a three-tiered waste management approach. First, companies try to minimize waste generation when possible. Next, they try to find ways to reuse or recycle the wastes that are generated. Finally, the wastes that cannot be reused or recycled must be disposed of. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) has evaluated the feasibility of various oil field waste management technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy. This paper describes four of the technologies Argonne has reviewed. In the area of waste minimization, the industry has developed synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs) that have the desired drilling properties of oil-based muds without the accompanying adverse environmental impacts. Use of SBMs avoids significant air pollution from work boats hauling offshore cuttings to shore for disposal and provides more efficient drilling than can be achieved with water-based muds. Downhole oil/water separators have been developed to separate produced water from oil at the bottom of wells. The produced water is directly injected to an underground formation without ever being lifted to the surface, thereby avoiding potential for groundwater or soil contamination. In the area of reuse/recycle, Argonne has worked with Southeastern Louisiana University and industry to develop a process to use treated drill cuttings to restore wetlands in coastal Louisiana. Finally, in an example of treatment and disposal, Argonne has conducted a series of four baseline studies to characterize the use of salt caverns for safe and economic disposal of oil field wastes.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Assessment

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Gulf Shale Oil Upgrading Process technology  

SciTech Connect

A description of the Gulf Shale Oil Hydrotreating Process, which is designed for upgrading full range shale oil to premium quality synthetic crude, is presented. The process consists of two sections: a low severity pretreating section which stabilizes the raw oil, removes iron, arsenic, trace metals and particulates, and sulfur; and a twostage, high severity hydrotreating section which completes the upgrading. The second section hydrotreats the bulk oil to a specified nitrogen content, allowing for a quality FCC feedstock in the 650F+ (343C+) residue. The main reactor effluent is flashed with subsequent hydrotreating of the flash vapor oil to achieve a low nitrogen level in the naphtha and middle distillate. The benefit of this flash configuration is hydrogen addition selectivity which maximizes syncrude quality while minimizing overall hydrogen consumption; this selectivity relationship is detailed. Finally, the product quality of the syncrudes produced with the Gulf Shale Oil Hydrotreating Process using shale oils derived from three different retort technologies and for Western and Eastern shales are discussed.

Jones, W.; Antezana, F.J.; Cugini, A.V.; Lyzinski, D.; Miller, J.B.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs DE-FC26-04NT15508 Project Goal The project goal is to provide a methodology that will allow operators of oil reservoirs in carbonate reefs to better image the interior structure of those reservoirs and to identify those areas that contain the most oil remaining after initial production. Performers Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Z-Seis Inc., Houston, TX Results This study provides a significant step forward in reservoir characterization by demonstrating that crosswell seismic imaging can be used over considerable distances to better define features within a reservoir and by showing that pre-stack characteristics of reflection events can be used to reduce ambiguity in determination of lithology and fluid content. Crosswell seismic imaging of the two reefs has provided data that is well beyond any that a reservoir engineer or development geologist has previously had for improved characterization and production.

199

Utilization of Oil Shale Retorting Technology and Underground Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper analyzes the world's oil shale development and status of underground dry distillation technology and, through case studies proved the advantages of underground dry distillation technology. Global oil shale resource-rich, many countries in the ... Keywords: oil shale, ground retorting, underground dry distillation, shale oil, long slope mining

Chen Shuzhao; Guo Liwen; Xiao Cangyan; Wang Haijun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas - Energy Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Natural Gas Supply Oil and Natural Gas Supply Energy Infrastructure NETL's Energy Infrastructure and Security Research Group (EISRG) has a key supporting role in emergency preparedness and response. The EISRG develops high-level analytical visualizations that are used to study critical U.S. energy infrastructures and their inter-relationships during natural and manmade emergencies. By deploying resources and providing vital information in a timely manner, EISRG improves the ability of government agencies and the energy sector to prevent, prepare for, and respond to hazards, emergencies, natural disasters, or any other threat to the nation's energy supply. NETL coordinated and provided information on an ongoing basis during every major landfall event of the 2005 hurricane season , including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as during Hurricanes Charley, Frances, and Ivan in 2004. NETL also has participated in exercises to prepare for events with varying degrees of impact, such as pipeline disruptions, local power outages, and transportation interruptions, such as the 2005 Powder River Basin rail service suspension, which resulted in curtailment of coal deliveries to major customers over a six-month period.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations DE-FC26-04NT15425 Project Goal This project is being conducted in two phases. The objective of the first phase is to characterize the reservoir using advanced evaluation methods in order to assess the potential of a CO2 flood of the target reservoir. This reservoir characterization includes advanced petrophysical, geophysical, geological, reservoir engineering, and reservoir simulation technologies. The objective of the second project phase is to demonstrate the benefits of using advanced seismic methods for the monitoring of the CO2 flood fronts. Performers Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services - Pittsburgh, PA New Horizon Energy - Traverse City, MI

202

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Second Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-03-00620 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Second Quarterly Report January - March 2003 Larry Zirker...

203

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Fifth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-04-01618 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Fifth Quarterly Report October - December 2003...

204

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Eighth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-04-02486 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eighth Quarterly Report July-September 2004...

205

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy...

206

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-03-00129 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation First Quarterly Report Larry Zirker James...

207

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Sixth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-04-02004 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Sixth Quarterly Report January - March 2004...

208

Advance Summary U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

recovery projects, improving technology, and operator corrections to prior year reports. Changing ... field development and enhanced oil recovery projects

209

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The oil and gas industry is a very diverse and complex sector of the energy economy. It ranges from exploration to production, processing, transportation, and distribution. All of these segments are elements of the natural gas industry and the oil industry but are different for oil than for natural gas. An example of a technology pathway for the oil refining industry is the Petroleum Refining Vision and Roadmap, which was developed through a joint effort of government and industry. Other technology roadmaps of relevance to Climate VISION participants either are being developed or will be developed in the future. The oil refining example is provided initially. Others will be added as they become available. Petroleum refining is one of nine energy-intensive industries that is

210

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 6 The Effect of Oil Processing on Frying Oil Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 6 The Effect of Oil Processing on Frying Oil Stability Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Down

211

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd EditionChapter 9 Olive Oil Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 Olive Oil Extraction Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press ...

212

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd EditionChapter 6 Olive Oil Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Chapter 6 Olive Oil Quality Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press ...

213

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Shale Oil Upgrading Utilizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companies providing oil samples of at least five (5) gallons include Chevron, Oil Shale Exploration Company (OSEC), and Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Background Work performed...

214

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

215

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

216

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

217

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

218

Crude oil, natural gas, and petroleum products prices all fell ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

So oil prices averaged over the year decreased sharply while year-end price ... Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, 1972-2009

219

Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1...

220

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators May 18, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources. The Utah Geologic Survey (UGS), with funding support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, recently updated and released a portfolio of oil plays in Utah, as well as neighboring Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays in this tri-state area are defined as those

222

DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators May 18, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources. The Utah Geologic Survey (UGS), with funding support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, recently updated and released a portfolio of oil plays in Utah, as well as neighboring Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays in this tri-state area are defined as those

223

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 – 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to quantitatively describe and understand the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin by collecting and analyzing a wide range of parameters, including seismic and geochemical data, that impact well productivity/oil recovery. Performer Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Background The Bakken Formation is rapidly emerging as an important source of oil in the Williston Basin. The formation typically consists of three members, with the upper and lower members being shales and the middle member being dolomitic siltstone and sandstone. Total organic carbon (TOC) within the shales may be as high as 40%, with estimates of total hydrocarbon generation across the entire Bakken Formation ranging from 200 to 400 billion barrels. While the formation is productive in numerous reservoirs throughout Montana and North Dakota, with the Elm Coulee Field in Montana and the Parshall area in North Dakota being the most prolific examples of Bakken success, many Bakken wells have yielded disappointing results. While variable productivity within a play is nothing unusual to the petroleum industry, the Bakken play is noteworthy because of the wide variety of approaches and technologies that have been applied with apparently inconsistent and all too often underachieving results. This project will implement a robust, systematic, scientific, and engineering research effort to overcome these challenges and unlock the vast resource potential of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin.

224

Technologies for the oil and gas industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a five-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors performed a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse-tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment for the oil and gas industry or geothermal industry. They prepared and distributed a report showing that this appears to be a viable technology.

Goff, S.J.; Swift, G.W.; Gardner, D.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2003 Annual Report DOE/EIA-0216(2003) November 2004

226

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA0216(2007) Distribution Category UC950 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report February 2009

227

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface The U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 Annual Report is the 22nd prepared by the Energy Information Administration

228

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 ... produce unconventional gas economically. Production.

229

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources April 9, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil

230

Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded January 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The results of nearly four decades of research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are now available through the OnePetro online document repository. TheOnePetro website now contains NETL's Oil & Gas Knowledge Management Database. DOE's Knowledge Management Database (KMD) provides access to content from dozens of CDs and DVDs related to oil and natural gas research that the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has published over the years. It also provides links to reports, data sets, and project summaries from ongoing research supported

231

Oil shale and tar sands technology: recent developments  

SciTech Connect

The detailed, descriptive information in this book is based on US patents, issued since March 1975, that deal with the technology of oil shale and tar sands. The book contains an introductory overview of the subject. Topics included are oil shale retorting, in situ processing of oil shale, shale oil refining and purification processes, in situ processing of tar sands, tar sands separation processes.

Ranney, M.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Caspian countries are developing new oil and natural gas export ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Caspian Sea region has the potential to export oil and natural gas to European, South Asian, and East Asian markets. With rising energy prices and growing global ...

234

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forum Forum Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) supports development and deployment of commercially competitive natural gas engines, vehicles, and infrastructure. Learn about NGVTF's purpose, activities, meetings, stakeholders, steering committee, and webinars. Purpose Led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission, NGVTF unites a diverse group of stakeholders to: Share information and resources Identify natural gas engine, vehicle, and infrastructure technology targets Facilitate government-industry research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) to achieve targets Communicate high-priority needs of natural gas vehicle end users to natural gas equipment and vehicle manufacturers

235

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #210: April 1, 2002 Crude Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: April 1, 2002 Crude Oil Prices Since 1870 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 210: April 1, 2002 Crude Oil Prices Since 1870 on Facebook Tweet about...

237

NETL: News Release - Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23, 2010 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Long-Term Success of Stripper Well Consortium Supports Small Oil and Gas Producers Washington, D.C. -...

238

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #579: July 13, 2009 Oil Price...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: July 13, 2009 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1970-2008 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 579: July 13, 2009 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1970-2008...

239

Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last Martin Sereno 1 Feb 2011 (orig. talk: Nov 2004) #12;Oil is the Lifeblood of Industrial Civilization · 80 million barrels/day, 1000 barrels/sec, 1 cubicPods to the roads themselves) · we're not "addicted to oil" -- that's like saying a person has an "addiction

Sereno, Martin

240

Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Predicted (2006) Discovery, Production FSU (former Soviet Union) history Soviet Union collapse 80's oil pricePeak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last Martin Sereno 1 Feb 2011 (orig. talk: Nov 2004) #12;Oil is the Lifeblood of Industrial Civilization · 80 million barrels/day, 1000 barrels/sec, 1 cubic

Sereno, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

"Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "Value...

242

"Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" "Characteristic(a)","(kWh)","(gallons)","(gallons)","(1000 cu ft)","(gallons)","(short tons)...

243

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: September 6, 6: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336:

244

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: September 17, 7: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487:

245

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential to use natural gas, currently consume more than a third of the petroleum in transportation in the U.S. Natural gas is an excellent fit for a wide range of heavy-duty applications, especially transit buses, refuse haulers, and Class 8 long-haul or delivery trucks. In addition, natural gas can be a very good choice for light-duty vehicle fleets with central refueling. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center for a description of the uses and benefits of natural gas vehicles or its Laws and Incentives database for information on tax incentives. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports the development of natural gas engines and research into renewable natural gas production.

246

June 2003VOLATILITY IN NATURAL GAS AND OIL MARKETS * by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in volatility during the time of the Enron collapse, and whether natural gas and crude oil price volatilities are interrelated. I also measure the persistence of shocks to volatility and discuss its implications for gas- and oil-related contingent claims.

Robert S. Pindyck; Robert S. Pindyck

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of...

248

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Seventh Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory-WV National Renewable Energy Laboratory Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves CO, UT, WY Nevada Site Office Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge Institute for...

249

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Seventh Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory-WV National Renewable Energy Laboratory Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves CO, UT, WY Nevada Site Office Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge Institute for...

250

Solar technology application to enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

One proposed near-term commercial application for solar energy technology is the use of solar energy systems to generate steam for thermal enhanced oil recovery (EOR). This report examines four aspects of solar energy employed for steam EOR. First, six solar technologies are evaluated and two - parabolic troughs and central receivers - are selected for closer study; typical systems that would meet current production requirements are proposed and costed. Second, the legal and environmental issues attending solar EOR are analyzed. Third, the petroleum producing companies' preferences and requirements are discussed. Finally, alternative means of financing solar EOR are addressed. The study concludes that within the next four to five years, conventional (fossil-fueled) thermal EOR means are much less expensive and more available than solar EOR systems, even given environmental requirements. Within 10 to 15 years, assuming specified advances in solar technologies, central receiver EOR systems will be significantly more cost-effective than parabolic trough EOR systems and will be price competitive with conventional thermal EOR systems. Important uncertainties remain (both in solar energy technologies and in how they affect the operating characteristics of petroleum reservoirs) that need resolution before definitive projections can be made.

de Leon, P.; Brown, K.C.; Margolis, J.W.; Nasr, L.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solar technology application to enhanced oil recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One proposed near-term commercial application for solar energy technology is the use of solar energy systems to generate steam for thermal enhanced oil recovery (EOR). This report examines four aspects of solar energy employed for steam EOR. First, six solar technologies are evaluated and two - parabolic troughs and central receivers - are selected for closer study; typical systems that would meet current production requirements are proposed and costed. Second, the legal and environmental issues attending solar EOR are analyzed. Third, the petroleum producing companies' preferences and requirements are discussed. Finally, alternative means of financing solar EOR are addressed. The study concludes that within the next four to five years, conventional (fossil-fueled) thermal EOR means are much less expensive and more available than solar EOR systems, even given environmental requirements. Within 10 to 15 years, assuming specified advances in solar technologies, central receiver EOR systems will be significantly more cost-effective than parabolic trough EOR systems and will be price competitive with conventional thermal EOR systems. Important uncertainties remain (both in solar energy technologies and in how they affect the operating characteristics of petroleum reservoirs) that need resolution before definitive projections can be made.

de Leon, P.; Brown, K.C.; Margolis, J.W.; Nasr, L.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09, 2013 09, 2013 Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Washington, D.C. - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil recovery methods, such as steam and hot water injection, to reduce its viscosity and enable it to flow. The largest U.S. deposits of heavy oil are in California and on Alaska's North Slope. Estimates for the U.S. heavy oil resource total about 104 billion barrels of oil in place - nearly five times the United States' proved reserves. In addition, although no commercial-scale development of U.S. oil sands or oil shale has yet occurred, both represent another potential future domestic unconventional oil resource.

253

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Tenth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-05-00381 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Tenth Quarterly Report January-March 2005 TECHNICAL...

254

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Third Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-03-00974 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Third Quarterly Report April-June 2003 Larry Zirker James...

255

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Ninth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-05-00040 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report October-December 2004 TECHNICAL...

256

Recent trends in oil shale. I. History, nature, and reserves  

SciTech Connect

To understand the current level of oil shale development and to anticipate some of the problems that will govern the growth rate of the domestic shale oil industry, this bulletin will discuss these issues in three parts. In this MIB, the nature of oil shale is discussed and a brief history of oil shale development is presented. The worldwide and domestic oil shale resources are described, with emphasis on recent geologic exploration of the Green River formation. Part II will cover oil shale mining and fuel extraction while Part III will discuss technical problems of shale oil refining and some economic and social problems of oil shale development. An extensive bibliography is provided. (MCW)

Sladek, T.A.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Models, Simulators, and Data-driven Resources for Oil and Natural Gas Research  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NETL provides a number of analytical tools to assist in conducting oil and natural gas research. Software, developed under various DOE/NETL projects, includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation.[copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/Software_main.html] Links lead users to methane hydrates models, preedictive models, simulators, databases, and other software tools or resources.

258

NETL: News Release - Heavy Oil Potential Key to Alaskan North...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

259

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Recipient to Transfer Oil and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources...

260

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. Introduction Background The principal focus of this report is to provide accurate annual estimates of U.S. proved reserves of crude oil, natural ga ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7. Total U.S. Proved Reserves of Crude Oil, Dry Natural Gas, and Lease Condensate, 2001-2009 Revisionsa Net of Salesb New Reservoir Provedd Change

262

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

263

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: News Release - NETL's Oil and Natural Gas Program Provides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2007 24, 2007 Oil and Natural Gas Program Uses Stranded Gas to Revive Oil Production Project Generates Energy from Waste Gas to Restore Marginal Fields WASHINGTON, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project is turning "stranded" natural gas at marginal, or low-production, oil fields into fuel for distributed electric power. The breakthrough is bringing previously idle oil fields back into production and could boost domestic oil production by some 28 million barrels per year within the next 10 years, helping to reduce the Nation's dependence on foreign oil sources. Stranded gas is natural gas that is uneconomic to produce for one or more reasons: the energy, or Btu content, may be too low; the gas may be too impure to use; or, the volume may be too small to warrant a pipeline connection to the gas infrastructure. Non-commercial gas is sometimes produced along with oil, becoming an environmental liability. This unwanted byproduct of oil production has become a major problem in California oil fields where producers have been forced to abandon sites early, leaving valuable reserves of domestic oil untapped.

265

NETL: News Release - Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded Washington, DC -The results of nearly four decades of research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are now available through the OnePetro online document repository. Click to link to the OnePetro website The OnePetro website now contains NETL's Oil & Gas Knowledge Management Database DOE's Knowledge Management Database (KMD) provides access to content from dozens of CDs and DVDs related to oil and natural gas research that the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has published over the years. It also provides links to reports, data sets, and project summaries from ongoing research supported by FE's Oil and Natural Gas Program.

266

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska Heavy Oils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluid and Rock Property Controls On Production and Seismic Monitoring Alaska Heavy Oils Last Reviewed 12/20/2012 Fluid and Rock Property Controls On Production and Seismic Monitoring Alaska Heavy Oils Last Reviewed 12/20/2012 DE-NT0005663 Goal The goal of this project is to improve recovery of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) heavy oil resources in the Ugnu formation by improving our understanding of the formation’s vertical and lateral heterogeneities via core evaluation, evaluating possible recovery processes, and employing geophysical monitoring to assess production and modify production operations. Performers Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 Earthworks, Newtown, CT 06470 BP, Anchorage, AK 99519 Background Although the reserves of heavy oil on the North Slope of Alaska are enormous (estimates are up to 10 billion barrels in place), difficult

267

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska North Slope Oil and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas Transportation Support System Last Reviewed 6172013 DE-FE0001240 Goal The primary objectives of this project are to develop analysis and management...

268

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska Heavy Oils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal The goal of this project is to improve recovery of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) heavy oil resources in the Ugnu formation by improving our understanding of the formations...

269

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources April 9, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology.

271

Natural Gas Technologies Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Center Technologies Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Gas Technologies Center Name Natural Gas Technologies Center Address 1350, Nobel, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada Place Montreal, Quebec Zip J4B 5H3 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1992 Phone number 1.450.449.4774 Coordinates 45.5678623°, -73.4186892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5678623,"lon":-73.4186892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

Proceedings of the 1998 oil heat technology conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference was held on April 7--8 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under sponsorship by the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, State and Community Programs (DOE/BTS). The meeting was held in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America (PMAA). Fourteen technical presentations was made during the two-day program, all related to oil-heat technology and equipment, these will cover a range of research, developmental, and demonstration activities being conducted within the United States and Canada, including: integrated oil heat appliance system development in Canada; a miniature heat-actuated air conditioner for distributed space conditioning; high-flow fan atomized oil burner (HFAB) development; progress in the development of self tuning oil burners; application of HFAB technology to the development of a 500 watt; thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power system; field tests of the Heat Wise Pioneer oil burner and Insight Technologies AFQI; expanded use of residential oil burners to reduce ambient ozone and particulate levels by conversion of electric heated homes to oilheat; PMAA`s Oil Heat Technician`s Manual (third edition); direct venting concept development; evolution of the chimney; combating fuel related problems; the effects of red dye and metal contamination on fuel oil stability; new standard for above ground and basement residential fuel oil storage; plastic and steel composite secondary contained tanks; and money left on the table: an economic analysis of tank cleaning.

McDonald, R.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 DE-FC26-02NT15133 Goal The primary goal of this study is to increase recovery of oil reserves from existing reservoirs and from new discoveries by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. The overall objectives of this study are to: 1) increase recoverable oil from existing reservoirs, 2) add new discoveries, 3) prevent premature abandonment of numerous small fields, 4) increase deliverability through identifying the latest drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques, and 5) reduce development costs and risk. Performer Utah Geological Survey (UGS), Salt Lake City, UT

274

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of this project is to overcome existing water-related environmental barriers to possible oil shale development in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Data collected from this study will help alleviate problems associated with disposal of produced saline water, which is a by-product of methods used to facilitate conventional hydrocarbon production. Performers Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114 Collaborators Uinta Basin Petroleum Companies: Questar, Anadarko, Newfield, Enduring Resources, Bill Barrett, Berry Petroleum, EOG Resources, FIML, Wind River Resources, Devon, Rosewood, Flying J, Gasco, Mustang Fuel,

275

NETL: natural gas and oil archive of announcements from home...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subscription information DOE-Funded Project Shows Promise for Tapping Vast U.S. Oil Shale Resources A technology as simple as an advanced heater cable may hold the secret for...

276

Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M. [Texas A& amp; M Univ, College Station, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Price ratio of crude oil to natural gas continues to increase ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

278

Oil and natural gas production is growing in Caspian Sea region ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

279

EIA Report 9/13/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts. Prices. NYMEX Futures Prices ... Gulf of Mexico Oil & Natural Gas Facts Energy Information Administration: Gulf of ...

280

Price ratio of crude oil to natural gas increasing - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. oil rig count overtakes natural gas rig count - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

282

Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

283

Table 4.6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

284

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2000 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2000, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2000.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1998, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1998.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2002 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2002, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2002.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2006 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2006

Information Center

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1996 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2005 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2005

Rafi Zeinalpour

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1997 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1995 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1993 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1993, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1993.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2003 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2003, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2003.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2007

Information Center

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1999 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1999, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1999.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2001 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2001, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2001.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1994 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1994, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1994.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2004 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2004.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

EXPLORER: A Natural Language Processing System for Oil Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPLORER: A Natural Language Processing System for Oil Exploration Wendy G. Lehnert Department", whereas the second time "show" is used it has a technical meaning (i.e., an indicator of oil or gas Steven P. Shwartz Cognitive Systems Inc. 234 Church Street New Haven, Ct. 06510 EXPLORER (Lehnert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas...

302

Oil and Natural Gas in Sub-Saharan Africa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas in Sub-Saharan Africa August 1, 2013 ... The Middle East has 13 times that amount and Central and South America has 5 times that amount.

303

Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

304

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:28:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012NM2"...

305

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils Last Reviewed 6/27/2012 Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils Last Reviewed 6/27/2012 DE-NT0006556 Goal The objective of this project is to develop improved chemical oil recovery options for the Ugnu reservoir overlying the Milne Point unit in North Slope, Alaska. Performers University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-1160 Background The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in the Ugnu, West Sak, and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir overlying Milne Point varies from 200 cP to 10,000 cP and the depth is about 3500 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west overlying the Kuparuk River Unit and on to the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity

306

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(SENM) produces around 400 million barrels of produced water per year as a by-product of oil and gas production. Water production volumes have been increasing every year. Ninety...

307

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explorer II – Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Pipelines Explorer II – Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Pipelines DE-FC26-04NT42264 Goal The goal of this project is to enhance the reliability and integrity of the Nation’s natural gas infrastructure through the development, construction, integration and testing of a long-range non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection capability in a modular robotic locomotion platform (Explorer II). The Explorer II will have an integrated inspection sensor (developed under a separate project) to provide enhanced in-situ, live, and real-time assessments of the status of a gas pipeline infrastructure. The Explorer II system will be capable of operating in 6-inch- and 8-inch-diameter, high-pressure (piggable and non-piggable) distribution and transmission mains. The system will also be enhanced to form an “extended” platform with additional drive and battery modules allowing the system the potential to carry alternative sensors that are heavier or more drag intensive than the current technology.

308

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technology Forum Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership

309

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on AddThis.com...

310

Oil shale technology and evironmental aspects  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale processes are a combination of mining, retorting, and upgrading facilities. This work outlines the processing steps and some design considerations required in an oil shale facility. A brief overview of above ground and in situ retorts is presented; 6 retorts are described. The development aspects which the oil shale industry is addressing to protect the environment are presented.

Scinta, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Natural Gas News Oil and Natural Gas News FE Oil and Natural Gas News RSS November 15, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas The Department of Energy announced the conditional authorization for Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S. This is the fifth conditional authorization the Department has announced. August 23, 2013 DOE and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Sign Memorandum of Collaboration for Safe Offshore Energy Development The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy and The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) signed a Memorandum of

312

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 June 23, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An industry-driven consortium initiated in 2000, SWC's goal is to keep "stripper wells" productive in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. The consortium is managed and administered by The Pennsylvania State University on behalf of DOE; the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

313

The Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 1 The Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices by Jose A. Villar Natural Gas Division Energy Information Administration and Frederick L. Joutz Department of Economics The George Washington University Abstract: This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price. Typically, this relationship has been approached using simple correlations and deterministic trends. When data have unit roots as in this case, such analysis is faulty and subject to spurious results. We find a cointegrating relationship relating Henry Hub prices to the WTI and trend capturing the relative demand and supply effects over the 1989-through-2005 period. The dynamics of the relationship

314

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma DE-FC26-00NT15125 Project Goal The Hunton formation in Oklahoma has some unique production characteristics, including large water production, initially decreasing gas-oil ratios, and excellent dynamic continuity—but poor geological continuity. The overall goal of the project is to understand the mechanism of gas and oil production from the Hunton Formation in Oklahoma so that similar reservoirs in other areas can be efficiently exploited. An additional goal is to develop methodologies to improve oil recovery using secondary recovery techniques. Performers University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Marjo Operating Company, Tulsa, OK University of Houston, Houston, TX Orca Exploration, Tulsa, OK

315

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Natural Gas Reources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive The United States is endowed with an abundance of natural gas resources. Besides its use for...

316

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1999 OIL HEAT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE AND WORKSHOP.  

SciTech Connect

The 1999 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop, April 15-16 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (DOEBTS). The meeting is also co-sponsored by the: Petroleum Marketers Association of America, New England Fuel Institute, Oilheat Manufacturers Association, National Association of Oil Heat Service Managers, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Empire State Petroleum Association, New York Oil Heating Association, Oil Heat Institute of Long Island, and the Pennsylvania Petroleum Association. BNL is proud to acknowledge all of our 1999 co-sponsors, without their help and support the conference would have been canceled due to budget restrictions. It is quite gratifying to see an industry come together to help support an activity like the technology conference, for the benefit of the industry as a whole. The 1999 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop, will be the thirteenth since 1984, is a very valuable technology transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology (Oilheat R and D) program at BNL. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. They will provide a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector.

MCDONALD,R.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Prospects for U.S. Oil & Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Proposed light-duty vehicle CAFE standards; advanced battery technology; heavy-duty truck natural gas potential : Independence does not eliminate interdependence ...

318

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Market enhancement of shale oil: The native products extraction technology  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this work was to assess the feasibility of enhancing shale oil commercialization through SO/NPX technology. Specific objectives were: (1) To determine the properties and characteristics of fractions isolable from shale oil utilizing separation sequences which are based on thermodynamic considerations; (2) To identify product streams of market value for promising technology development; (3)To conduct technology development studies leading to a shale oil extraction and processing sequence which promises economic enhancement of shale oil commercialization; (4) To develop an analytical methodology and model for obtaining engineering design data required for process development; (5) To estimate the economics of SO/NPX including the potential for enhancing the profitability of a commercial-scale shale oil MIS retort.

Bunger, J.W. (Bunger (James W.) and Associates, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); DuBow, J.B. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1998 OIL HEAT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference will be held on April 7--8 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under sponsorship by the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, State and Community Programs (DOE/BTS). The meeting will be held in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America (PMAA). The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference, will be the twelfth since 1984, is an important technology transfer activity and is supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology (Oilheat R and D) program at BNL. The reason for the conference is to provide a forum for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. They will provide a channel by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the Conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

MCDONALD,R.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY/OIL SPILL COMMUNITY SEMINAR "Natural and Unnatural Oil in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY/OIL SPILL COMMUNITY SEMINAR "Natural and Unnatural Oil in the Gulf of Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico has been cited as a factor that may have pre-conditioned the gulf ecosystem better a strong Gulf of Mexico focus, but includes work on the deep-sea biology of hydrothermal vents

322

Propane Prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Propane prices have been high this year for several reasons. Propane usually follows crude oil prices more closely than natural gas prices. As crude oil prices rose beginning in 1999, propane has followed. In addition, some early cold weather this year put extra pressure on prices. However, more recently, the highly unusual surge in natural gas prices affected propane supply and drove propane prices up. Propane comes from two sources of supply: refineries and natural gas processing plants. The very high natural gas prices made it more economic for refineries to use the propane they normally produce and sell than to buy natural gas. The gas processing plants found it more economic to leave propane in the natural gas streams than to extract it for sale separately.

323

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Oil and Natural Gas in Sub-Saharan Africa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Natural Gas in Sub-Saharan Africa Oil and Natural Gas in Sub-Saharan Africa August 1, 2013 2 Sub-Saharan Africa Source: U.S. Department of State Liquid Fuels Reserves and Production in Sub-Saharan Africa 3 4 Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) produced nearly 6 million bbl/d of liquid fuels in 2012, which was about 7% of total world oil production. Overview Sub-Saharan Africa contains 62.6 billion barrels of proved crude oil reserves. The Middle East has 13 times that amount and Central and South America has 5 times that amount. Middle East 30% North America 20% Eurasia 15% Sub-Saharan Africa 7% North Africa 5% Asia & Oceania 10% Central & South America 9% Europe 4% Global Liquid Fuels Production, 2012 Source: EIA, International Energy Statistics 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 Middle East Central & South America

326

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 23, 2010 June 23, 2010 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 The Stripper Well Consortium - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy. March 30, 2010 Results from DOE Expedition Confirm Existence of Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate in Gulf of Mexico Gas hydrate, a potentially immense energy resource, occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the Gulf of Mexico, according to reports released by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. March 1, 2010 Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 Storage

327

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Investing in Oil and Natural Gas: A Few Key Issues Prepared for EIA Conference Susan Farrell, Senior Director PFC Energy April 8, 2009 Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 2 The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 3 Oil Prices Rose, But So Did Costs + 52% $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 WTI $/barrel Annual averages Large Gulf of Mexico Facility Costs by Segment Avg $28.31 Avg $59.13 Source: PFC Energy Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 4 Near term Spending Cuts will be Significant

328

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves With Data for 2011 | Release Date: August 1, 2013 | Next Release Date: Early 2014 | full report Previous Issues: Year: 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 Go Summary In 2011, oil and gas exploration and production companies operating in the United States added almost 3.8 billion barrels of crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves, an increase of 15 percent, and the greatest volume increase since the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) began publishing proved reserves estimates in 1977 (Table 1). Proved reserves of crude oil and lease condensate increased by 2.9 billion barrels in 2010, the previous record. Proved reserves of U.S. wet natural gas1 rose

329

2012 Short Course Edible Oils Refining Update: From the Fundamentals to New Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oils Refining Update: From the Fundamentals to New Technologies held at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2012 Short Course Edible Oils Refining Update: From the Fundamentals to New Technologies Edible Oils Refining Update: From the Fund

330

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives are listed and technical progress is summarized for contracts for field projects and supporting research on: chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, extraction technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Oil and Natural Gas Knowledge Management Database from NETL  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) Portal provides four options for searching the documents and data that NETL-managed oil and gas research has produced over the years for DOEs Office of Fossil Energy. Information includes R&D carried out under both historical and ongoing DOE oil and gas research and development (R&D). The Document Repository, the CD/DVD Library, the Project Summaries from 1990 to the present, and the Oil and Natural Gas Program Reference Shelf provide a wide range of flexibility and coverage.

332

Proceedings of the 1991 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Conference, which was the sixth held since 1984, is a key technology-transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology program at BNL, and is aimed at providing a forum for the exchange of information among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The objectives of the Conference were to: Identify and evaluate the state-of-the-art and recommend; new initiatives to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; Foster cooperation among federal and industrial representatives with the common goal of national security via energy conservation. The 1991 Oil Technology Conference comprised: (a) two plenary sessions devoted to presentations and summations by public and private sector representatives from the United States, Europe, and Canada; and, (b) four workshops which focused on mainstream issues in oil-heating technology. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDonald, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Proceedings of the 1993 oil heat technology conference and workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the proceedings of the 1993 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop, held on March 25--26 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and sponsored by the US Department of Energy - Office of Building Technologies (DOE-OBT), in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America. This Conference, which was the seventh held since 1984, is a key technology-transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology (Oil-Heat R&D) program at BNL, and is aimed at providing a forum for the exchange of information among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketers of oil-fired space- conditioning equipment. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDonald, R.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd EditionChapter 8 Healthful Properties of Olive Oil Minor Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Chapter 8 Healthful Properties of Olive Oil Minor Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

335

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd EditionChapter 3 Olive Oil in the World Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Chapter 3 Olive Oil in the World Market Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press

336

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winter 2003) to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical Committee Meeting (Winter 2003) on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural...

337

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential July 18, 2012 - 3:52pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy...

338

Membrane Technologies for Lifelong Oil Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work to date on a novel technique to extend the life of power transformers. A hollow fiber unit is used to remove moisture and oxygen continuously from the oil of an operational transformer. Moisture and oxygen are two key aging factors of oil and paper in a power transformer. Thus it is imperative to keep these low at all times. By maintaining moisture and oxygen at low levels at all times, the aging of both oil and paper will be retarded.To date work has ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

339

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2011 August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. August 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2011 ii

340

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4. Total U.S. Proved Reserves of Wet Natural Gas, and Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate, 2001-2009 Revisionsa Net of Salesb New Reservoir Provedd Change

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harsh Environment Electronics Packaging for Downhole Oil & Gas Exploration Harsh Environment Electronics Packaging for Downhole Oil & Gas Exploration DE-FC26-06NT42950 Goal The goal is to develop new packaging techniques for downhole electronics that will be capable of withstanding at least 200oC (~400oF) while maintaining a small form factor and high vibration tolerance necessary for use in a downhole environment. These packaging techniques will also be capable of integrating a sensor and other electronics to form an integrated electronics/sensor module. Performers General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY 12309 Binghamton University (SUNY), Binghamton, NY 13902 Background Sensors and electronics systems are key components in measurement-while-drilling (MWD) equipment. Examples of sensors and electronics that can directly impact the efficiency of drilling guidance systems can include gamma ray and neutron sensors, orientation modules, pressure sensors and the all of the associated signal conditioning and computational electronics. As drilling depths increase, more rigorous temperature demands are made on the electronic components in the drillstring. Current sensor systems for MWD applications are limited by the temperature rating of their electronics, with a typical upper end temperature rating of 175oC (~350oF). The lifetime of an electronics system at such temperatures is extremely short (600-1500 hrs). These limitations are driven by the temperature performance and reliability of the materials in the electronic components (active and passive devices) and their associated packages and interconnect methods.

342

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

343

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

344

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

345

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2013 Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forum 2013 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2013 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology...

346

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2013 Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forum 2013 Meeting Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) will hold a meeting for stakeholders on Oct. 22-23, 2013, at...

347

Introduction to Fats and Oils Technology, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material covered in the 16 chapters retained from the first edition has been updated to include the advances in technology and practice. Thirteen new chapters that pertain to new areas of fats and oils technology have been added to supplement the original

348

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling DE-FC26-03NT15476 Project Goal The goal of the project is to develop an innovative mud system for coiled tubing drilling (CTD) and small-diameter holes (microholes) for vertical, horizontal and multilateral drilling and completion applications. The system will be able to mix the required fluids (water, oil, chemicals, muds, slurries), circulate that mixture downhole (modified 350 gpm @1,000 psi and 15 gpm@ 5,000 psi), clean and store (200 bbls) the base fluids, and be able to perform these functions in an underbalanced condition with zero discharge and low environmental impact. Another primary and most important goal of this project is to develop key components for a new abrasive slurry drilling system.

349

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Mississippi Leadville Limestone Exploration Play of Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents The Mississippi Leadville Limestone Exploration Play of Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents DE-FC26-03NT15424 Project Goal The overall goals of this study are to 1) develop and demonstrate techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone; 2) target areas for exploration; 3) increase deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization; 4) reduce exploration costs and risk, especially in environmentally sensitive areas; and 5) add new oil discoveries and reserves. The project is being conducted in two phases, each with specific objectives. The objective of Phase 1 (Budget Period I) is to conduct a case study of the Leadville reservoir at Lisbon field (the largest Leadville producer) in San Juan County, UT, in order understand the reservoir characteristics and facies that can be applied regionally.

350

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Artificial Barriers to Augment Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 Using Artificial Barriers to Augment Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 DE-NT0005684 Goal The goal of this project is to implement a snow control practice to enhance snow drift formation as a local water source to recharge a depleted lake despite possible unfavorable climate and hydrology preconditions (i.e., surface storage deficit and/or low precipitation). Performer University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK Background Snow is central to activities in polar latitudes of Alaska over a very significant part of each year. With the arrival of snow, modes of travel, working, and living are transformed. Oil and gas exploration operations restricted to winter months use ice roads and ice pads in arctic and subarctic regions. The general reasoning behind ice road construction is

351

Coming revolution in world oil markets. [Abetted by conservation, fuel substitution, and better technologies  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Singer feels that a revolution will take place in the world oil market provided government does not enact counterproductive policies, but stands aside to let market forces achieve their inevitable results. He observes that by the end of this decade, and certainly in the 1990s, the free world may require less than half of the oil it uses today - some 20 million barrels per day (mbd) instead of 50 mbd. However, some 75% of this oil, instead of the current 25%, will be refined into gasoline and other motor fuels, while natural gas, nuclear energy and coal in different forms will substitute for most of the fuel oil to produce heat and steam - generally at much lower cost. Oil has become too expensive to burn, and a major adjustment in world-wide use patterns is overdue. Three factors will bring about these dramatic changes: First, new coal technologies: they make it convenient to replace heavy fuel oil in existing oil-fired boilers. Second, advances in refinery technology: they can produce more light products, gasoline and motor fuels, and less heavy fuel oil from a barrel of crude oil. Third, and above all, the laws of economics: higher oil prices, by themselves, encourage conservation and substitution. In addition, large price differentials between higher-quality light crudes and heavy crudes that normally yield less gasoline put a significant premium on refinery upgrading. And wholesale prices for gasoline are greater and are rising faster than those of residual fuel oil. Squeezing out more gasoline can increase the value of a barrel of crude substantially. Dr. Singer notes that the coming revolution is not generally recognized because many of the demand and supply trends are just emerging. He proceeds to discuss the staggering consequences of such a revolution.

Singer, S.F.

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

2011 Short CourseNew Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and Edible Oil Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and Edible Oil Refining ShortCourse held at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2011 Short CourseNew Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and Edible Oil Refining New Technologies in Oilseed Extraction

353

2010 Short Course New Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and Edible Oil Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and Edible Oil Refining Short Course held at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2010 Short Course New Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and Edible Oil Refining New Technologies in Oilseed Extraction and

354

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Trek Re-configurable Processor for Data Acquisition Deep Trek Re-configurable Processor for Data Acquisition DE-FC26-06NT42947 Goal The goal of this project is to develop and qualify a Re-configurable Processor for Data Acquisition (RPDA) by packaging previously developed components in an advanced high-temperature Multi-Chip Module (MCM), and by developing configuration software that may be embedded within the RPDA to link data-acquisition system Analog Front-Ends to digital system busses. Performer Honeywell International Inc., Plymouth, MN 55441 Background Electronic data acquisition systems are necessary to make deep oil and gas drilling and production cost effective, yet the basic electronic components from which such systems are built will not operate reliably at the high temperatures encountered in deep wells. As well depths increase beyond 15,000 feet, temperatures above 200°C are relatively common. In some cases the target reservoir temperature may be as high as 300°C.

355

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Thousand Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 176,867 203,997 240,969 285,398 308,210 331,740 1949-2008 Crude Oil 38,495 42,032 51,511 63,649 66,527 88,382 1949-2008 Natural Gas 115,833 138,503 164,353 193,595 212,753 212,079 1949-2008 Dry Holes 22,539 23,462 25,104 28,154 28,931 31,280 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 17,785 22,382 25,955 29,630 36,534 35,585 1949-2008 Crude Oil 2,453 3,141 4,262 4,998 6,271 7,389 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,569 9,998 12,347 14,945 19,982 17,066 1949-2008 Dry Holes

356

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

357

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA...

358

Technological overview reports for eight shale oil recovery processes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the document is to supply background information for evaluation of environmental impacts and pollution control technologies in connection with oil shale development. Six surface retorting processes selected for characterization were: (1) Union Oil Retort B, (2) Paraho, (3) TOSCO II, (4) Lurgi Ruhrgas, (5) Superior Oil, and (6) USBM Gas Combustion. In addition, two in-situ retorting activities were selected: (1) the Occidental modified in-situ retort, and (2) the true in-situ development programs of Laramie Energy Technology Center (DOE). Each overview report contains information on oil shale processing. General process descriptions, shale preparation requirements, equipment types, operating conditions, process products and by-products, physical and chemical characteristics, energy and water requirements, process stream characteristics, processed shale disposal requirements, and site-specific environmental aspects are included.

Shih, C.C.; Cotter, J.E.; Prien, C.H.; Nevens, T.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Synthesis and Evaluation of Inexpensive CO2 Thickeners Designed by Molecular Modeling The Synthesis and Evaluation of Inexpensive CO2 Thickeners Designed by Molecular Modeling DE-FC26-04NT15533 Project Goal The goal of this project is to use molecular modeling and experimental results to design inexpensive, environmentally benign, CO2-soluble compounds that can decrease the mobility of CO2 at typical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) reservoir conditions. Performers University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Yale University, New Haven, CT Background The research group previously formulated the only known CO2 thickener, a (fluoroacrylate-styrene) random copolymer, but this proof-of-concept compound was expensive and environmentally unacceptable because it was fluorous. They then identified the most CO2-soluble, high-molecular-weight, conventional polymer composed solely of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen: poly(vinyl acetate), or PVAc. PVAc could not dissolve at pressures below the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP), however. The current research effort, therefore, was directed at using molecular modeling and experimental tools to design polymers that are far more CO2-soluble than PVAc. The subsequent goal was to incorporate this polymer into a thickening agent that will dissolve in CO2 below the MMP and generate a two- to ten-fold decrease in CO2 mobility at concentrations of 0.01–1.0 percent by weight. Although most of the thickeners envisioned are copolymers, researchers will also evaluated several small hydrogen-bonding agents and surfactants with oligomeric (very short polymer) tails that form viscosity-enhancing structures in solution , and novel CO2 soluble surfactants that may be able to generate foams in situ as they mix with reservoir brine (without the need for the injection of alternating slugs of water).

360

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-High-Speed Motor for Drilling Ultra-High-Speed Motor for Drilling DE-FC26-04NT15502 Project Goal The project goal is to design two sizes of an ultra-high-speed (10,000 rpm), inverted, configured electric motor specifically for drilling. Performers Impact Technologies LLC, Tulsa, OK University of Texas, Arlington, TX Results Researchers have developed PMSM (permanent magnet synchronous machine) electromagnetic designs of both radial and axial motors for rotational speeds up to 10,000 rpm in two outer diameters (OD). Finite element analyses (FEA) of the magnetic saturation and power/torque output have been made at various speed and loading conditions. Mechanical 3-D models have been prepared based on those designs. Bearing and seal materials have been studied, and manufacturers have been contacted to provide them. The project milestones completed to date are the:

362

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System DE-FC26-02NT41664 Goal Improve the rate of penetration and reduce the incidence of premature equipment failures in deep hard rock drilling environments by reducing harmful drillstring vibration. Performer APS Technology, Inc., Cromwell, CT 06492 Results To date, this project has produced the following results: Carried out a review of the major sources of vibration likely to influence the bottom hole assembly (BHA) and in particular the bit, and characterized them by their anticipated frequency and amplitude; Developed a software model to analyze drillstring axial vibration and determine optimal damping action; Developed a method to directly quantify the various vibration modes using a system of four accelerometers and a magnetometer mounted in a sensor sub of the damper component;

363

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative DE-NT-0004654 Goal The goal of the Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) is to address sensor system needs for low-cost monitoring and inspection as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap. This project intends to develop a new sensing and continuous monitoring system with alternative use as an inspection method. Performers Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC), Johnstown, PA 15213 Carnegie Melon University (CMU), Pittsburgh, PA 15904 Background Pie Chart showing Pipeline Installation Dates for U.S. Gas Transmission and Distribution Lines Figure 1. Pipeline Installation Dates for U.S. Gas Transmission and Distribution Lines

364

Industrial Potential for Substitution of Electricity for Oil and Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prospect of natural gas decontrol as well as uncertainties of gas and other fuel supplies have aroused interest in electric processes among industrial officials. Where there is ample electric power supply at reasonable cost, an opportunity exists for selected industry groups to make cost-effective conversions to electric processes. Technological advances in high-efficiency electric process equipment increase the potential for energy substitution. This, in turn, is changing the market outlook for electric utilities. By and large, energy substitution decisions will be based on their economic and technical feasibility. In view of projections of the long-term price escalations of oil and natural gas, the economic of choosing electricity are looking good at present. This paper will describe certain industrial applications where the substitution of electricity for oil and natural gas appears economically advantageous.

Reynolds, S. D.; Gardner, J. R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Zhuhai Oil Energy Science and Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhuhai Oil Energy Science and Technology Zhuhai Oil Energy Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhuhai Oil Energy Science and Technology Place Zhuhai, China Sector Biofuels Stock Symbol BMGP Coordinates 22.27094°, 113.577261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.27094,"lon":113.577261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

366

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Meeting to someone by E-mail 2 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

367

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program

368

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Meeting to someone by E-mail 1 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

369

Micro and Nano-enabled Separation Technologies for the Oil and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and ... and cost effective separation technologies are in demand in diverse oil and gas...

370

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

371

The domestic natural gas and oil initiative. Energy leadership in the world economy  

SciTech Connect

Two key overarching goals of this Initiative are enhancing the efficiency and competitiveness of U.S. industry and reducing the trends toward higher imports. These goals take into account new Federal policies that reflect economic needs, including economic growth, deficit reduction, job creation and security, and global competitiveness, as well as the need to preserve the environment, improve energy efficiency, and provide for national security. The success of this Initiative clearly requires coordinated strategies that range far beyond policies primarily directed at natural gas and oil supplies. Therefore, this Initiative proposes three major strategic activities: Strategic Activity 1 -- increase domestic natural gas and oil production and environmental protection by advancing and disseminating new exploration, production, and refining technologies; Strategic Activity 2 -- stimulate markets for natural gas and natural-gas-derived products, including their use as substitutes for imported oil where feasible; and Strategic Activity 3 -- ensure cost-effective environmental protection by streamlining and improving government communication, decision making, and regulation. Finally, the Initiative will reexamine the costs and benefits of increase oil imports through a broad new Department of Energy study. This study will form the basis for additional actions found to be warranted under the study.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) High Temperature Electronics Development of Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) High Temperature Electronics DE-FC26-03NT41834 Goal The goal is to improve the reliability of high-temperature electronic components found in the downhole “smart drilling” tools needed to improve drilling efficiency and success rate at depths of 20,000 feet and below and temperatures greater than 225°C. This will be done by utilizing Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) based technology to develop various high priority electronic components. Performer Honeywell, Inc., Plymouth, Minnesota 55441 Joint Industry Partners: BP, Baker Hughes, Goodrich Aerospace, Honeywell, Schlumberger, Intelliserv, Quartzdyne. Results The project has resulted in the successful design and testing of four key components needed for high temperature drilling equipment. These include: an Electrically-Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory (EEPROM); a Field Programmable Gate Array; a Precision Amplifier (OpAmp) and a Sigma-Delta Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC). The establishment of a Joint Industry Project (JIP) and participating companies’ commitment was a major reason for the project success. Major results include:

373

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells DE-FC26-03NT41836 Goal: The goal of the project is to develop a supercement capable of sealing the annuli of and providing long-term integrity in deep, hot wells. Performers CSI Technologies, LLC , Houston, TX Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Results Phase I work involved a literature search on cements and evaluation of Portland and non-Portland cement systems and various formulations within these systems. Laboratory work involved more than 1,100 tests on 169 different formulations. Baseline testing established a foundation for comparison. Conventional and unconventional mechanical tests were conducted, and many systems were tested at high temperatures. From this work six candidate systems comprising some 10 formulas were recommended for further analysis in Phase II: reduced water systems, magnesium oxide, molybdenum trioxide, fibers, epoxy (resins), and graded particle systems.

374

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 2: technology characterization and production scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A technology characterization of processes that may be used in the oil shale industry is presented. The six processes investigated are TOSCO II, Paraho Direct, Union B, Superior, Occidental MIS, and Lurgi-Ruhrgas. A scanario of shale oil production to the 300,000 BPD level by 1990 is developed. (ACR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Status of enhanced oil recovery technology  

SciTech Connect

The various enhanced oil recovery processes are discussed and classified into the following categories: (1) polymer waterflooding; (2) steam processes; (3) miscible gas (CO/sub 2/) processes; (4) surfactant flooding; and (5) in-situ combustion. Polymer flooding alone is of limited applicability and production from polymer projects is unlikely to become highly significant. Steam processes are now economic for favorable prospects, and recovery levels range from 5 to 35%. Miscible gas processes are particularly applicable to those reservoirs with favorable geology located near sources of CO/sub 2/, and production could become significant in the next five years, but not sooner due to the time necessary to develop CO/sub 2/ sources and construct distribution systems. Recovery levels for the miscible gas processes are in the 5 to 15% range. Most surfactant processes are still in the research stage, and will not yield significant production for at least ten years. Ten to fifteen % of the original oil-in-place can be recovered through these processes. In Situ combustion processes are currently economic in some cases, but the ultimate potential is presently very limited unless significant technical breakthroughs are made in the future. It is estimated that the ultimate potential for present enhanced oil recovery processes in the conterminous United States is up to 20 billion barrels of petroleum.

Mattax, C.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic (EM) Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications Electromagnetic (EM) Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications DE-FC26-02NT41656 Goal: To develop a wireless, electromagnetic (EM) based telemetry system to facilitate efficient deep natural gas drilling at depths beyond 20,000 feet and up to 392˚F (200˚C) Background: The wireless, EM telemetry system will be designed to facilitate measurement-while-drilling (MWD) operations within a high temperature, deep drilling environment. The key components that will be developed and tested include a new high efficiency power amplifier (PA) and advanced signal processing algorithms. The novel PA architecture will provide greater and more efficient power delivery from the subterranean transmitter through the transmission media. Maximum energy transfer is especially critical downhole, where the transmitter’s principal power source is typically a battery. Increased energy at the receiver antenna equates to increased recoverable signal amplitude; thus, the overall receiver signal-to-noise ratio is improved resulting in deeper operational depth capability.

377

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect

The general goal of this study is to present the prospects of shale oil within the context of (1) environmental constraints, (2) available natural and economic resources, and (3) the characteristics of existing and emerging technology. The objectives are: to review shale oil technologies objectively as a means of supplying domestically produced fuels within environmental, social, economic, and legal/institutional constraints; using available data, analyses, and experienced judgment, to examine the major points of uncertainty regarding potential impacts of oil shale development; to resolve issues where data and analyses are compelling or where conclusions can be reached on judgmental grounds; to specify issues which cannot be resolved on the bases of the data, analyses, and experienced judgment currently available; and when appropriate and feasible, to suggest ways for the removal of existing uncertainties that stand in the way of resolving outstanding issues.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Sequestration of Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to unconventional deposits bringing along the need to dispose of, or sequester, ... The ILS process allows recycling of mineral oils from drill cuttings into new...

379

U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

380

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0...

382

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

383

Figure 41. U.S. Brent crude oil and Henry Hub natural gas spot ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 41. U.S. Brent crude oil and Henry Hub natural gas spot market prices in three cases, 2005-2040 Natural Gas Crude Oil Reference

384

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? A measure of the total cost to produce crude oil and natural gas is the upstream costs.

385

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

386

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service on Northeast Heating Oil Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Assesses the extent of interruptible natural gas contracts and their effect on heating oil demand in the Northeast.

Elizabeth E. Campbell

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

388

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: Proved Reserves: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 2010 (August 2012).

389

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Chapter 56 Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource regulating well spacing, preventing of flaring or venting of natural gas, regulating production from wells oil/gas and oil/water ratios, and no-flaring and venting rules for natural gas. 1 Introduction

Garousi, Vahid

390

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

391

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 6 Utilization of Supercritical Fluid Technology for Oil And Oilseed Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 6 Utilization of Supercritical Fluid Technology for Oil And Oilseed Processing Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 U

392

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail 2005 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative

393

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail 10 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative

394

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 View History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Exploratory NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Development Wells Drilled NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012

395

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Thousand Dollars per Well All (Real*) 1,011.9 1,127.4 1,528.5 1,522.3 1,801.3 3,481.8 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 1,054.2 1,199.5 1,673.1 1,720.7 2,101.7 4,171.7 1960-2007 Crude Oil (Nominal) 882.8 1,037.3 1,441.8 1,920.4 2,238.6 4,000.4 1960-2007 Natural Gas (Nominal) 991.9 1,106.0 1,716.4 1,497.6 1,936.2 3,906.9 1960-2007 Dry Holes (Nominal) 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9 2,664.6 6,131.2 1960-2007 Dollars per Foot All (Real*) 187.46 203.25 267.28 271.16 324.00 574.46 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 195.31 216.27 292.57 306.50 378.03 688.30 1960-2007

396

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential...

397

NETL: News Release - Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs Innovative Compressor Design Can Extend Productive Life of Stripper Wells,...

398

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure technology development and marketing, small scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) production, and codes & standards. Many attendees also toured Pacific Gas & Electric's...

399

Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Technology Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Technology Assessment June 30, 2012 DOENETL-20121539 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of...

400

Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.  

SciTech Connect

The largest volume waste stream associated with oil and gas production is produced water. A survey conducted by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 20.9 billion barrels of produced water were disposed of in 1985 (Wakim 1987). Of this total, 91% was disposed of through disposal wells or was injected for enhanced oil recovery projects. Treatment and disposal of produced water represents a significant cost for operators. A relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), has been developed to reduce the cost of handling produced water. DOWS separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. When DOWS are used, additional oil may be recovered as well. In cases where surface processing or disposal capacity is a limiting factor for further production within a field, the use of DOWS to dispose of some of the produced water can allow additional production within that field. Simultaneous injection using DOWS minimizes the opportunity for contamination of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) through leaks in tubing and casing during the injection process. This report uses the acronym 'DOWS' although the technology may also be referred to as DHOWS or as dual injection and lifting systems (DIALS). Simultaneous injection using DOWS has the potential to profoundly influence the domestic oil industry. The technology has been shown to work in limited oil field applications in the United States and Canada. Several technical papers describing DOWS have been presented at oil and gas industry conferences, but for the most part, the information on the DOWS technology has not been widely transferred to operators, particularly to small or medium-sized independent U.S. companies. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) is to assess the feasibility of promising oil and gas technologies that offer improved operating performance, reduced operating costs, or greater environmental protection. To further this mission, the NPTO provided funding to a partnership of three organizations a DOE national laboratory (Argonne National Laboratory), a private-sector consulting firm (CH2M-Hill), and a state government agency (Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) to assess the feasibility of DOWS. The purpose of this report is to provide general information to the industry on DOWS by describing the existing uses of simultaneous injection, summarizing the regulatory implications of simultaneous injection, and assessing the potential future uses of the technology. Chapter 2 provides a more detailed description of the two major types of DOWS. Chapter 3 summarizes the existing U.S. and Canadian installations of DOWS equipment, to the extent that operators have been willing to share their data. Data are provided on the location and geology of existing installations, production information before and after installation of the DOWS, and costs. Chapter 4 provides an overview of DOWS-specific regulatory requirements imposed by some state agencies and discusses the regulatory implications of handling produced water downhole, rather than pumping it to the surface and reinjecting it. Findings and conclusions are presented in Chapter 5 and a list of the references cited in the report is provided in Chapter 6. Appendix A presents detailed data on DOWS installations. This report presents the findings of Phase 1 of the simultaneous injection project, the feasibility assessment. Another activity of the Phase 1 investigation is to design a study plan for Phase 2 of the project, field pilot studies. The Phase 2 study plan is being developed separately and is not included in this report.

Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.; Environmental Assessment; CH2M Hill; Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of the environmental control technology for oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

The environmental control technology proposed in the various oil shale projects which are under development are examined. The technologies for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the processed shale were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. There are no published national standards against which to judge the stabilization and vegetation of the processed shale. However, based on the goal of producing an environmentally and aesthetically acceptable finished processed shale pile, it seems probable that this can be accomplished. It is concluded that the environmental control technology is available to meet all current legal requirements. This was not the case before Colorado changed their applicable Air Pollution regulations in August of 1977; the previous ones for the oil shale region were sufficiently stringent to have caused a problem for the current stage of oil shale development. Similarly, the federal air-quality, non-deterioration regulations could be interpreted in the future in ways which would be difficult for the oil shale industry to comply with. The Utah water-quality, non-deterioration regulations could also be a problem. Thus, the only specific regulations which may be a problem are the non-deterioration parts of air and water quality regulations. The unresolved areas of environmental concern with oil shale processing are mostly for the problems not covered by existing environmental law, e.g., trace metals, polynuclear organics, ground water-quality changes, etc. These may be problems, but no evidence is yet available that these problems will prevent the successful commercialization of oil shale production.

de Nevers, N.; Eckhoff, D.; Swanson, S.; Glenne, B.; Wagner, F.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Office of Oil and Natural Gas Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The domestic oil resource recovery potential outlined in this report is based on six basin-oriented assessments released by the Department of Energy (DOE) in April 2005. These estimates do not include the additional oil resource potential outlined in the ten basin-oriented assessments or recoverable resources from residual oil zones, as discussed in related reports issued by DOE in February 2006. Accounting for these, the future recovery potential from domestic undeveloped oil resources by applying EOR technology is 240 billion barrels, boosting potentially recoverable resources to 430 billion barrels. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Energy.

Prepared For; Vello A. Kuuskraa; George J. Koperna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Office of Oil and Natural Gas Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the analysis in this report was performed in late 2005. The domestic oil resource recovery potential outlined in the report is based on six basin-oriented assessments released by the United States Department of Energy in April 2005. These estimates do not include the additional oil resource potential outlined in the ten basin-oriented assessments or recoverable resources from residual oil zones, as discussed in related reports issued by Department of Energy in February 2006. Accounting for these, the future recovery potential from domestic undeveloped oil resources by applying EOR technology is 240 billion barrels, boosting potentially recoverable resources to 430 billion barrels. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily

L. Stephen Melzer; Prepared For; L. Stephen Melzer; Melzer Consulting

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Executive summary. Western oil shale developmet: a technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objectives are to review shale oil technologies as a means of supplying domestically produced fuels within environmental, social, economic, and legal/institutional constraints; using available data, analyses, and experienced judgment, to examine the major points of uncertainty regarding potential impacts of oil shale development; to resolve issues where data and analyses are compelling or where conclusions can be reached on judgmental grounds; to specify issues which cannot be resolved on the bases of the data, analyses, and experienced judgment currently available; and when appropriate and feasible, to suggest ways for the removal of existing uncertainties that stand in the way of resolving outstanding issues.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

User`s guide to natural gas technologies  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas technologies that were new five years ago have now been tested in the real world. Those shown to be successful are being improved constantly, and adopted quickly, now that the initial developmental stage is past. This book describes some of these important technological improvements, covering both new engineering concepts and new products which have emerged, as well as important innovations to existing technologies. Many of the chapters include economic analyses which identify the cost savings attributable to the technologies described. Specific areas of development addressed include gas cooling, chillers, desiccant technologies, cogeneration, heating systems, and other natural gas technologies.

Payne, F.W. [ed.] [comp.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #488: September 24, 2007 World Natural  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: September 24, 8: September 24, 2007 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2005 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #488: September 24, 2007 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2005 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #488: September 24, 2007 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2005 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #488: September 24, 2007 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2005 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #488: September 24, 2007 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2005 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #488: September 24, 2007 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2005 on Digg

408

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #337: September 13, 2004 World Natural  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: September 13, 7: September 13, 2004 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #337: September 13, 2004 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #337: September 13, 2004 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #337: September 13, 2004 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #337: September 13, 2004 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #337: September 13, 2004 World Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Digg

409

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 20,182 27,443 33,331 31,799 31,380 31,236 38,545 1990's 34,332 35,391 41,284 41,532 42,497 46,916 61,276 69,084 71,019 75,034 2000's 68,752 67,034 64,735 56,363 53,805 53,404 38,313 43,379 43,300 40,023 2010's 39,444 35,020 12,703 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

410

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NETL: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are designed to: enhance domestic oil and natural gas supplies through advanced exploration and production technology; examine water related concerns; investigate...

412

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 26, 2009 March 26, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming Researchers Seek Patent for Isotopic Ratio to Evaluate Water in Coalbeds Washington, DC -Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, was the creation of 27 jobs over the project's 2+ years.

413

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: August 23, 4: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on AddThis.com... Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption

417

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: August 27, 2: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth on AddThis.com... Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth

418

US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

419

EIA Report 11/10/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hurricane Impacts on the U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Markets. As of Thursday, November 10, 3:00 pm. Shut-in Status. Date: Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total

420

"End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment- House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Unconventional Oil and Natural Gas Resources By: Anthony V. Cugini, Director National Energy Technology Laboratory

422

Proceedings of the 1999 Oil and Gas Conference: Technology Options for Producer Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1999 Oil & Gas Conference was cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) on June 28 to 30 in Dallas, Texas. The Oil & Gas Conference theme, Technology Options for Producer Survival, reflects the need for development and implementation of new technologies to ensure an affordable, reliable energy future. The conference was attended by nearly 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, DOE, and other Government agencies. Three preconference workshops (Downhole Separation Technologies: Is it Applicable for Your Operations, Exploring and developing Naturally Fractured Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs from the Rocky Mountains to the Austin Chalk, and Software Program Applications) were held. The conference agenda included an opening plenary session, three platform sessions (Sessions 2 and 3 were split into 2 concurrent topics), and a poster presentation reception. The platform session topics were Converting Your Resources Into Reserves (Sessions 1 and 2A), Clarifying Your Subsurface Vision (Session 2B), and High Performance, Cost Effective Drilling, Completion, Stimulation Technologies (Session 3B). In total, there were 5 opening speakers, 30 presenters, and 16 poster presentations.

None available

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama spoke of the importance of reducing our reliance on imported oil by increasing domestic energy production. As the U.S. has only 2 percent of the world's oil reserves, natural gas and renewable energy production will play an important role in reducing our net oil imports.

424

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama spoke of the importance of reducing our reliance on imported oil by increasing domestic energy production. As the U.S. has only 2 percent of the world's oil reserves, natural gas and renewable energy production will play an important role in reducing our net oil imports.

425

Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assay of natural and synthetic crude oils including a Fischer-Retorted Estonian shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DMSO extracts of a variety of natural and synthetic crude oils were tested for genotoxic activity in the Ames/Salmonella bioassay. Both mutagenic and cytotoxic potentials are cited. Natural crude oils and their refined products and upgraded synfuels are less mutagenic than parent crude shale oils which in turn are less mutagenic than the coal derived distillate blend sample, SRC II. However, this order is not true for cytotoxicity induced by these oil samples; therefore, caution must be exercised in the assessment of their mutagenic potential without consideration of other influential factors including cytotoxicity.

Strniste, G.F.; Nickols, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrated Petroleum Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy Murphy Larry Zirker Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program * Performed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Fleet Operations * Goal - Support DOE's efforts to reduce petroleum consumption & ensure the energy security of the United States Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Objectives - Test the concept of using oil bypass filters to minimize engine oil changes & the generation of waste oils - Demonstration the economics of oil bypass filter systems - Estimate potential engine oil saving from bypass filter technologies that can be achieved by INEEL,

427

Arctic oil and natural gas resources - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind Geothermal ... seals, whales, and other sea life. The adequacy of existing technology to manage offshore oil spills in an arctic environment is another ...

428

Shale oil technology: status of the industry. Working paper no. 7  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of the shale oil industry, with emphasis upon the engineering options for producing synthetic oil from shale. The first section describes alternate technologies to extract the process oil from shale. The second section evaluates resource, environmental, and economic factors which influence the shale oil industry.

Eaton, D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER SOURCES An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM of natural gas, which is mostly CH4, occurs through natural gas production, oil production, and coal mining

Delucchi, Mark

430

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: December 6, 2: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises on AddThis.com... Fact #652: December 6, 2010

431

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: November 12, 5: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #495: November 12, 2007 Oil Price and Economic Growth, 1971-2006 on

432

United States Producing and Nonproducting Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004 By Philip M. Budzik Abstract The Form EIA-23 survey of crude oil and natural gas producer reserves permits reserves to be differentiated into producing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are available to the crude oil and natural gas markets, and nonproducing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are unavailable to the crude oil and natural gas markets. The proportion of nonproducing reserves relative to total reserves grew for both crude oil and natural gas from 1985 through 2004, and this growth is apparent in almost every major domestic production region. However, the growth patterns in nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves are

433

Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: 1 October 1998 Reporting Period End Date: 31 March 2003 Principal Investigator: Anbo Wang Principal Report Authors: Kristie L. Cooper, Gary R. Pickrell, Anbo Wang Report Issued: June 2003 DOE Award Number: DE-FT26-98BC15167 Submitted by: Center for Photonics Technology Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061-0111 ii Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

434

TYPE CURVES FOR PRODUCTION TRANSIENT ANALYSIS OFMULTILATERAL WELLS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED SHALE GASRESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing demand for oil and natural gas and depletion of conventional reserves has led tothe advancement of technology to economically produce oil and natural gas (more)

Saxena, Aditya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Drilling efficiency is a key driver of oil and natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increases in drilling efficiency have contributed to the breakdown of traditional methods that seek to estimate oil and natural gas production based principally on ...

436

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas spot prices and its stability over time.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The historical basis for a link between crude oil and natural gas prices was examined to determine whether one has existed in the past and (more)

Ramberg, David J. (David John)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Essays on the U.S. oil and natural gas industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation investigates various aspects of the U.S. offshore crude oil and natural gas production market. In the first essay, I investigate whether energy firms (more)

Littlefield, Thomas Lucas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook: the Gulf of Mexico ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook: the Gulf of Mexico and Other

439

Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is a special analysis report on hurricanes and their effects on oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico region.

Information Center

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Low natural gas prices in 2012 reduced returns for some oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on Evaluate Energy database and company financial statements. Note: Results based on data from 60 oil and natural ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. ... How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas?

442

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Proved Reserves, Crude Oil," "Proved Reserves, Lease Condensate," and "Proved Reserves, Natural Gas" in Glossary. 7 Includes Federal offshore and State ...

443

Low natural gas prices in 2012 reduced returns for some oil and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Producers with lower proportions of liquids in their total oil and gas production generally had ... wholesale natural gas prices in the United States and Canada fell ...

444

EIA Report 9/26/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts. Prices. NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/26/2008: Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008: change ...

445

EIA Report 11/3/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita damaged a number of natural gas processing facilities on the Gulf Coast. The loss has and will ... Louisiana Oil Profile L ...

446

EIA Report 12/13/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita damaged a number of natural gas processing facilities on the Gulf Coast. The loss has and will ... Louisiana Oil Profile L ...

447

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices and its effect on demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall theme of the three chapters is the relationship between the prices of natural gas and crude oil, and the factors that cause short (more)

Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Table 4.4 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4.4 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation, 1949-2011 (Number of Rigs) Year: By Site : By Type: Total 1: Onshore

449

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research pipelines from outofstate supply basins located in the southwestern United States, the Rocky Mountains, and Canada. These pipelines run throughout the state, including underneath high population areas

450

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs May 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). OsComp Systems designed and tested the novel compressor design with funding from the DOE-supported Stripper Well Consortium, an industry-driven organization whose members include natural gas and petroleum producers,

452

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... between the production of oil from the layers of shale within the Bakken Formation and the extraction of oil from oil shale plays. See ...

453

DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results October 2, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy plans to introduce a new, user-friendly online repository of oil and natural gas research results at the Society of Petroleum Engineers' Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, to be held in New Orleans, La., October 4-7, 2009. By providing easy access to the results of nearly four decades of research supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's Oil and Natural Gas Program, the knowledge management database could ultimately help boost recovery of the nation's oil and gas resources. The database largely evolved from a recommendation made by the Federal

454

Market Analysis for Natural Gas Compression Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas compression market offers huge growth potential for the electric utility industry. As utilities search for ways to expand electricity sales, a combination of economic, environmental, and regulatory factors are further encouraging the use of electric motors in a market that has long been dominated by gas-driven systems. This report provides information and strategies that can help utilities capture a larger share of the gas compression market.

1997-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

455

Chris Smith Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chris Smith Chris Smith Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives March 28, 2012 Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush, and Members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) perspective on two legislative proposals - the discussion drafts of the "Strategic Energy Production Act of 2012" and the "Gasoline Regulations Act of 2012." We share the concern of the Members regarding the burden that the rising price of gasoline places on U.S. families and businesses. For decades, volatile energy prices have threatened economic security for millions of American households. That volatility has hit consumers hard

456

Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles James Francfort American Filtration and Separations Society April 2005 Presentation Outline * Background & Objectives * Oil bypass filters - features & reported benefits * INL testing method * puraDYN oil bypass filters * Refined Global Solutions (RGS) oil bypass filters * Testing results & trends * Particulate and ferrography testing * Initial INL Oil Bypass Filter Economics * Potential fleet oil savings * Testing Status Bypass Filter Evaluation - Background * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) * Vehicles operated by Idaho National Laboratory's Fleet Operations group * Idaho National Laboratory

457

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil pollution sources. A field of strong hydrocarbon seepage offshore of Coal Oil Point near Santa Barbara in the Coal Oil Point field to measure directly the atmospheric gas flux from three seeps of varying size

California at Santa Barbara, University of

458

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80: July 11, 2005 80: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380:

459

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: May 5, 2003 6: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266:

460

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: June 10, 2002 0: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies oil natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: May 11, 1999 8: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May

462

Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Available Technologies: Low Power, Lightweight Nanoparticle ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Monitoring harmful hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas emissions from. Oil and natural gas extraction and distribution

465

IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1 Jeffrey L and natural gas development on grouse populations and habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge on the effects of oil and gas development and production on prairie grouse based

Beck, Jeffrey L.

466

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

467

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: November 19, 1: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Digg

469

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: June 13, 2005 6: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Digg

470

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells. One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells