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Sample records for technologies oil natural

  1. Oil & Natural Gas Technology

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    or any agency thereof. 3 ABSTRACT In our research, we are ... However, the first generation technologies have proven to be ... However, during the course of this project, CD-adapco ...

  2. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration...

  3. Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and Significant Research Accomplishments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercialized Technologies and Significant Research Accomplishments O il and natural gas are the lifeblood of our economy, accounting for roughly 62 percent of the energy consumed in the United States in 2009. As the only U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory dedicated to fossil energy, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) works to ensure that domestic natural gas and oil can remain part of the U.S. energy portfolio for decades to come. Research focused on accelerating

  4. Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Final Technical Report Project Period: October 1, 2012 - January 31, 2015 Submitted by: Carol Blanton Lutken, Leonardo Macelloni, Marco D'Emidio, John Dunbar, Paul Higley August, 2015 DOE Award No.: DE- FE0010141 The University of Mississippi Mississippi Mineral Resources

  5. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-05-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

  6. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-05-31

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

  7. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY02. Activities were maintained at recent record levels. Strategic planning from multiple sources within the framework of the organization gives PTTC the vision to have even more impact in the future. The Houston Headquarters (HQ) location has strived to serve PTTC well in better connecting with producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database, exhibit at more trade shows and a new E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience. All considered, the PTTC network has proven to be an effective way to reach domestic producers locally, regionally and nationally.

  8. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  9. Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This report presents information about the Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin: its location, production, geology, resources, proved reserves, and the technology being used for development. This is the first in a series intending to share information about technology-based oil and natural gas plays.

  10. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2003-12-15

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback confirms that producers are taking action with the information they receive. RLO Directors captured examples demonstrating how PTTC activities influenced industry activity. Additional follow-up in all regions explored industry's awareness of PTTC and the services it provides. PTTC publishes monthly case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' and monthly Tech Connections columns in the ''American Oil and Gas Reporter''. Email Tech Alerts are utilized to notify the O&G community of DOE solicitations and demonstration results, PTTC key technical information and meetings, as well as industry highlights. Workshop summaries are posted online at www.pttc.org. PTTC maintains an active exhibit schedule at national industry events. The national communications effort continues to expand the audience PTTC reaches. The network of national and regional websites has proven effective for conveying technology-related information and facilitating user's access to basic oil and gas data, which supplement regional and national newsletters. The regions frequently work with professional societies and producer associations in co-sponsored events and there is a conscious effort to incorporate findings from DOE-supported research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects within events. The level of software training varies by region, with the Rocky Mountain Region taking the lead. Where appropriate, regions develop information products that provide a service to industry and, in some cases, generate moderate revenues. Data access is an on-going industry priority, so all regions work to facilitate access to public source databases. Various outreach programs also emanate from the resource centers, including targeted visits to producers.

  11. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

  12. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Duttlinger

    1999-12-01

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-10-31

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  14. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Duttlinger

    2001-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization efficiently has an impact on business economics as the focus remains on proven applicable technologies, which target cost reduction and efficiency gains.

  15. Oil & Gas Technology Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new ... GE Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center Mark Little, SVP and chief technology ...

  16. Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil ...

  17. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil and Natural Gas News FE Oil and Natural Gas News RSS May 11, 2016 NETL Launches a University Coalition for Fossil Energy Research at Pennsylvania State University The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected Pennsylvania State University as the lead institution to establish the University Coalition for Fossil Energy Research. The Coalition will bring together a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from participating universities to address the

  18. Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the discovered and undiscovered Arctic oil and natural gas resource base with respect to their location and concentration. The paper also discusses the cost and impediments to developing Arctic oil and natural gas resources, including those issues associated with environmental habitats and political boundaries.

  19. Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural ...

  20. FE Oil and Natural Gas News

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oil-natural-gas-news Office of Fossil Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585202-586-6660 en TechLine: Newly Released Study Highlights...

  1. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-05

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1989, and production volumes for the year 1989 for the total United States and for selected states and state sub-divisions. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production reported separately. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. 28 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. The Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil R&D Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Jared Ciferno Director, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil The National Energy Technology Laboratory & The Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil R&D Program August 18, 2015 Tribal leader forum: U.S. Department of Energy oil and gas technical assistance capabilities Denver, Colorado 2 National Energy Technology Laboratory National Energy Technology Laboratory * Partner in DOE's national laboratory system * Five locations with 1,200 staff * 'Full-service' DOE National Laboratory

  3. Technologies to characterize natural gas emissions tested in field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experiments Natural gas emissions tested in field experiments Technologies to characterize natural gas emissions tested in field experiments A new collaborative science program is pioneering the development of ultra-sensitive methane-sensing technology. October 28, 2013 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center, RMOTC, which includes a small areas with active oil and gas production. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center, RMOTC, which includes a small areas with active oil and gas production.

  4. Oil shale: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and ...

  6. Construction progresses at GE's Oil & Gas Technology Center ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City Click to email this to a friend ... the Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City Construction is well underway on ...

  7. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers ...

  8. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production RTI International report-out at the CTAB webinar on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil ...

  9. Natural Gas Technologies Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Gas Technologies Center Name: Natural Gas Technologies Center Address: 1350, Nobel, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada...

  10. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Oil Production Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production RTI International report-out at the CTAB webinar on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production. PDF icon ctab_webinar_bio_oils_production.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Bio-oil Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oils

  11. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    future energy supplies. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich...

  12. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Oil Upgrading Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading PNNL report-out at the CTAB webinar on Bio-Oil Upgrading. PDF icon ctab_webinar_bio_oils_upgrading.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production Thermochemical Conversion Proceeses to Aviation Fuels 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Bio-oil

  13. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 Next Release Date: 2292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

  14. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1,872 1,824 1,629 1,296 1,066 1973-2015 Offshore 58 53 59 53 52 43 1973-2015 By Type Crude Oil 1,596 1,573 1,539 1,362 1,050 857 1973-2015 Natural Gas 328 351 342 320 296 250...

  15. Table 4.3 Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 1949-2010 Year Crude Oil 1 Natural Gas (Dry) Natural Gas Liquids 1 Total Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet 2 ...

  16. "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ...

  17. Oil shale technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This collaborative project with industrial participants studied oil shale retorting through an integrated program of fundamental research, mathematical model development and operation of a 4-tonne-per-day solid recirculation oil shale test unit. Quarterly, project personnel presented progress and findings to a Project Guidance Committee consisting of company representatives and DOE program management. We successfully operated the test unit, developed the oil shale process (OSP) mathematical model, evaluated technical plans for process scale up and determined economics for a successful small scale commercial deployment, producing premium motor fuel, specility chemicals along with electricity co-production. In budget negotiations, DOE funding for this three year CRADA was terminated, 17 months prematurely, as of October 1993. Funds to restore the project and continue the partnership have not been secured.

  18. Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Install a new ...

  19. Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oils |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bio-Oils Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oils Introduction presentation report-out at the CTAB webinar on bio-oils. PDF icon ctab_webinar_bio_oils_intro.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading 2013 Peer Review Presnentations-Plenaries

  20. Zhuhai Oil Energy Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it. Zhuhai Oil Energy Science and Technology is a company based in Zhuhai, China. Zhuai Oil Energy produces biofuels and recently increased its production capacity to 60 metric...

  1. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil Upgrading Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading PNNL report-out at the CTAB webinar on Bio-Oil Upgrading. PDF icon ctabwebinarbiooilsupgrading.p...

  2. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

  3. Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

    1995-11-01

    The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

  4. Hubei Xinda Bio oil Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xinda Bio oil Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hubei Xinda Bio-oil Technology Co Ltd Place: Hubei Province, China Product: Hubei-based biofuel producer....

  5. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  6. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  7. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  8. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  9. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

  10. Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003...

  11. ,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  12. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  13. SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    policy on critical infrastructure protection. PDF icon SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY More Documents & Publications Energy Sector-Specific ...

  14. Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ONG-C2M2) | Department of Energy Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) The Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) was established as a result of the Administration's efforts to improve electricity subsector cybersecurity capabilities, and to

  15. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE will continue to work together to ensure safe, sustainable offshore production of oil and natural gas. August 7, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Third Proposed Facility to...

  16. Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price.

  17. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud See All Natural Gas Reports U.S. Crude Oil and ... In 2014, U.S. crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves increased to 39.9 billion ...

  18. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

  19. Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department works to ensure domestic and global oil supplies are environmentally sustainable and invests in research and technology to make oil drilling cleaner and more efficient.

  20. Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (February 2014) | Department of Energy Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ONG-C2M2) is a derivative of the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1. The ES-C2M2 was developed in support of a White House initiative led by the Department of

  1. Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

  2. Models, Simulators, and Data-driven Resources for Oil and Natural Gas Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NETL provides a number of analytical tools to assist in conducting oil and natural gas research. Software, developed under various DOE/NETL projects, includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation.[copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/Software_main.html] Links lead users to methane hydrates models, preedictive models, simulators, databases, and other software tools or resources.

  3. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

  4. Crude oil and natural gas dissolved in deep, hot geothermal waters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Crude oil and natural gas dissolved in deep, hot geothermal waters of ... Title: Crude oil and natural gas dissolved in deep, hot geothermal waters of petroleum ...

  5. Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    more about energy-efficient furnaces and boilers. Addthis Related Articles Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Energy Saver Guide: Tips on Saving Money and Energy at Home...

  6. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the risks while enhancing the environmental performance of drilling for natural gas and oil in ultra-deepwater settings have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  7. Oil-free centrifugal hydrogen compression technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heshmat, Hooshang

    2014-05-31

    One of the key elements in realizing a mature market for hydrogen vehicles is the deployment of a safe and efficient hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can compete economically with current fuels. The challenge, however, is that hydrogen, being the lightest and smallest of gases with a lower viscosity and density than natural gas, readily migrates through small spaces and is difficult to compresses efficiently. While efficient and cost effective compression technology is crucial to effective pipeline delivery of hydrogen, the compression methods used currently rely on oil lubricated positive displacement (PD) machines. PD compression technology is very costly, has poor reliability and durability, especially for components subjected to wear (e.g., valves, rider bands and piston rings) and contaminates hydrogen with lubricating fluid. Even so called “oil-free” machines use oil lubricants that migrate into and contaminate the gas path. Due to the poor reliability of PD compressors, current hydrogen producers often install duplicate units in order to maintain on-line times of 98-99%. Such machine redundancy adds substantially to system capital costs. As such, DOE deemed that low capital cost, reliable, efficient and oil-free advanced compressor technologies are needed. MiTi’s solution is a completely oil-free, multi-stage, high-speed, centrifugal compressor designed for flow capacity of 500,000 kg/day with a discharge pressure of 1200 psig. The design employs oil-free compliant foil bearings and seals to allow for very high operating speeds, totally contamination free operation, long life and reliability. This design meets the DOE’s performance targets and achieves an extremely aggressive, specific power metric of 0.48 kW-hr/kg and provides significant improvements in reliability/durability, energy efficiency, sealing and freedom from contamination. The multi-stage compressor system concept has been validated through full scale performance testing of a single stage with helium similitude gas at full speed in accordance with ASME PTC-10. The experimental results indicated that aerodynamic performance, with respect to compressor discharge pressure, flow, power and efficiency exceeded theoretical prediction. Dynamic testing of a simulated multistage centrifugal compressor was also completed under a parallel program to validate the integrity and viability of the system concept. The results give strong confidence in the feasibility of the multi-stage design for use in hydrogen gas transportation and delivery from production locations to point of use.

  8. Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Investing in Oil and Natural Gas: A Few Key Issues Prepared for EIA Conference Susan Farrell, Senior Director PFC Energy April 8, 2009 Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 2 The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 3 Oil Prices Rose, But So Did Costs + 52% $0 $20 $40

  9. Proceedings of the 1998 oil heat technology conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.J.

    1998-04-01

    The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference was held on April 7--8 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under sponsorship by the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, State and Community Programs (DOE/BTS). The meeting was held in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America (PMAA). Fourteen technical presentations was made during the two-day program, all related to oil-heat technology and equipment, these will cover a range of research, developmental, and demonstration activities being conducted within the United States and Canada, including: integrated oil heat appliance system development in Canada; a miniature heat-actuated air conditioner for distributed space conditioning; high-flow fan atomized oil burner (HFAB) development; progress in the development of self tuning oil burners; application of HFAB technology to the development of a 500 watt; thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power system; field tests of the Heat Wise Pioneer oil burner and Insight Technologies AFQI; expanded use of residential oil burners to reduce ambient ozone and particulate levels by conversion of electric heated homes to oilheat; PMAA`s Oil Heat Technician`s Manual (third edition); direct venting concept development; evolution of the chimney; combating fuel related problems; the effects of red dye and metal contamination on fuel oil stability; new standard for above ground and basement residential fuel oil storage; plastic and steel composite secondary contained tanks; and money left on the table: an economic analysis of tank cleaning.

  10. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, John H.; Grape, Steven G.; Green, Rhonda S.

    1998-12-01

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  12. Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... methods and assumptions and use of best practice guidelines, allowing agencies to revise ... simulation-based science and judicial communities could align, such that there were ...

  13. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves, 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1992, as well as production volumes for the United States, and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1992. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production data presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1992 is provided.

  14. Oil shale technology and evironmental aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scinta, J.

    1982-01-01

    Oil shale processes are a combination of mining, retorting, and upgrading facilities. This work outlines the processing steps and some design considerations required in an oil shale facility. A brief overview of above ground and in situ retorts is presented; 6 retorts are described. The development aspects which the oil shale industry is addressing to protect the environment are presented.

  15. A Global R&D Network Driving GE's Oil & Gas Technology Pipeline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... GeothermalV Newest APS Fellow Driving Groundbreaking Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas unconventionalgasV New Pumping Technology for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells

  16. National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wellbore cement integrity is paramount to safe, successful oil and natural gas drilling. ... technologies for drilling systems associated with onshore oil and natural gas development. ...

  17. The Oil and Natural Gas Knowledge Management Database from NETL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) Portal provides four options for searching the documents and data that NETL-managed oil and gas research has produced over the years for DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy. Information includes R&D carried out under both historical and ongoing DOE oil and gas research and development (R&D). The Document Repository, the CD/DVD Library, the Project Summaries from 1990 to the present, and the Oil and Natural Gas Program Reference Shelf provide a wide range of flexibility and coverage.

  18. The Oil and Natural Gas Knowledge Management Database from NETL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) Portal provides four options for searching the documents and data that NETL-managed oil and gas research has produced over the years for DOEs Office of Fossil Energy. Information includes R&D carried out under both historical and ongoing DOE oil and gas research and development (R&D). The Document Repository, the CD/DVD Library, the Project Summaries from 1990 to the present, and the Oil and Natural Gas Program Reference Shelf provide a wide range of flexibility and coverage.

  19. Heavy oil and tar sands recovery and upgrading. International technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    This work provides an in-depth assessment of international technology for the recovery and upgrading of heavy crude oil and tar sands. The technologies included are currently in use, under development, or planned; emphasis is placed on post-1978 activities. The heavy oil technologies and processes considered include methods relating to the exploitation of heavy oil reservoirs, such as production from underground workings, all types of improved or enhanced recovery, subsurface extraction, and well rate stimulation. The tar sands section includes sizing the resource base and reviewing and evaluating past, present, and planned research and field developments on processes for mining, producing, extracting, and upgrading very heavy oils recovered from tar sands, e.g., bitumen recovery from tar sands where primary production was impossible because of the oil's high viscosity. 616 references.

  20. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  1. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1998 OIL HEAT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    1998-04-01

    The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference will be held on April 7--8 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under sponsorship by the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, State and Community Programs (DOE/BTS). The meeting will be held in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America (PMAA). The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference, will be the twelfth since 1984, is an important technology transfer activity and is supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology (Oilheat R and D) program at BNL. The reason for the conference is to provide a forum for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. They will provide a channel by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the Conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  4. Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Stripper Well Consortium - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Driving Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newest APS Fellow Driving Groundbreaking Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to ...

  6. Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy-funded project.

  7. Timeline: A Brief History of Oil Prices and Vehicle Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Timeline: A Brief History of Oil Prices and Vehicle Technologies Timeline: A Brief History of Oil Prices and Vehicle Technologies April 13, 2016 - 10:15am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Benjamin Franklin once expressed that there are only two things you can count on in life: death and taxes. Transportation analysts might add a third item to that list - fluctuating gas prices. In the last decade, gas prices have risen and fallen

  8. Characteristics and upgrading technologies of Chinese heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghuang Yang; Jinsen Gao

    1995-12-31

    The characteristics of typical Chinese heavy oils produced in the eastern, northwestern, and northeastern parts of China are presented to show the uniqueness of heavy oils on the Chinese mainland. Henceforth, upgrading technologies of Chinese domestic heavy crudes are discussed along this line. Two main categories of upgrading technologies, decarbonization and hydrogenation, as realized or being developed in this country are presented. It is concluded that most Chinese heavy crudes are adaptable to conventional upgrading processes.

  9. Fossil Energy Oil and Natural Gas Capabilities for Tribes Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this webinar to hear from U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program staff about the Program’s oil and gas portfolio, technologies, and research capabilities that may be of interest to Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations.

  10. Proceedings of the 1993 oil heat technology conference and workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the proceedings of the 1993 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop, held on March 25--26 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and sponsored by the US Department of Energy - Office of Building Technologies (DOE-OBT), in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America. This Conference, which was the seventh held since 1984, is a key technology-transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology (Oil-Heat R&D) program at BNL, and is aimed at providing a forum for the exchange of information among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketers of oil-fired space- conditioning equipment. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Proceedings of the 1991 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.J.

    1992-07-01

    This Conference, which was the sixth held since 1984, is a key technology-transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology program at BNL, and is aimed at providing a forum for the exchange of information among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The objectives of the Conference were to: Identify and evaluate the state-of-the-art and recommend; new initiatives to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; Foster cooperation among federal and industrial representatives with the common goal of national security via energy conservation. The 1991 Oil Technology Conference comprised: (a) two plenary sessions devoted to presentations and summations by public and private sector representatives from the United States, Europe, and Canada; and, (b) four workshops which focused on mainstream issues in oil-heating technology. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA...

  13. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA...

  14. Heavy oil and tar sands recovery and upgrading: international technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth assessment of international technology for the recovery and upgrading of heavy crude oil and tar sands. The technologies included are currently in use, under development, or planned; emphasis is placed on post-1978 activities. The heavy oil technologies and processes considered in Part I include methods relating to the exploitation of heavy oil reservoirs, such as production from undergorun workings, all types of improved or enhanced recovery, subsurface extraction, and well rate stimulation. Furthermore, even though heavy crudes are understood to include only those liquid or semiliquid hydrocarbons with a gravity of 20/sup 0/API or less, technology applied to lighter crude oils with in situ viscosities of the same order of magnitude as some US heavy oils is also included. The scope of the tar sands section (Part II) includes sizing the resource base and reviewing and evaluatin past, present, and planned research and field developments on processes for mining, producing, extracting, and upgrading very heavy oils recovered from tar sands, e.g., bitumen recovery from tar sands where primary production was impossible because of the oil's high viscosity. On the production side, very heavy oil is defined as having a gravity less than 10/sup 0/ to 12/sup 0/API and greater than 100,000-centipoise viscosity at 50/sup 0/F. On the upgrading side, hydrocarbons whose characteristics dictated additional processing prior to conventional refining into salable products (1050+/sup 0/ material) were included, regardless of origin, in order to encompass all pertinent upgrading technologies.

  15. Preliminary Reference Case Results for Oil and Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Reference Case Results for Oil and Natural Gas AEO2014 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis September 26, 2013 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AEO2014P uses ref2014.d092413a AEO2013 uses ref2013.d102312a Changes for AEO2014 2 * Revised shale & tight play resources (EURs, type curves) * Updated classification of shale gas, tight gas, &

  16. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl more oil than only water injection.

  17. The domestic natural gas and oil initiative. Energy leadership in the world economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Two key overarching goals of this Initiative are enhancing the efficiency and competitiveness of U.S. industry and reducing the trends toward higher imports. These goals take into account new Federal policies that reflect economic needs, including economic growth, deficit reduction, job creation and security, and global competitiveness, as well as the need to preserve the environment, improve energy efficiency, and provide for national security. The success of this Initiative clearly requires coordinated strategies that range far beyond policies primarily directed at natural gas and oil supplies. Therefore, this Initiative proposes three major strategic activities: Strategic Activity 1 -- increase domestic natural gas and oil production and environmental protection by advancing and disseminating new exploration, production, and refining technologies; Strategic Activity 2 -- stimulate markets for natural gas and natural-gas-derived products, including their use as substitutes for imported oil where feasible; and Strategic Activity 3 -- ensure cost-effective environmental protection by streamlining and improving government communication, decision making, and regulation. Finally, the Initiative will reexamine the costs and benefits of increase oil imports through a broad new Department of Energy study. This study will form the basis for additional actions found to be warranted under the study.

  18. U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0...

  19. U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

  20. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  1. U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

  2. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  3. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  4. Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service on Northeast Heating Oil Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    Assesses the extent of interruptible natural gas contracts and their effect on heating oil demand in the Northeast.

  5. Accelerated Depletion: Assessing Its Impacts on Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Prices and Production

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the potential impacts of accelerated depletion on domestic oil and natural gas prices and production.

  6. United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This report discusses the regional and temporal trends in producing and nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves using the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) categorization of reserves. The report first focuses on EIA's collection and reporting of crude oil and natural gas reserves data, followed by a discussion of the natural gas reserve trends, and then the crude oil reserve trends.

  7. Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 2: technology characterization and production scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    A technology characterization of processes that may be used in the oil shale industry is presented. The six processes investigated are TOSCO II, Paraho Direct, Union B, Superior, Occidental MIS, and Lurgi-Ruhrgas. A scanario of shale oil production to the 300,000 BPD level by 1990 is developed. (ACR)

  8. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The general goal of this study is to present the prospects of shale oil within the context of (1) environmental constraints, (2) available natural and economic resources, and (3) the characteristics of existing and emerging technology. The objectives are: to review shale oil technologies objectively as a means of supplying domestically produced fuels within environmental, social, economic, and legal/institutional constraints; using available data, analyses, and experienced judgment, to examine the major points of uncertainty regarding potential impacts of oil shale development; to resolve issues where data and analyses are compelling or where conclusions can be reached on judgmental grounds; to specify issues which cannot be resolved on the bases of the data, analyses, and experienced judgment currently available; and when appropriate and feasible, to suggest ways for the removal of existing uncertainties that stand in the way of resolving outstanding issues.

  9. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide gels, chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels, silicate-polymer, and chromium-xanthan gum gels did not alter an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution's ability to produce incremental oil. Incremental oil was reduced with the resorcinol-formaldehyde gel system. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were generally similar. Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow.

  10. Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oils

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Melissa Klembara Office of the Biomass Program U.S. Department of Energy Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oils Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 2 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Focus of 2007 Roadmap 2007 Roadmap "Thrust" Areas * Selective thermal processing * Syngas conversion * Utilization of conventional refinery technologies * Liquid-phase catalytic processing * Process engineering & design * Crosscutting issues 3

  11. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 92 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016

  12. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  13. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

  14. Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on imported oil, while at the same time creating new U.S. jobs and industries. ... will pursue innovations in natural gas storage tanks and fueling stations, helping to harness ...

  15. "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural ...

  16. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil ...

  17. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

  18. Oil & Gas Technology at Oklahoma City | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oklahoma City, USA > Technology & Discovery at Oklahoma City Technology & Discovery at Oklahoma City Experience efforts to safely, efficiently and reliably accelerate oil and gas industry-changing solutions at GE's newest global research facility. Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Areas of

  19. "U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Summary Data Tables, 2014"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Summary Data Tables, 2014" "Contents" "Table 1: U.S. proved reserves, and reserves changes, 2013-14" "Table 2: U.S. tight oil plays: oil production and proved reserves, 2014" "Table 3: Changes to proved reserves of U.S. natural gas reserves by source, 2013-14" "Table 4: U.S. shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2013-14" "Table 5: U.S. proved reserves of

  20. Major Fuels","Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)","Total of Major Fuels","Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ...",4657,67338,81552,66424,10...

  1. Trends in U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Upstream Costs - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and completion, which tends to lower costs, shifts towards longer wells with more complex completions, which tends to increase them, and prices for oil and natural gas, which ...

  2. Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This is a special analysis report on hurricanes and their effects on oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico region.

  3. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Sum of Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" ,,,,"Primary","Site" "All Buildings...

  4. Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Wet Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. proved reserves, and reserves changes, 2013-2014 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Wet Natural Gas billion barrels trillion cubic feet U.S. proved reserves at December 31, 2013 36.5 354.0 Total discoveries 5.4 50.5 Net revisions 0.4 1.0 Net Adjustments, Sales, Acquisitions 0.8 11.5 Production -3.2 -28.1 Net additions to U.S. proved reserves 3.4 34.8 U.S. proved reserves at December 31, 2014 39.9 388.8 Percent change in U.S. proved reserves 9.3% 9.8% Percent change calculated from unrounded

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternative Fuels » Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential to use natural gas, currently consume more than a third of the petroleum in transportation in the U.S. Natural gas is an excellent fit for a wide range of heavy-duty applications, especially transit buses, refuse

  6. Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

    2006-04-30

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on work that is required before the technology can be considered mature and ready for commercial implementation.

  7. Proceedings of the 1999 Oil and Gas Conference: Technology Options for Producer Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    2000-04-12

    The 1999 Oil & Gas Conference was cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) on June 28 to 30 in Dallas, Texas. The Oil & Gas Conference theme, Technology Options for Producer Survival, reflects the need for development and implementation of new technologies to ensure an affordable, reliable energy future. The conference was attended by nearly 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, DOE, and other Government agencies. Three preconference workshops (Downhole Separation Technologies: Is it Applicable for Your Operations, Exploring and developing Naturally Fractured Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs from the Rocky Mountains to the Austin Chalk, and Software Program Applications) were held. The conference agenda included an opening plenary session, three platform sessions (Sessions 2 and 3 were split into 2 concurrent topics), and a poster presentation reception. The platform session topics were Converting Your Resources Into Reserves (Sessions 1 and 2A), Clarifying Your Subsurface Vision (Session 2B), and High Performance, Cost Effective Drilling, Completion, Stimulation Technologies (Session 3B). In total, there were 5 opening speakers, 30 presenters, and 16 poster presentations.

  8. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  9. Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery research is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center to advance the application of miscible carbon dioxide flooding. This research is an integral part of a multidisciplinary effort to improve the technology for producing additional oil from US resources. This report summarizes the problems of the technology and the 1986 results of the ongoing research that was conducted to solve those problems. Poor reservoir volumetric sweep efficiency is the major problem associated with gas flooding and all miscible displacements. This problem results from the channeling and viscous fingering that occur due to the large differences between viscosity or density of the displacing and displaced fluids (i.e., carbon dioxide and oil, respectively). Simple modeling and core flooding studies indicate that, because of differences in fluid viscosities, breakthrough can occur after only 30% of the total pore volume (PV) of the rock has been injected with gas, while field tests have shown breakthrough occurring much earlier. The differences in fluid densities lead to gravity segregation. The lower density carbon dioxide tends to override the residual fluids in the reservoir. This process would be considerably more efficient if a larger area of the reservoir could be contacted by the gas. Current research has focused on the mobility control, computer simulation, and reservoir heterogeneity studies. Three mobility control methods have been investigated: (1) the use of polymers for direct thickening of high-density carbon dioxide, (2) mobile ''foam-like dispersions'' of carbon dioxide and an aqueous surfactant, and (3) in situ deposition of chemical precipitates. 22 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Natural Gas Fuel Cells: Technology, Advances, and Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Fuel Cells: Technology, Advantages and Opportunities March 4, 2014 Overview Introduction - Fuel Cell Basics - Fuel Cell Benefits Potential Applications - ...

  11. OIL AND NATURAL GAS SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL (ONG-C2M2)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OIL AND NATURAL GAS SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL (ONG-C2M2) Version 1.1 February 2014 Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Version 1.1 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction

  12. Natural Building Technologies Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NBT is a technical sales and product development business bringing a new generation of building materials and designs into the mainstream market. References: Natural Building...

  13. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas

  14. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? JOE PEREZ 1 & SHAWN WHITACRE 2 1 The ... TEST PURPOSE COMMENT BOSCH INJECTOR HIGH TEMPERATURE - HIGH SHEAR BOSCH INJECTOR SHEAR ...

  15. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    its effectiveness, the U.S. Department of Energy today announced plans to leverage oil and gas expertise to test the reliability and efficiency of geothermal power generation...

  16. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  17. Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment- House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Unconventional Oil and Natural Gas Resources By: Anthony V. Cugini, Director National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday

  19. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 NA NA 2010's NA NA NA 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

  20. Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Educational poster developed by the Office of Fossil Energy that graphically displays items that are made from oil and gas. Appropriate for teachers and students in K-8th grade.

  1. Chris Smith Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American families are estimated to save approximately 1.7 trillion at the pump, and cut oil consumption by 12 billion barrels. The Administration is also investing in advanced...

  2. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Economy Built to Last January 4, 2012 DOE-Sponsored Online Mapping Portal Helps Oil and Gas Producers Comply with New Mexico Compliance Rules An online mapping portal to...

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  4. Table 4.5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 21,352 3,363 12,597 37,312 66.2 79,428 12,437 43,754 135,619 3,720 3,698 3,473 3,635 1950 23,812 3,439 14,799 42,050 64.8 92,695 13,685 50,977 157,358 3,893 3,979 3,445

  5. Table 4.6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 1,406 424 7,228 9,058 20.2 5,950 2,409 26,439 34,798 4,232 5,682 3,658 3,842 1950 1,583 431 8,292 10,306 19.5 6,862 2,356 30,957 40,175 4,335 5,466 3,733 3,898 1951 1,763 454 9,539

  6. Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 19,946 2,939 5,369 28,254 81.0 73,478 10,028 17,315 100,821 3,684 3,412 3,225 3,568 1950 22,229 3,008 6,507 31,744 79.5 85,833 11,329 20,020 117,183 3,861 3,766 3,077 3,691 1951 21,416

  7. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  8. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  9. Paula Gant Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    years, domestic natural gas production has increased significantly, outpacing consumption growth, resulting in declining natural gas and LNG imports. Production growth is...

  10. EIA-914 Monthly Crude Oil, Lease Condensate, and Natural Gas Production Report Revision Policy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-914 Monthly Crude Oil, Lease Condensate, and Natural Gas Production Report Revision Policy December 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | EIA-94 Monthly Crude Oil, Lease Condensate, and Natural Gas Production Report Methodology i This revision policy was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of

  11. Factors Affecting the Relationship between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Over the 1995-2005 period, crude oil prices and U.S. natural gas prices tended to move together, which supported the conclusion that the markets for the two commodities were connected. Figure 26 illustrates the fairly stable ratio over that period between the price of low-sulfur light crude oil at Cushing, Oklahoma, and the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub on an energy-equivalent basis.

  12. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  13. Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of about 19 million barrels of U.S. crude oil and 46 billion cubic feet of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That's about one-third more than the amount of oil and gas production knocked offline during last year's hurricane season.

  14. Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded January 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The results of nearly four decades of research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are now available through the OnePetro online document repository. TheOnePetro website now contains NETL's Oil & Gas Knowledge Management Database. DOE's Knowledge Management

  15. DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More | Department of Energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars February 6: Live Webinar on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Bioenergy Technologies Office The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "The

  16. Natural Gas and Crude Oil Prices in AEO (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    If oil and natural gas were perfect substitutes in all markets where they are used, market forces would be expected to drive their delivered prices to near equality on an energy-equivalent basis. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil generally is denominated in terms of barrels, where 1 barrel has an energy content of approximately 5.8 million Btu. The price of natural gas (at the Henry Hub), in contrast, generally is denominated in million Btu. Thus, if the market prices of the two fuels were equal on the basis of their energy contents, the ratio of the crude oil price (the spot price for WTI, or low-sulfur light, crude oil) to the natural gas price (the Henry Hub spot price) would be approximately 6.0. From 1990 through 2007, however, the ratio of natural gas prices to crude oil prices averaged 8.6; and in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 projections from 2008 through 2030, it averages 7.7 in the low oil price case, 14.6 in the reference case, and 20.2 in the high oil price case.

  17. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  18. New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil March 3, 2006 - 11:40am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) released today reports indicating that state-of-the-art enhanced oil recovery techniques could significantly increase recoverable oil resources of the United States in the future. According to the findings, 89 billion barrels or more could eventually be added to

  19. Flexibility in heavy oil upgrading with unicracking/HDS technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennig, H.; Baron, K.; Moorhead, E.L.; Smith, M.

    1984-03-01

    With petroleum reserves becoming heavier and the demand for bottom of the barrel products greatly reduced, refiners are increasing their capabilities to upgrade heavy oil. Many heavy oil upgrading options are available and the best strategy for each refiner is not obvious. The best approach will depend on the specific circumstances and goals of the refiner. This presentation discusses the relative merits of several heavy oil upgrading options utilizing the Unicracking/HDS process.

  20. Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Childers

    2011-03-30

    Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

  1. New Technology for Hydroprocessing Bio-oils to Fuels Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils In A.V. Bridgwater (Ed.), Research in Thermochemical Biomass Conversion (p 893). Netherlands: Springer. Quad Chart Overview 3 Award: ...

  2. DOE - Fossil Energy: An Introduction to Oil Well Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use each day? To find out... READ ON.... FORWARD Dr. H. Carbon asks: Which state produces the most crude oil? ALASKA Alaska TEXAS Texas LOUISIANA Louisiana CALIFORNIA California

  3. Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... out as clear resistivity anomalies relative to sediment containing saline pore water. ... Observatory at MC118. The ROV provided power from its onboard battery and an emulated ...

  4. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and...

  5. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  6. Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversion Technologies - Chemical Conversion Technologies - Process Integration and Separations ... have been developed by other industries * Recent program activities ...

  7. Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry 2015 Markets and Financial Analysis Team May 2016 Key findings for 2015 * Brent crude oil prices averaged $53.60 in 2015-46% below 2014 levels- which significantly reduced cash flow for upstream companies. * Asset write-downs reduced profits and the amount of proved reserves; proved liquids reserves declined for the first time since 2008. * Production increased largely because of investment from past projects. * Companies were able to

  8. Environmental benefits of advanced oil and gas exploration and production technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-10-01

    THROUGHOUT THE OIL AND GAS LIFE CYCLE, THE INDUSTRY HAS APPLIED AN ARRAY OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE. THIS REPORT FOCUSES SPECIFICALLY ON ADVANCES IN EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (E&P) OPERATIONS.

  9. Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

    2006-11-01

    A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

  10. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

  11. How Technology Keeps Beating Peak Oil Predictions | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This oil is typically produced by either strip mining and processing the sand, or digging a series of wells for steam injection to heat the sand in situ and using alternate wells ...

  12. Natural gas: Governments and oil companies in the Third World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, A.; Hurst, C.; Mabro, R.

    1988-01-01

    It is asserted that oil companies claim to be generally receptive to gas development proposals; however, the lack of potential markets for gas, problems of foreign exchange convertibility, and lack of a legal framework often hinders their engagement. Governments, on the other hand, need to secure domestic energy supply and, if possible, gain some export earnings or royalties. An extensive discussion on the principles of pricing and fiscal regimes, potential points of disagreement is provided. A course of action is outlined from the managerial point of view to circumvent the most common pitfalls in planning and financing a gas project. Eight very detailed case studies are presented for Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Tunisia and Thailand.

  13. Diesel Engine Oil Technology Insights and Opportunities | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Perrformance of API CJ-4 diesel engine lubricating oil and emerging lubricant technologiy are examined with respect to protection and fuel economy benefits. PDF icon deer08_arcy.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils Verification of Shell GTL Fuel as CARB Alternative Diesel Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion

  14. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  15. Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies; Natural Gas Trasit Users Group (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and infrastructure research, development, and deployment through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petro- leum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The goal of the Natural Gas Transit Users Group (TUG) is to facilitate the deployment of

  16. DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to introduce a new, user-friendly online repository of oil and natural gas research results at the Society of Petroleum Engineers' Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, to be held in New Orleans, La., October 4-7, 2009.

  17. The domestic natural gas and oil initiatve. First annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    This document is the first of a series of annual progress reports designed to inform the industry and the public of the accomplishments of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (the Initiative) and the benefits realized. Undertaking of the Initiative was first announced by Hazel O`Leary, Secretary of the Department of Energy (Department or DOE), in April 1993.

  18. Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the legislative and regulatory regime that affects natural gas and oil exploration and production in offshore regions of the United States. It discusses the role and importance of these areas as well as the competing interests surrounding ownership, production, exploration and conservation.

  19. Analysis of Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brashear, Jerry P.; North, Walter B.; Thomas Charles P.; Becker, Alan B.; Faulder, David D.

    2000-01-12

    Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers is a program of the National Oil Research Program, U.S. Department of Energy. Between 1995 and 1998, the program competitively selected and cost-shared twenty-two projects with small producers. The purpose was to involve small independent producers in testing technologies of interest to them that would advance (directly or indirectly) one or more of four national program objectives: (1) Extend the productive life of reservoirs; (2) Increase production and/or reserves; (3) Improve environmental performance; and (4) Broaden the exchange of technology information.

  20. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  1. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 3,194 350 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring

  2. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  3. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  4. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels … Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 Doug C. Elliott PNNL Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Douglas C. Elliott Laboratory Fellow Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1974 - present PNNL B.S. in Chemistry from Montana State University M.B.A. in Operations and Systems Analysis from the University of Washington  Over 37 years of project management and research experience in biomass thermochemical conversion R&D involving biomass liquefaction and bio-oil

  5. Lubricant oil production: The proper marriage of process and catalyst technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, G.L.; Suchanek, A.

    1996-12-01

    As the industry moves into the next millennium, higher product quality demands to meet the higher performance needs of modern engine technology and rising costs of traditional good quality lube crudes are driving lubricant base oil manufacturers to select hydroprocessing options versus traditional solvent refining techniques. This paper discusses how to properly select the best economic hydroprocessing technology necessary to produce high quality lubricant base oils and waxes. The economic success of such operations depends on the proper combination of process and catalyst technologies that maximizes yields of high quality products with minimum consumption of hydrogen resources and process utilities. This is particular true on the extreme end of the quality spectrum, namely, Very High Viscosity Index (VHVI) base oils and food grade white oils and waxes where there is no room for marginal product quality. Multiplicity of operations is also becoming more important as refiners try to upgrade their facilities with as little capital expense as possible, while at the same time, broaden their high valued product slate to recoup these expenses in the shortest possible payback period. Lyondell Licensing and Criterion Catalyst have put together an effective alliance based on years of development and commercial experience in both the process and catalyst areas to assist lubricant oil manufacturers in meeting these future challenges using as much existing equipment and infrastructure as is practical. Their experience will permit the proper fitting of the chemistry of hydroprocessing to make lubricant base oils to existing or new operations.

  6. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  7. Natural Oil Production from Microorganisms: Bioprocess and Microbe Engineering for Total Carbon Utilization in Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen generated from electricity to produce natural oils that can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels. MIT has designed a 2-stage biofuel production system. In the first stage, hydrogen and CO2 are fed to a microorganism capable of converting these feedstocks to a 2-carbon compound called acetate. In the second stage, acetate is delivered to a different microorganism that can use the acetate to grow and produce oil. The oil can be removed from the reactor tank and chemically converted to various hydrocarbons. The electricity for the process could be supplied from novel means currently in development, or more proven methods such as the combustion of municipal waste, which would also generate the required CO2 and enhance the overall efficiency of MIT’s biofuel-production system.

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the

  9. Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotariu,, G. J.

    1982-02-01

    The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

  10. Construction progresses at GE's Oil & Gas Technology Center | GE Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Home > Impact > Construction progressing at GE's newest research center, the Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Construction progressing at GE's newest research center, the Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City Construction is

  11. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  12. Development of an In Situ Biosurfactant Production Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; Kathleen Duncan; D.R. Simpson; N. Youssef; N. Ravi; M.J. Folmsbee; T.Fincher; S. Maudgalya; Jim Davis; Sandra Weiland

    2007-09-30

    The long-term economic potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is large with more than 300 billion barrels of oil remaining in domestic reservoirs after conventional technologies reach their economic limit. Actual EOR production in the United States has never been very large, less than 10% of the total U. S. production even though a number of economic incentives have been used to stimulate the development and application of EOR processes. The U.S. DOE Reservoir Data Base contains more than 600 reservoirs with over 12 billion barrels of unrecoverable oil that are potential targets for microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). If MEOR could be successfully applied to reduce the residual oil saturation by 10% in a quarter of these reservoirs, more than 300 million barrels of oil could be added to the U.S. oil reserve. This would stimulate oil production from domestic reservoirs and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign imports. Laboratory studies have shown that detergent-like molecules called biosurfactants, which are produced by microorganisms, are very effective in mobilizing entrapped oil from model test systems. The biosurfactants are effective at very low concentrations. Given the promising laboratory results, it is important to determine the efficacy of using biosurfactants in actual field applications. The goal of this project is to move biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery from laboratory investigations to actual field applications. In order to meet this goal, several important questions must be answered. First, it is critical to know whether biosurfactant-producing microbes are present in oil formations. If they are present, then it will be important to know whether a nutrient regime can be devised to stimulate their growth and activity in the reservoir. If biosurfactant producers are not present, then a suitable strain must be obtained that can be injected into oil reservoirs. We were successful in answering all three questions. The specific objectives of the project were (1) to determine the prevalence of biosurfactant producers in oil reservoirs, and (2) to develop a nutrient regime that would stimulate biosurfactant production in the oil reservoir.

  13. Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Region Proved Reserves 1 Unproved Resources Total Technically Recoverable Resources 2 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate (billion barrels)<//td> 48 States 3 Onshore 14.2 112.6 126.7 48 States 3 Offshore 4.6 50.3 54.8 Alaska 3.6 35.0 38.6 Total U.S. 22.3 197.9 220.2 Dry Natural Gas 4 (trillion cubic feet)<//td> Conventionally Reservoired Fields 5 105.5 904.0 1,009.5 48 States 3 Onshore Gas 6 81.4 369.7 451.1 48

  14. Methods of refining natural oils, and methods of producing fuel compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.

    2015-10-27

    A method of refining a natural oil includes: (a) providing a feedstock that includes a natural oil; (b) reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a metathesized product that includes olefins and esters; (c) passivating residual metathesis catalyst with an agent that comprises nitric acid; (d) separating the olefins in the metathesized product from the esters in the metathesized product; and (e) transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product and/or hydrogenating the olefins to form a fully or partially saturated hydrogenated product. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products produced in a metathesis reaction, and methods of producing fuel compositions are described.

  15. Methods of refining natural oils and methods of producing fuel compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firth, Bruce E; Kirk, Sharon E; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S

    2015-11-04

    A method of refining a natural oil includes: (a) providing a feedstock that includes a natural oil; (b) reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a metathesized product that includes olefins and esters; (c) passivating residual metathesis catalyst with an agent selected from the group consisting of phosphorous acid, phosphinic acid, and a combination thereof; (d) separating the olefins in the metathesized product from the esters in the metathesized product; and (e) transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product and/or hydrogenating the olefins to form a fully or partially saturated hydrogenated product. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products produced in a metathesis reaction, and methods of producing fuel compositions are described.

  16. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-09-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-06-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  18. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  19. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01

    This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs thermally recoverable by steam drive which are equal to or greater than 2500 feet deep and contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range. Data were collected from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

  20. Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

    2006-03-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

  2. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 8. Health effects of oil shale development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotariu, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Information on the potential health effects of a developing oil shale industry can be derived from two major sources: (1) the historical experience in foreign countries that have had major industries; and (2) the health effects research that has been conducted in the US in recent years. The information presented here is divided into two major sections: one dealing with the experience in foreign countries and the second dealing with the more recent work associated with current oil shale development in the US. As a result of the study, several observations can be made: (1) most of the current and historical data from foreign countries relate to occupational hazards rather than to impacts on regional populations; (2) neither the historical evidence from other countries nor the results of current research have shown pulmonary neoplasia to be a major concern, however, certain types of exposure, particularly such mixed source exposures as dust/diesel or dust/organic-vapor have not been adequately studied and the lung cancer question is not closed; (3) the industry should be alert to the incidence of skin disease in the industrial setting, however, automated techniques, modern industrial hygiene practices and realistic personal hygiene should greatly reduce the hazards associated with skin contact; and (4) the entire question of regional water contamination and any resultant health hazard has not been adequately addressed. The industrial practice of hydrotreating the crude shale oil will diminish the carcinogenic hazard of the product, however, the quantitative reduction of biological activity is dependent on the degree of hydrotreatment. Both Soviet and American experimentalists have demonstrated a correlation betweed carcinogenicity/toxicity and retorting temperature; the higher temperatures producing the more carcinogenic or toxic products.

  3. DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana.

  4. Natural Gas Treatment and Fuel Gas Conditioning: Membrane Technology...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Membrane modules are needed to selectively recover the heavy hydrocarbons, which can be ... revenues, especially for applications in the shale oil and shale gas production areas. ...

  5. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery for thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, T.B.; Bolivar, J.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) (DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP)] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

  6. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels … Bio-Oil Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 David Dayton, Ph.D. RTI International Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Dr. David C. Dayton Director, Chemistry and Biofuels Center for Energy Technology RTI International 2007 - present RTI International 1993 - 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1991-1993 U.S. Army Research Laboratory * Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2000 * B.S., Biochemistry, cum laude, Washington

  7. EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for a Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that...

  8. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  9. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  10. TREATMENT OF PLUTONIUM- AND URANIUM-CONTAMINATED OIL FROM ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasson, KT

    2002-12-05

    A removal method for plutonium and uranium has been tested at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This alternative treatment technology is applicable to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organics (mainly used pump oil) contaminated with actinides. In our studies, greater than 70% removal of the actinides was achieved. The technology is based on contacting the oil with a sorbent powder consisting of a surface modified mesoporous material. The SAMMS (Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Support) technology was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for removal and stabilization of RCRA (i.e., lead, mercury, cadmium, silver, etc.) and actinides in water and for removal of mercury from organic solvents [1, 2]. The SAMMS material is based on self-assembly of functionalized monolayers on mesoporous oxide surfaces. The unique mesoporous oxide support provides a high surface area, thereby enhancing the metal-loading capacity. The testing described in this report was conducted on a small scale but larger-scale testing of the technology has been performed on mercury-contaminated oil without difficulty [3].

  11. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,236 1,773 1980's 1,874 3,278 2,770 3,382 3,391 3,491 2,347 2,997 1,601 2,503 1990's 995 1,608 1,625 1,350 996 801 716 625 565 380 2000's 312 364 2,391 1,363 316 400 255 108 130 991 2010's 1,153 0 552 386 299 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  12. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 417,053 383,647 369,968 1980's 385,573 377,245 400,129 461,796 523,200 570,733 599,978 537,101 497,072 485,150 1990's 484,516 535,250 513,058 550,850 622,235 653,870 687,424 729,162 804,290 905,293 2000's 951,088 989,969 893,193 939,828 840,852 730,830 681,869 654,334 524,965 606,403 2010's

  13. US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 97,850 682,977 1980's 50,432 50,716 51,200 54,414 57,278 56,185 58,282 59,079 78,841 83,584 1990's 79,108 99,688 136,809 136,948 154,390 28,917 33,493 31,717 38,072 31,566 2000's 174,287 170,206 211,778 254,150 279,249 321,019 308,391 341,925 356,139 327,105 2010's 341,365 340,182 284,838

  14. Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 410,179 375,593 360,533 1980's 360,906 348,113 357,671 408,632 461,821 502,000 529,453 470,493 426,945 403,144 1990's 408,654 455,052 436,493 467,340 518,305 522,437 523,155 566,210 643,886 722,750 2000's 752,296 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported;

  15. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,457 2,888 4,004 1980's 18,767 16,369 24,707 32,982 33,936 35,402 38,726 35,228 38,891 43,461 1990's 41,530 44,807 35,281 41,978 58,240 84,167 102,993 93,867 89,384 107,509 2000's 130,040 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  16. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 18,689 15,053 1980's 13,959 13,526 12,554 12,405 11,263 9,412 9,547 16,422 43,562 50,165 1990's 49,422 70,932 106,311 105,363 124,501 7,684 7,055 7,919 7,880 6,938 2000's 149,077 149,067 190,608 236,404 260,667 305,641 292,660 325,328 345,109 316,537 2010's 328,114 328,500 274,431

  17. Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-02-01

    It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

  18. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linville, B.

    1983-07-01

    Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

  19. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Sixth Quarterly Report, January - March 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy; Larry Zirker

    2004-06-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation quarterly report (January-March 2004) details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. The bypass filters are reported to have engine oil filtering capability of <1 micron and a built-in additive package to facilitate extended oil-drain intervals. This quarter, the heavy-duty buses traveled 88,747 miles, and as of the end of March 2004, the eight buses have accumulated 412,838 total test miles without requiring an oil change. This represents an avoidance of 34 oil changes, which equates to 1,199 quarts (300 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, furthermore, 1,199 quarts of waste oil not generated.

  20. U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 November 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2014 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government.

  1. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.

    2016-03-15

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  2. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snead, Thomas E; Cohen, Steven A; Gildon, Demond L

    2015-04-07

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  3. U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 December 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2013 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government.

  4. ,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    proved reserves, and reserves changes, 2013-2014" ,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas" ,"billion barrels","trillion cubic feet" "U.S. proved reserves at December 31, 2013",36.52,353.994 " Total discoveries",5.404,50.487 " Net revisions",0.416,0.984 " Net Adjustments, Sales, Acquisitions",0.793,11.47 " Production",-3.2,-28.094 "Net additions to U.S. proved reserves",3.413,34.847

  5. Applications of EOR (enhanced oil recovery) technology in field projects--1990 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pautz, J.F.; Thomas, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Trends in the type and number of US enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects are analyzed for the period from 1980 through 1989. The analysis is based on current literature and news media and the Department of Energy (DOE) EOR Project Data Base, which contains information on over 1,348 projects. The characteristics of the EOR projects are grouped by starting date and process type to identify trends in reservoir statistics and applications of process technologies. Twenty-two EOR projects starts were identified for 1989 and ten project starts for 1988. An obvious trend over recent years has been the decline in the number of project starts since 1981 until 1988 which corresponds to the oil price decline during that period. There was a modest recovery in 1989 of project starts, which lags the modest recovery of oil prices in 1987 that was reconfirmed in 1989. During the time frame of 1980 to 1989, there has been a gradual improvement in costs of operation for EOR technology. The perceived average cost of EOR has gone down from a $30/bbl range to low $20/bbl. These costs of operation seems to stay just at the price of oil or slightly above to result in marginal profitability. The use of polymer flooding has drastically decreased both in actual and relative numbers of project starts since the oil price drop in 1986. Production from polymer flooding is down more than 50%. Long-term plans for large, high-cost projects such as CO{sub 2} flooding in West Texas, steamflooding in California, and hydrocarbon flooding on the North Slope have continued to be implemented. EOR process technologies have been refined to be more cost effective as shown by the continued application and rising production attributable to EOR. 8 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  7. Assessment of oil-shale technology in Brazil. Final technical report, October 27, 1980-July 27, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-27

    The development of an oil shale industry in the United States will require the solution of a variety of technical, economic, environmental, and health and safety problems. This assessment investigates whether US oil shale developers might benefit from the experience gained by the Brazilians in the operation of their Usina Prototipo do Irati oil shale demonstration plant at Sao Mateus do Sul, and from the data generated from their oil shale research and development programs. A chapter providing background information on Brazil and the Brazilian oil shale deposits is followed by an examination of the potential recovery processes applicable to Brazilian oil shale. The evolution of the Brazilian retorting system is reviewed and compared with the mining and retorting proposed for US shales. Factors impacting on the economics of shale oil production in Brazil are reviewed and compared to economic analyses of oil shale production in the US. Chapters examining the consequences of shale development in terms of impact on the physical environment and the oil shale worker complete the report. Throughout the report, where data permits, similarities and differences are drawn between the oil shale programs underway in Brazil and the US. In addition, research areas in which technology or information transfer could benefit either or both countries' oil shale programs are identified.

  8. Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

  9. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  10. Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Transit Users Group, which provides assistance to transit agencies implementing natural gas vehicles into their fleets.

  11. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-07

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

  12. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11,226 12,829 1980's 11,634 11,759 12,222 12,117 12,525 13,378 12,935 10,962 9,728 8,243 1990's 7,743 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,654 6,977 6,764 5,470 2010's 5,483 4,904 4,411 5,057 5,530 - = No Data Reported;

  13. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117 3,336 1,781 1,806 1,881 1,841 1,820 1,781 1,699 1,247 1,228 1992 4,284 3,872 4,141 4,027 4,047 3,883 3,964 3,957 3,892 4,169 4,146 4,334 1993 4,123 3,693 4,049 3,865 3,942 3,786 3,915 3,924 3,861 4,146 4,114 4,200 1994 3,639 3,242 3,557 3,409 3,488 3,384 3,552 3,643 3,597 3,796 3,818 3,991 1995 3,937 3,524

  14. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,635 1950's 3,742 3,944 4,132 4,069 4,070 4,101 4,080 4,174 4,118 4,220 1960's 4,213 4,285 4,408 4,405 4,431 4,510 4,478 4,385 4,738 4,881 1970's 4,943 4,858 4,974 5,041 4,662 4,661 4,577 4,708 4,760 4,689

  15. Using Natural Gas for Vehicles: Comparing Three Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natural gas could be used as a transportation fuel, especially with the recent expansion of U.S. resource and production. This could mean burning natural gas in an internal combustion engine like most of the vehicles on the road today. Or, with the advanced vehicles now becoming available, other pathways are possible to use natural gas for personal vehicles. This fact sheet summarizes a comparison of efficiency and environmental metrics for three possible options.

  16. Using Natural Gas for Vehicles: Comparing Three Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas could be used as a transportation fuel, especially with the recent expansion of U.S. resource and production. This could mean burning natural gas in an internal combustion engine like most of the vehicles on the road today. Or, with the advanced vehicles now becoming available, other pathways are possible to use natural gas for personal vehicles. This fact sheet summarizes a comparison of efficiency and environmental metrics for three possible options.

  17. The examination of pretreatment and end use technologies for dirty fuels produced from coal gasification, coal pyrolysis, oil shale processing, and heavy oil recovery: Final technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raden, D.P.; Page, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify pretreatment (upgrading) and end use technologies which: (1) reduce environmental, health and safety impacts, (2) reduce pollution control costs, or (3) reduce upgrading costs of ''dirty fuels'' while producing higher value energy products. A comprehensive list of technologies was developed for upgrading the various dirty fuels to higher value and products. Fifty-two process flow concepts were examined and from these four process flow concepts were chosen for further development. These are: heavy oil recovery and in situ hydrotreating; wet air oxidation in a downhole reactor; total raw gas shift; and high density fuels via vacuum devolatilization. Each of these four process flow concepts described exhibit the potential for reducing environmental, health and safety impacts and/or pollution control costs. In addition these concepts utilize dirty fuels to produce an upgraded or higher value energy product. These concepts should be developed and evaluated in greater detail to assess their technical and economical viability. Therefore, it is recommended that a program plan be formulated and a proof-of-concept research program be performed for each process concept. 3 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

  19. Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will present a live webinar titled "The Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies" on Thursday, February 6, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. During the webinar, Mr. Zia Haq and Mr. Prasad Gupte, of BETO, and Mr. Timothy Skone, of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, will present an overview of Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids technology, advantages of using natural gas, and some key themes that were established at the September Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids Workshop.

  20. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001. Much of the second quarter was spent writing DOE annual and quarterly reports to stay current with contract requirements.

  1. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-11-01

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

  2. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-01-31

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-04-30

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

  4. VEBA-Combi-cracking - A technology for upgrading of heavy oils and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doehler, W.; Kretschmar, D.I.K.; Merz, L.; Niemann, K. )

    1987-04-01

    Based on experiences with liquid phase hydrogenation for coal liquefaction according to the Berguis-Pier-Process as well as crude oil residue hydrogenation in the Fifties and Sixties, VEBA OEL in recent years developed the VEBA-LQ-Cracking (VLC) and the VEBA-Combi-Cracking (VCC) Processes. Since 1978, more than 20 different feedstocks have been converted in small scale plants with a capacity of 3-20 kg/h. Together with LURGI GmbH, Frankfurt, the next steps were taken: the design and construction of a 1 t/h Pilot Plant located at the RUHR OEL refinery in Gelsenkirchen. After 18 months of construction, the heavy oil pilot plant was put on stream in May 1983. Since the beginning of 1983, the plant has been funded and owned by LURGI GmbH, VEBA OEL AG and INTEVEP S.A., the research institute of Petroleos de Venezuela, all of whom have participated in the development of the VLC/VCC process. Reported here are the results of the intensive experimental work for the development of the VLC/VCC-processes in a scale covering all aspects relevant for a scale-up, demonstrate the technical maturity of the processes developed by VEBA OEL to convert refinery residues and natural heavy crude oils.

  5. Oil and natural gas supply and demand trends in North America...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TX By Adam Sieminski U.S. Energy Information Administration Historical and projected oil prices 2 crude oil price price per barrel (real 2010 dollars) Sources: U.S. Energy...

  6. Expert system technology for natural gas resource development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munro, R.G.

    1997-12-31

    Materials data are used in all aspects of the development of natural gas resources. Unconventional gas resources require special attention in their development and may benefit from heuristic assessments of the materials data, geological site conditions, and the knowledge base accumulated from previous unconventional site developments. Opportunities for using expert systems in the development of unconventional natural gas resources are discussed. A brief introduction to expert systems is provided in a context that emphasizes the practical nature of their service. The discussion then focuses on the development of unconventional gas reserves. Whenever possible, the likelihood of success in constructing useful expert systems for gas resource development is indicated by comparisons to existing expert systems that perform comparable functions in other industries. Significant opportunities are found for applications to site assessment, the interpretation of well log data, and the monitoring and optimization of gas processing in small-scale recovery operations.

  7. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  8. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Drilled (Feet per Well) Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,568 1950's 3,691 3,851 3,999 3,880 3,905 3,904 3,880 3,966 3,907 3,999 1960's 4,020 4,064 4,227 4,193 4,179 4,288 4,112 4,004 4,328 4,431 1970's 4,610 4,480 4,590 4,687 4,249 4,285 4,214 4,404 4,421 4,374 1980's 4,166 4,209 4,225 4,004 4,125

  9. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Drilled (Feet per Well) Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,842 1950's 3,898 4,197 4,476 4,557 4,550 4,632 4,587 4,702 4,658 4,795 1960's 4,770 4,953 4,966 5,016 5,174 5,198 5,402 5,388 5,739 5,924 1970's 5,885 5,915 6,015 5,955 5,777 5,842 5,825 5,798 5,978 5,916 1980's 5,733 5,793 5,597 5,035 5,369 5,544 5,680 5,563

  10. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2005-09-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

  11. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-02-18

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross and net oil production rates of 7,700 BPD and 750 BOPD (injection to production ratio of 4) will occur in October 1999. At that time, the reservoir should act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection can be operated at lower net injection rates to be determined. Modeling runs developed this quarter found that varying individual well injection rates to meet added production and local pressure problems by sub-zone could reduce steam chest fill-up by up to one month.

  12. Table 4.2 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, 1977-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil and Natural Gas Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, 1977-2010 Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate 1 Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production Proved Reserves 2 Cumulative Production Proved Reserves 3 Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet 1977 118,091 31,780 514,439 207,413 1978 121,269 31,355 533,561 208,033 1979 124,390 31,221 553,224 200,997 1980 127,537 31,335 572,627 199,021 1981 130,665 31,006 591,808 201,730 1982 133,822 29,459 609,628 201,512 1983 136,993 29,348 625,722

  13. Natural language processing-based COTS software and related technologies survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickland, Michael G.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Eaton, Shelley M.

    2003-09-01

    Natural language processing-based knowledge management software, traditionally developed for security organizations, is now becoming commercially available. An informal survey was conducted to discover and examine current NLP and related technologies and potential applications for information retrieval, information extraction, summarization, categorization, terminology management, link analysis, and visualization for possible implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. This report documents our current understanding of the technologies, lists software vendors and their products, and identifies potential applications of these technologies.

  14. The Quadrennial Technology Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Quadrennial Technology Review The Quadrennial Technology Review The Quadrennial Technology Review ACCESS ALL OF THE QUADRENNIAL TECHNOLOGY REVIEW 2015 CONTENT The last four years have been defined by dramatic change in the nation's energy landscape. Domestic production of oil and natural gas has boomed, causing the United States to become the world leader in combined oil and natural gas production for the last three consecutive years. Electricity generation from solar photovoltaic cells has

  15. Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. Mission The Secretary of Energy, in response to provisions of

  16. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  17. Oil and Gas Technology at Rio de Janeiro | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Center » Oil Refund Decisions Oil Refund Decisions During the period 1973 through 1981, the Federal government imposed price and allocation controls of crude oil and refined petroleum products, such as gasoline and heating oil. During that period and for many years afterwards, the DOE had an enforcement program. When a firm was found to have overcharged, the DOE generally required the firm to make refunds to its customers. However, because of the price controls in place at the time

  18. EIA Report 9/12/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 12, the Minerals Management Service ... Additionally, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) suspended all operations, both ...

  19. EIA Report 9/14/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 14, the Minerals Management Service ... Oil Port (LOOP) had resumed limited operations from its Clovelly storage facility, but ...

  20. EIA Report 9/11/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 11, the Minerals Management Service ... Additionally, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) suspended marine operations for ...

  1. EIA Report 9/15/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 15, the Minerals Management Service ... Oil Port (LOOP) had resumed limited operations from its Clovelly storage facility, and ...

  2. Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) March 22, 2015 Bio-Oil Technology Area Review Principal Investigator : Zia Abdullah Organization: Battelle Memorial Institute 1 ...

  3. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  4. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-15

    World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

  5. Application of nonparametric regression and statistical testing to identify the impact of oil and natural gas development on local air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, Natalie J.; Cheng, Hanqi; Small, Mitchell J.

    2015-11-05

    Abstract: The objective of the current work was to develop a statistical method and associated tool to evaluate the impact of oil and natural gas exploration and production activities on local air quality.

  6. Brushing up on oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, J.

    1995-12-01

    To be prepared for a range of oil spills, emergency response organizations must have an arsenal of powerful and adaptable equipment. Around the coastal United States, a network of oil spill cooperatives and emergency response organizations stand ready with the technology and the know-how to respond to the first sign of an oil spill. When the telephone rings, they may be required to mop up 200 gallons of oil that leaked off the deck of a ship or to contain and skim 2,000 gallons of oil from a broken hose at a loading terminal. In a few cases each year, they may find themselves responding to a major pollution incident, one that involves hundreds of people and tons of equipment. To clean an oil spill at a New Jersey marine terminal, the local cooperative used the Lundin Oil Recovery Inc. (LORI) skimming system to separate the oil and water and the lift the oil out of the river. The LORI skimming technology is based on sound principles of fluid management - using the natural movement of water instead of trying to fight against it. A natural feeding mechanism delivers oily water through the separation process, and a simple mechanical separation and recovery device - a brush conveyor - removes the pollutants from the water.

  7. Environmental trends in Asia are accelerating the introduction of clean coal technologies and natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.J.

    1997-09-01

    This paper examines the changing energy mix for Asia to 2020, and impacts of increased coal consumption on Asia`s share of world SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} emissions. Stricter SO{sub 2} emissions laws are summarized for eight Asian economies along with implications for fuel and technology choices. The paper compares the economics of different technologies for coal and natural gas in 1997 and in 2007. Trends toward introducing clean coal technologies and the use of natural gas will accelerate in response to tighter environmental standards by 2000. The most important coal conversion technology for Asia, particularly China, in the long term is likely to be integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), but only under the assumption of multiple products.

  8. Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R. D.

    1981-07-01

    This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Assessing the Outlook of US Oil Dependence Using Oil Security Metrics Model (OSMM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about assessing the...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Reassessing the Outlook of US Oil Dependence Using Oil Security Metrics Model (OSMM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about reassessing ...

  11. EIA Report 11/1/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tuesday, November 1, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbld) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcfd) % of Total Federal GOM 1112005 1,000,092 63.5% 5,269 52.2% 1031...

  12. DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources.

  13. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-03-01

    This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and qualitatively demonstrated in tests on three different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

  14. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-08-01

    This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infracture''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and tested on four different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

  15. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  16. Integration of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Technology with Oil Sands Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of siting an HTGR plant in a remote area supplying steam, electricity and high temperature gas for recovery and upgrading of unconventional crude oil from oil sands. The area selected for this evaluation is the Alberta Canada oil sands. This is a very fertile and active area for bitumen recovery and upgrading with significant quantities piped to refineries in Canada and the U.S Additionally data on the energy consumption and other factors that are required to complete the evaluation of HTGR application is readily available in the public domain. There is also interest by the Alberta oil sands producers (OSP) in identifying alternative energy sources for their operations. It should be noted, however, that the results of this evaluation could be applied to any similar oil sands area.

  17. EIA - Daily Report 9/22/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 23, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Natural Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% 9/21/2005 1,097,357 70.2% 4,713 45.3% 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% 9/19/2005 837,648 53.6% 3,375 32.5% 9/16/2005 840,921 53.8% 3,384 32.5% 9/15/2005 842,091 53.9% 3,411 32.8% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production comparison

  18. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas...

  20. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2002-01-16

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  1. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris

    2003-01-01

    This report documents work performed in the first quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: preparation and submission of the Research Management Plan; preparation and submission of the Technology Status Assessment; attendance at the Project Kick-Off meeting at DOE-NETL; formation of the Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) for the project; preparation of the Test Plan; acquisition and assembly of the data acquisition system (DAS).

  2. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley

    2003-04-01

    This report documents work performed in the second quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: preparation and submission of the Technology Status Assessment; formation of the Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) for the project; attendance at the first IAC meeting; preparation of the Test Plan; completion of the data acquisition system (DAS); plans for the first field test.

  3. NOx reduction technology for natural-gas-industry prime movers. Special report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldini, C.

    1990-08-01

    The applicability, performance, and costs are summarized for state-of-the-art NOx emission controls for prime movers used by the natural gas industry to drive pipeline compressors. Nearly 7700 prime movers of 300 hp or greater are in operation at compressor stations. NOx control technologies for application to reciprocating engines are catalytic reduction, engine modification, exhaust gas recirculation, and pre-stratified charge. Technologies discussed for application to gas turbines are catalytic reduction, water or steam injection, and low-NOx combustors.

  4. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  5. Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Type of photovoltaic cell. Angle of tilt refers to the angle of the installed solar panel in relation to the horizontal plane. This angle is important because it will...

  6. EIA Report 9/24/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 24, the Minerals Management ... In addition, 24 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal levels with a total ...

  7. EIA Report 9/25/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 25, the Minerals Management ... In addition, EIA reports 24 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal levels ...

  8. EIA Report 9/18/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 18, the Minerals Management ... In addition, EIA reports that 17 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal ...

  9. EIA Report 9/8/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 8, the Minerals Management ... million cubic feet per day, have resumed operations at either reduced or normal levels. ...

  10. EIA Report 9/22/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas As of 2:00 pm EDT (1:00 pm CDT), September 22, the Minerals Management Service ... In addition, EIA reports 22 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal levels ...

  11. EIA Report 9/19/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 19, the Minerals Management ... In addition, EIA reports that 19 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal ...

  12. EIA Report 9/16/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 16, the Minerals Management ... repairs and clean up to be completed before these facilities can restart their operations. ...

  13. EIA Report 9/13/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... to Hurricane Gustav returning to normal operations and without any reports of significant ... Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 13, the Minerals Management ...

  14. EIA Report 9/23/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 23, the Minerals Management ... In addition, 24 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal levels with a total ...

  15. EIA Report 9/17/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 17, the Minerals Management ... In addition, EIA reports that 13 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal ...

  16. EIA Report 9/26/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), September 26, the Minerals Management ... In addition, 26 plants have resumed operations at reduced or normal levels with a total ...

  17. EIA Report 9/1/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), August 31, the Minerals Management Service ... majeure, effectively shutting in all operations along their systems in the Gulf of Mexico. ...

  18. U.S. oil reserves highest since 1975, natural gas reserves set...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    topped 36 billion barrels for the first time in nearly four decades, while natural gas ... for the first time since 1975. North Dakota and Texas accounted for 90% of the increase. ...

  19. State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy Cummins Westport Inc. PDF icon deer_2003_dunn.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Development and Field Demonstrations of the Low NO2 ACCRT’ System for Retrofit Applications Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations

  20. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalle; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2003-07-01

    This report documents work performed in the third quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: first field test; test data analysis.

  1. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2003-10-01

    This report documents work performed in the fourth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: second field test; test data analysis for the first field test; operational optimization plans.

  2. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-01-01

    This report documents work performed in the fifth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: completion of analysis of data from first visit to second site; preparation for follow-up testing.

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    Through December 1999, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone in order to focus the remaining time on using the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam chests from reoccurring. A new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model was used to provide operations with the necessary water injection rates and allowable production rates by well to minimize future surface subsidence and to accurately project reservoir steam chest fill-up by October 1999. A geomechanics study and a separate reservoir simulation study have been performed to determine the possible indicators of formation compaction, the temperatures at which specific indicators are affected and the projected temperature profiles in the over and underburden shales over a ten year period following steam injection. It was believed that once steam chest fill-up occurred, the reservoir would act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection could be operated at lower Injection to production ratios (I/P) and net injection rates. In mid-September 1999, net water injection was reduced substantially in the ''D'' sands following steam chest fill-up. This caused reservoir pressures to plummet about 100 psi within six weeks. Starting in late-October 1999, net ''D'' sand injection was increased and reservoir pressures have slowly increased back to steam chest fill-up pressures as of the end of March 2000. When the ''T'' sands reached fill-up, net ''T'' sand injection was lowered only slightly and reservoir pressures stabilized. A more detailed discussion of the operational changes is in the Reservoir Management section of this report. A reservoir pressure monitoring program was developed as part of the poststeamflood reservoir management plan. This bi-monthly sonic fluid level program measures the static fluid levels in all idle wells an average of once a month. The fluid levels have been calibrated for liquid and gas density gradients by comparing a number of them with Amerada bomb pressures taken within a few days. This data allows engineering to respond quickly to rises or declines in reservoir pressure by either increasing injection or production or idling production. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current thermal operations in the Wilm

  4. Hard truths: facing the hard truths about energy. A comprehensive view to 2030 of global oil and natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-07-01

    In response to the questions posed by the US Secretary of Energy in October 2005, the National Petroleum Council conducted a comprehensive study considering the future of oil and natural gas to 2030 in the context of the global energy system. The Council proposed five core strategies to assist markets in meeting the energy challenges to 2030 and beyond. All five strategies are essential; there is no single, easy solution to the multiple challenges we face. However, we are confident that the prompt adoption of these strategies, along with a sustained commitment to implementation, will promote U.S. competitiveness by balancing economic, security, and environmental goals. The United States must: Moderate the growing demand for energy by increasing efficiency of transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial uses; Expand and diversify production from clean coal, nuclear, biomass, other renewables, and unconventional oil and gas; moderate the decline of conventional domestic oil and gas production; and increase access for development of new resources; Integrate energy policy into trade, economic, environmental, security, and foreign policies; strengthen global energy trade and investment; and broaden dialogue with both producing and consuming nations to improve global energy security; Enhance science and engineering capabilities and create long-term opportunities for research and development in all phases of the energy supply and demand system; and Develop the legal and regulatory framework to enable carbon capture and sequestration. In addition, as policymakers consider options to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, provide an effective global framework for carbon management, including establishment of a transparent, predictable, economy-wide cost for carbon dioxide emissions. The report, details findings and recommendations based on comprehensive analyses developed by the study teams. 5 apps.

  5. Assessment of oil-pretreatment technologies to improve performance of reverse-osmosis systems. Technical literature review and technologies evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tansel, B.; Villate, J.

    1992-06-19

    The services provided under this contract include both theoretical and experimental research for development of an appropriate technology for treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons in source water for reverse osmosis (RO) systems. This report evaluates and screens the candidate technologies identified during the literature review in accordance with the approved Technology Evaluation Plan. A short-list of technologies that warrant further study is recommended to be carried forward to the experimental phase. The contamination problems due to petroleum hydrocarbons have been long recognized. However, the treatment technologies available for treatment of petroleum contaminated media are still very limited. Major limitations relative to treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons include: exact chemical composition is not defined; aerobic treatment processes are not effective for breaking down heavy petroleum hydrocarbons; anaerobic treatment processes are slow; and physical/chemical treatment processes are expensive and there is usually additional waste produced during treatment of the contaminated media.

  6. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2005-09-29

    This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Program - Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-08-01

    R&D drives innovation while lowering technology costs, which then enables the private sector to accelerate clean technology deployment. Along with R&D, DOE's Vehicles Technologies Program deploys clean, efficient vehicle technologies and renewable fuels, which reduce U.S. demand for petroleum products.

  8. EIA - Daily Report 9/20/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 0, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% 9/19/2005 837,648 53.6% 3,375 32.5% 9/16/2005 840,921 53.8% 3,384 32.5% 9/15/2005 842,091 53.9% 3,411 32.8% 9/14/2005 843,725 54.0% 3,518 33.8% 9/13/2005 846,720 54.2% 3,720 35.8% 9/12/2005 860,636 55.1% 3,784 36.4% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production comparison of hurricanes

  9. EIA - Daily Report 9/22/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 2, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% 9/21/2005 1,097,357 70.2% 4,713 45.3% 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% 9/19/2005 837,648 53.6% 3,375 32.5% 9/16/2005 840,921 53.8% 3,384 32.5% 9/15/2005 842,091 53.9% 3,411 32.8% 9/14/2005 843,725 54.0% 3,518 33.8% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production comparison of

  10. EIA - Daily Report 9/26/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets September 26, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/25/2005 1,501,863 96.2% 8,047 77.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% 9/21/2005 1,097,357 70.2% 4,713 45.3% 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production

  11. EIA - Daily Report 9/27/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets Tuesday, September 27, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/25/2005 1,501,863 96.2% 8,047 77.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% 9/21/2005 1,097,357 70.2% 4,713 45.3% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas

  12. EIA - Daily Report 9/28/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets September 28, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/25/2005 1,501,863 96.2% 8,047 77.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production

  13. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR for metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.

  14. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR formore » metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.« less

  15. Environmental benefits of replacing fuel oil by natural gas in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, S.; Assuncao, J.V. de

    1998-12-31

    The Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo (Brazil) has a population 16.322 million people (1995 estimate) living in an area of 8,051 km2 with most of them concentrated in the city of Sao Paulo with 9.8 million people and 4.6 million cars. Although with an air quality better than some other Latin American megacities such as Mexico and Santiago do Chile, the air quality still exceeds the national air quality standards. In 2/17/1993 Brazilian Petroleum Company (PETROBRAS) and the Bolivian Petroleum Company (Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos -- YPFB) signed an agreement to bring natural gas from Bolivia to the south and southeast of Brazil. The end of the construction of the gas pipeline will be in 1999, and it will deliver 4 million Nm3/day of natural gas to COMGAS Sao Paulo State Gas Company. This amount will increase to 8.1 million Nm3/day by the year 2006, that will be sufficient to supply the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region market need at that time. In this study an estimate of the influence in the air quality was performed supposing the substitution of fuel oil by natural gas in industry and also in diesel buses. The results showed that there will be benefits in relation to sulfur dioxide, PM10, greenhouse gases and trace elements, and negligible effects in relation to NO{sub x}, NMTOC and carbon monoxide.

  16. Solidification Tests Conducted on Transuranic Mixed Oil Waste (TRUM) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunkow, W. G.; Campbell, D.; Geimer, R.; Gilbreath, C.; Rivera, M.

    2002-02-25

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) near Golden, Colorado is the first major nuclear weapons site within the DOE complex that has been declared a full closure site. RFETS has been given the challenge of closing the site by 2006. Key to meeting this challenge is the removal of all waste from the site followed by site restoration. Crucial to meeting this challenge is Kaiser-Hill's (RFETS Operating Contractor) ability to dispose of significant quantities of ''orphan'' wastes. Orphan wastes are those with no current disposition for treatment or disposal. Once such waste stream, generically referred to as Transuranic oils, poses a significant threat to meeting the closure schedule. Historically, this waste stream, which consist of a variety of oil contaminated with a range of organic solvents were treated by simply mixing with Environstone. This treatment method rendered a solidified waste form, but unfortunately not a TRUPACT-II transportable waste. So for the last ten years, RFETS has been accumulating these TRU oils while searching for a non-controversial treatment option.

  17. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

  18. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2006-03-31

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is possible as current investigations continue.

  19. Crude Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other Petroleum Products Natural Gas Coal Purchased Electricity Purchased Steam Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 0 0 0 0

  20. Proposed natural gas protection program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    As a result of US Department of Energy (DOE) monitoring activities, it was determined in 1983 that the potential existed for natural gas resources underlying the Naval Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSrs-1 3) to be drained by privately-owned gas wells that were being drilled along the Reserves borders. In 1985, DOE initiated a limited number of projects to protect the Government's interest in the gas resources by drilling its own offset production'' wells just inside the boundaries, and by formally sharing in the production, revenues and costs of private wells that are drilled near the boundaries ( communitize'' the privately-drilled wells). The scope of these protection efforts must be expanded. DOE is therefore proposing a Natural Gas Protection Program for NOSRs-1 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells (including the wells drilled and/or communitized since 1985). Of these, 111 would be offset wells drilled by DOE on Government land inside the NOSRs' boundaries and would be owned either entirely by the Government or communitized with adjacent private land owners or lessees. The remainder would be wells drilled by private operators in an area one half-mile wide extending around the NOSRs boundaries and communitized with the Government. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

  2. Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to ...

  3. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-10-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report documents the second series of tests performed on a GMW10 engine/compressor after modifications to add high pressure Fuel and a Turbocharger. It also presents baseline testing for air balance investigations and initial simulation modeling of the air manifold for a Cooper GMVH6.

  5. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-07-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report documents the second series of tests performed on a turbocharged HBA-6T engine/compressor. It also presents baseline testing for air balance investigations and initial simulation modeling of the air manifold for a Cooper GMVH6.

  6. A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used to measure the inferential variables, which can then be applied (through the data correlations) to convert existing flow meters (ultrasonic, orifice, turbine, rotary, Coriolis, diaphragm, etc.) for on-line energy measurement. The practical issues for field development were evaluated using two transducers extracted from a $100 ultrasonic domestic gas meter, and a $400 infrared sensor.

  7. New High-Power Laser Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Power Laser Technology New High-Power Laser Technology December 10, 2013 - 10:38am Addthis Foro Energy partners with Dept of Energy to commercialize high power lasers for the oil, natural gas, geothermal, and mining industries. photo courtesy of Foro Energy. Foro Energy partners with Dept of Energy to commercialize high power lasers for the oil, natural gas, geothermal, and mining industries. photo courtesy of Foro Energy. The Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) partners with cutting- edge

  8. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infill drilling program at this time. Pruet is integrating the reservoir characterization, 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation results of the project into their field-scale reservoir management strategy for the Womack Hill Field to improve field operations.

  9. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infill drilling program at this time. Pruet is integrating the reservoir characterization, 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation results of the project into their field-scale reservoir management strategy for the Womack Hill Field to improve field operations.

  10. Energy Department Announces New ARPA-E Projects to Advance Innovative Natural Gas Vehicle Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Awards totaling $30 million to develop new ways of harnessing U.S. energy resources to reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil

  11. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2001-10-31

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) in southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types. Production at the NDP is from the Brushy Canyon formation, a low-permeability turbidite reservoir in the Delaware Mountain Group of Permian, Guadalupian age. A major challenge in this marginal-quality reservoir is to distinguish oil-productive pay intervals from water-saturated non-pay intervals. Because initial reservoir pressure is only slightly above bubble-point pressure, rapid oil decline rates and high gas/oil ratios are typically observed in the first year of primary production. Limited surface access, caused by the proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, prohibits development with conventional drilling. Reservoir characterization results obtained to date at the NDP show that a proposed pilot injection area appears to be compartmentalized. Because reservoir discontinuities will reduce effectiveness of a pressure maintenance project, the pilot area will be reconsidered in a more continuous part of the reservoir if such areas have sufficient reservoir pressure. Most importantly, the advanced characterization results are being used to design extended reach/horizontal wells to tap into predicted ''sweet spots'' that are inaccessible with conventional vertical wells. The activity at the NDP during the past year has included the completion of the NDP Well No.36 deviated/horizontal well and the completion of additional zones in three wells, the design of the NDP No.33 directional/horizontal well, The planning and regulatory approval for the north No.-D seismic survey extension and the continued analysis of data.

  12. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third well has not been on production long enough for an accurate assessment but initial results from it are encouraging. Cumulative production from the first two wells through August 31, 2005 was 235,039 BO, 816,592 MCFG and 310,333 barrels of water (BW). Total estimated reserves from all three of the horizontal wells are 878,135 BO and 3.87 BCFG. The ratio of net revenue to cost for the first two wells is approximately 2.9 to 1 for an oil price of $30 per barrel that existed when the wells were drilled. Based on recent pricing trends, a detailed reserve study for the project was performed that assumed an oil price of $40 per barrel and a gas price of $7 per MCFG. These results show that this project has acceptable economics and similar projects can be economically developed as long as oil and gas prices remain over $30 per BOE.

  13. Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of

  14. oil and gas portfolio reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas & Oil Program Research Portfolio Reports The Office of Fossil Energy (FE)... focus areas: Unconventional Oil & Gas Resources; Ultra-Deepwater; and Small Producers. ...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Significant New Deepwater Oil and Natural Gas Discovery: A successful production test in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico has confirmed a significant new oil play in the lower...

  16. Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Erik R.; Piao, Hailan; Scott, Nicole M.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; del Rio, Tijana G.; Foster, Brian; Copeland, A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Pati, Amrita; Gilbert, Jack A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-02

    Crude oils can be major contaminants of the marine ecosystem and microorganisms play a significant role in the degradation of the main constituents of crude oil. To increase our understanding of the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in the marine ecosystem, we collected crude oil from an active seep area located in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and generated a total of about 52 Gb of raw metagenomic sequence data. The assembled data comprised ~500 Mb, representing ~1.1 million genes derived primarily from chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Members of Oceanospirillales, a bacterial order belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, recruited less than 2% of the assembled genes within the SBC metagenome. In contrast, the microbial community associated with the oil plume that developed in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout in 2010, was dominated by Oceanospirillales, which comprised more than 60% of the metagenomic data generated from the DWH oil plume. This suggests that Oceanospirillales might play a less significant role in the microbially mediated hydrocarbon conversion within the SBC seep oil compared to the DWH plume oil. We hypothesize that this difference results from the SBC oil seep being mostly anaerobic, while the DWH oil plume is aerobic. Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota, recruited more than 95% of the assembled archaeal sequences from the SBC oil seep metagenome, with more than 50% of the sequences assigned to members of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. These orders contain organisms capable of anaerobic methanogenesis and methane oxidation (AOM) and we hypothesize that these orders and their metabolic capabilities may be fundamental to the ecology of the SBC oil seep.

  17. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-01-28

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey test performed on an HBA-6 engine/compressor installed at Duke Energy's Bedford Compressor Station. This is one of several tests planned, which will emphasize identification and reduction of compressor losses. Additionally, this report presents a methodology for distinguishing losses in compressor attributable to valves, irreversibility in the compression process, and the attached piping (installation losses); it illustrates the methodology with data from the survey test. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

  18. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-10-27

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first summarizes key results from survey site tests performed on an HBA-6 installed at Duke Energy's Bedford compressor station, and on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. The report then presents results of design analysis performed on the Bedford HBA-6 to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

  19. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2006-01-24

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report presents results of design analysis performed on the TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

  20. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-07-27

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

  1. Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Review's "35 under 35" Recognizes Two ARPA-E Performers Technology Review's "35 under 35" Recognizes Two ARPA-E Performers December 12, 2011 - 9:55am Addthis Dr. Riccardo Signorelli, CEO of FastCAP Systems meets with Secretary Chu. Signorelli founded a startup focused on researching and developing carbon nanotube ultracapacitors and was chosen by <i> Technology Review </i> as a "35 Under 35" innovator along with Foro Energy's Dr.

  2. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  3. Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 states Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

  4. (HC){sub 3} process - An economical technology for upgrading bitumen and heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padamsey, R.; Bailey, R.T.; Cyr, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the development of the (HC){sub 3} Process. (HC){sub 3} is a high conversion hydro-cracking process with integrated hydro-treating that has been developed by Alberta Department of Energy, Oil Sands and Research Division. The (HC){sub 3} Process has been developed and demonstrated to achieve conversion in excess of 95% at moderate pressures and relatively high temperature in a very cost effective manner. This has been achieved with the aid of a colloidal catalyst that selectively converts the asphaltenes, and a proprietary recycle methodology that significantly reduces the catalyst consumption. Cost and economic studies indicate that capital and operating costs of the (HC){sub 3} upgrading scheme are lower than those of other high conversion schemes and are comparable to those of low and moderate conversion upgrading schemes. This cost advantage combined with the high yield gives the (HC){sub 3} a significant economic advantage over other upgrading schemes. The (HC){sub 3} process shows great promise at achieving high conversion efficiently and economically. The process is ready for commercial testing. Discussions are underway with regards to testing the process in a commercial facility designed to process nominally 5000 barrels per day (BPD).

  5. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  6. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  7. Assessment of solid-waste characteristics and control technology for oil-shale retorting. Final report for September 1983-February 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.K.

    1986-05-01

    The report presents information on oil-shale deposits in the eastern and western parts of the United States, their geological subdivisions, locations, tonnage, and physical and chemical characteristics. Characteristics of solid and liquid wastes produced from various oil-shale-processing technologies and control methods are presented. Also included are results from an experimental study to construct liners and covers for disposal of spent shale. A compilation of available data on the auto-ignition potential of raw and spent shales indicates a similarity between raw-shale fines and bituminous coals.

  8. Oil shale as an energy source in Israel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fainberg, V.; Hetsroni, G. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel)

    1996-01-01

    Reserves, characteristics, energetics, chemistry, and technology of Israeli oil shales are described. Oil shale is the only source of energy and the only organic natural resource in Israel. Its reserves of about 12 billion tons will be enough to meet Israel`s requirements for about 80 years. The heating value of the oil shale is 1,150 kcal/kg, oil yield is 6%, and sulfur content of the oil is 5--7%. A method of oil shale processing, providing exhaustive utilization of its energy and chemical potential, developed in the Technion, is described. The principal feature of the method is a two-stage pyrolysis of the oil shale. As a result, gas and aromatic liquids are obtained. The gas may be used for energy production in a high-efficiency power unit, or as a source for chemical synthesis. The liquid products can be an excellent source for production of chemicals.

  9. Technology Solutions Case Study: Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

  10. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-01-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents tests performed on a KVG103 engine/compressor installed at Duke's Thomaston Compressor Station. This is the first series of tests performed on a four-stroke engine under this program. Additionally, this report presents results, which complete a comparison of performance before and after modification to install High Pressure Fuel Injection and a Turbocharger on a GMW10 at Williams Station 60. Quarterly Reports 7 and 8 already presented detailed data from tests before and after this modification, but the final quantitative comparison required some further analysis, which is presented in Section 5 of this report. The report further presents results of detailed geometrical measurements and flow bench testing performed on the cylinders and manifolds of the Laboratory Cooper GMVH6 engine being employed for two-stroke engine air balance investigations. These measurements are required to enhance the detailed accuracy in modeling the dynamic interaction of air manifold, exhaust manifold, and in-cylinder fuel-air balance.

  11. PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Technologies & Infrastructure Department PURADYN OIL BYPASS FILTRATION ... 3 5 Baseline of the Engines and Oil Analysis ......

  12. Current issues in natural gas lubrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reber, J.

    1997-10-01

    Because of the ability of natural gas to burn completely relatively easily, supplying excess oxygen to promote complete reactions is a viable alternative to catalysts. Hence, lean burn technology has a natural fit for this industry. Lube oil is not adversely affected by lean burn operation. There is a slight tendency to cause more oil nitration than oxidation, but the real difference is not significant. Operators may notice somewhat more varnish (caramel color) and less sludge (black) as a result. Because the fuel is burned more completely, there is less problem with fuel-derived oil contamination. Also because of the excess air in the combustion chamber, overall cylinder temperature is lower, causing less stress on the oil. Oil life is generally lengthened. One common misconception that lean burn engines require different lubricants may stem from a change at Waukesha Engine Division--Dresser Industries. Waukesha has changed its lube oil requirements for VHP 3521, 5115, 7042, 9390 GL turbocharged and lean burn model engines. The lube oil specification for these engines is 1% to 1.7% ash with the same 0.10% zinc maximum. This change is not because of the lean burn nature of these engines, rather it is because of drastically decreased lube oil consumption. With less oil consumption, less ash is carried to the critical exhaust valve seat area to prevent valve recession.

  13. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil from Biomass Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil from Biomass March 25,2015 Technology Area Review ... first converting biomass to hydropyrolysis oil and then upgrading the hydropyrolysis oil ...

  14. Virent is Replacing Crude Oil | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virent is Replacing Crude Oil Virent is Replacing Crude Oil Breakout Session 2A-Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and ...

  15. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Gas Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources in an environmentally safe manner requires the development and application of new technologies that address the ...

  16. Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-22

    Objective is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery and to transfer this technology to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced technologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elswhere in the US oil and gas industry. This is the first quarterly progress report on the project; results to date are summarized.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Pennsylvania Partnership for Promoting Natural Gas Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  18. Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

    2002-09-01

    Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

  19. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  20. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2006-05-31

    This project has documented and demonstrated the feasibility of technologies and operational choices for companies who operate the large installed fleet of integral engine compressors in pipeline service. Continued operations of this fleet is required to meet the projected growth of the U.S. gas market. Applying project results will meet the goals of the DOE-NETL Natural Gas Infrastructure program to enhance integrity, extend life, improve efficiency, and increase capacity, while managing NOx emissions. These benefits will translate into lower cost, more reliable gas transmission, and options for increasing deliverability from the existing infrastructure on high demand days. The power cylinders on large bore slow-speed integral engine/compressors do not in general combust equally. Variations in cylinder pressure between power cylinders occur cycle-to-cycle. These variations affect both individual cylinder performance and unit average performance. The magnitude of the variations in power cylinder combustion is dependent on a variety of parameters, including air/fuel ratio. Large variations in cylinder performance and peak firing pressure can lead to detonation and misfires, both of which can be damaging to the unit. Reducing the variation in combustion pressure, and moving the high and low performing cylinders closer to the mean is the goal of engine balancing. The benefit of improving the state of the engine ''balance'' is a small reduction in heat rate and a significant reduction in both crankshaft strain and emissions. A new method invented during the course of this project is combustion pressure ratio (CPR) balancing. This method is more effective than current methods because it naturally accounts for differences in compression pressure, which results from cylinder-to-cylinder differences in the amount of air flowing through the inlet ports and trapped at port closure. It also helps avoid compensation for low compression pressure by the addition of excess fuel to achieve equalizing peak firing pressure, even if some of the compression pressure differences are attributed to differences in cylinder and piston geometry, clearance, and kinematics. The combination of high-pressure fuel injection and turbocharging should produce better mixing of fuel and air in lean mixtures. Test results documented modest improvements in heat rate and efficiency and significant improvements in emissions. The feasibility of a closed-loop control of waste-gate setting, which will maintain an equivalence ratio set point, has been demonstrated. This capability allows more direct tuning to enhance combustion stability, heat rate, or emissions. The project has documented the strong dependence of heat rate on load. The feasibility of directly measuring power and torque using the GMRC Rod Load Monitor (RLM) has been demonstrated. This capability helps to optimize heat rate while avoiding overload. The crankshaft Strain Data Capture Module (SDCM) has shown the sensitivity to changes in operating conditions and how they influence crankshaft bending strain. The results indicate that: balancing reduces the frequency of high-strain excursions, advanced timing directly increases crankshaft dynamic strain, reduced speed directly reduces strain, and high-pressure fuel injection reduces crankshaft strain slightly. The project demonstrated that when the timing is advanced, the heat rate is reduced, and when the timing is retarded, the heat rate is increased. One reason why timing is not advanced as much as it might be is the potential for detonation on hot days. A low-cost knock detector was demonstrated that allowed active control to use timing to allow the heat rate benefit to be realized safely. High flow resistance losses in the pulsation control systems installed on some compressors have been shown to hurt efficiency of both compressor and engine/compressor system. Improved pulsation control systems have the potential to recover almost 10% of available engine power. Integrity enhancements and reduced component failure probability will enhance aggregate

  1. Oil and Gas Research| GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Gas We're balancing the increasing demand for finite resources with technology that ensures access to energy for generations to come. Home > Innovation > Oil & Gas ...

  2. Plasticizers Derived from Vegetable Oils - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetable Oils Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis technology addresses the known health issues of commonly used...

  3. Plasticizers Derived from Vegetable Oils - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetable Oils Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary This technology addresses the known health issues of commonly used...

  4. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  5. New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support of the Stripper Well Consortium.

  6. Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

    2007-01-25

    Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

  7. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  8. EIA - Daily Report 9/29/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 9, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/29/2005 1,478,780 94.7% 7,980 76.7% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/25/2005 1,501,863 96.2% 8,047 77.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil

  9. Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

    1996-09-01

    Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

  10. Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology Soybean oil used for groundwater and wastewater remediation Soybean oil used for groundwater and wastewater remediation Technology Marketing Summary Scientists have developed a groundwater treatment technique that employs agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil,

  11. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Technologies Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate-affect, detect, and neutralize & mitigate all types of explosive threats. v Technologies Since its inception in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a driving force in explosives science. Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate, detect, and mitigate all types of explosive threats. ANDE:

  12. H. R. 4564: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to provide a deduction and special net operating loss rules with respect to certain losses on domestic crude oil, to increase tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, to require the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to be filled with stripper well oil, and to eliminate certain restrictions on the sale of natural gas and on the use of natural gas and oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 10, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Secure Energy Supply Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Title I provides a deduction and special net operating loss treatment for certain losses on crude oil. Title II increases tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, the revenues of which will cover authorized refunds. Title III provides that only stripper well oil or oil exchanged for stripper well oil will be used to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Title IV removes wellhead price controls and repeals Natural Gas Act jurisdiction over certain first sales of natural gas. Later titles repeal certain restrictions on the use of natural gas and petroleum, repeal incremental pricing requirements, and promote flexibility in rescheduling or marking down troubled loans. The bill was referred to the House Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs.

  13. EIA Report 12/27/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets This will be the last of our reports summarizing Hurricane impacts. The statistics used in the report can still be found on our site in these specific locations. As of Tuesday, December 27, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 12/22/2005 412,687 26.2% 1,962 19.4% 12/19/2005 414,495 26.3% 2,014 19.9% 12/16/2005 426,282 27.0% 2,228 22.1% 12/15/2005 426,282 27.0% 3,228 22.1% 12/12/2005 441,394 28.0% 2,312

  14. Deep Water Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deepwater Technology Deepwater (and Ultra-Deepwater, 5000 feet of water depth and beyond) is recognized as one of the last remaining areas of the world were oil and natural gas resources remain to be discovered and produced. The architecture of the systems employed to cost-effectively develop these resources in an environmentally safe manner, reflect some of industry's most advanced engineering accomplishments. NETL funds research to catalyze further advances that can help Gulf of Mexico

  15. Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

  16. heavy_oil | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Oil Heavy oil is a vast U.S. oil resource that is underexploited because its highly viscous nature renders it difficult to produce and to refine. As higher-gravity crudes ...

  17. S. 234: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Codes of 1986 to provide incentives for oil and natural gas exploration, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, January 25, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 234 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Codes of 1986 to provide incentives for oil and natural gas exploration, and for other purposes.

  18. S. 449: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide incentives for oil and natural gas exploration and production, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, February 23, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 449 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide incentives for oil and natural gas exploration and production, and for other purposes.

  19. Advanced Materials Manufacturing and Innovative Technologies for Natural Gas Pipeline Systems and Components

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 5 Budget At-A-Glance Advanced Manufacturing Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) partners with industry, small business, universities, and other stakeholders to identify and invest in emerging technologies with the potential to create high-quality U.S. manufacturing jobs, enhance global competitiveness, and reduce energy use by encouraging a culture of continuous improvement in corporate energy management. PDF icon fy15_at-a-glance_amo.pdf More

  20. Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority (NELHA): Hawaii Ocean Science & Technology Park; Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Olson, K.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  1. Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority (NELHA): Hawaii Ocean Science & Technology Park; Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Olson, K.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-01

    A partnership with the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  2. Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    A technology demonstration program of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles was conducted at FL Bliss, Texas to demonstrate the use of CNG as an alternative fuel. The demonstration program at FL Bliss was the first Army initiative with CNG-fueled vehicles under the legislated Alternative Motor Fuels Act. This Department of Energy (DOE)-supported fleet demonstration consisted of 48 General Services Administration (GSA)-owned, Army-leased 1992 dedicated CNG General Motors (GM) 3/4-ton pickup trucks and four 1993 gasoline-powered Chevrolet 3/4-ton pickup trucks.

  3. Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    2003-11-14

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

  4. EIA Report 11/10/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 0, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/10/2005 736,279 46.7% 4,016 39.8% 11/9/2005 737,136 46.8% 4,033 39.9% 11/8/2005 738,617 44.9% 4,123 40.8% 11/7/2005 773,097 49.0% 4,451 44.0% 11/4/2005 780,633 49.5% 4,569 45.2% 11/3/2005 790,610 50.2% 4,727 46.8% 11/2/2005 957,978 60.8% 5,043 49.9% 11/1/2005 1,000,092 63.5% 5,269 52.2% 10/31/2005 1,015,859 64.5% 5,427 53.7% 10/28/2005 1,017,551 64.6% 5,504 54.5%

  5. EIA Report 11/15/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 15, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/15/2005 725,423 46.0% 3,715 36.8% 11/14/2005 727,054 46.1% 3,742 37.0% 11/10/2005 736,279 46.7% 4,016 39.8% 11/9/2005 737,136 46.8% 4,033 39.9% 11/8/2005 738,617 44.9% 4,123 40.8% 11/7/2005 773,097 49.0% 4,451 44.0% 11/4/2005 780,633 49.5% 4,569 45.2% 11/3/2005 790,610 50.2% 4,727 46.8% 11/2/2005 957,978 60.8% 5,043 49.9% 11/1/2005 1,000,092 63.5% 5,269 52.2%

  6. EIA Report 11/17/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 7, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/17/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/16/2005 725,218 46.0% 3,713 36.8% 11/15/2005 725,423 46.0% 3,715 36.8% 11/14/2005 727,054 46.1% 3,742 37.0% 11/10/2005 736,279 46.7% 4,016 39.8% 11/9/2005 737,136 46.8% 4,033 39.9% 11/8/2005 738,617 44.9% 4,123 40.8% 11/7/2005 773,097 49.0% 4,451 44.0% 11/4/2005 780,633 49.5% 4,569 45.2% 11/3/2005 790,610 50.2% 4,727 46.8%

  7. EIA Report 11/22/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 2, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/22/2005 621,233 39.4% 3,219 31.9% 11/21/2005 633,064 40.2% 3,269 32.4% 11/18/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/17/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/16/2005 725,218 46.0% 3,713 36.8% 11/15/2005 725,423 46.0% 3,715 36.8% 11/14/2005 727,054 46.1% 3,742 37.0% 11/10/2005 736,279 46.7% 4,016 39.8% 11/9/2005 737,136 46.8% 4,033 39.9% 11/8/2005 738,617 44.9% 4,123 40.8%

  8. EIA Report 11/29/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 9, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/29/2005 564,229 35.8% 2,994 29.6% 11/28/2005 594,421 37.7% 3,060 30.3% 11/23/2005 615,623 39.1% 3,196 31.6% 11/22/2005 621,233 39.4% 3,219 31.9% 11/21/2005 633,064 40.2% 3,269 32.4% 11/18/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/17/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/16/2005 725,218 46.0% 3,713 36.8% 11/15/2005 725,423 46.0% 3,715 36.8% 11/14/2005 727,054 46.1% 3,742 37.0%

  9. EIA Report 11/29/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets December 1, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 12/1/2005 547,074 34.7% 2,964 29.3% 11/30/2005 547,223 34.7% 2,965 29.4% 11/29/2005 564,229 35.8% 2,994 29.6% 11/28/2005 594,421 37.7% 3,060 30.3% 11/23/2005 615,623 39.1% 3,196 31.6% 11/22/2005 621,233 39.4% 3,219 31.9% 11/21/2005 633,064 40.2% 3,269 32.4% 11/18/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/17/2005 717,807 45.5% 3,648 36.1% 11/16/2005 725,218 46.0%

  10. EIA Report 11/3/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets Thursday, November 3, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/3/2005 790,610 50.2% 4,727 46.8% 11/2/2005 957,978 60.8% 5,043 49.9% 11/1/2005 1,000,092 63.5% 5,269 52.2% 10/31/2005 1,015,859 64.5% 5,427 53.7% 10/28/2005 1,017,551 64.6% 5,504 54.5% 10/27/2005 1,022,313 64.9% 5,559 55.0% 10/26/2005 1,022,515 64.9% 5,563 55.1% 10/25/2005 1,033,621 65.6% 5,582 55.3% 10/24/2005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2%

  11. EIA Report 11/8/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 8, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 11/8/2005 738,617 44.9% 4,123 40.8% 11/7/2005 773,097 49.0% 4,451 44.0% 11/4/2005 780,633 49.5% 4,569 45.2% 11/3/2005 790,610 50.2% 4,727 46.8% 11/2/2005 957,978 60.8% 5,043 49.9% 11/1/2005 1,000,092 63.5% 5,269 52.2% 10/31/2005 1,015,859 64.5% 5,427 53.7% 10/28/2005 1,017,551 64.6% 5,504 54.5% 10/27/2005 1,022,313 64.9% 5,559 55.0% 10/26/2005 1,022,515 64.9% 5,563

  12. EIA Report 12/13/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 13, 6:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 12/12/2005 441,394 28.0% 2,312 22.9% 12/9/2005 447,425 28.4% 2,347 23.2% 12/8/2005 464,858 29.5% 2,442 24.2% 12/7/2005 476,035 30.2% 2,475 24.5% 12/6/2005 503,187 31.9% 2,650 26.2% 12/5/2005 509,270 32.3% 2,716 26.9% 12/2/2005 539,074 34.2% 2,943 29.1% 12/1/2005 547,074 34.7% 2,964 29.3% 11/30/2005 547,223 34.7% 2,965 29.4% 11/29/2005 564,229 35.8% 2,994 29.6%

  13. EIA Report 12/20/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 20, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 12/19/2005 414,495 26.3% 2,014 19.9% 12/16/2005 426,282 27.0% 2,228 22.1% 12/15/2005 426,282 27.0% 3,228 22.1% 12/12/2005 441,394 28.0% 2,312 22.9% 12/9/2005 447,425 28.4% 2,347 23.2% 12/8/2005 464,858 29.5% 2,442 24.2% 12/7/2005 476,035 30.2% 2,475 24.5% 12/6/2005 503,187 31.9% 2,650 26.2% 12/5/2005 509,270 32.3% 2,716 26.9% 12/2/2005 539,074 34.2% 2,943 29.1%

  14. EIA Report 12/6/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets Beginning today this report will be updated every Tuesday. As of Tuesday, December 6, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 12/6/2005 503,187 31.9% 2,650 26.2% 12/5/2005 509,270 32.3% 2,716 26.9% 12/2/2005 539,074 34.2% 2,943 29.1% 12/1/2005 547,074 34.7% 2,964 29.3% 11/30/2005 547,223 34.7% 2,965 29.4% 11/29/2005 564,229 35.8% 2,994 29.6% 11/28/2005 594,421 37.7% 3,060 30.3% 11/23/2005 615,623 39.1% 3,196

  15. EIA - Daily Report 10/11/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets Tuesday, October 11, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 85.6% 7,170 71.0% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 88.3% 7,495 74.2% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 93.1% 7,941 78.6% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 93.8% 7,980 79.0% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2%

  16. EIA - Daily Report 10/12/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 2, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 85.6% 7,170 71.0% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 88.3% 7,495 74.2% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 93.1% 7,941 78.6% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 93.8% 7,980 79.0% 9/28/2005 1,511,715

  17. EIA - Daily Report 10/13/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 13, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 85.6% 7,170 71.0% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 88.3% 7,495 74.2% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 93.1% 7,941 78.6% 9/29/2005

  18. EIA - Daily Report 10/14/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 14, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 85.6% 7,170 71.0% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 88.3% 7,495 74.2% 9/30/2005

  19. EIA - Daily Report 10/17/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 17, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 85.6% 7,170 71.0% 10/3/2005

  20. EIA - Daily Report 10/18/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 18, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005

  1. EIA - Daily Report 10/19/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 9, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928

  2. EIA - Daily Report 10/20/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 0, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364

  3. EIA - Daily Report 10/21/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 21, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/21/2005 986,805 62.6% 5,337 52.8% 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530 67.4% 6,042 59.8% 10/7/2005 1,162,913

  4. EIA - Daily Report 10/24/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 24, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/24/2005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2% 10/21/2005 986,805 62.6% 5,337 52.8% 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462 66.4% 5,919 58.6% 10/11/2005 1,062,530

  5. EIA - Daily Report 10/25/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 25, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/25/2005 1,033,621 65.6% 5,582 55.3% 10/24/2005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2% 10/21/2005 986,805 62.6% 5,337 52.8% 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261 65.4% 5,700 56.4% 10/12/2005 1,046,462

  6. EIA - Daily Report 10/26/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 26, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/26/2005 1,022,515 64.9% 5,563 55.1% 10/25/2005 1,033,621 65.6% 5,582 55.3% 10/24/2005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2% 10/21/2005 986,805 62.6% 5,337 52.8% 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909 64.0% 5,647 55.9% 10/13/2005 1,031,261

  7. EIA - Daily Report 10/27/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 7, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/27/2005 1,022,313 64.9% 5,559 55.0% 10/26/2005 1,022,515 64.9% 5,563 55.1% 10/25/2005 1,033,621 65.6% 5,582 55.3% 10/24/2005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2% 10/21/2005 986,805 62.6% 5,337 52.8% 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291 63.2% 5,498 54.4% 10/14/2005 1,008,909

  8. EIA - Daily Report 10/28/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 8, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/28/2005 1,022,313 64.9% 5,559 55.0% 10/27/2005 1,022,313 64.9% 5,559 55.0% 10/26/2005 1,022,515 64.9% 5,563 55.1% 10/25/2005 1,033,621 65.6% 5,582 55.3% 10/24/2005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2% 10/21/2005 986,805 62.6% 5,337 52.8% 10/20/2005 967,734 61.4% 5,196 51.4% 10/19/2005 973,084 61.7% 5,242 51.9% 10/18/2005 982,011 62.3% 5,346 52.9% 10/17/2005 996,291

  9. EIA - Daily Report 10/3/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets October 3, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/3/2005 1,391,926 89.1% 7,495 72.1% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 94.0% 7,941 76.4% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 94.7% 7,980 76.7% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/25/2005 1,501,863 96.2% 8,047 77.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% source:

  10. EIA - Daily Report 10/4/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 4, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/4/2005 1,349,617 86.4% 7,170 68.9% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 89.1% 7,495 72.1% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 94.0% 7,941 76.4% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 94.7% 7,980 76.7% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% source: Minerals

  11. EIA - Daily Report 10/5/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets October 5, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/5/2005 1,299,928 83.2% 6,895 66.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 86.4% 7,170 68.9% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 89.1% 7,495 72.1% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 94.0% 7,941 76.4% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 94.7% 7,980 76.7% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% source:

  12. EIA - Daily Report 10/6/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets October 6, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/6/2005 1,202,364 77.0% 6,628 63.7% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 83.2% 6,895 66.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 86.4% 7,170 68.9% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 89.1% 7,495 72.1% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 94.0% 7,941 76.4% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 94.7% 7,980 76.7% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/24/2005

  13. EIA - Daily Report 10/7/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets October 7, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 10/7/2005 1,162,913 73.8% 6,441 63.8% 10/6/2005 1,202,364 76.3% 6,628 65.6% 10/5/2005 1,299,928 82.5% 6,895 68.3% 10/4/2005 1,349,617 85.6% 7,170 71.0% 10/3/2005 1,391,926 88.3% 7,495 74.2% 9/30/2005 1,467,577 93.1% 7,941 78.6% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 93.8% 7,980 79.0% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005

  14. EIA - Daily Report 9/30/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 30, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/30/2005 1,467,577 94.0% 7,941 76.4% 9/29/2005 1,478,780 94.7% 7,980 76.7% 9/28/2005 1,511,715 96.8% 8,072 77.2% 9/27/2005 1,512,937 96.9% 7,857 75.5% 9/26/2005 1,527,630 97.8% 7,843 75.4% 9/25/2005 1,501,863 96.2% 8,047 77.4% 9/24/2005 1,500,898 96.1% 7,488 72.0% 9/23/2005 1,486,877 95.2% 7,204 69.3% 9/22/2005 1,379,000 88.3% 6,595 63.4% source: Minerals

  15. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    that likely contributed to the run-up in natural gas prices late last week was the spike in crude oil prices as WTI crude oil surged 2.70 per barrel to average 30.10 per...

  17. The twentieth oil shale symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: The technical contributions of John Ward Smith in oil shale research; Oil shale rubble fires: ignition and extinguishment; Fragmentation of eastern oil shale for in situ recovery; A study of thermal properties of Chinese oil shale; and Natural invasion of native plants on retorted oil shale.

  18. An Evaluation of the Feasibility of Combining Carbon Dioxide Flooding Technologies with Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery Technologies in Order To Sequester Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd French; Lew Brown; Rafael Hernandez; Magan Green; Lynn Prewitt; Terry Coggins

    2009-08-19

    The need for more energy as our population grows results in an increase in the amount of CO2 introduced into the atmosphere. The effect of this introduction is currently debated intensely as to the severity of the effect of this. The bjective of this investigation was to determine if the production of more energy (i.e. petroleum) and the sequestration of CO2 could be coupled into one process. Carbon dioxide flooding is a well-established technique that introduces Compressed CO2 into a subsurface oil-bearing formation to aide in liquefying harder to extract petroleum and enhancing its mobility towards the production wells.

  19. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  20. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology /newsroom/_assets/images/s-icon.png Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. Health Space Computing Energy Earth Materials Science Technology The Lab All Glen Wurden in the stellarator's vacuum vessel during camera installation in 2014. Innovative imaging systems on the Wendelstein 7-X bring steady-state fusion energy closer to reality Innovative new imaging systems designed at Los Alamos are helping physicists

  1. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  2. FCC Pilot Plant Results with Vegetable Oil and Pyrolysis Oil...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies E. Thomas (Tom) Habib, Jr., Director, Customer ...

  3. Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-29

    In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  5. The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program- The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  6. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased this week in tandem with the crude oil prices. The natural gas futures contract for delivery in June...

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions or Impediments to Their Development. The report, which was...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Other Market Trends EIA Proposes Extending Oil and Natural Gas Reserves Survey Forms. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) on July 15 published a notice in the Federal...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    which summarizes the likely demand, supply, and prices for natural gas, heating oil, propane, and electricity during the upcoming winter (October 2004 - March 2005). According to...

  11. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matter and Technologies R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI Winfried Barth Matter and Technologies Super Heavy Nuclei International Symposium, Texas A & M University, College Station TX, USA, March 31 - April 02, 2015 W. Barth, R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI 2 R&D activities towards a future cw LINAC at GSI 1. Introduction 2. Status of the Unilac High Current Performance 3. Cavity Development 4. General linac layout 5. R&D approach 6. Status of

  12. SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene A. Fritzler

    2005-09-01

    The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

  13. Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, ... Analysis of Technology and Policy Tradeoffs, Energy Policy, ...

  14. Ethanol Oil Recovery Systems EORS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems EORS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol Oil Recovery Systems (EORS) Place: Clayton, Georgia Product: Ethanol Oil Recovery Systems (EORS), a green technology...

  15. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis Photo of a scientist testing a photoelectrochemical water splitting system. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. It is a major component of water, oil, natural gas, and all living matter. Despite its simplicity and abundance, hydrogen rarely occurs naturally as a gas on Earth. It is almost always combined with other elements. It can be generated from

  16. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  17. West Virginia Office of Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    monitoring and regulating all actions related to the exploration, drilling, storage and production of oil and natural gas. References "West Virginia Office of Oil and Gas"...

  18. Category:Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search This category includes companies and information related to oil (petroleum) or natural gas. Pages in category "Oil and Gas" The following 110 pages are in this category,...

  19. Providential Energy Corp formerly Providential Oil Gas Inc |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (formerly Providential Oil & Gas Inc) Place: California Sector: Hydro Product: Focused on natural gas and crude oil; expanding into hydropower, fuel cells, and ethanol. References:...

  20. Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil and Gas Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Address: 301 Natural Resources Dr. Ste 102 Place: Arkansas Zip: 72205 Website:...

  1. Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to talk to professionals in electricity generation, transmission and distribution, and oil sector ... will allow much needed foreign investment in the oil and natural gas sector ...

  2. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  3. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-11: Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezuela

    2000-04-06

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Tenth Amendment anti Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. This report is presented in sections (for each of the six Tasks) and each section contains one or more reports that were prepared to describe the results of the effort under each of the Tasks. A statement of each Task, taken from the Agreement Between Project Managers, is presented on the first page of each section. The Tasks are numbered 68 through 73. The first through tenth report on research performed under Annex IV Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report Number IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10 contain the results of the first 67 Tasks. These reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, March 1995, and December 1997, respectively.

  4. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    these data from 2005 to 2009 are presented for each State. (12282010) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves: 2009 National and State...

  6. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  7. Oil recovery enhancement from fractured, low permeability reservoirs. Annual report 1990--1991, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, S.W.

    1991-12-31

    Joint funding by the Department of Energy and the State of Texas has Permitted a three year, multi-disciplinary investigation to enhance oil recovery from a dual porosity, fractured, low matrix permeability oil reservoir to be initiated. The Austin Chalk producing horizon trending thru the median of Texas has been identified as the candidate for analysis. Ultimate primary recovery of oil from the Austin Chalk is very low because of two major technological problems. The commercial oil producing rate is based on the wellbore encountering a significant number of natural fractures. The prediction of the location and frequency of natural fractures at any particular region in the subsurface is problematical at this time, unless extensive and expensive seismic work is conducted. A major portion of the oil remains in the low permeability matrix blocks after depletion because there are no methods currently available to the industry to mobilize this bypassed oil. The following multi-faceted study is aimed to develop new methods to increase oil and gas recovery from the Austin Chalk producing trend. These methods may involve new geological and geophysical interpretation methods, improved ways to study production decline curves or the application of a new enhanced oil recovery technique. The efforts for the second year may be summarized as one of coalescing the initial concepts developed during the initial phase to more in depth analyses. Accomplishments are predicting natural fractures; relating recovery to well-log signatures; development of the EOR imbibition process; mathematical modeling; and field test.

  8. Clean and Secure Energy from Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Resources

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Clean and Secure Energy from Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Resources Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Clean and Secure Energy from Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Resources This report summarizes the significant findings from the Clean and Secure Energy from Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Resources program sponsored by the Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology

  9. History of western oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The history of oil shale in the United States since the early 1900's is detailed. Research on western oil shale probably began with the work of Robert Catlin in 1915. During the next 15 years there was considerable interest in the oil shales, and oil shale claims were located, and a few recovery plants were erected in Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, and Montana. Little shale soil was produced, however, and the major oil companies showed little interest in producing shale oil. The early boom in shale oil saw less than 15 plants produce a total of less than 15,000 barrels of shale oil, all but about 500 barrels of which was produced by the Catlin Operation in Nevada and by the US Bureau of Mines Rulison, Colorado operation. Between 1930 and 1944 plentiful petroleum supplies at reasonable prices prevent any significant interest in shale oil, but oil shortages during World War II caused a resurgence of interest in oil shale. Between 1940 and 1969, the first large-scale mining and retorting operations in soil shale, and the first attempts at true in situ recovery of shale oil began. Only 75,000 barrels of shale oil were produced, but major advancements were made in developing mine designs and technology, and in retort design and technology. The oil embargo of 1973 together with a new offering of oil shale leases by the Government in 1974 resulted in the most concentrated efforts for shale oil production to date. These efforts and the future prospects for shale oil as an energy source in the US are discussed.

  10. Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad; Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric; Wang, Mr. Michael; Ruth, Mr. Mark; Andress, Mr. David; Ward, Jacob; Joseck, Fred; Nguyen, Tien; Das, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week ... 2014: Reassessing the Outlook of US Oil Dependence Using Oil Security Metrics ...

  12. Effects of Alaska Oil and Natural Gas Provisions of H. R. 4 and S. 1766 on U.S. Energy Markets, Addendum

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This addendum provides projections on the increase in U.S. oil production from opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the decease in net petroleum imports, and the change in net petroleum expenditures across a range of cases.

  13. OriginOil Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90016 Product: California-based OTC-quoted algae-to-oil technology developer. References: OriginOil Inc1 This article is a stub. You...

  14. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  15. H.R.3688: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for marginal oil and natural gas well production, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This bill proposes a new section to be added to the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. The credit proposed is $3 per barrel of qualified crude oil production and 50 cents per 1,000 cubic feet of qualified natural gas production. In this case qualified production means domestic crude oil or natural gas which is produced from a marginal well. Marginal production is defined within the Internal Revenue Code Section 613A(c)(6).

  16. Too early to tell on $100 oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Confidential Presentation to: April 7, 2008 Middle East oil demand and Lehman Brothers oil price outlook Adam Robinson Middle East oil demand u Three pillars of Middle East oil demand - Petrodollar reinvestment - Purchasing power rise - Power sector constraints u Natural gas shortages for power generation mean balance of risks to any Middle East oil demand forecast are firmly to the upside, adding to summer upside seasonality u Lehman Brothers has pegged 3Q08 as the tightest quarter of the

  17. Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance February 3, 2014 HOUSTON, TX, Feb. 3, 2014-Chevron Energy Technology Company and GE Oil & Gas announced today the creation of the Chevron GE Technology Alliance, which will develop and commercialize valuable technologies to solve critical needs for the oil and gas industry. The Alliance builds upon a current collaboration on flow analysis technology for oil and gas wells. It will leverage research and development from GE's newest Global Research Center,

  18. Proceedings of the fuels technology contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    The Fuels Technology Contractors Review Meeting was held November 16-18, 1993, at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). METC periodically provides an opportunity to bring together all of the R&D participants in a DOE-sponsored contractors review meeting to present key results of their research and to provide technology transfer to the active research community and to the interested public. This meeting was previously called the Natural Gas Technology Contractors Review Meeting. This year it was expanded to include DOE-sponsored research on oil shale and tar sands and so was retitled the Fuels Technology Contractors Review Meeting. Current research activities include efforts in both natural gas and liquid fuels. The natural gas portion of the meeting included discussions of results summarizing work being conducted in fracture systems, both natural and induced; drilling, completion, and stimulation research; resource characterization; delivery and storage; gas to liquids research; and environmental issues. The meeting also included project and technology summaries on research in oil shale, tar sands, and mild coal gasification, and summaries of work in natural-gas fuel cells and natural-gas turbines. The format included oral and poster session presentations. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  19. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  20. Oil and Gas R&D Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This publication describes the major components of the research and development programs of the Department of Energy`s Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology. These programs are commonly referred to collectively as the `Oil and Gas Program.` This document provides customers with a single source of information describing the details of the individual technology program components. This document reflects the results of a planning cycle that began in early 1996 with the development of a scenario analysis for the programs, followed by the development of the coordinated strategic plan. The technology program plans, which are the most recent products of the planning cycle, expand on the program descriptions presented in the coordinated strategic plan, and represent an initial effort to coordinate the Oil and Gas Program exploration and production programs and budgets. Each technology program plan includes a `roadmap` that summarizes the progress of the program to the present and indicates its future direction. The roadmaps describe the program drivers, vision, mission, strategies, and measures of success. Both the individual technology program plans and the strategic plan are dynamic and are intended to be updated regularly.

  1. Bio-oil Upgrading with Novel Low Cost Catalysts Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Bio-oil Upgrading with Novel Low Cost Catalysts March 24, 2015 Bio-oil Technology Area Review Jae-Soon Choi Oak Ridge National ...

  2. Case Studies of the ROZ CO2 Flood and the Combined ROZ/MPZ CO2 Flood at the Goldsmith Landreth Unit, Ector County, Texas. Using ''Next Generation'' CO2 EOR Technologies to Optimize the Residual Oil Zone CO2 Flood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, Robert C.; Melzer, L. Stephen; Kuuskraa, Vello; Koperna, George

    2015-06-30

    The technology for CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2 EOR) has significantly advanced since the earliest floods were implemented in the 1970s. At least for the Permian Basin region of the U.S., the oil recovery has been now been extended into residual oil zones (ROZs) where the mobile fluid phase is water and immobile phase is oil. But the nature of the formation and fluids within the ROZs has brought some challenges that were not present when flooding the MPZs. The Goldsmith-Landreth project in the Permian Basin was intended to first identify the most pressing issues of the ROZs floods and, secondly, begin to address them with new techniques designed to optimize a flood that commingled the MPZ and the ROZ. The early phase of the research conducted considerable reservoir and fluid characterization work and identified both technical and commercial challenges of producing the enormous quantities of water when flooding the ROZs. It also noted the differing water compositions in the ROZ as compared to the overlying MPZs. A new CO2 gas lift system using a capillary string was successfully applied during the project which conveyed the CO2 to the deeper and differing ROZ reservoir conditions at Goldsmith and added a second capillary string that facilitated applying scale inhibitors to mitigate the scaling tendencies of the mixing ROZ and MPZ formation waters. The project also undertook a reservoir modeling effort, using the acquired reservoir characterization data, to history match both the primary and water flood phases of the MPZ and to establish the initial conditions for a modeling effort to forecast response of the ROZ to CO2 EOR. With the advantage of many profile logs acquired from the operator, some concentration on the original pattern area for the ROZ pilot was accomplished to attempt to perfect the history match for that area. Several optional scenarios for producing the ROZ were simulated seeking to find the preferred mode of producing the two intervals. Finally, the project attempted to document for the first time the production performance of commingled MPZ and ROZ CO2 EOR project at the nearby Seminole San Andres Unit. The analysis shows that over 10,000 bopd can be shown to be coming from the ROZ interval, a zone that would have produced no oil under primary or water flood phases. A similar analysis was done for the GLSAU project illustrating that 2000 bopd of incremental EOR oil is currently being produced. The results of the modeling work would suggest that 800 bopd can be attributed to the ROZ alone at GLSAU.

  3. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector- Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The "Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles" workshop report by Sandia National Laboratory summarizes a workshop that discussed common opportunities and challenges in expanding the use of hydrogen (H2) and natural gas (CNG or LNG) as transportation fuels.

  5. EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Exploration & Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Exploration & Reserves 2009 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2008 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 10292009, PDF, XLS, and...

  6. ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",4657,4403,4395,2670,434,117,50,451,153 "Building

  7. ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",67338,65753,65716,45525,13285,5891,2750,6290,2322

  8. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  9. Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeorgiaDepartmentofNaturalResources(GDNR)&oldid765343" Categories: Organizations Oil and Gas State Oil and...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Significant New Deepwater Oil and Natural Gas Discovery: A successful production test in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico has confirmed a significant new oil play in the lower...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the technology that drove Enron's North American wholesale electricity and natural gas trading unit. That technology, together with reportedly over 600 former Enron...

  12. State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suite Arizona http www azogcc az gov Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Natural Resources Dr Ste Arkansas http www aogc state ar us JDesignerPro...

  13. Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico. Annual report, September 25, 1995--September 24, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The basic driver for this project is the low recovery observed in Delaware reservoirs, such as the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). This low recovery is caused by low reservoir energy, less than optimum permeabilities and porosities, and inadequate reservoir characterization and reservoir management strategies which are typical of projects operated by independent producers. Rapid oil decline rates and high gas/oil ratios are typically observed in the first year of primary production. Based on the production characteristics that have been observed in similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Pool. Three basic constraints to producing the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Reservoir are: (1) limited areal and interwell geologic knowledge, (2) lack of an engineering tool to evaluate the various producing strategies, and (3) limited surface access prohibiting development with conventional drilling. The limited surface access is caused by the proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes. The objectives of this project are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers, especially in the Permian Basin.

  14. Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    environmental impacts as companies move into deeper and deeper water around the globe. ... oil and natural gas supplies and reduce America's dependence on foreign petroleum imports. ...

  15. 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report March 5, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Foro Energy, Inc. partners with the United States Department of Energy to commercialize high power lasers for the oil, natural gas, geothermal, and mining industries. photo courtesy of Foro Energy Foro Energy, Inc. partners with the United States Department of Energy to commercialize high power lasers for the

  16. Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks in part to innovations supported by the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory over the past 30 years, the United States is a world leader in the number of EOR projects and volume of oil production from this method.

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table A4 of the Annual Energy Review 2002. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Natural gas stocks stood at 2,155 Bcf as of Friday, July 9,...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Trends Natural Gas and Crude Oil Production Shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the Department of the Interior reported that a significant...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    country this week and slightly lower prices for crude oil led to an easing of natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 3. On the week...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Friday, July 6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 12, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this week (Wednesday-Thursday, June 27-July 5), although crude oil prices...

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crude oil prices and increasing cooling demand in some regions contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing more than 10 percent at trading locations in the Lower 48 States...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Price, West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Spot Price, and Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price Graph More Summary Data Prices Prices increased at all trading locations during the week,...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu (MMBtu). The NEB noted the contrast of this forecast to the market prices of last summer, when natural gas prices peaked at more than 13 per MMBtu and crude oil reached a...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Leasing. The U. S. Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) held a sale of offshore oil and natural gas leases in the Central Gulf of Mexico on March 20,...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the lease sale could result in the recovery of between 276 and 654 million barrels of oil and from 1.59 to 3.30 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. Sale 197 in the Eastern Gulf...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the holiday-shortened week, falling crude oil prices, and a favorable supply situation led to widespread declines in natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since last...

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    In contrast to natural gas spot prices, crude oil prices continued to soften. After dropping over 1 per barrel the previous week, the average spot price for West Texas...

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    withdrawal from working gas storage reported last Thursday. A contributing factor to the run-up in natural gas prices could be climbing crude oil prices, which rallied late last...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    part of a 65 billion project to supply the United States with oil, natural gas, and electricity from Siberia. The tunnel, which would be the world's longest, would take 10 to 15...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    its oil and natural gas royalty-in-kind (RIK) program, which is expected to increase revenue and lower administrative costs linked with the program. The RIK approach takes...

  11. Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Today, the United States spends about $400 billion each year on imported oil. To realize a secure energy future, America must break its dependence on imported oil and its volatile costs. The transportation sector accounts for about 70% of U.S. oil demand and holds tremendous opportunity to increase America's energy security by reducing oil consumption. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R and D) on vehicle technologies which can stem America's dependence on oil, strengthen the economy, and protect the environment. Hybrid-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles can significantly improve fuel economy, displacing petroleum. Researchers are making batteries more affordable and recyclable, while enhancing battery range, performance, and life. This research supports President Obama's goal of putting 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The program is also working with businesses to develop domestic battery and electric-drive component plants to improve America's economic competitiveness globally. The program facilitates deployment of alternative fuels (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, propane, and natural gas) and fuel infrastructures by partnering with state and local governments, universities, and industry. Reducing vehicle weight directly improves vehicle efficiency and fuel economy, and can potentially reduce vehicle operating costs. Cost-effective, lightweight, high-strength materials can significantly reduce vehicle weight without compromising safety. Improved combustion technologies and optimized fuel systems can improve near-and mid-term fuel economy by 25% for passenger vehicles and 20% for commercial vehicles by 2015, compared to 2009 vehicles. Reducing the use of oil-based fuels and lubricants in vehicles has more potential to improve the nation's energy security than any other action; even a 1% improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency would save consumers more than $4 billion annually.

  12. Natural Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    133. Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Table 134. Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions Table 135. Natural Gas...

  13. Natural Gas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources Fossil Natural Gas Natural Gas April 13, 2016 New Leader Announced for FE's Office of Oil and Gas The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) ...

  14. PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

  15. OpenEI:Projects/Improvements Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2 Oil | General Classification 3 Oil | Uses 3.1 Fuels 3.2 Derivatives 3.3 Agriculture 4 Natural Gas | Energy Basics 5 Natural Gas | General Classification 5.1 Biogas 6 Natural...

  16. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  17. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    consistent with expected deployment timelines. EOR and other Technology Options Crude oil development and production in U.S. oil reservoirs can include up to three distinct...

  18. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse provides information about the implications of natural gas infrastructure modernization, including strategies and technologies that increase public safety, improve environmental performance and enhance natural gas deliverability.

  19. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

  20. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot...