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1

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

Geothermal Technologies Office: Electricity Generation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

3

Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

4

Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

5

Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

6

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

8

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

9

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

10

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

12

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

17

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

20

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The O H E G plant is a revolutionary concept using tidal energy designed by FreeFlow 69 The plant uses tidal energy to create electricity 24 hours a day making this a unique project 24 hour power is produced by using both the kinetic energy in tidal flow and the potential energy created by tidal height changes The O H E G plant is completely independent of the wind farm however it does make an ideal foundation for offshore wind turbines combining both tidal energy and wind energy The O H E G plant is not detrimental to the surrounding environment or ecosystem and due to its offshore location it will not be visually offensive

23

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heating andenergy source for thermal energy loads and the generation of2 emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

27

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-level2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics3. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and T. O’Brien. 2003. Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-plants and sites that need electricity and heat (i.e. steam)of the Potential for Electricity Generation Owen Bailey and

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-scale back-pressure steam turbine. Several manufactures2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Program on Technology Innovation: An Assessment of the Future Potential for Biomass Electricity Generation in a Carbon-Constrained World  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed as part of EPRI's Program on Technology Innovation. It evaluates the potential role of biomass electric power generation technologies in a carbon-constrained world. Also, it provides detailed background on U.S. and international biomass use, supply issues, and technologies that can be used to convert biomass into electric power and transportation fuels. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) compatible database of U.S. biomass fuel supplies was also developed as part of this pro...

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

34

Technological analysis of options for generating electricity with solid waste fuel in the Bangkok metropolitan area  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of relatively current techniques for converting mixed municipal waste into electricity is presented. A brief review of the comparative capabilities of the relevant energy recovery systems is documented in this section. The discussion is focused on the principal system and technological strategies that would be best suited for the municipal solid waste recovery project in Thailand. Emphasis in the review was placed on mixed waste processing in a mass burning waterwalled system.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Natural gas fired electric generating technology: A key to the adequacy of electric generating capacity in North American Electric Reliability Councils. Topical report, May 1991  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an enhanced modeling system for electricity market analysis is explained. The relevant geographic areas that must be used for accurate supply and demand modeling and analysis are defined. There is no national market for electricity in the United States. Surplus hydroelectric capacity from the Pacific Northwest cannot be made available in Florida. Any model of U.S. electricity consumer and producer interaction that does not differentiate by region would produce misleading results. The expected natural gas-dominated capacity expansion phase in electricity markets is described.

Makovick, L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Rethinking the scale of coal-fired electric generation: technological and institutional considerations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic and social implications of an electric-utility system based on medium-scale (50 to 200 MWe) coal-fired plants dispersed near load centers. The historical trend in US electric generation has been a sustained effort to capture the economies of large scale. Technical and institutional conditions within the industry, as well as the historical perception of universal electrification as a desirable social goal, have brought about this trend. Large fossil and nuclear plants, often representing joint ventures of several utilities, dominate the plans of utilities over the next 20 years. Despite these trends, this review was unable to conclude that clear advantages must inherently accrue to either small- or large-scale electrical generation. Transportation and construction do offer demonstrable economies of scale, but the other terms in the cost equation (such as reliability and transmission) are sufficiently uncertain or site-specific to prevent firm conclusions concerning the effect of scale. Biases believed to exist in the regulatory process would dilute the utilities' perception of any advantages accruing to small generators; rate-of-return regulation favors overcapitalization as embodied in the construction of large plants and extensive transmission networks. It is not clear that the current regulatory structure is capable of weighing the institutional values of accountability and local control against dollar savings generally supposed to accrue to large plants. The Midwest and East North Central states may be singularly fit for a decentralized, medium-scale system for historical, geographical, and institutional reasons, as well as for their location near the coal fields.

Gilmer, R.W.; Meunier, R.E.; Whittle, C.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the US Electricity Industry,” October mimeo.deregulation” of the electricity industry in the U.S. hasreg- ulation in the electricity industry has attracted

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supercritical coal-?red steam generators. Additionally, thecost of heat recovery steam generator(s) (HSRG) necessarythe primary generator is used to drive a secondary steam

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

40

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57451 Clean Energy Technologies A Preliminary InventoryDepartment Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernestand renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000. Distributed Power Generation, Marcel Dekker. pp.180-This greatly influences power generation costs and reducesand Ogden, 2000) total power generation is estimated at 5.3

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the condensate is returned to the steam generating plant.the condensate is often returned to the steam generating

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies. The production of renewable energy creates noand thermal energy production from all renewable resources,

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines to Electrical Machines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor

50

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment plants release biogas through the decomposition oforganic matter. The biogas (mostly methane) can be capturedgenerate electricity from biogas and they have the same rate

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes. Industrial steam distribution pressures areto medium pressure steam for distribution. Although thelosses in steam generation or distribution. The potential

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cyclefarms to large integrated gasifiers at petroleum refineries.BLGCC). The black liquor gasifier technology will produce a

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline of 145 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant for KawasakiGas Firing Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plant,” Journal ofgasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for$/kWh References EPA. 2002. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MCFC) and solid oxide (SOFC). Proton exchange membrane (PEM)technology. Hence, MCFC and SOFC offer the most potentialfuel cell system, MCFC and SOFC offer the most potential.

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

58

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of natural gas and the enactment of the Power Plant &Power Plant & Industrial Fuel Use Act and the natural gaspower plant emissions, created a premium for “clean-burning” technologies. With natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suited for combined cycle, baseload applications. This sug-for the provision of baseload power in a combined cycle set-generators: provision of baseload power using a combined

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

62

Program on Technology Innovation: Electricity Use in the Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many utilities are encouraged by regulators to engage in end-use energy efficiency programs, few consider options to reduce energy losses along the electricity value chain, even though the electricity sector is the second largest electricity-consuming industry in the United States. Electricity used to facilitate power production, transmission, and distribution alone consumes approximately 11% of generated electricity. A number of technologies can be applied to reduce this electricity use. This repo...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

63

Electrical pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

Norris, Neil J. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Definition: Electricity Storage Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Electricity Storage Technologies Technologies that can store electricity to be used at a later time. These devices require a mechanism to convert alternating current (AC) electricity into another form for storage, and then back to AC electricity. Common forms of electricity storage include batteries, flywheels, and pumped hydro. Electricity storage can provide backup power, peaking power, and ancillary services, and can store excess electricity produced by renewable energy resources when available.[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/electricity_storage_technologies [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitionssmart grid,smart grid,

66

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor technologies, performance, low-cost materials, and thermal control systems that will yield...

67

Generation of electrical power  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

Hursen, Thomas F. (Monroeville, PA); Kolenik, Steven A. (Leechburg, PA); Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Integrated Generation Technology Options is intended to provide a snapshot of current cost and performance and technology trends for central electricity generation stations (>50 MW). This document is designed to help with information on the current options in power generation infrastructure capital investments. This 2008 Integrated Generation Technology Options draws from the results of the 2007 TAG studies with relevant current updates. However, while the TAG addresses about 20 different Power ...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies ...  

Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research ...

70

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymerfullerene bulk...

71

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy Search Search Search Help | A-Z Subject Index EERE Geothermal Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all...

72

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Solar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to...

73

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

74

OpenEI - Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/878 Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of

75

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: September 30, 9: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on

76

Method for protecting an electric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

New Electric Grid Technologies for Renewable Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and changing electric loads that are becoming part of the "orchestra" · Dealing with economic and public policy & Intelligent Agent (temporal power flow control) · Solar and Wind Forecasting Tools · Generator and LoadNew Electric Grid Technologies for Renewable Integration - The Need for Being Smarter - Presented

Islam, M. Saif

78

High Strength Undiffused Brushless Electric Motors and Generators  

A brushless electric motor/generator with enhanced air-gap flux density and simplified field weakening. Inventor HSU, JOHN S Engineering Science & Technology Div

79

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind, and geothermal energy resources, and many U.S. companies are developing, manufacturing, and installing cutting-edge, high-tech renewable energy systems. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost competitive with traditional sources of energy. Working with our national laboratories and through these partnerships, we are catalyzing the transformation of the nation's energy system and building on a tradition of U.S. leadership in science and

80

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electricity Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Generation world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 46.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

82

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

Jordan, K.C.

1958-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

85

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination...

87

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

88

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind,...

89

Motor generator electric automotive vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A motor generator electric automotive vehicle is described comprising in combination, a traction drive motor coupled by a first drive shaft to a differential of an axle of the vehicle, a main battery bank electrically connected by wires to a small electric motor driving a large D.C. generator having a second drive shaft therebetween, an on-off switch in series with one of the wires to the small motor, a speed control unit attached to an accelerator pedal of the vehicle being coupled with a double pole-double throw reverse switch to the traction drive motor, a charger regulator electrically connected to the generator, a bank of solar cells coupled to the charge regulator, an electric extension cord from the charge regulator having a plug on its end for selective connection to an exterior electric power source, a plurality of pulleys on the second drive shaft, a belt unit driven by the pulley, one the belt unit being connected to a present alternator of the vehicle which is coupled to a present battery and present regulator of the vehicle, and other of the units being connected to power brakes and equipment including power steering and an air conditioner.

Weldin, W.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

ARPA-E Announces $30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliable Electricity Based on ELectrochemical Systems (REBELS) program will develop fuel cell technology for distributed power generation to improve grid stability, increase...

91

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

92

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2009. It addresses relevant policies in the United States and internationally, technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to Revolutionize Electric Power in North America National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to...

94

Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Feasibility Study of Sustainable Distributed Generation Technologies to Improve the electrical System on the Duck Valley Reservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A range of sustainable energy options were assessed for feasibility in addressing chronic electric grid reliability problems at Duck Valley IR. Wind power and building energy efficiency were determined to have the most merit, with the Duck Valley Tribes now well positioned to pursue large scale wind power development for on- and off-reservation sales.

Herman Atkins, Shoshone-Paiute; Mark Hannifan, New West Technologies

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

97

Definition: Electricity generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity generation Electricity generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electricity generation The process of producing electric energy or the amount of electric energy produced by transforming other forms of energy into electrical energy; commonly expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electricity generation is the process of generating electrical power from other sources of primary energy. The fundamental principles of electricity generation were discovered during the 1820s and early 1830s by the British scientist Michael Faraday. His basic method is still used today: electricity is generated by the movement of a loop of wire, or disc of copper between the poles of a magnet. For electric utilities, it is the

98

Composition of Electricity Generation Portfolios, Pivotal Dynamics, and Market Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use simulations to study how the diversification of electricity generation portfolios influences wholesale prices. We find that the relationship between technological diversification and market prices is mediated by the supply-to-demand ratio. In ... Keywords: electricity, market power, simulations, technology diversification

Albert Banal-Estaòol; Augusto Rupérez Micola

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

MHK Technologies/Float Wave Electric Power Station | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Electric Power Station Wave Electric Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Float Wave Electric Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Applied Technologies Company Ltd Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The module of FWEPS is an oblong axisymmetrical capsule float which is located on the sea surface Inside the capsule there is a mechanical wave energy converter consisting of an oscillatory system and drive and an electric generator and energy accumulator Under the wave effect the capsule float and inner oscillatory system of the mechanical converter are in continuous oscillatory motion while the drive engaged with the system provides a continuous turn for the electric generator

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation sector have stayed constant or increased slightly. Values predicted in recent DTI Updated Energy. As Figure 1 shows, if overall UK energy use were to match DTI UEP predictions for 2020, the UK would Pollution [2], and subsequently endorsed by the Energy White Paper [3], exceeding the target by about 30 Mt

Haszeldine, Stuart

102

Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

103

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2008. It addresses technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by EPRI and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

105

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make… (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic...

107

Definition: Electric generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generator generator Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric generator A device for converting mechanical energy to electrical energy. Note: The EIA defines "electric generator" as a facility rather than as a device; per the EIA definition, examples include electric utilities and independent power producers.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electricity generation, an electric generator is a device that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy. A generator forces electric current to flow through an external circuit. The source of mechanical energy may be a reciprocating or turbine steam engine, water falling through a turbine or waterwheel, an internal combustion engine, a wind turbine, a hand crank, compressed air, or any other source of

108

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Generation Technology Conventional Coal-Fired PowerPlants Advanced Coal-Electric Plants OperatingCharacteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Power

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

American Electric Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Technologies Inc Electric Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Technologies Inc Place Houston, Texas Zip TX 77087 Sector Services Product American Electric Technologies (formerly M&I Electric Industries) is a global supplier of power delivery products and services to the traditional and alternative energy industries. References American Electric Technologies Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Electric Technologies Inc is a company located in Houston, Texas . References ↑ "American Electric Technologies Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Electric_Technologies_Inc&oldid=342113"

110

Solar Thermal Generation Technologies: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is experiencing renewed activity and investment. The shift is partly due to new interest in large-scale centralized electricity generation, for which STE is well suited and offers the lowest cost for solar-specific renewable portfolio standards. With policymaking and public interest driven by concerns such as global climate change, atmospheric emissions, and traditional fossil fuel price and supply volatility, STE is increasing...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

NREL: Energy Analysis - Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools that can assist in learning more about the listed technologies and...

112

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

113

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Drought An Analysis of the Effects of Drought Conditions on Electric Power Generation in the Western United States April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1365 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

114

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

115

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

116

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers8212including increased deployment of renewable generation, the high capital cost of managing grid peak demands, and large capital investments in grid infrastructure for reliability8212is creating new interest in electric energy storage systems. New EPRI research offers a current snapshot of the storage landscape and an analytical framework for estimating the benefits of applications and life-cycle costs of energy storage systems. This paper describes in detail 10 key appl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

117

Program on Technology Innovation: Nuclear Power Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States and other countries are currently planning to expand their nuclear power electrical generation base in order to provide energy security and price stability while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Since the existing fleet of nuclear plants was built during or before the 1970s, new plants will incorporate more advanced designs. This report documents the current status and potential for advanced nuclear power technology development and/or commercialization over the next 5 to 15 years.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators THG Generators THG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Ramsey Sound Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The concept of generating energy in this way is made unique by our novel design feature. The generator, devised in 1998, is a hydraulic accumulator system, involving relatively small revolving blades which gather power to a central collector, where electricity is generated. The generator, which is situated under water, is 80 metres square, stands at 15 metres high, and is designed to run for a minimum of ten years without service.

119

Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop Slides Preliminary Slides for Alternative Generation Workshop including Carbon Capture and Sequestration, Nuclear Power,...

120

Curtailing Intermittent Generation in Electrical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy generation from intermittent renewable sources introduces additional variability into electrical systems, resulting in a higher cost of balancing against the increased variabilities. Ways to balance demand and supply for electricity include using ... Keywords: economic curtailment, energy storage operations, flexible generation, intermittent generation, operations management practice, wind power

Owen Q. Wu, Roman Kapuscinski

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy  

SciTech Connect

An up-to-date account of electric power generation and distribution (including coverage of the use of computers in various components of the power system). Describes conventional and unconventional methods of electricity generation and its economics, distribution methods, substation location, electric drives, high frequency power for induction and heating, illumination engineering, and electric traction. Each chapter contains illustrative worked problems, exercises (some with answers), and a bibliography.

Wadhwa, C.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Welcome - Energy Efficiency & Electricity Technologies Program - EESD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome ORNL delivers key support to DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs through three broad areas of research and development. Sustainable electricity is aligned under the Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program. ORNL's sustainable electricity program develops technologies to create a cleaner environment. This program addresses challenges in renewable generation, electricity distribution and end-use in buildings to ensure our nation's energy security through cost effective solutions while mitigating and reducing environmental impacts. Sustainable manufacturing is aligned under ORNL's Office of Energy Materials, which manages the EERE Industrial Technologies Program at ORNL. Sustainable manufacturing draws on the laboratory's world-class

123

Modeling and Model Validation for Variable Generation Technologies: Focus on Wind Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influx of variable-generation technologies, particularly wind generation, into the bulk transmission grid has been tremendous over the past decade. This trend will likely continue, in light of national and state renewable portfolio standards. Thus, there is a need for generic, standard, and publicly available models for variable-generation technologies for power system planning studies. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in collaboration with the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Permits for Electricity Generating Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All applicants for conditional permits for electricity generating facilities must provide opportunity for public participation and quantify expected air emissions from the proposed project.

125

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

electric generation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This new web application collects cost and performance estimates and makes it available to everyone...

127

MHK Technologies/The Linear Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linear Generator Linear Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Linear Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Trident Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/TE4 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The simplicity of the Trident Energy solution is based around the fact that the system has only one moving part - float / linear generator translator, which is powered by the motion of floats placed in the sea. As waves pass through the wavefarm, so the floats rise and fall. This causes relative motion between the two components of the linear generator (the translator and stator) and electricity is immediately generated. There is absolutely no contact between the two parts of the generator as the energy conversion is entirely electromagnetic.

128

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

129

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) model represent one of the most promising technologies for next-generation solar energy conversion due to their low cost and scalability. Traditional organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are thought to have interpenetrating networks of pure polymer and fullerene layers with discrete interfaces. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory, working with collaborators from the University of Chicago, LBNL, and NIST, used ALS Beamline 11.0.1.2 to perform resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSoXS) on PTB7/fullerene BHJ solar cells to probe performance-related structures at different length scales. These solar cells set a historic record of conversion efficiency (7.4%). The RSoXS demonstrated that the superior performance of PTB7/fullerene solar cells is attributed to surprising hierarchical nanomorphologies ranging from several nanometers of crystallites to tens of nanometers of nanocrystallite aggregates in intermixed PTB7-rich and fullerene-rich domains, themselves hundreds of nanometers in size. This work will lead the research community to rethink ideal OPV morphologies, reconsider which structures should be targeted in OPVs, and enable the rational design of even higher-performance organic solar cells.

130

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

131

MHK Technologies/Electric Buoy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buoy Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aqua Magnetics Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description AMI s Ocean Swell and Wave Energy Conversion OSWEC device uses a patented linear generator to directly convert the motion of ocean swells and waves into electric power In our initial designs the generator mounts underneath a floating buoy or on the surface of a platform with the buoy below however it is possible to fit the generator on other types of wave motion energy extracting mechanisms Housing moves up and down with the motion of the Buoy on the ocean s surface while the Damping Plates hold the Generator Coil in a stable position The relative motion between the magnetic field in the generator housing and Generator Coil creates an electric voltage in the Generator Coil After four design evolutions Aqua Magnetics Inc has created our patented reciprocating linear generator Scalable for a wide range of applications and able to operate in a wide range of sea states Generator prototype will produce approximately 10 watts of power in 15 cm 6 inch wind chop in the intraco

132

CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION & SOLUTIONS | GREENER VEHICLES Home There are currently no...

133

MHK Technologies/Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Buoy Power Generation Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Columbia Power Technologies Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Direct drive point absorber In 2005 Oregon State University entered into an exclusive license agreement with Columbia Power Technologies to jointly develop a direct drive wave energy conversion device Designed to be anchored 2 5 miles off the Oregon coast in 130 feet of water it uses the rise and fall of ocean waves to generate electricity Mooring Configuration Anchored

134

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning January 14, 2014 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV "ownership" are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes. Analysts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Solar Electric Power

135

Other Distributed Generation Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

136

Application of field-modulated generator systems to dispersed solar thermal electric generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Parabolic Dish-Electric Transport concept for dispersed solar thermal generation is considered. In this concept the power generated by 15 kWe Solar Generation Units is electrically collected in a large plant. Various approaches are possible for the conversion of mechanical shaft output of the heat engines to electricity. This study focuses on the Application of Field Modulated Generation System (FMGS) for that purpose. Initially the state-of-the-art of FMGS is presented, and the application of FMGS to dispersed solar thermal electric generation is investigated. This is followed by the definition of the control and monitoring requirements for solar generation system. Then comparison is made between FMGS approach and other options. Finally, the technology developmental needs are identified.

Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

1979-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

140

Technological development under global warning : roadmap of the coal generation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the measures for the Japanese electric power utilities to meet the Kyoto Target, and the technological development of the coal thermal power generation to meet the further abatement of the carbon dioxide ...

Furuyama, Yasushi, 1963-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

143

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

144

MHK Technologies/Gyroscopic wave power generation system | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gyroscopic wave power generation system Gyroscopic wave power generation system < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Gyrodynamics Corporation Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description This gyroscopic wave power generation system is a pure rotational mechanical system that does not use conventional air turbines and is housed on a unique floating platform float In particular its outstanding feature is that it utilizes the gyroscopic spinning effect A motor is used to turn a 1 meter diameter steel disc flywheel inside the apparatus and when the rolling action of waves against the float tilts it at an angle the gyroscopic effect causes the disc to rotate longitudinally This energy turns a generator producing electricity

145

Generation Trends in the Electricity Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key questions concerning the interaction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and the electricity grid is how the upstream emissions and energy use of power plants used to charge PEVs compare with the lifecycle emissions and energy use of conventional vehicles. This Update provides a look at recent data on trends in power generation in the United States from 1990 to 2013, including capacity, generation, capacity factor, energy use, and heat rate—emissions rates will be analyzed in ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Program on Technology Innovation: Power Generation and Water Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure summarizes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report 1015371, Program on Technology Innovation: An Energy/Water Sustainability Program for the Electric Power Industry. It presents a research planbased on business, economic, and technical considerationsthat would create and test new technology and science to overcome present and future constraints on thermoelectric and hydroelectric generation resulting from limited fresh water availability. The 10 year plan has an overall budget o...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; ... For more information about these technologies, ... Marketing Summaries: TAG CLOUD:

149

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a condensed, public-domain reference for current cost, performance, and technology status data for eight central-station power generation technologies. In this report, central station is defined as >100 MW with the exception of some renewable-resource-based technologies. In addition to fossil- and nuclear-based technologies, four renewable-resource-based technologies are included. This report addresses the principal technology options for utility-scale power generation.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Anaerobic digesters · Electrogenesis ­ Generation of electricity ­ Exoelectrogens ­ Microbial fuel cells1 Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies Bruce E. Logan · US electricity generation: 13 quad ·Electricity needed for H2 transportation: · Via water

Lee, Dongwon

151

CO2 Intensity in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to the launch of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005, the electricity sector was widely proclaimed to have more low-cost emission abatement opportunities than other sectors. If this were true, effects of the EU ETS on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would likely be visible in the electricity sector. Our study looks at the effect of the price of emission allowances (EUA) on CO2 emissions from Swedish electricity generation, using an econometric time series analysis for the period 2004–2008. We control for effects of other input prices and hydropower reservoir levels. Our results do not indicate any link between the price of EUA and the CO2 emissions of Swedish electricity production. A number of reasons may explain this result and we conclude that other determinants of fossil fuel use in Swedish electricity generation probably diminished the effects of the EU ETS.

Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke; Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they emerge?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they emerge? Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they emerge? Speaker(s): Tony DeVuono Date: March 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Utility deregulation, environmental issues, increases in electricity demand, natural gas/electricity rate changes, new technologies, and several other key drivers are stimulating distributed generation globally. The technologies that have pushed ahead of the pack are micro turbines and fuel cells. Since Modine is a world leader in the manufacturing of heat transfer equipment, we are eager to play in this new, emerging market. Are the market drivers real? Will these technologies survive or even thrive? What are the pitfalls? If you had the responsibility in your company to spend millions and direct dozens of people down the DG path,

153

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Industry Recruitment/Support Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Program Grant Program Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal gasification. The statute also supports the development of projects using renewable energy sources as well

154

NREL Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006) : U.S. Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

: U.S. Electricity Generation The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies...

155

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

156

MHK Technologies/Brandl Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Brandl Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Brandl Motor Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Brandl Generator consists of a floating disc that is 10 meters in diameter and one meter thick that rises and falls with the waves A pendulum mass hanging beneath a spring moves up and down anticyclically This mass drives the direct connected magnets that induce an electrical current when they move through the induction coils This drawing shows the basic idea Legend 1 magnets 2 inductance coil 3 floating disc 4 spring 5 pendulum mass

157

ARPA-E Announces $30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 Million for Distributed Generation 30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies ARPA-E Announces $30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies November 25, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, the Department of Energy announced up to $30 million in Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) funding for a new program focused on the development of transformational electrochemical technologies to enable low-cost distributed power generation. ARPA-E's Reliable Electricity Based on ELectrochemical Systems (REBELS) program will develop fuel cell technology for distributed power generation to improve grid stability, increase energy security, and balance intermittent renewable technologies while reducing CO2 emissions associated with current

158

Program on Technology Innovation: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Update documents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which will demonstrate the design, licensing, construction, and operation of a new nuclear energy source using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. This new non-emitting energy source is applicable to a broad range of uses, from generating electricity to providing high-temperature industrial process heat to producing hydrogen. The NGNP project is sponsored as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and envi...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and...

160

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? In 2012, the United States generated about 4,054 billion kilowatthours of electricity. About 68% ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

162

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

163

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet),...

164

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

165

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from...

166

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

167

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

168

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation and Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector Ed Torrero Cooperative Research Network (CRN) National Rural Electric Cooperative Association September 22, 2004 Co-op Basics  Customer owned  Serve 35 million people in 47 states  75 percent of nation's area  2.3 million miles of line is close to half of nation's total  Growth rate twice that of IOU Electrics  Six customers per line-mile vs 33 for IOU  Co-ops view DP as a needed solution; not as a "problem" Broad Range of Technologies Chugach EA 1-MW Fuel Cell Installation Post Office in Anchorage, AK Chugach EA Microturbine Demo Unit at Alaska Village Electric Co-op CRN Transportable 200kW Fuel Cell at Delta- Montrose EA in Durango, CO Plug Power Fuel Cell at Fort Jackson, SC

169

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

170

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

171

Electric Transportation Technology Update Newsletter, September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to Electric Transportation's first Technology Update Newsletter. The purpose of this newsletter is to provide high level information on EPRI research, highlight member projects, and discuss other relevant topics of interest in electric transportation. This first newsletter focuses on plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure, including interoperability for networked charging equipment, a status update on DC fast charging protocols, GIS modeling for statewide infrastructure deployment, and the ..

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

MHK Technologies/Submergible Power Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Submergible Power Generator Submergible Power Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Submergible Power Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current to Current Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The design of the SPG leverages water flows in varying scenarios to generate electricity While the focus of the C2C deployments is ocean currents the SPG works in a bi directional manner Therefore the SPG can be deployed to generate electricity from tidal differential tidal streams In areas where currents and tidal differential streams converge the SPG with remote control and telemetry systems will track the water velocity In this manner the SPG can be maneuver in three dimensions to optimize water flow Each tube of the catamaran is approximately 150 feet in length The inner tube contains the electronic components and the outer tube is the rotating impeller system comprising a generator with a four blade turbine which measures approximately 100 feet in diameter The total area covered by each SPG is about the size of a football field

173

Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Place Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 214187...

174

Pages that link to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd" Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Jump to:...

175

Changes related to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd" Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Jump to:...

176

U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop...

177

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

List of Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 123 Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 123) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (Pennsylvania) Renewables Portfolio Standard Pennsylvania Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Building Insulation Ceiling Fan

182

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a condensed, public-domain reference for 2012 cost, performance, and technology status data for 10 central-station power-generation technologies, including fossil-, nuclear-, and renewable resource–based technologies. In this report, central station is defined as > 100 MW with the exception of some renewable resource–based technologies. This report addresses the principal technology options for utility-scale power ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing distributed generation sources are more difficultfrom all electricity generation sources using a standarda co-located distributed generation source. It reads in text

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Trends in electric power technologies  

SciTech Connect

Research and development (R and D) on power plants is now aimed at increasing plant efficiency and reliability to avoid the high capital costs of new plant construction. The trend toward larger generating plants makes efficiency and reliability even more important. Studies include ways to improve operator judgment and minimize error by feeding continuous in-plant information into models of plant subsystems, efforts to improve fuel conversion efficiency by studying higher-temperature thermodynamics, ways to replace existing generators with superconducting generators, and to meet environmental needs with atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion. As fuel costs rise, the US will shift more toward coal and nuclear plants, with research aimed at optimizing performance. (DCK)

Starr, C.; Lihach, N.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Technology: TOPTEC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today, growing awareness of environmental and energy issues associated with the automobile has resulted in renewed interest in the electric vehicle. In recognition of this, the Society of Automotive Engineers has added a TOPTEC on electric vehicles to the series of technical symposia focused on key issues currently facing industry and government. This workshop on the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle provides an opportunity to learn about recent progress in these rapidly changing technologies. Research and development of both the vehicle and battery system has accelerated sharply and in fact, the improved technologies of the powertrain system make the performance of today's electric vehicle quite comparable to the equivalent gasoline vehicle, with the exception of driving range between refueling'' stops. Also, since there is no tailpipe emission, the electric vehicle meets the definition of Zero Emission Vehicle: embodied in recent air quality regulations. The discussion forum will include a review of the advantages and limitations of electric vehicles, where the technologies are today and where they need to be in order to get to production level vehicles, and the service and maintenance requirements once they get to the road. There will be a major focus on the status of battery technologies, the various approaches to recharge of the battery systems and the activities currently underway for developing standards throughout the vehicle and infrastructure system. Intermingled in all of this technology discussion will be a view of the new relationships emerging between the auto industry, the utilities, and government. Since the electric vehicle and its support system will be the most radical change ever introduced into the private vehicle sector of the transportation system, success in the market requires an understanding of the role of all of the partners, as well as the new technologies involved.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Technology: TOPTEC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today, growing awareness of environmental and energy issues associated with the automobile has resulted in renewed interest in the electric vehicle. In recognition of this, the Society of Automotive Engineers has added a TOPTEC on electric vehicles to the series of technical symposia focused on key issues currently facing industry and government. This workshop on the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle provides an opportunity to learn about recent progress in these rapidly changing technologies. Research and development of both the vehicle and battery system has accelerated sharply and in fact, the improved technologies of the powertrain system make the performance of today`s electric vehicle quite comparable to the equivalent gasoline vehicle, with the exception of driving range between ``refueling`` stops. Also, since there is no tailpipe emission, the electric vehicle meets the definition of ``Zero Emission Vehicle: embodied in recent air quality regulations. The discussion forum will include a review of the advantages and limitations of electric vehicles, where the technologies are today and where they need to be in order to get to production level vehicles, and the service and maintenance requirements once they get to the road. There will be a major focus on the status of battery technologies, the various approaches to recharge of the battery systems and the activities currently underway for developing standards throughout the vehicle and infrastructure system. Intermingled in all of this technology discussion will be a view of the new relationships emerging between the auto industry, the utilities, and government. Since the electric vehicle and its support system will be the most radical change ever introduced into the private vehicle sector of the transportation system, success in the market requires an understanding of the role of all of the partners, as well as the new technologies involved.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Exploratory Research for New Solar Electric Technologies  

SciTech Connect

We will review highlights of exploratory research for new PV technologies funded by the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program through NREL and its Photovoltaic Exploratory Research Project. The goal for this effort is highlighted in the beginning of the Solar Program Multi-Year Technical Plan by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham's challenge to leapfrog the status quo by pursuing research having the potential to create breakthroughs. The ultimate goal is to create solar electric technologies for achieving electricity costs below 5 cents/kWh. Exploratory research includes work on advanced photovoltaic technologies (organic and ultra-high efficiency solar cells for solar concentrators) as well as innovative approaches to emerging and mature technologies (e.g., crystalline silicon).

McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Exploratory Research for New Solar Electric Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We will review highlights of exploratory research for new PV technologies funded by the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program through NREL and its Photovoltaic Exploratory Research Project. The goal for this effort is highlighted in the beginning of the Solar Program Multi-Year Technical Plan by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham's challenge to leapfrog the status quo by pursuing research having the potential to create breakthroughs. The ultimate goal is to create solar electric technologies for achieving electricity costs below 5 cents/kWh. Exploratory research includes work on advanced photovoltaic technologies (organic and ultra-high efficiency solar cells for solar concentrators) as well as innovative approaches to emerging and mature technologies (e.g., crystalline silicon).

McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Role of Renewable Energy in Sustainable Electricity Generation Portfolios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update describes the use of energy system and capacity planning models and alternative scenarios of the future to evaluate the potential role of renewable energy in a sustainable electricity generation portfolio. Base case runs of the three models considered in this study all forecast growing contributions from renewables over a range of scenarios, but predictions vary widely due to differing modeling approaches and differing assumptions about future market, policy, technology, and other c...

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquirá Associate Professor Electricity Heat Water #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 6 PEM Fuel Cells for research 2. Fuel-cell fundamentals 3. Implications of using water from fuel cells in a society

Keller, Arturo A.

191

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact 799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 With the increase in market penetration for electric vehicles, the upstream emissions from electricity...

192

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Integrated Assessment of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

described in this paper coordinated by the Consortium of Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions

194

Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd Place Xian, Shaanxi Province, China Zip 710016 Sector Wind energy Product Xian based manufacturer of Wind turbine generator. Coordinates 34.27301°, 108.928009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.27301,"lon":108.928009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

196

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Wind electric generator project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind generator is installed and connected at Iowa Western Community College. It is heating water through four hot water tanks and has proven to be an excellent demonstration project for the community. The college gets frequent inquiries about the wind mill and has been very cooperative in informing the public about the success. The windmill generates more electricity than is needed to heat four hot water heaters and future plans are to hook up more. The project requires very little maintenance. Attached is a date sheet on the project.

Not Available

1983-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Converting Site Electricity to Include Generation and Transmission...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Electricity Consumption in the Manufacturing Division The energy intensities presented in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation...

200

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation ... Cost of coal and natural gas delivered to electric power plants in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, Jan 2007- April 2012 . 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

202

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

203

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generating Capacity by Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual...

204

Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 69 Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation

205

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

206

New Electricity Technologies for a Sustainable Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the twentieth century relied upon the combustion of fossil fuels – initially coal and oil and now increasingly natural gas. The Brundtland Commission definition of sustainability requires that a sustainable electricity system must be able to meet current... needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987). As such electricity systems based upon the depletion of finite fossil fuel reserves are fundamentally...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Nuttall, William J.; Pollitt, Michael G.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Solar Thermal Electric Technology in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in the solar thermal electric (STE) industry during 2004. It addresses noteworthy policy decisions, economic considerations, and technological advances. It also provides a status report for selected key demonstrations, as well as analysis and context from EPRI experts and consultants.

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

Summary of New Generation Technologies and Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compendium includes a PG&E R&D program perspective on the Advanced Energy Systems Technology Information Module (TIM) project, a glossary, a summary of each TIM, updated information on the status and trends of each technology, and a bibliography. The objectives of the TIMs are to enhance and document the PG&E R&D Program's understanding of the technology status, resource potential, deployment hurdles, commercial timing, PG&E applications and impacts, and R&D issues of advanced technologies for electric utility applications in Northern California. [DJE-2005

None

1993-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Syphon Wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Syphon Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Syphon Wave Generator is composed of a horizontal pipe containing a propeller driven generator mounted above the highest normal wave at high tide and two or more vertical pipes at least one at each end of the horizontal pipe Each vertical pipe must extend below the water surface at all times and have openings below the surface All the air must be removed from the pipe thus filling the unit completely with water When the crest of a wave reaches the first vertical pipe the water level will be higher at that pipe than at the second vertical pipe This causes water to flow up the first pipe and through the horizontal pipe thus turning the propeller and generator to produce electricity and then down the second vertical pipe due to the siphon effect When the crest of the wave moves to the second vertical pipe the water level is higher there than at the first pipe This will cause the water to flow up the second pipe and through the system in the opposite direction again prod

210

Entropy Generation Analysis of Desalination Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies. Entropy generation analysis, and specifically, Second Law efficiency, is an ...

Mistry, Karan Hemant

211

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Gross System Electricity Production for 2001.CA. http://energy.ca.gov/electricity/gross_system_power.htmlCEC. 2002c. 1992-2001 Electricity Generation By Fuel Type.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the

216

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Kentucky Public Service Commission No person shall commence to construct a merchant electric generating facility until that person has applied for and obtained a construction certificate for the facility from the Kentucky State Board on Electric Generation and Transmission. The construction certificate shall be valid

217

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San...

218

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy Storage and Distributed Generation Technology Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage continues to hold a great deal of interest to utilities and other stakeholders in the electric power enterprise. Storage can be used to shift load or energy from one time to another, to provide ancillary services and grid support, and is an enabling technology for smart grid technologies. This report investigates the current state of the art of advanced lead-acid batteries and zinc-air batteries, specifically where pertinent to stationary applications. It focuses on those developments and ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Annual Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Country (1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu)....

222

Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

May 2, 2012 Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies by state. Wind accounted for most non-hydro renewable generation in 2011, but sources of ...

223

Power Quality Impacts of Distributed Generation: Survey of Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of deregulation, distributed generation (DG) will play an increasing role in electric distribution systems. Various new types of DG technologies, such as microturbines and fuel cells, now are being developed in addition to the more traditional solar and wind power. A common belief among developers is that DG will improve the local power quality. This potential for better quality is cited as one of the attributes that add value to the installation of distributed generators. In some cases, ...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electric energy savings from new technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for ten technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all ten technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Thus, the savings projected here represent between 4% and 14% of total consumption projected for 2000. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference forecast, reducing projected electricity consumption from what it otherwise would have been, the savings estimated here should not be directly subtracted from the reference forecast.

Moe, R.J.; Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of concern about such emissions has led to significant improvements in the polluting characteristics of electricity generation

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

227

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #795: September 2, 2013 Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: September 2, 2013 Electric Vehicle Charging Stations by State to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 795: September 2, 2013 Electric Vehicle Charging...

228

Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Electricity Workshop Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity Workshop Public release of the documents and presentations shared during the clean...

229

NREL: Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Chapter 7. Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7.2 Net Generation at Electricity-Only Plants (Excel 21 KB) (PDF 204 KB) 7.3 Electricity Generation at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants (Excel 18 KB) (PDF 204 KB) 7.4 Generation and...

230

Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James;PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell. Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell and Steven Stoft

California at Berkeley. University of

231

Program on Technology Innovation: Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Advanced Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation (TI) project that provides background information and increased understanding to EPRI members of the potential benefits of integrating ion transport membrane (ITM) technology for oxygen production with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and oxyfuel combustion pulverized coal power plants. This TI project also generated new learning by conducting literature reviews of existing and new air separation technolo...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT Jump to: navigation, search Name Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT) Place Finland Zip 4320 Product Offers large capacity electrical energy storage solutions using technology based on lithium-ion batteries and intelligent cell control systems. References Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT) is a company located in Finland . References ↑ "Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Finnish_Electric_Vehicle_Technologies_FEVT&oldid=345367"

235

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in...

236

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Electricity Generation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Electricity Generation U.S. electricity consumption—including both purchases from electric power producers and on-site generation—increases steadily in the AEO2008 reference case, at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year. In comparison, electricity consumption grew by annual rates of 4.2 percent, 2.6 percent, and 2.3 percent in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, respectively. The growth rate in the AEO2008 projection is lower than in the AEO2007 reference case (1.5 percent per year), and it leads to lower projections of electricity generation. Figure 4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

237

Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Measurement Measurement Science & Systems Engineering Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research...

238

International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen: Book of Abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen provides an opportunity to learn about current significant research on solar concentrators for generating electricity or hydrogen. The conference will emphasize in-depth technical discussions of recent achievements in technologies that convert concentrated solar radiation to electricity or hydrogen, with primary emphasis on photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Very high-efficiency solar cells--above 37%--were recently developed, and are now widely used for powering satellites. This development demands that we take a fresh look at the potential of solar concentrators for generating low-cost electricity or hydrogen. Solar electric concentrators could dramatically overtake other PV technologies in the electric utility marketplace because of the low capital cost of concentrator manufacturing facilities and the larger module size of concentrators. Concentrating solar energy also has advantages for th e solar generation of hydrogen. Around the world, researchers and engineers are developing solar concentrator technologies for entry into the electricity generation market and several have explored the use of concentrators for hydrogen production. The last conference on the subject of solar electric concentrators was held in November of 2003 and proved to be an important opportunity for researchers and developers to share new and crucial information that is helping to stimulate projects in their countries.

McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.; Hayden, H.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hybrid & electric vehicle technology and its market feasibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) technology and their sales forecasts are discussed. First, the current limitations and the future potential ...

Jeon, Sang Yeob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Carbon Nanomaterials: The Ideal Interconnect Technology for Next-Generation ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Editor's note:Carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons are two promising next-generation interconnect technologies. Electrical modeling and performance analysis have demonstrated the superiority of these emerging technologies compared to conventional ... Keywords: design and test, carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nanoribbon (GNR), electrical interconnects, optical interconnects, RF or wireless interconnects, on-chip vias, through-silicon vias (TSVs), delay, power

Hong Li; Chuan Xu; Kaustav Banerjee

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Automation and Optimization for Electrical Design of Hydro Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the author presents a software platform to conceptually design hydraulic generator, a typical complex manufacture.Applying this platform, the generator’s electrical design can be performed interactively through a friendly human-machine ...

Zhu Dianhua; Guo Wei; Ma Ruimin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY Guy MEUNIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY MARKET Guy MEUNIER Cahier n° 2013-23 ECOLE:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00906944,version1-20Nov2013 #12;Risk aversion and technology mix in an electricity market Guy-aversion on the long-term equilibrium technology mix in an electricity market. It develops a model where firms can

Recanati, Catherine

243

Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

International Coal Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 45.70 52.67 64.47 81.28 87.52 92.75 96.24 122.10 120.10 Belgium 37.72 34.48 35.94 72.46 80.35 63.24 75.54 130.54 NA Canada 18.52 19.17 21.03 20.32 24.50 26.29 NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 31.29 31.43 31.18 47.75 57.70 54.68 70.17 118.49 NA Czech Republic3 8.05 8.52 C C C C C C C Denmark NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Finland 46.66 44.02 48.28 67.00 72.06 74.27 83.72 142.90 NA France 45.28 42.89 42.45 63.55 74.90 72.90 83.90 136.10 NA Germany 51.86 45.70 50.02 70.00 79.74 77.95 90.26 152.60 NA

245

Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercialization of Electric Technologies Commercialization of Electric Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Place Austin, Texas Zip 78701 Product Texas-based research institution that promotes the development of the electrical system. References Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies is a company located in Austin, Texas . References ↑ "Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Center_for_the_Commercialization_of_Electric_Technologies&oldid=343363

246

El Paso County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Resource Potential at Ft. Bliss Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title El Paso County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Resource Potential at Ft. Bliss Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description A dynamic and technically capable project team has been assembled to evaluate the commercial viability of geothermal resources on the Ft. Bliss Military Reservation with a focus on the McGregor Test Range. Driving the desire of Ft. Bliss and El Paso County to assess the commercial viability of the geothermal resources are four factors that have converged in the last several years. The first is that Ft. Bliss will be expanding by nearly 30,000 additional troops, an expansion which will significantly increase utilization of energy resources on the facility. Second is the desire for both strategic and tactical reasons to identify and control a source of power than can directly provide the forward fire bases with "off grid" electricity in the event of a major power outage. In the worst case, this power can be sold to the grid and be used to reduce energy costs at the main Ft. Bliss installation in El Paso. Finally, Congress and the Department of Defense have mandated that Ft. Bliss and other military reservations obtain specified percentages of their power from renewable sources of production. The geothermal resource to be evaluated, if commercially viable, could provide Ft. Bliss with all the energy necessary to meet these goals now and in the future. To that end, the garrison commander has requested a target of 20 megawatts as an initial objective for geothermal resources on the installation. Finally, the County government has determined that it not only wishes to facility this effort by Ft. Bliss, but would like to reduce its own reliance on fossil based energy resources to provide power for current and future needs.

247

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

248

The Market for Coal Based Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's initiative to effectively remove environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels through better technology....

249

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.orgwebinar-renewable-energy-electricity-gene...

250

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Costs Operations and Maintenance Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent operations and maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology operations and maintenance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation.

251

Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Climate Focus Area: Geothermal Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/getem.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/geothermal-electricity-technology-eva Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model[1] Model the estimated performance and costs of available U.S. geothermal

252

MHK Technologies/Platform generators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generators generators < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Platform generators.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aqua Magnetics Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description In the platform configuration the generators sit on a platform and buoy floats move the generator s coil up and down as waves and swell pass underneath Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 06:09.4 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Platform_generators&oldid=681636

253

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Hybrid and for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

254

Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission Assets a methodology for valuing electricity deriva- tives by constructing replicating portfolios from electricity-storable nature of electricity, which rules out the traditional spot mar- ket, storage-based method of valuing

255

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Generation Advanced Reburning Second Generation Advanced Reburning General Electric - Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) is carrying out a two Phase research program to develop novel Advanced Reburning (AR) concepts for high efficiency and low cost NOx control from coal-fired utility boilers. AR technologies are based on combination of basic reburning and N-agent/promoter injections. Phase I of the project was successfully completed and EER was selected to continue to develop AR technology during Phase II. Phase I demonstrated that AR technologies are able to provide effective NOx control for coal-fired combustors. Three technologies were originally envisioned for development: AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and Multiple Injection AR (MIAR). Along with these, three additional technologies were identified during the project: reburning plus promoted SNCR; AR-Lean plus promoted SNCR; and AR-Rich plus promoted SNCR. The promoters are sodium salts, in particular sodium carbonate. These AR technologies have different optimum reburn heat input levels and furnace temperature requirements. For full scale application, an optimum technology can be selected on a boiler-specific basis depending on furnace temperature profile and regions of injector access.

256

VDE Association for Electrical Electronic Information Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VDE Association for Electrical Electronic Information Technologies VDE Association for Electrical Electronic Information Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies) Place Germany Sector Services, Solar Product VDE provides certification services for, amongst others, solar panels. References VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies) is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=VDE_Association_for_Electrical_Electronic_Information_Technologies&oldid=352739

257

Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

Finger, Susan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Increased use of reject heat from electric generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

Leigh, R.W. [Leigh (Richard W.), New York, NY (United States); Piraino, M. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality After a proposed power plant has received approval from the State Corporation Commission (SCC) and location approval from the local government, it must apply for all applicable permits from the Virginia

260

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O& #39; Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/49476.pdf Cost: Free References: Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation[1] Overview This guidebook is a short discussion on how to create policy that overcomes challenges to geothermal implementation. The document follows a five step

263

Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating capacity, 1949-2040 (index, 1949 = 1.0) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author

264

Figure 15. Renewable electricity generation in three cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 15. Renewable electricity generation in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset ...

265

Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset

266

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and ...

267

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

268

NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, researchers have conducted hundreds of life cycle assessments of...

269

Most electric generating capacity additions in the last decade ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report, and Form EIA-860M (see Table ES3 in the March 2011 ...

270

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of...

271

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

272

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

273

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

274

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

275

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

276

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

277

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

278

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

279

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

280

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

282

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

283

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

284

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

285

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy consumption is from ...

286

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Electricity generation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy...

287

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

288

ELECTRICAL MOTOR/GENERATOR DRIVE APPARATUS AND METHOD - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple ...

289

NREL Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006) : U.S. Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

: U.S. Electricity : U.S. Electricity Generation Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting, among other things, electricity generation. The series of datasets included are: electricity net generation (1980 - 2030); generation and transmission/distribution losses (1980 - 2030); and electricity trade (e.g. gross domestic firm power trade, gross imports from Mexico and Canada). Source NREL Date Released March 06th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Generation NREL Data

290

FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stationary/Distributed Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Twitter Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Google Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Delicious Rank FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Digg Find More places to share FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects DOE Projects Non-DOE Projects Integrated Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production

291

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: July 23, 2001 5: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on

292

The Installed Base of Distributed Electrical Generating Resources in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of electric power at or near electric loads, referred to here as distributed resources (DR), has received considerable attention during recent years, with some experts projecting that DR technologies may provide up to 30 percent of all new generation resources installed in the United States within a couple of decades. There are, in fact, many electric generators in place that are or could be used as DR. There has not, however, been a concerted effort to quantify this fleet nor to understan...

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Role of Future Generation Options for the U.S. Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update documents efforts to enhance, update, and apply EPRI's financial model of the U.S. electric sector for generation capacity expansion and dispatch at the national and regional levels. The model evaluates the possible effects of various climate policy, renewable portfolio standard (RPS), technology, and market scenarios on the deployment and operation of nuclear, fossil, and renewable generation options and on electricity prices, emissions, fuel use, and other parameters. Within indiv...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

295

New electric technologies to reduce global warming impacts  

SciTech Connect

Advanced electric technologies hold significant potential to reduce global warming impact through reduction of primary fuel needed to power end-use applications. These reductions can occur in two forms: (1) reduced kilowatt-hour usage and power plant emissions through efficiency improvements and technological enhancements of existing electrically-driven applications; (2) the development of new electric technologies to replace traditional fossil-fuel driven applications which can result in less overall primary energy consumption and lower overall emissions. Numerous new electric technologies are presently being developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. The technologies reviewed in this paper include: Microwave Fabric Dryer, Advanced Heat Pumps, Heat Pump Water Heater, Infrared Sand Reclaimer, Freeze Concentration, Membrane Water Recovery, Microwave Petrochemical Production, Infrared Drying, and Electric Vehicles. Full commercialization of these technologies can result in significant energy savings and CO[sub 2] reductions, in addition to improving the competitiveness of businesses using these technologies.

Courtright, H.A. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% Provider Office of the State Tax Commissioner Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible personal property that is used for constructing or expanding the facility. In order to qualify, the facility must have at least one electrical generation unity

297

CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

Eto, Joseph

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

The specification and estimation of technological change in electricity production  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the rate of technological change in electricity production. The dominant role of fossil fuel-fired electricity production in the industry, coupled with the direct association with the emission of greenhouse gases, makes technology parameters particularly significant for several reasons. First, very long-run simulations of energy-economic paths at a global level require that technical progress occupy a place in the methodology for sound formulations that are vital in global emissions/energy policy analysis. Second, given the outlook for electricity generation being predominately coal-based, especially in developing economies around the world, the specification and measurement of technical change is essential for developing realistic long-run technology forecasts. Finally, industry or sector growth in productivity hinges partly on technical progress, and updated analysis will always be necessary to stay abreast of developments on this front, as well as for economic growth considerations in general. This study is based on empirical economic research on production functions in the electric utility industry. However, it advances a seldom used approach, called the {open_quotes}engineering-production function{close_quotes}, in contrast to the more common neoclassical approach used by economists. Combined with this approach is a major departure from the type of data used to conduct econometric estimations of production parameters. This research draws upon a consistent set of ex ante or {open_quotes}blueprint{close_quotes} data that better reflects planned, technical performance and cost data elements, in contrast to the more customary, expect type of data from actual firm/plant operations. The results from the examination of coal-fired technologies indicate the presence of technical change. Using data for the period from 1979 to 1989, we find technical change to be capital-augmenting at the rate of 1.8 percent per year.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Ashton, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption.
2011-07-25T20:15:39Z...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC electric motors or DC electric generators. but there is a significant difference in their working principle; in a DC electric motor or generator the Lorence force is the driving force, while in an LFEG the Coulomb force is the deriving force. So in despite to usual electric generators, this generator does not use a magnetic field and is purely electrical, which brings a similarity to bio mechanisms. We have investigated the characteristics of such a generator experimentally. This investigation sheds light on the physics of Electrohydrodynamics on liquid films.

Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

304

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

305

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Kansas Corporation Commission This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility's investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a contract for purchasing power. There is no restriction on the type or the size of electric generating unit

306

Global Potential for Wind-Generated Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... free, non-urban areas and operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity, could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Wanlass Polyphase Rotating Magnetic Device in Electric Motor and Induction Generator Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric motor in its present technological configuration has remained virtually unchanged since its original conception nearly 100 years ago. It would be logical to assume that a device, which has undergone such insignificant evolution, would have small impact with reference to industry. This paper will provide an introduction to the Wanlass technology and its application to induction motors and generators. This will be accomplished through analysis of motor and generator tests.

Asp, D. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electricity Generation in the Manufacturing Sector: A ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technologies such as the combustion turbine, reciprocating engines, fuel cells, and ... wood chips, black liquor, or different forms of gas.

309

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about...

310

Vehicle Technologies Office: Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan on Facebook Tweet about...

311

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #796: September 9, 2013 Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: September 9, 2013 Electric Vehicle and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales History to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 796: September 9, 2013...

312

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 11, 6: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766:

313

THE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER RESTRUCTURING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remainTHE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER RESTRUCTURING Catherine Wolfram· UC Berkeley, NBER and UCEI June 2003 · Prepared for the 2003 Electricity Deregulation Conference at Bush

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

314

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO Xinmin Hu Daniel Ralph to model markets for delivery of electrical power on looped transmission networks. It analyzes in transmission capacity mean the ISO potentially sets a different electricity price at each node of the trans

Ferris, Michael C.

315

Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

Anderson, Iver

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info

318

The Economic Value of Temperature Forecasts in Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every day, the U.S. electricity-generating industry decides how to meet the electricity demand anticipated over the next 24 h. Various generating units are available to meet the demand, and each unit may have its own production lead time, start-...

Thomas J. Teisberg; Rodney F. Weiher; Alireza Khotanzad

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

320

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 07/01/2011 Expiration Date 10/01/2013 State Connecticut Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Connecticut Department of Revenue Services In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A next generation smart energy technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper has focused on the integration of renewable energy, specifically the solar energy resources into conventional electric grid and deployment of smart architecture of hybrid energy system in the user-centric pervasive computing concept in the ... Keywords: Kyoto protocol, NASA surface meteorology and solar energy data on solar energy resources, SAP-SOA energy optimization model, acceptance index, energy service companies, enterprise SAP-SOA net weaver architecture, enterprise resource planning, green house gas, market potential mappings, next generation smart-grid through pervasive computing, service-oriented-architecture, systems applications products in data processing

Aurobi Das; V. Balakrishnan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

323

Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and the use of integrated Smart Grid technologies, including household and community battery storage, smart meters and appliances, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and homes...

324

Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co Ang Li Tiansheng | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co (Ang Li Tiansheng) Place Zaozhuang, Shandong Province, China Product Chinese PV cell and module maker. References Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co (Ang Li Tiansheng)1...

325

U.S. - China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center, Argonne National Lab TCS Building and Conference Center United States Flag China flag U.S. - China Electric Vehicle Technology Workshop August 30 - September 1, 2010...

326

MHK Technologies/Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy AS Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Wave Energy AS Project 1 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Overtopping Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Sea Wave Slot-Cone Generator (SSG) is based on the overtopping principle. It utilizes a total of three reservoirs stacked on top of one other (referred to as a 'multi-stage water turbine') in which the potential energy of the incoming wave will be stored. The water captured in the reservoirs will then run through the multi-stage turbine for highly efficient electricity production.

327

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: July 25, 2013 Data for : May 2013 Next Release: August 2013 Contacts: Michael Mobilia Phone: 202-287-6318 E-mail:...

328

Homeostatic control: economic integration of solar technologies into electric power operations and planning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and technical interfaces between the electrical utility and the distributed, nondispatchable electric generation systems are only minimally understood at the present time. The economic issues associated with the interface of new energy technologies and the electric utility grid are discussed. Then the concept of Homeostatic Control is introduced and the use of such an economic concept applied to the introduction of nondispatchable technologies into the existing utility system is discussed. The transition and potential impact of a Homoeostatic Control system working with the existing electric utility system is discussed.

Tabors, R.D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle Net Energy Balance Designated a 'Hot' Article by Journal Photoelectrochemical hydrogen technology LCA analysis July...

330

Solar Photovoltaics Expanding Electric Generation Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and others have demonstrated that a broad portfolio of cost-competitive supply technologies will be needed to satisfy the world's rising demands for energy while meeting climate policy and other societal objectives. Solar energy is a particularly attractive renewable energy option because it is well distributed and abundant over most of the earth's surface. This White Paper reviews the status of PV technology and markets, the potential for evolutionary and revolutionary technology advances, the iss...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Scientists Studying Photosynthesis to Generate Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supercomputers to investigate photosynthetic materials May 15, 2012 | Tags: Carver, Energy Technologies, HPSS, Magellan NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402...

332

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their...

333

Distributed Generation Technologies DGT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DGT DGT Jump to: navigation, search Name Distributed Generation Technologies (DGT) Place Ithaca, New York Zip 14850 Product Commercializing a technology to convert organic waste into pure and compressed methane gas via anaerobic digestion. Coordinates 39.93746°, -84.553194° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.93746,"lon":-84.553194,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Can I generate and sell electricity to an electric utility? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

335

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate PV 10 kW or smaller: $4,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV 10 kW-DC or smaller: Upfront incentive of $0.40 per watt DC PV greater than 10 kW-DC: Performance-based incentive of $44.91/MWh ($0.04491/kWh) paid every 6 months for 10 years Provider La Plata Electric Association La Plata Electric Association (LPEA) offers a one-time rebate, not to exceed the cost of the system, to residential and small commercial customers who install a photovoltaic (PV), wind or hydropower facility. To

336

Renewable electricity generation in California includes variable ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power produced by geothermal, biomass, biogas, and small hydro generators can be easily dispatched, meaning it can be either increased, decreased, ...

337

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants ...

338

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to… (more)

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Osborn Utility deregulation, environmental issues, increases in electricity demand, natural gaselectricity rate changes, new technologies, and several other key drivers are...

340

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

SciTech Connect

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: October 22, 0: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012

343

EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric 750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology to facilitate the development and demonstration of a multi-faceted, synergistic approach to managing fluctuations in wind power within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas transmission grid. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

344

Electric Springs A new Smart Grid Technology Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electronics system. · · It can be embedded in an electric appliance such as electric water heater-scale wind and solar power generation · . 7 #12;Future power systems adopt "distributed" power generation (Wind and Solar Power). · ( ). · Electric Springs do not need communication and, collectively

Leung, Ka-Cheong

345

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles between 1997 and 2000, the major automakers discontinued production of all-electric cars by the early 2000s. Still, the idea of an all-electric car was alive. A...

346

Assessment study of devices from the generation of electricity from stored hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A study was performed to evaluate alternative methods for the generation of electricity from stored hydrogen. The generation systems considered were low- temperature and high-temperature fuel cells, gas turbines and steam turbines. These systems were evaluated in terms of present-day technology and future (1995) technology. Of primary interest were the costs and efficiencies of the devices, the versatility of the devices toward various types of gaseous feeds, and the likelihood of commercial development. On the basis of these evaluations, recommendations were made describing the areas of technology which should be developed.

Ackerman, J.P.; Barghusen, J.J.; Link, L.E.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the

348

DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean Energy Project to design, build, and demonstrate an integrated gasification combined cycle electric generating facility, complete with co-production of high-value products and carbon capture and storage. The project was a third round selection under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal Government and

349

DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean Energy Project to design, build, and demonstrate an integrated gasification combined cycle electric generating facility, complete with co-production of high-value products and carbon capture and storage. The project was a third round selection under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal Government and

350

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

351

INSTRUCTION MANUAL--SNAP-7C ELECTRIC GENERATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A description of SNAP-7C isotope-fueled electric generation system is presented. The operational limits and transportation, handling, installation, and adjustment procedures are described. Maintenance instructions and emergency and safety precautions are included. (M.C.G.)

Blazek, E.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

353

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the...

354

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

355

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

356

Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

357

Climate Impact on Water Availability for Electricity Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Impact on Water Availability for Electricity Generation Speaker(s): Denis Aelbrecht Date: April 11, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Europe and France experienced a huge...

358

Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

Gruhl, Jim

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Role of Renewable Energy in a Sustainable Electric Generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) Widely Available and Deployed After 2020 None Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Nuclear Generation 12.5 GWe by 2030 64 GWe by 2030

360

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States

Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

362

Evaluating Policies to Increase Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on a review of experience in the United States and the European Union, this article advances four main propositions concerning policies aimed at increasing electricity generation from renewable energy. First, who ...

Schmalensee, Richard

363

Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Efficient Electric Technologies for Industrial Heating: Emerging Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial process heating is typically accomplished with fossil- and by-product fuels. However, new high-efficiency electric technologies for process heating applications are under development and commercially available, including three efficient electric process heating technologies covered in this Brief: Induction heating and melting Microwave (MW) heating, drying and curing Radio frequency (RF) heating, drying, and curing These technologies were selected for three reasons. First, in each case there a...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

MHK Technologies/Sabella River Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sabella River Generator Sabella River Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sabella River Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Sabella Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/SR 01 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A unidirectional river bed turbine Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 2 Device Testing Date Submitted 7/11/2012 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sabella_River_Generator&oldid=680598

366

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX XXXXX Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Summary This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate

367

Intelligence in Electricity Networks for Embedding Renewables and Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Over the course of the 20 th century, the electrical power systems of industrialized economies have become one of the most complex systems created by mankind. In the same period, electricity made a transition from a novelty, to a convenience, to an advantage, and finally to an absolute necessity. World-wide electricity use has been ever-growing. The electricity infrastructure consists of two highlyinterrelated and complex subsystems for commodity trade and physical delivery. To ensure the infrastructure is up and running in the first place, the increasing electricity demand poses a serious threat. Additionally, there are a number of other trends that are forcing a change in infrastructure management. Firstly, there is a shift to intermittent sources: a larger share of renewables in the energy mix means a higher influence of weather patterns on generation. At the same time, introducing more combined heat and power generation (CHP) couples electricity production to heat demand patterns. Secondly, the location of electricity generation relative to the load centers is changing. Large-scale generation from wind is migrating towards and into the seas and oceans, away from the locations of high electricity demand. On

J. K. Kok; M. J. J. Scheepers; I. G. Kamphuis; J. K. Kok; M. J. J. Scheepers; I. G. Kamphuis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Voltaic Cells: Using Chemical Reactions to Generate Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voltaic Cells: Using Chemical Reactions to Generate Electricity Project Overview: Middle and high electricity. A voltaic cell allows for the transfer of electrons through a wire as a result of chemical where the increase in zinc ions creates a demand for them. Lab preparation: 1. Pour the sulfate

Weston, Ken

370

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC ele...

Amjadi, Ahmad; Namin, Reza Montazeri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as "intermittent") output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

MHK Technologies/Floating wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Floating wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Floating Wave Powered Generator is an attenuator that uses three pontoons that pivot on rigid arms as the wave passes driving gears that turn a generator Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 45:12.2 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Floating_wave_Generator&oldid=681577"

374

The New Generation of Vertical Shaft Calciner Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... shaft calciner, the waste heat from which can be recuperated to generate electricity of 28 million kWh. The major invention is calciner structure optimization by ...

375

Matrix converter technology in doubly-fed induction generators for wind generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind generator technologies have been widely researched and documented. Modern wind generator systems are now being implemented with an output power of up to 5… (more)

Harris, Benjamin J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Insufficient Incentives for Investment in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contracts, which are typically only signed once in a lifetime, with large commissions involved, and therefore require strict regulation. An institutional change, which would create a credible counterpart for generators to sign long-term contracts... . In our calculations we assume an open cycle gas turbine with investment costs of £300/kw.13,14 If contractual arrangements ensure constant revenue streams, then such peak units could be financed at weighted...

Neuhoff, Karsten; de Vries, Laurens

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

377

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation Science & Technology Science Education Innovation Energy Sources Energy Usage Energy Efficiency...

378

On Low-Frequency Electric Power Generation With PZT Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piezoelectric materials have long been used as sensors and actuators, however their use as electrical generators is less established. A piezoelectric power generator has great potential for some remote applications such as in vivo sensors, embedded MEMS devices, and distributed networking. Such materials are capable of converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, but developing piezoelectric generators is challenging because of their poor source characteristics (high voltage, low current, high impedance) and relatively low power output. In the past these challenges have limited the development and application of piezoelectric generators, but the recent advent of extremely low power electrical and mechanical devices (e.g., MEMS) make such generators attractive. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of piezoelectric power generation that is verified with simulation and experimental results. Several important considerations in designing such generators are explored, including parameter identification, load matching, form factors, efficiency, longevity, energy conversion and energy storage. Finally, an application of this analysis is presented where electrical energy is generated inside a prototype Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implant.

Stephen R. Platt; et al.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy utilization and environmental control technologies in the coal-electric cycle  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview and assessment of the currently commercial and possible future technologies in the United States that are a part of the coal-electric cycle. From coal production to residual emissions control at the power plant stack, this report includes a brief history, current status and future assessment of each technology. It also includes a discussion, helpful for policy making decisions, of the process operation, environmental emission characteristics, market constraints and detailed cost estimates for each of these technologies, with primary emphasis on coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissions control systems.

Ferrell, G.C.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Focus Area: Vehicles Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.iea.org/papers/2011/EV_PHEV_Roadmap.pdf The primary role of this EV/PHEV Roadmap is to help establish a vision for technology deployment; set approximate, feasible targets; and identify steps required to get there. It also outlines the role for different stakeholders and how they can work together to reach common objectives, and the role for government policy to support the process. References

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

383

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

384

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

385

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

386

Production Tax Credit for Renewable Electricity Generation (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, environmental and energy security concerns were addressed at the Federal level by several key pieces of energy legislation. Among them, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), P.L. 95-617, required regulated power utilities to purchase alternative electricity generation from qualified generating facilities, including small-scale renewable generators; and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), P.L. 95-618, part of the Energy Tax Act of 1978, provided a 10-percent Federal tax credit on new investment in capital-intensive wind and solar generation technologies.

Information Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems To support trends in the electric generating industry of moving from seasonal to year-round operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for control of NOx and mercury, as well as extending the time between generating unit outages, Fossil Energy Research Corporation (FERCo) is developing technology to determine SCR catalyst activity and remaining life without requiring an outage to obtain and analyze catalyst samples. FERCo intends to use SCR catalyst performance results measured with their in situ device at Alabama PowerÂ’s Plant Gorgas during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons, along with EPRIÂ’s CatReactTM catalyst management software, to demonstrate the value of real-time activity measurements with respect to the optimization of catalyst replacement strategy. Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute are co-funding the project.

388

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

389

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. STEP 1 Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential STEP 2 Identify Challenges to Local Development STEP 3 Evaluate Current Policy STEP 4 Consider Policy Options STEP 5 Implement Policies Increased Development Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation This document identifies and describes five steps for implementing geothermal policies that may reduce barriers and result in deployment and implementation of geothermal technologies that can be used for electricity generation, such as conventional hydrothermal, enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), geopressured, co-production, and low temperature geothermal resources. Step 1: Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential Increasing the use of geothermal

390

Investment under Regulatory Uncertainty: U.S. Electricity Generation Investment Since 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand. North American Electricity Reliability Council.Regulatory Risk in U.K. Electricity Distribution. ” JournalAn Empirical Model of Electricity Generation Investment

Ishii, Jun; Yan, Jingming

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: Energy Analysis - Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Analysis NREL's energy analysis supports distribution and interconnection R&D, which is responsible for distributed resources' system integration. Industrial...

392

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of Today Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of Today February 14, 2011 - 6:15pm Addthis Jeff Chamberlain Speaks at Brookings Battery Forum | Photo Courtesy of Audra Capas, 5StarPR Jeff Chamberlain Speaks at Brookings Battery Forum | Photo Courtesy of Audra Capas, 5StarPR David Moore Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy The Department of Energy has been investing in vehicle electrification for more than a decade, with results that speak for themselves: The battery technologies in almost all of the electric vehicles and hybrids on the road today were developed with support from the Department. As you may have read

393

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29359 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for Joint Base...

394

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29360 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for NAS...

395

Solar Thermal Electric Technology Update: 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After more than a dozen years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is seeing pronounced activity and investment. This product is intended to update the reader on these recent world-wide activities.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

398

Feasibility investigation of the giromill for generation of electrical power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cyclogiro computer program, obtained from Prof. H. C. Larsen of the United States Air Force Institute of Technology, was modified to incorporate computation of blade loads for the normal operating and gust loading conditions. The program was also changed to allow computation of the effects of smoothing the blade rock angles in the region where they experienced large oscillations due to passing through a vortex shed by the previous blade. Using this program the various effects of rotor geometric parameters were investigated. Giromill configuration design concepts were explored. A baseline concept was adopted having an upper structural triangular tower extending through the lower support tower and supported by two main rotor bearings. Twenty-one different Giromill systems covering a power range of 120, 500 and 1500 kW were then synthesized. These were structurally analyzed and sized. An automatic electronic control concept built around existing equipment and employing state of the art techniques was developed. Preliminary cost estimates for generating electrical power from the Giromill systems were completed. Cost estimating relationships of the major items of equipment were formulated. 10 references. (auth)

Brulle, R.V.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Building Integration of Micro-Generation Technologies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Micro-generation can be defined as residential or small-commercial applications of the on-site generation of power with heating and/or cooling ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Cyclocean LLC Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description Self regulated sub surface current generators that operate independently that tether freely anchored offshore in deep waters in the Gulf Stream Current producing continuos clean energy for the eastern seaboard Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 20:10.1 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sub_Surface_Counter_Rotation_Current_Generator&oldid=681657

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Strategic planning in electric utilities: Using wind technologies as risk management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights research investigating the ownership of renewable energy technologies to mitigate risks faced by the electric utility industry. Renewable energy technology attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead time, modularity, and investment reversibility are discussed. Incorporating some of these attributes into an economic evaluation is illustrated using a municipal utility`s decision to invest in either wind generation or natural gas based generation. The research concludes that wind and other modular renewable energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, have the potential to provide decision makers with physical risk-management investments.

Hoff, T E [Pacific Energy Group, Stanford, CA (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnological Approaches to Removing Boron from Electric Utility Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-based electric power generation faces compliance difficulties with respect to boron (B) contamination. Concentrations of B in coal-combustion byproduct electric utility effluents commonly range from 30 to 120 ppm; there is a critical need for cost-effective technologies to treat and remove B from these effluents to levels around 1.7 ppm. Wetland treatment systems offer significant operational and maintenance cost savings over chemical treatment alternatives for wastewater discharges from ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Agriculture, Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/Pess/PESSenergymodels.shtml References: Overview of IAEA PESS Models [1] Related Tools DNE21+ Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS

405

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Place Yancheng, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. Coordinates 33.583°, 113.983009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.583,"lon":113.983009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

407

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The effects of technological change, experience and environmental regulation on the construction of coal-burning generating units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the technological, regulatory and organizational factors that have influenced the costs of building coal-burning steam-electric generating units over the past twenty year. We ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Validation Testing of Hydrogen Generation Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of testing performed by ORNL for Photech Energies, Inc. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the efficacy of Photech's hydrogen generation reactor technology, which produces gaseous hydrogen through electrolysis. Photech provided several prototypes of their proprietary reactor for testing and the ancillary equipment, such as power supplies and electrolyte solutions, required for proper operation of the reactors. ORNL measured the production of hydrogen gas (volumetric flow of hydrogen at atmospheric pressure) as a function of input power and analyzed the composition of the output stream to determine the purity of the hydrogen content. ORNL attempted measurements on two basic versions of the prototype reactors-one version had a clear plastic outer cylinder, while another version had a stainless steel outer cylinder-but was only able to complete measurements on reactors in the plastic version. The problem observed in the stainless steel reactors was that in these reactors most of the hydrogen was produced near the anodes along with oxygen and the mixed gases made it impossible to determine the amount of hydrogen produced. In the plastic reactors the production of hydrogen gas increased monotonically with input power, and the flow rates increased faster at low input powers than they did at higher input powers. The maximum flow rate from the cathode port measured during the tests was 0.85 LPM at an input power of about 1100 W, an electrolyte concentration of 20%. The composition of the flow from the cathode port was primarily hydrogen and water vapor, with some oxygen and trace amounts of carbon dioxide. An operational mode that occurs briefly during certain operating conditions, and is characterized by flashes of light and violent bubbling near the cathode, might be attributable to the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen in the electrolyte solution.

Smith, Barton [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTAR’s initial offering combines--for the first time--a “gasification with CO2 capture” process simulator with a “combined-cycle” power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industry’s growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

Zitney, Stephen

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power - Technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways Industry Vision & Roadmaps The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader A Climate Contingency Roadmap for the U.S. Electricity Sector: Phase II (PDF 192 KB) This roadmap examines the role of the electric sector in climate change and the sectoral impacts of alternative climate policy designs. The document explores the capabilities and costs of emissions reduction options and the influence of company-specific circumstances on the design of cost-effective response strategies. It also investigates mechanisms to create incentives for support of advanced climate-related technology research, development, and demonstration. Electric Power Research Institute Roadmap The Electric Power Research Institute is initiating an effort to develop an

413

Technology for automatic generation of application programs: a pragmatic view  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article pragmatically reviews and appraises significant technology and efforts directed toward enhancing application program development and productivity and the challenging automatic generation of application programs. The topics covered are: decision ... Keywords: COBOL generators, automated information system development, automatic program generation, automatic programming, customizers, database generation, problem statement languages, software automation, special purpose languages

Alfonso F. Cardenas

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

415

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 5,666 5,414 81 171 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3,494 3,491 Q 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3,213 3,211 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,382 1,319 64 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 336 325 Q * 3115 Dairy Products 38 36 1 1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 19 Q Q 14 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 342 238 Q 7 3121 Beverages 308 204 Q 7 3122 Tobacco 34

416

Assessment of Micro-Generation Technologies for Distributed Generation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small micro-turbine engines targeted for stationary power markets have been advancing rapidly the past few years. This report provides intelligence on vendor programs, markets and economic assessments for this emerging technology.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technology Assessment of Li-Ion Energy Storage Technology for Stationary Electric Utility Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging Lithium-ion (Li-ion) energy storage technology, which is being developed and applied in the transportation sector, could have a profound impact in the electric sector by serving applications for distributed energy storage (DES). An earlier EPRI Report, Technology Review and Assessment of Distributed Energy Resources: Distributed Energy Storage (1012983, February 2006), identified Li-ion batteries as a potential disruptive technology for the electric power sector. EPRI undertook this project to a...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Available Technologies: High Energy Gamma Generator  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. ... In addition, it can simultaneously use two or more target materials to generate photons with discrete energies.

419

MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underwater Electric Kite Turbines Underwater Electric Kite Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Underwater Electric Kite Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization UEK Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II *MHK Projects/Chitokoloki Project *MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project *MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/Luangwa Zambia Project *MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration *MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project *MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/UEK Yukon River Project Technology Resource

420

The Spanish Experience in Electric Generation Capacity Turnover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an authoritative review of the recent changes in Spain's electric generation, capacity additions and regulation. Concerns about energy security and environmental performance motivated these changes and the scale is dramatic, certainly on a par with changes that other countries may elicit to reduce CO2 emissions. First motivated to reduce oil use and coal generation, Spain turned to natural gas combustion turbine combined cycle plants. Since this occurred at a time of extraordinary ec...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7 fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

422

Assessment of battery technologies for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This document, Part 2 of Volume 2, provides appendices to this report and includes the following technologies, zinc/air battery; lithium/molybdenum disulfide battery; sodium/sulfur battery; nickel/cadmium battery; nickel/iron battery; iron/oxygen battery and iron/air battery. (FI)

Ratner, E.Z. (Sheladia Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (USA)); Henriksen, G.L. (ed.) (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

426

Co-generation of electricity and heat from biogas  

SciTech Connect

Biogas powered co-generation of electricity and hot water is being documented in a full scale demonstration with a 25 kW capacity system. The performance characteristics and effects of operating on biogas for 1400 hours are presented in this paper.

Koelsch, R.K.; Cummings, R.J.; Harrison, C.E.; Jewell, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Use of a thermophotovoltaic generator in a hybrid electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viking 29 is the World’s first thermophotovoltaic (TPV) powered automobile. The prototype was funded by the Department of Energy and designed and built by students and faculty at the Vehicle Research Institute (VRI) at Western Washington University. Viking 29 is a series hybrid electric vehicle that utilizes TPV generators to charge its battery pack. Acceleration

Orion Morrison; Michael Seal; Edward West; William Connelly

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 19-20, 2011 April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas Cornell University Proceedings Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid LBNL-5105E Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas, Cornell University The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

431

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treatment of Solar Generation Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

432

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

433

Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well as for coal and natural gas grid-generation technologies, are provided as baseline cases Cycle Power Plants 14.9 33.1 Natural Gas Turbine, Combined Cycle Power Plants 18.3 46.0 Coal comparable to the total energy use associated with the natural gas and coal grid-generation technologies

Argonne National Laboratory

434

MHK Technologies/Under Bottom Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Bottom Wave Generator Under Bottom Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Under Bottom Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Glen Edward Cook Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Water will flow up into the pipe from the down stroke and out of the pipe back into the ocean on the up stroke Waves rolling by will push water into the pipe This will mock the ocean swell A propellar is mounted inside the lower portion of the pipe the upward and downward flow of water will spin the propellar in both direcitons The propellar is connected to a generator

435

Program Plan for Renewable Energy generation of electricity. Response to Section 2111 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992  

SciTech Connect

A 5-Year Program Plan for providing cost-effective options for generating electricity from renewable energy sources is presented by the US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The document covers the Utility-Sector situation, scope of the program, specific generating technologies, and implementation of the program plan.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology February 6, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District’s wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department.

437

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

438

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology Assessment Presentation on Li-Ion Energy Storage Technology for Stationary Electric Uti lity Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging Li-ion (Li-ion) energy storage technology, which is being developed and applied in the transportation sector, could have a profound impact to in the electric sector by serving applications for distributed energy storage (DES). An earlier EPRI Report, Technology Review and Assessment of Distributed Energy ResourcesDistributed Energy Storage (1012983), identified Li-ion batteries as a potential disruptive technology for the electric power sector. This project was undertaken to assess the potential...

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hybrid electric vehicle technology assessment : methodology, analytical issues, and interim results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the first phase of Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) examination of the costs and energy impacts of light-duty hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We call this research an HEV Technology Assessment, or HEVTA. HEVs are vehicles with drivetrains that combine electric drive components (electric motor, electricity storage) with a refuelable power plant (e.g., an internal combustion engine). The use of hybrid drivetrains is widely considered a key technology strategy in improving automotive fuel efficiency. Two hybrid vehicles--Toyota's Prius and Honda's Insight--have been introduced into the U.S. market, and all three auto industry participants in the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) have selected hybrid drivetrains for their prototype vehicles.

Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.; Vyas, A.; Anderson, J.; Wang, M.; Bharathan, D.; He, J.

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Program on Technology Innovation: Alternative Approaches to Generation Adequacy Assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliability of electricity supply"keeping the lights on"has been the principal motivation for many technical and economic constraints imposed on market designs. While short-term operational reliability is provided by means of protection devices, operating standards, and procedures that include security-constrained dispatch and procurement of ancillary services, long-term generation adequacy requires investment in upgrading and expansion of generation capacity. In restructured electricity markets, such ex...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ningbo Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ningbo Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd Place Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China Zip 315322 Sector Solar Product China-based firm focused on the research, development and production of solar PV module junction boxes and connectors. Coordinates 30.168501°, 121.235023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.168501,"lon":121.235023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Electric energy savings from new technologies. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for 10 technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all 10 technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference projection, only 25% of the savings estimated here should be subtracted from the reference projection for analysis purposes.

Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

1 The Price Elasticity of Supply of Renewable Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many states have adopted policies aimed at promoting the growth of renewable electricity within their state. The most salient of these policies is a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) which mandates that retail electricity providers purchase a predetermined fraction of their electricity from renewable sources. Renewable portfolio standards are a policy tool likely to persist for many decades due to the long term goals of many state RPSs and the likely creation of a federal RPS alongside any comprehensive climate change bill. However, there is little empirical evidence about the costs of these RPS policies. I take an instrumental variables approach to estimate the long-run price elasticity of supply of renewable generation. To instrument for the price paid to renewable generators I use the phased-in implementation of RPSs over time. Using this IV strategy, my preferred estimate of the supply elasticity is 2.7. This parameter allows me to measure the costs of carbon abatement in the electricity sector and to compare those costs with the costs of a broader based policy. Using my parameter estimates, I find that a policy to reduce the CO2 emissions in the northeastern US electricity sector by 2.5 % using only an RPS would cost at least six times more than the regional cap-and-trade system (Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative). The marginal cost of CO2 abatement is $12 using the most optimistic assumptions for an RPS compared to a marginal cost of abatement of $2 in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

Erik Johnson; Erik Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Assessment of Emerging Low-Emissions Technologies for Combustion-Based Distributed Resource Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the performance and cost of conventional and emerging emission control technologies for combustion-based distributed resource generators (combustion turbines, microturbines, and reciprocating engines). The performance is measured against the proposed California Air Resources Board (CARB) small generator certification standards for 2007. The costs are provided as capital cost and cost of electricity for emission control. The report also provides information on alternative fuel conside...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

446

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Evaluation of power production from the solar electric generating systems at Kramer Junction: 1988 to 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The five Solar Electric Generating Systems (SEGS) at Kramer Junction, California, now have nearly 30 years of cumulative operating experience. These 30 MW plants employ parabolic trough technology originally deployed by LUZ International in the late 1980`s and are now managed, operated and maintained by the Kramer Junction Company. In this paper, Sandia National Laboratories performed an analysis of the annual energy production from the five plants. Annual solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies are calculated and the major factors that influenced the results are presented. The generally good efficiencies are primarily attributed to the excellent equipment availabilities achieved at all plants.

Kolb, G.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hectares (Mha) of land would be required to meet the EU target for biofuels (5.75 per cent of transport29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically

450

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles - PHEV Modeling - Component Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency One of the main objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) R&D Plan (2.2Mb pdf) is to "determine component development requirements" through simulation analysis. Overall fuel efficiency is affected by component technologies from a component sizing and efficiency aspect. To properly define component requirements, several technologies for each of the main components (energy storage, engine and electric machines) are being compared at Argonne using PSAT. Per the R&D plan, several Li-ion battery materials are being modeled to evaluate their impacts on fuel efficiency and vehicle mass. Different Power to Energy ratios are being considered to understand the relative impact of power and energy.

451

Technological and economic comparison of battery technologies for U.S.A electric grid stabilization applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy storage can provide many benefits to the electric grid of the United States of America. With recent pushes to stabilize renewable energy and implement a Smart Grid, battery technology can play a pivotal role in the ...

Fernandez, Ted (Ted A.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

MHK Technologies/Yu Oscillating Generator YOG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscillating Generator YOG Oscillating Generator YOG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Yu Oscillating Generator YOG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Yu Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description By harnessing force located on top of the device s mast Known as a form of actuator You would get a levered mechanical gain converted to torque for a period of time oscillating the lower half side to side The lower half will then drive a turbine producing power As it slows due to resistance the actuator will harness force again to drive the device Making up for any loss motion do to resistance

453

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Research and Development Improve the energy efficiency of appliances, including

454

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Emission Cuts Realities – Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a „Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews current activity in the field of enhanced heat transfer, with the aim of illustrating the technology and typical applications. Guidelines for application of enhanced surfaces are given, and practical concerns and economics are discussed. Special attention is directed toward use of enhanced surfaces in industrial process heat exchangers and heat recovery equipment.

Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity Markets and Policy Group Supporting Solar Power in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity Markets and Policy Group Supporting Solar the impact of RPS policies on solar growth 2 #12;Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity by: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program

458

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Information Technology Requirements for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Advanced Information Technology Requirements for the Electric Power Industry workshop was held September 16–17, 2008, in Knoxville, Tennessee. It was attended by 15 senior information technology (IT) professionals representing various investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities, rural cooperatives, and regional transmission organizations (RTOs), as well as the Edison Electric Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy. The workshop provided a forum to identify needs and opportunities for indu...

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Converting Steam Generators Back to Coal Firing,Conditions on Steam-Electric Generator Emissions," McKnight,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies generate electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electricity generation and environmental externalities: Case studies, September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Electricity constitutes a critical input in sustaining the Nation`s economic growth and development and the well-being of its inhabitants. However, there are byproducts of electricity production that have an undesirable effect on the environment. Most of these are emissions introduced by the combustion of fossil fuels, which accounts for nearly 70 percent of the total electricity generated in the United States. The environmental impacts (or damages) caused by these emissions are labeled environmental ``externalities.`` Included in the generic term ``externality`` are benefits or costs resulting as an unintended byproduct of an economic activity that accrue to someone other than the parties involved in the activity. This report provides an overview of the economic foundation of externalities, the Federal and State regulatory approaches, and case studies of the impacts of the externality policies adopted by three States.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

CDCA Final EIS for Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN AMENDMENT / FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR IVANPAH SOLAR ELECTRIC GENERATING SYSTEM FEIS-10-31 JULY 2010 BLM/CA/ES-2010-010+1793 In Reply Refer To: In reply refer to: 1610-5.G.1.4 2800lCACA-48668 Dear Reader: Enclosed is the proposed California Desert Conservation Area Plan Amendment and Final Environmental Impact Statement (CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS) for the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS) project. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared the CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS for the ISEGS project in consultation with cooperating agencies and California State agencies, taking into account public comments received during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. The proposed plan amendment adds the Ivanpah

463

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

464

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

465

The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

87 87 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-47187 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan Prepared under Task No. WER8.5005 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

466

Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) 60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) Release Date: October 10, 2013 for Final 2012 data Next Release Date: September 2014 Re-Release 2012 data: December 4, 2013 (CORRECTION) The survey Form EIA-860 collects generator-level specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. Summary level data can be found in the Electric Power Annual. Detailed data are compressed (zip) and contain the following files: LayoutYyy – Provides a directory of all (published) data elements collected on the Form EIA-860 together with the related description, specific file location(s), and, where appropriate, an explanation of codes.

467

Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and DeliveryInfrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The legacy paradigm for electricity service in most of the electrified world today is based on the centralized generation-transmission-distribution infrastructure that evolved under a regulated environment. More recently, a quest for effective economic investments, responsive markets, and sensitivity to the availability of resources, has led to various degrees of deregulation and unbundling of services. In this context, a new paradigm is emerging wherein electricity generation is intimately embedded with the load in microgrids. Development and decay of the familiar macrogrid is discussed. Three salient features of microgrids are examined to suggest that cohabitation of micro and macro grids is desirable, and that overall energy efficiency can be increased, while power is delivered to loads at appropriate levels of quality.

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Pricing Carbon for Electricity Generation: National and International Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CO2 equivalent). This is equivalent to specifying a stock of GHGs, or a quantity limit on the amount of fossil fuel that can be burned over the next 100-200 years. The argument for choosing this quantity target, loosely stated, is that mitigation... treatment), but it is the combination of long timescales and policy risk that is damaging, - While fossil-fuel generation is at the margin and setting the electricity price, conventional generators will be largely hedged against both fuel and carbon price...

Grubb, Michael; Newbery, David

469

BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SECTION 01000—SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1—GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractor’s responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to fuel systems. 4. Install power to new dampers/louvers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Wiring shall be similar to installation to existing dampers/louvers. Utilize existing conduits already routed to louver areas to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to new dampers/louvers. 5. Install power to jacket water heaters for new generators 3 and 4 from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 6. Install new neutral grounding resistor and associated parts and wiring for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Grounding resistors will be Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). 7. Install two new switchgear sections, one for generator #3 and one for generator #4, to match existing generator #1 cubicle design and installation and in accordance with drawings and existing parts lists. This switchgear will be provided as GFE. 8. Ground all new switchgear, generators 3 and 4, and any other new equipment to match existing grounding connections for generators 1 and 2, switchgear and other equipment. See drawings for additional details. Grounding grid is already existing. Ensure that all grounding meets National Electrical Code requirements. 9. Cummins DMC control for the generator and switchgear syste

Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Program on Technology Innovation: Decision-Centered Guidelines for the Design of Human System Interfaces for Electric Power Industry Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision-centered guidelines support improved user decision making across a broad range of electric power industry application areas. The guidelines will aid in the design of user-centered human-system interfaces (HSIs), while increasing the beneficial uses of new technologies for electric power generation, transmission, and distribution (GTD) systems. Decision-centered guidelines are applicable to system designs involving new technology that will transform current user tasks, responsibilities, ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

471

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Electric Generation Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The type and stringency of environmental mandates and carbon regulation in the next 10 years continue to be a topic of substantial uncertainty and debate. This study applies a model-based approach for exploring the potential magnitude of shifts in electric generation trends that could occur over a broad range of future environmental regulatory outcomes. Cases examined include a path of stringent environmental regulations, a high cost carbon policy, and their combination. This study is a follow-on modelin...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Clearance and Tagging Guideline for Fossil Electric Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In their trips to more than a dozen plants in the past three years, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teams observed that clearance and tagging processes have ranged from comprehensive to less than adequate. In plants with detailed procedures and plants with less than adequate procedures, activities have been observed that were not as safe as they should have been. EPRI and fossil generating advisors determined that a clearance and tagging guideline was needed. EPRI and the industry advisors decid...

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

473

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone,Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual, Case studies/examples, Templates, Technical report User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/geothermal/publications.html Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

475

Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

476

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Decentralized control techniques applied to electric power distributed generation in microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Distributed generation of electric energy has become part of the current electric power system. In this context a new scenario is arising in which small… (more)

Vásquez Quintero, Juan Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

479

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm Addthis GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG) meeting on November 21-22 in Brussels, Belgium. The PG reviewed progress on a number of on-going actions and received progress reports from the GIF Experts Group (EG) and the GIF Senior Industry Advisory Panel (SIAP).

480

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

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481

Energy Generation by State, by Technology (2009) Provides annual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology (2009) Provides annual energy generation for all states by fuel source (e.g. coal, gas, solar, wind) in 2009, reported in MWh. Also includes facility-level data...

482

Impacts of Electric Industry Restructuring on Electric Generation and Fuel Markets: Analytical and Business Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring and increasing competition are likely to have a major impact on electric generating companies and the individuals and organizations that buy, transport, market, or supply fuels. Restructuring may also affect the patterns of coal and gas use. This report, the first in a series by EPRI and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), describes the scope of these potential impacts.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

483

Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (e) "Facility" means one or all generating units at an electric generating station. (f) "Fuel (b)(3)(C) of section 1392. (g) "Generating facility output" means the electrical energy and/or fuel1 Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure

484

Comparison of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery technologies of different chemistries, manufacture and geometry were evaluated as candidates for use in Electric Vehicles (EV). The candidate batteries that were evaluated include four single cell and seven multi-cell modules representing four technologies: Lead-Acid, Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Zinc-Bromide. A standard set of testing procedures for electric vehicle batteries, based on industry accepted testing procedures, and any tests which were specific to individual battery types were used in the evaluations. The batteries were evaluated by conducting performance tests, and by subjecting them to cyclical loading, using a computer controlled charge--discharge cycler, to simulate typical EV driving cycles. Criteria for comparison of batteries were: performance, projected vehicle range, cost, and applicability to various types of EVs. The four battery technologies have individual strengths and weaknesses and each is suited to fill a particular application. None of the batteries tested can fill every EV application.

Dickinson, B.E.; Lalk, T.R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Swan, D.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Comparison of various battery technologies for electric vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery technologies of different chemistries, manufacture and geometry were evaluated as candidates for use in Electric Vehicles (EV). The candidate batteries that were evaluated include four single cell and seven multi-cell modules representing four technologies; Lead-Acid, Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Zinc-Bromide. A standard set of testing procedures for electric vehicle batteries, based on industry accepted testing procedur