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1

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Electrolysis Water Electrolysis Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

2

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

3

Pre-treatment of Dye Wastewater by Electrolysis Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pre-treatment of Dye Wastewater by Electrolysis Technology .... Application in High Temperature Thermochemical Hydrogen Production.

4

Electrolysis Technology Development and Fueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production from electrolysis *General electrolysis fueling overview *Near term hydrogen electricity integration *Grid based renewable hydrogen integration Receive feedback from...

5

Scaling-Up Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Technology for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Scaling-Up Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Technology for Magnesium Production. Author(s), Soobhankar Pati, Adam Powell, Steve...

6

Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Name: John Smith Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This topic is kind of all the sciences combined, but I'll put it here. My question is actually just asking for anybody to help me. My topic is electrolysis. Any help is appreciated. Please just tell me what you know. Thanks a lot!!! Replies: This question would be better placed in the chemistry section. Electrolysis is simply the use of an electric current to change the chemistry of a substance. Water is a good example. Water is made up of two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom combined in a single molecule. We can cool water to a solid and we can boil liquid water to a gas, but in all these three states, it is still water. Placing a electric current (direct current) into water will result in the formation of bubbles at both the + and - electrodes. These bubbles are the result of the water molecule being taken apart and changed into oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. This is a chemical change because these gases do not behave like the water from which they came. Electrolysis is used in a number of different applications with many different types of molecules, not just water.

7

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Wind and hydropower are currently being evaluated in the U.S. and abroad as electricity sources that could enable large volume production of renewable hydrogen for use in transportation and distributed power applications. To further explore this prospect the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program at the Department of Energy held a workshop to bring together stakeholders from wind, hydropower, and the electrolysis industries on September 9-10, 2003. The main objectives of the workshop were to: 1) discuss with stakeholders their current activities related to hydrogen, 2) explore with industry opportunities for low-cost hydrogen production through integration between wind and hydropower, water electrolysis and the electricity grid, and 3) review and provide feedback on a current Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory analysis efforts to study opportunities for wind electrolysis and other renewable electricity sources.

8

Electrolysis: Technology and Infrastructure Options Today, electrolysis systems supply 4% of the world's hydrogen. Although electrolysis can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cost, production methods, namely large centralized steam methane reformers. However, electrolysis is gaining ground facility at a substation level on the edge of a population center with potentially many such terminals

9

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miller, Atomic Energy of Canada Wind in the Electricity Infrastructure, Mark McGree, Xcel Energy Hydrogen at the Fueling Station, Steven Schlasner, Conoco Phillips Electrolysis...

10

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored an Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop in Broomfield, Colorado September 22-23, 2004. Attendees included representatives from utilities and energy companies, researchers, and government officials. Water electrolysis is a leading candidate for hydrogen production as the U.S. begins the transition to a hydrogen economy. Ideally, electrolysis will be able to provide hydrogen fuel for at least 20% of our light duty fleet; at prices competitive with traditional fuels and other hydrogen production pathways, using domestically available resources; and without adverse impacts to the environment. To be successful, the utility sector must play a vital role in identifying opportunities to diversify electricity generation and markets and begin to look at transportation fuel as a high priority business opportunity for the future. This workshop was held to identify the opportunities and challenges facing the widespread deployment of electrolysis based hydrogen production in the U.S.

11

Electrolysis Hydrogen  

INL has invented a process that leverages nuclear technology in combination with various carbon sources to produce synthetic gases for refinement into synthetic transportation fuels/chemicals. Using solid-state electrolysis, water is decomposed to ...

12

Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy TechnologySummary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

PEM Electrolysis R&D Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis R&D Webinar Electrolysis R&D Webinar May 23, 2011 Presented by Dr. Katherine Ayers Outline * Key Messages About Electrolysis * Company Intro and Market Discussion - Electrolysis Technology Comparison * Infrastructure Challenges and Solutions - System Approaches: Capacity and Delivery Pressure - Materials Advancements: Cost and Efficiency Improvements * Summary and Future Vision 2 Key Takeaways for Today * Hydrogen markets exist today that can leverage advancements in on-site generation technologies * PEM electrolysis already highly cost competitive in these markets * PEM technology meets alkaline output capacities and has performance advantages for many applications * Multiple fueling stations utilizing hydrogen from electrolysis: can help bridge the infrastructure gap * Clear pathways exist for considerable cost reductions

15

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

16

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Non-Noble Metal Water Electrolysis Catalysts; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

17

Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of todays technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available today that perform in a range of efficiencies, >95%, that are suitable for the overall operational goals. The balance of plant scales well both operationally and in terms of cost becoming a smaller portion of the overall cost equation as the systems get larger. Capital cost reduction of the cell stack power supplies is achievable by modifying the system configuration to have the cell stacks in electrical series driving up the DC bus voltage, thereby allowing the use of large-scale DC power supply technologies. The single power supply approach reduces cost. Elements of the cell stack cost reduction and efficiency improvement work performed in the early stage of the program is being continued in subsequent DOE sponsored programs and through internal investment by Proton. The results of the trade study of the 100 kg H2/day system have established a conceptual platform for design and development of a next generation electrolyzer for Proton. The advancements started by this program have the possibility of being realized in systems for the developing fueling markets in 2010 period.

Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alkaline Electrolysis Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, GE developed electrolyzer stack technologies to meet DOEs goals for low cost electrolysis hydrogen. The main barrier to meeting the targets for electrolyzer cost was in stack assembly and construction. GEs invention of a single piece or monolithic plastic electrolyzer stack reduces these costs considerably. In addition, GE developed low cost cell electrodes using a novel application of metal spray coating technology. Bench scale stack testing and cost modeling indicates that the DOE targets for stack capital cost and efficiency can be met by full-scale production of industrial electrolyzers incorporating GEs stack technology innovations.

RIchard Bourgeois; Steven Sanborn; Eliot Assimakopoulos

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Anodes for alkaline electrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. Miller *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Giner Giner Electrochemical Systems: Monjid Hamdan *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Proton Proton OnSite: Kathy Ayers *Q&A 3 DOE EERE-FCT Goals and Objectives Develop technologies to produce hydrogen from clean, domestic resources at a delivered and dispensed cost of $2-$4/gge Capacity (kg/day) Distributed Central 100,000,000 100,000 50,000 10,000 1,000 10 Natural Gas Reforming Photo- electro- chemical Biological Water Electrolysis (Solar) 2015-2020 Today-2015 2020-2030 Coal Gasification (No Carbon Capture) Electrolysis Water (Grid) Coal Gasification (Carbon Capture)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high temperature process heat. The overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. An overview of high temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic thermodynamics, experimental methods, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

James E. O'Brien

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Electrolysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Introduction 2 The Basics 3 Diagram 4 References Introduction By providing energy from a battery, water (H2O) can be dissociated into the diatomic molecules of hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2). This process is a good example of the the application of the four thermodynamic potentials.The electrolysis of one mole of water produces a mole of hydrogen gas and a half-mole of oxygen gas in their normal diatomic forms. Hydrogen electrolysis is the process of spitting water into Hydrogen gas and Oxygen gas. The Hydrogen gas can then be used as fuel either by being burnt in an engine or reacted in a fuel cell. This is the process that so-called water powered cars rely on for their energy. No car can use water as a fuel, but a car can be made to run only on Hydrogen, meaning that its

23

DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTROLYSIS-UTILITY ELECTROLYSIS-UTILITY INTEGRATION WORKSHOP Renaissance Suites at Flatirons, Broomfield, CO September 22-23, 2004 September 22, 2004 7:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 am Welcome and Overview of Workshop Goals, Pete Devlin, DOE/OHFCIT 8:45 am Review Agenda and Objectives, Shawna McQueen, Energetics 9:00 am Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation, Steve Cohen, Teledyne Energy Systems 9:20 am Electrolyzers Operating in Real-World Conditions, Rob Regan, DTE Energy Systems 9:40 am Break 10:00 am Technology Advancements and New Concepts, Dan Smith, GE Global Research 10:20 am DG and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector, Ed Torerro, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 10:40 am Electrolytic Hydrogen from a Blend of Nuclear- and Wind-Produced Electricity,

24

Candidate anode materials for iron production by molten oxide electrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) has been identified by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) as one of four possible breakthrough technologies to alleviate the environmental impact of iron and steel production. This ...

Paramore, James D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

High Temperature Electrolysis 4 kW Experiment Design, Operation, and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of long-term stack testing completed in the new high-temperature steam electrolysis multi-kW test facility recently developed at INL. The report includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This facility has provided a demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis operation at the 4 kW scale with advanced cell and stack technology. This successful large-scale demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Stability of Iridium Anode in Molten Oxide Electrolysis for Ironmaking: Influence of Slag Basicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is a carbon-neutral, electrochemical technique to decompose metal oxide directly into liquid metal and oxygen gas upon use of an inert anode. What sets MOE apart from other technologies is ...

Kim, Hojong

29

Wind Electrolysis - Hydrogen Cost Optimization (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is about the Wind-to-Hydrogen Project at NREL, part of the Renewable Electrolysis task and the examination of a grid-tied, co-located wind electrolysis hydrogen production facility.

Saur, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 6002: Electrolysis Analysis to Support Technical Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record #: 6002 Date: September 28, 2006 Title: Electrolysis Analysis to Support Technical Targets Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2008 Distributed Water Electrolysis - Technical Targets. Item #1: Table 3.1.4 and Table 3.1.4A in the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. This Record provides further information vis-à-vis the assumptions and corresponding references used in Table 3.1.4 "Technical Targets: Distributed Water Electrolysis Hydrogen Production" and Table 3.1.4A "Distributed Electrolysis H2A Example Cost Contributions" in the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,

31

THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Water Electrolysis at the Thermodynamic Limit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Metal oxide catalysts for alkaline water electrolysis were created through cathodic electrodeposition and the deposition variables were explored. It was discovered that the use (more)

Merrill, Matthew D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: STACK TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolytesupported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc., Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), and Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain), respectively for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technology developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, respectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. A three-cell short stack provided by St. Gobain, however, showed rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Improvements on electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyteelectrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

X, Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; J. J. Hartvigsen; G. Tao; N. Petigny

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Mathematical Analysis of High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of CO2 and O2 Production in a Closed-Loop Atmosphere Revitalization System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating two closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures based on Sabatier and Bosch carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. A number of process models have been developed and analyzed to determine the theoretical power required to recover oxygen, O2, in each case. These models include the current Sabatier and Bosch technologies and combinations of those processes with high-temperature co-electrolysis. The cases of constant CO2 supply and constant O2 production were evaluated. In addition, a process model of the hydrogenation process with co-electrolysis was developed and compared. Sabatier processes require the least amount of energy input per kg of oxygen produced. If co-electrolysis replaces solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrolysis within the Sabatier architecture, the power requirement is reduced by over 10%, but only if heat recuperation is used. Sabatier processes, however, require external water to achieve the lower power results. Under conditions of constant incoming carbon dioxide flow, the Sabatier architectures require more power than the other architectures. The Bosch, Boudouard with co-electrolysis, and the hydrogenation with co-electrolysis processes require little or no external water. The Bosch and hydrogenation processes produce water within their reactors, which aids in reducing the power requirement for electrolysis. The Boudouard with co-electrolysis process has a higher electrolysis power requirement because carbon dioxide is split instead of water, which has a lower heat of formation. Hydrogenation with co-electrolysis offers the best overall power performance for two reasons: it requires no external water, and it produces its own water, which reduces the power requirement for co-electrolysis.

Michael G. McKellar; Manohar S. Sohal; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna; Morgan B. Abney

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cathode Technology in Hall-Heroult Electrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... meals, and lodging) undertaken to maintain and improve professional skills. For more information concerning applicability, contact your local Internal Revenue...

37

ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

Hansen, W.N.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Rare Earth Extraction by Molten Oxide Electrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Production, Refining and Recycling of Rare Earth Metals ... Electrolysis in molten halides is an established method for the reduction but requires ... Recycling of Different Sintered Magnet Grades by Hydrogen Processing Yielding...

40

Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production from Biodegradable Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield H Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield H 2 Production from Biodegradable Materials Zhiyong "Jason" Ren, Ph.D Associate Professor, Environmental and Sustainability Engineering University of Colorado Boulder Jason.Ren@colorado.edu (303) 492-4137 http://spot.colorado.edu/~zhre0706/ MxC or Microbial Electrochemical System (MES) is a platform technology for energy and resource recovery Main type of MXC Products Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) Electricity Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC) H 2 , H 2 O 2 , NaOH, Struvite Microbial Chemical Cell (MCC) CH 4 , C 2 H 4 O 2 , Organics Microbial Remediation Cell (MRC) Reduced/non-toxic chemicals Microbial Desalination Cell (MDC) Desalinated water >90% H 2 MEC for H 2 Recovery PS e - e - Wang and Ren, Biotechnol. Adv. 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Feasibility Study of Steelmaking by Molten Oxide Electrolysis (TRP9956)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is an extreme form of molten salt electrolysis, a technology that has been used to produce tonnage metals for over 100 years - aluminum, magnesium, lithium, sodium and the rare earth metals specifically. The use of carbon-free anodes is the distinguishing factor in MOE compared to other molten salt electrolysis techniques. MOE is totally carbon-free and produces no CO or CO2 - only O2 gas at the anode. This project is directed at assessing the technical feasibility of MOE at the bench scale while determining optimum values of MOE operating parameters. An inert anode will be identified and its ability to sustain oxygen evalution will be demonstrated.

Donald R. Sadoway; Gerbrand Ceder

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thermal and Electrochemical Performance of a High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis Stack  

SciTech Connect

A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. We are conducting a progression of electrolysis stack testing activities, at increasing scales, along with a continuation of supporting research activities in the areas of materials development, single-cell testing, detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and systems modeling. This paper will present recent experimental results obtained from testing of planar solid-oxide stacks operating in the electrolysis mode. The hydrogen-production and electrochemical performance of these stacks will be presented, over a range of operating conditions. In addition, internal stack temperature measurements will be presented, with comparisons to computational fluid dynamic predictions.

J. O' Brien; C. Stoots; G. Hawkes; J. Hartvigsen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a hydrogen economy. The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

James E. O'Brien

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRODUCTION BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L....

45

Hydrogen production by water electrolysis: present status and future prospects  

SciTech Connect

Development of advanced alkaline water electrolysis cells operating at 120-150/sup 0/C, electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions, and development of solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis cell are discussed. (LK)

Srinivasan, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CO2 Emission Reduction through Innovative Molten Salt Electrolysis ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical metallurgy especially through high temperature molten salt electrolysis with renewable electricity stands for a great opportunity for producing

47

Electrolysis method for producing hydrogen and oxygen  

SciTech Connect

A novel electrolytic cell produces a mixture of highly ionized hydrogen and oxygen gases by a method combining electrolysis and radiolysis of an aqueous electrolyte. The electrolyte, which may be 25 percent of potassium hydroxide, is introduced into the cell and is simultaneously subjected to an electrolyting current and intense irradiation by electromagnetic radiation of frequency less than 10/sup -10/ meters.

Horvath, S.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800/sup 0/C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400/sup 0/C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) ($1000/KW(E) equivalent), the H/sub 2/ energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10/sup 6/ scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen.

Fillo, J.A. (ed.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advancements of Dubal High Amperage Reduction Cell Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of Low-Voltage Energy-Saving Aluminum Reduction Technology ... Energy Savings in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells: Effect of the Cathode Design.

50

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Project Summary Full Title: High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Project ID: 159 Principal Investigator: Steve Herring Brief Description: A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). A solid-oxide fuel cell model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell; solid oxide elctrolysis cell; nuclear; model Purpose Assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Performer Principal Investigator: Steve Herring

51

High temperature electrolysis for syngas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

Stoots, Carl M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O' Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, James Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hawkes, Grant L. (Sugar City, ID); Hartvigsen, Joseph J. (Kaysville, UT)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Recent Progress in Molten Oxide Electrolysis for Iron Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Recent Progress in Molten Oxide Electrolysis for Iron Production ... Concentrated Solar Power for Producing Liquid Fuels from CO2 and H2O.

53

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Molten Salt Electrolysis for the Synthesis of Elemental Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative method using molten salt electrolysis was developed in this work. The electrolyte system evaluated was MgF2-NaF-LiF with...

55

Molten Oxide Electrolysis Application to Steelmaking: A New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is a new steelmaking ... Electrochemical Reduction of Tantalum Oxide in a CaCl2 CaO Molten Salt Electrolyte.

56

Coal Electrolysis to Produce Hydrogen at Intermediate Temperatures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As an alternative technique for hydrogen production, coal electrolysis was evaluated at intermediate temperatures (80 C-108 C). First, an electrochemical technique was developed to (more)

Jin, Xin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5040: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 Date: December 12, 2008 40 Date: December 12, 2008 Title: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 19, 2008 Item: The 2005 cost status for hydrogen produced from distributed water electrolysis is $5.90 / gge. Assumptions and References: The H2A analysis used to determine the projected cost of $5.88/gge (rounded up to $5.90/gge) was performed by Directed Technologies, Inc. and can be found in Record 5040a. The increase in cost compared to the 2004 analysis ($5.45/gge) is due to two assumptions changed in the model: (a) an increase in the industrial electricity price from 5¢/kWh to 5.5¢/kWh from the EIA Annual Energy Outlook, and (b) an increase in the capital cost estimate of the electrolyzer. The other assumptions in the analysis used standard values

59

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

60

System Design and New Materials for Reversible, Solid-Oxide, High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer high electrical efficiency and a potential path to large scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide technology is capable of both power generation and hydrogen production. That makes it possible for the development of a reversible solid-oxide system that can respond to market conditions to produce electricity or hydrogen on demand. New high-temperature electrolyzer cell materials are needed to enable cost-effective hydrogen production system designs based on reversible steam electrolysis. Two test methods were established for the eventual development of the reversible, durable electrode materials: the button cell test and the oxygen electrode test. The button cell test is capable of evaluating the performance and degradation of full solid oxide cells with dual atmosphere of air and hydrogen-steam. The oxygen electrode test is capable of isolating the performance and degradation of the oxygen electrode. It has higher throughput and sensitivity than the button cell test.

Ruud, J.A.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation, held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

Manohar Sohal

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Summary Report on Solid-oxide Electrolysis Cell Testing and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. From 2003 to 2009, this work was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, under the Office of Nuclear Energy. Starting in 2010, the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research program has been sponsored by the INL Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This report provides a summaryof program activities performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and the first quarter of FY-12, with a focus on small-scale testing and cell development activities. HTE research priorities during this period have included the development and testing of SOEC and stack designs that exhibit high-efficiency initial performance and low, long-term degradation rates. This report includes contributions from INL and five industry partners: Materials and Systems Research, Incorporated (MSRI); Versa Power Systems, Incorporated (VPS); Ceramatec, Incorporated; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Glenn Research Center (NASA - GRC); and the St. Gobain Advanced Materials Division. These industry partners have developed SOEC cells and stacks for in-house testing in the electrolysis mode and independent testing at INL. Additional fundamental research and post-test physical examinations have been performed at two university partners: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Connecticut. Summaries of these activities and test results are also presented in this report.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R.C. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Transient nanobubbles in short-time electrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water electrolysis in a microsystem is observed and analyzed on a short-time scale ~10 us. Very unusual properties of the process are stressed. An extremely high current density is observed because the process is not limited by the diffusion of electroactive species. The high current is accompanied by a high relative supersaturation S>1000 that results in homogeneous nucleation of bubbles. On the short-time scale only nanobubbles can be formed. These nanobubbles densely cover the electrodes and aggregate at a later time to microbubbles. The effect is significantly intensified with a small increase of temperature. Application of alternating polarity voltage pulses produces bubbles containing a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Spontaneous reaction between gases is observed for stoichiometric bubbles with the size smallaer than 150 nm. Such bubbles disintegrate violently affecting the surface of electrodes.

Vitaly B. Svetovoy; Remco G. P. Sanders; Miko C. Elwenspoek

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropo

68

DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Background Paper...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

challenge for electrolysis to provide a significant portion of this fuel remains the high price of electricity. For every kilogram of hydrogen produced, 60-90% of the cost is...

69

Materials Degradation Studies for High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments are currently in progress to assess the high temperature degradation behavior of materials in solid oxide electrolysis systems. This research includes the investigation of various electrolysis cell components and balance of plant materials under both anodic and cathodic gas atmospheres at temperatures up to 850C. Current results include corrosion data for a high temperature nickel alloy used for the air-side flow field in electrolysis cells and a commercial ferritic stainless steel used as the metallic interconnect. Three different corrosion inhibiting coatings were also tested on the steel material. The samples were tested at 850C for 500 h in both air and H2O/H2 atmospheres. The results of this research will be used to identify degradation mechanisms and demonstrate the suitability of candidate materials for long-term operation in electrolysis cells.

Paul Demkowicz; Pavel Medvedev; Kevin DeWall; Paul Lessing

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The co-electrolysis was carried out at 1073K to 1173K using SOEC with H2O- CO2-H2 inlet mixtures at Ni-YSZ hydrogen electrode and air at the LSM-YSZ...

71

Liquid metal batteries : ambipolar electrolysis and alkaline earth electroalloying cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three novel forms of liquid metal batteries were conceived, studied, and operated, and their suitability for grid-scale energy storage applications was evaluated. A ZnlITe ambipolar electrolysis cell comprising ZnTe dissolved ...

Bradwell, David (David Johnathon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Systems Engineering Provides Successful High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes two Systems Engineering Studies completed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the High Temperature Stream Electrolysis (HTSE) process. HTSE produces hydrogen from water using nuclear power and was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) for integration with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The first study was a reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) analysis to identify critical areas for technology development based on available information regarding expected component performance. An HTSE process baseline flowsheet at commercial scale was used as a basis. The NGNP project also established a process and capability to perform future RAM analyses. The analysis identified which components had the greatest impact on HTSE process availability and indicated that the HTSE process could achieve over 90% availability. The second study developed a series of life-cycle cost estimates for the various scale-ups required to demonstrate the HTSE process. Both studies were useful in identifying near- and long-term efforts necessary for successful HTSE process deployment. The size of demonstrations to support scale-up was refined, which is essential to estimate near- and long-term cost and schedule. The life-cycle funding profile, with high-level allocations, was identified as the program transitions from experiment scale R&D to engineering scale demonstration.

Charles V. Park; Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory June 3, 2010 CX-002571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Street Lighting Fixture Energy Efficiency Retrofit Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 0603...

74

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12072009 Location(s): Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 7, 2009 CX-000459: Categorical...

75

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Non-Contaminating Cryogenic Fracturing Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12202011 Location(s): California Offices(s):...

76

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Non-Contaminating Cryogenic Fracturing Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12202011 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s):...

77

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory June 19, 2012 CX-008450: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 93 Heat Exchanger Removal at National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh CX(s) Applied:...

78

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Regional Demonstration - Technology Solutions for Wind Integration - Phase I CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05112010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s):...

79

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Data Access Utilizing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education as a Catalyst - Phase 1 CX(s) Applied: A9,...

80

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 08312012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 31, 2012 CX-009299: Categorical Exclusion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 4, 2011 CX-005159: Categorical Exclusion Determination United States-China Advanced Coal Technologies Consortium - Indiana Geological Survey CX(s) Applied: A9,...

82

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory December 10, 2009 CX-000368: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11...

83

High Temperature Electrolysis using Electrode-Supported Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. The cells currently under study were developed primarily for the fuel cell mode of operation. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (~10 m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (~1400 m thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes (~90 m thick). The purpose of the present study was to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of DC potential sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-duration testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode over more than 500 hours of operation. Results indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of the single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Overview of U. S. activities in IEA Hydrogen Technology. Annex IV. Electrolytic hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Technical contributions are described for R and D efforts into: Anode Depolarization; High Temperature Electrolysis Static Feedwater Electrolysis; and the implementing of plans for an Integrated Test Bed for Advanced H/sub 2/ Technology. The US rationale is presented for placing programmatic emphasis on base technology development applicable to the far term.

Mezzina, A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

86

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via a gas analyser, and their relationship to conversion efficiencies will be presented. These measurements will be compared to predictions obtained from chemical equilibrium computer codes. Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high-temperature electrolysis will initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

Stoots, C.M.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Overview of High-Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

Over the last five years there has been a growing interest in the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, particularly to augment transportation fuels and thus reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, in the long term, methane reforming is not a viable process for the large-scale hydrogen production since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen without consuming fossil fuels and without emitting greenhouse gases through the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is developing three general categories of high temperature processes for hydrogen production: thermochemical, electrolytic and hybrid thermo-electrolytic. This paper introduces the work being done in the development of high temperature electrolysis of steam. High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) is built on the technology of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which were invented over a century ago, but which have been most vigorously developed during the last twenty years. SOFCs consume hydrogen and oxygen and produce steam and electricity. Solid Oxide Electrolytic Cells (SOECs) consume electricity and steam and produce hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the HTE research is to solve those problems unique to the electrolytic mode of operation, while building further on continuing fuel cell development. ORGANIZATION Experiments have been conducted for the last three years at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. on the operation of button cells and of progressively larger stacks of planar cells. In addition, the INL has been performing analyses of the cell-scale fluid dynamics and plant-scale flowsheets in order to determine optimum operating conditions and plant configurations. Argonne National Laboratory has been performing experiments for the development of new electrode materials, as well as modeling of the fluid dynamics and flowsheets for comparison with the work being done at the INL. ANL has also been performing diagnostic measures on components form long-duration tests at the INL and Ceramatec to determine the causes for the slow degradation in cell performance. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing high temperature porous membranes for the separation of hydrogen from the residual steam, thus avoiding the need to condense and reheat the steam. The University of Nevada at Las Vegas has been collaborating with ANL on the development of electrode and electrolyte materials and will soon begin to investigate the causes of cell degradation. HTE research also includes NERI projects at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute on the development of toughened SOEC composite seals and at the Georgia Institute of Technology on the microstructural design of SOEC materials. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS The most recent large-scale test of HTE was performed from June 28 through Sept 22, 2006 at the Ceramatec plant in Salt Lake City. The test apparatus consists of two stacks of 60 cells each in a configuration that will be used in the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) experiment during FY-07. The ILS will contain three modules of four stacks each. The Half-Module initially produced 1.2 normal m3of H2/hour and 0.65 Nm3/hr at the end of the 2040-hour continuous test.

Herring, J. S.; O' Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Hartvigsen, J. J.; Petri, M. C.; Carter, J. D.; Bischoff, B. L.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

C1 Technology of Molten salt Electrolysis of Magnesium Chloride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D14 Gold Nanoparticles in Red Ruby Glasses Used for Decoration in Thailand D15 Soft Magnetic Properties of Nanocrystalline Fe-based P/M Cores Mixed...

90

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagram showing the flow of energy from wind, other renewables such as solar, geothermal, hydro, and biomass to an electrolyzer or short term energy storage to hydrogen storage or...

91

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis: Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Prepared under Task No. HY61.3620 Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006

92

CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to be addressed for hydrogen to become an economical and viable option.

M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

95

Three Dimensional CFD Model of a Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell for Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon-Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE). A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. An experimental study is also being performed at the INL to assess the SOE. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and syn-gas production over a range of stack operating conditions. Typical results of current density versus cell potential, cell current versus H2 and CO production, temperature, and voltage potential are all presented within this paper. Plots of mole fraction of CO2, CO, H2, H2O, O2, are presented. Currently there is strong interest in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. This process takes the carbon-neutral approach where the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere does not increase. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $70 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis or thermochemical processes, using high-temperature nuclear process heat. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (~850C). High-temperature electrolytic CO2 and water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce syn-gas with an overall system efficiency near those of the thermochemical processes. Specifically, a high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to

G. Hawkes; J. O' Brien; C. Stoots; S. Herring; R. Jones

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electrolytic process useful for the electrolysis of water  

SciTech Connect

It is possible to significantly increase the efficiency of the electrolysis of water into hydrogen and oxygen while maintaining stability of the anode. This efficiency increase is obtained by using an iridium oxide anode which is produced by vacuum deposition techniques.

Beni, G.; Dautremont-Smith, W.C.; Schiavone, L.M.; Shay, J.L.

1981-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

Minh, Nguyen Q. (Woodridge, IL); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Tucson, AZ); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Applications of Computer in Engineering Especially in Electrolysis Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modern times, computers have closely connection with everyone, especially scientist and engineer. Computer programs can now solve difficult problems in a fraction of the time it used to take. Computer-Aided engineering is a powerful tool and necessary ... Keywords: CFD, CAE, Electrochemistry, electrolysis, molten magnesium salt

Ze Sun; Bing Li; Jianguo Yu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Electrolysis for Energy Storage & Grid Balancing in West Denmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the original stakeholders who were, Dansk Fjenrvarmeværkers Forening (DFF), Norsk Hydro EnergyElectrolysis for Energy Storage & Grid Balancing in West Denmark A possible first step toward. Economic Assessment 30 6. Other Methods for Storing Energy 34 Work Method & Acknowledgements This project

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101

Production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. Task 1 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents results of a cooperative effort among the Florida Energy Office, NASA/Kennedy Space Center, the US Department of Energy and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). It reports on a task to evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. The resulting activities covered five years of effort funded at a total of $216,809. The results represent a successful, coordinated effort among two state agencies and two federal agencies. Results are reported on two separate investigations. The first investigation looked at the use of line focus concentrating photovoltaics coupled with single-cell electrolyzers to produce gaseous hydrogen. The concept, and its design, construction and operation, are presented. The objectives of the line focusing PV system are to reduce overall system cost under the assumptions that lenses and mirrors are cheaper to deploy than are PV cells, and that low-voltage, high-current dc electricity can efficiently power a single-cell elctrolyzer to produce hydrogen. The second investigation evaluated a base case cost of PV electrolysis hydrogen production based on present-day PV and electrolyzer costs and efficiencies. A second step analyzed the hydrogen costs based on a best prediction of where PV costs and efficiencies will be in 10 years. These results set the minimum cost standards that other renewable production technologies must meet or better.

Block, D.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Renewable Electrolysis Integrated Systems Development and Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

integrated renewable hydrogen demonstration project to support industry innovation and DOE Technology Validation goals. Technical Barriers This project addresses the following...

103

LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of electrolysis-cell separator for 125/sup 0/C operation. Advanced alkaline electrolysis cell development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the findings of a seven-month contracted effort. The major technical task involved a 125/sup 0/C operating temperature test of the 20 v/o polybenzimidazole (PBI) - 80 v/o potassium titanate (K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) separator in combination with the nickel-molybdenum cathode electrocatalyst system dubbed the C-AN cathode using the ARIES test system which was developed previously. The test of the PBI-K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/ separator was only partially successful. The anticipated 1.85 (75/sup 0/C) and 1.75 volt per cell (100/sup 0/C) input requirement at 550 ma/cm/sup 2/ were surpassed slightly. The test module operated stably for about 550 hr. Although there were some mechanical difficulties with the ARIES test unit, testing at 125/sup 0/C proceeded from 745 hr on test until the test was terminated at 2318 operating hours to allow diagnostic disassembly. The input voltage degraded to a value of 1.82 volt per cell at 125/sup 0/C which is unacceptable. Diagnostic disassembly showed the PBI portion of the separator was no longer present. PBI had been shown to be stable in 123/sup 0/C, 45 w/o KOH solutions in a 1000-hr test. The attack is suggested to be attributable to a peroxide or perchlorate type oxidizer which would be unique to the electrolysis mode and probably not present in alkaline fuel cell applications. Recommendations for further testing include an evaluation of the chemical compatibility of PBI with alkaline/oxidizer solutions and endurance testing the C-AN cathode with new improved anode structures at 125/sup 0/C using asbestos separators in combination with a silicate saturated KOH electrolyte. Demonstration of the stability of this 1.65 volt per cell (90% voltage efficiency) technology at 500 ma/cm/sup 2/ will document an inexpensive and intelligent hydrogen production process which will satisfy the needs of the United States in the 1990s.

Murray, J N

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M

109

HYFIRE: a tokamak/high-temperature electrolysis system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The HYFIRE studies to date have investigated a number of technical approaches for using the thermal energy produced in a high-temperature Tokamak blanket to provide the electrical and thermal energy required to drive a high-temperature (> 1000/sup 0/C) water electrolysis process. Current emphasis is on two design points, one consistent with electrolyzer peak inlet temperatures of 1400/sup 0/C, which is an extrapolation of present experience, and one consistent with a peak electrolyzer temperature of 1100/sup 0/C. This latter condition is based on current laboratory experience with high-temperature solid electrolyte fuel cells. Our major conclusion to date is that the technical integration of fusion and high-temperature electrolysis appears to be feasible and that overall hydrogen production efficiencies of 50 to 55% seem possible.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.P.; Benenati, R.; Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Decomposition of tritiated water with solid oxide electrolysis cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept for decomposing tritiated water with a solid oxide electrolysis cell is proposed. This method is essentially free from problems such as large tritium inventory, radiation damage, and solid waste, so it is expected to be a promising one. Preliminary experiments with the cell using stabilized zirconia with 8 mol% CaO were performed. Water vapor was decomposed electrically and cell voltage agreed well with the theoretical value.

Konishi, S.; Naruse, Y.; Ohno, H.; Yoshida, H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Summary status of advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport R and D  

SciTech Connect

Major projects within the framework of the U.S. DOE Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Systems Program are described. Goals, accomplishments and status of investigations into advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport are summarized. Electrolytic hydrogen production systems include: SPE electrolyzers; static feed water electrolysis; high temperature electrolysis; and other advanced concepts. Hydrogen transport studies have emphasized the characterization of hydrogen embrittlement effects on conventional natural gas pipeline steels.

Mezzina, A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm/sup -2/, and at 35 to 90/sup 0/C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm/sup -2/ have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 90/sup 0/C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H/sub 2/O at 0.2 A cm/sup -2/ and 5.0 kwh/kg H/sub 2/O at 0.5 A cm/sup -2/ current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H/sub 2/O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values.

Ramey, D.W.; Petek, M.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.; Ramey, J.; Sampson, C.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microbial electrolysis cells: hydrogen production from glycerol and alternative cathode materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are promising systems for producing sustainable energy while treating organic waste. MECs contain exoelectrogenic bacteria that produce hydrogen from organic matter (more)

Selembo, Priscilla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ultrasound-Assisted Electrolysis in NaOH Solution for Hydrogen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results suggest that ultrasound assisted water electrolysis can have potential in energy savings for hydrogen production. Proceedings Inclusion? Planned: A...

115

Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production  

SciTech Connect

The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 1, 2012 May 1, 2012 CX-008288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Appliance Testing and Evaluation Center in Morgantown CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008287: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008286: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008285: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.22

117

Author's personal copy Synergistic roles of off-peak electrolysis and thermochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Synergistic roles of off-peak electrolysis and thermochemical production, but electrolysis can take advantage of low electricity prices during off-peak hours, as well as intermittent and de million tonnes per year by 2023. In Alberta alone, oil sands development is requiring huge quantities

Naterer, Greg F.

118

Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

658 * July 2012 658 * July 2012 Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services Project: Renewable Electrolysis Integrated System Development and Testing NREL Team: Kevin Harrison, Marc Mann, Danny Terlip, and Mike Peters Accomplishment: NREL operated both commercially available low-temperature electrolyzer technologies (PEM and alkaline) to evaluate their response to commands to increase and decrease stack power that shorten frequency disturbances on an alternating current (AC) mini-grid (Figure 1). Results show that both the PEM and alkaline electrolyzers are capable of adding or removing stack power to provide sub-second response that reduced the duration of frequency disturbances. Context: Management of distributed power systems is expected to become more commonplace as grids and devices

119

DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL's test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. This model is under continued development. It shows that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, within the electrolyte. The chemical potential within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just under the oxygen electrode (anode)/electrolyte interface, leading to electrode delamination. This theory is being further refined and tested by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte.

M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. Virkar

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Generating Hydrogen through Water Electrolysis using Concentrator Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be an important element in reducing global climate change if the feedstock and process to produce the hydrogen are carbon free. Using nuclear energy to power a high temperature water electrolysis process meets these constraints while another uses heat and electricity from solar electric concentrators. Nuclear researchers have estimated the cost of hydrogen generated in this fashion and we will compare their estimates with those we have made for generating hydrogen using electricity and waste heat from a dish concentrator photovoltaic system. The conclusion is that the costs are comparable and low enough to compete with gasoline costs in the not too distant future.

McConnell, R.; Thompson, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory April 1, 2010 CX-001504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ocean Wind Energy Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9, A11 Date: 04012010 Location(s): Chapel...

123

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Waste Management Site) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10072011 Location(s): West Jordan, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology...

124

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Experiments CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09292010 Location(s): Hawaii Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 29, 2010 CX-004156:...

125

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11182009 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 17, 2009 CX-000312: Categorical...

126

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03032011 Location(s): Bozeman, Montana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 3, 2011 CX-005350: Categorical...

127

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 09132011 Location(s): Stairtown, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 13, 2011 CX-006755:...

128

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09102010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003885:...

129

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11082010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 8, 2010 CX-004408: Categorical...

130

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12112009 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-002608: Categorical...

131

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12112009 Location(s): Campbell County, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000429: Categorical...

132

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06282011 Location(s): Port Fourchon, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 28, 2011 CX-006117: Categorical...

133

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04132011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2011 CX-005607: Categorical...

134

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11182010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 18, 2010 CX-004476: Categorical...

135

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory November 19, 2010 CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thai Process for Heavy Oil CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11192010 Location(s): Laramie,...

136

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2010 CX-000726: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Integrated Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Technology: A Near-Zero Emissions Pathway CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

137

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amine Absorbent CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, A14 Date: 08162010 Location(s): San Francisco, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory...

138

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Technology Laboratory May 10, 2010 CX-002358: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05102010 Location(s): Grand...

139

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory April 11, 2011 CX-005602: Categorical Exclusion Determination Jet Drilling With Energized Fluids CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7 Date: 04112011 Location(s):...

140

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory August 8, 2013 CX-010806: Categorical Exclusion Determination 12-Volt Start Stop Battery Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08082013 Location(s):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination United States-China Advanced Coal Technologies Consortium - University of Kentucky CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 02042011 Location(s):...

142

Results Of Recent High Temperature Co-Electrolysis Studies At The Idaho National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past several years, the Idaho National Laboratory and Ceramatec, Inc. have been studying the feasibility of high temperature solid oxide electrolysis for large-scale, nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Parallel to this effort, the INL and Ceramatec have been researching high temperature solid oxide co-electrolysis of steam/CO2 mixtures to produce syngas, the raw material for synthetic fuels production. When powered by nuclear energy, high temperature co-electrolysis offers a carbon-neutral means of syngas production while consuming CO2. The INL has been conducting experiments to characterize the electrochemical performance of co-electrolysis, as well as validate INL-developed computer models. An inline methanation reactor has also been tested to study direct methane production from co-electrolysis products. Testing to date indicate that high temperature steam electrolysis cells perform equally well under co-electrolysis conditions. Process model predictions compare well with measurements for outlet product compositions. The process appears to be a promising technique for large-scale syngas production.

C. M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

G. K. Housley; J.E. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

146

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

147

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

148

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

149

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

150

Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable oxygen standards and practices for minimum safety requirements. A summary of operational hazards, along with oxygen safety and emergency procedures, are provided.

Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Operating high temperature (1000/sup 0/C) electrolysis demonstration unit  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the BNL Fusion Synfuel Demonstration Program has been the successful construction and demonstration of a 100-W electrically-heated, high-temperature electrolysis unit operating at a temperature of 1000/sup 0/C. The high-temperature electrolyzer demonstration unit consists of 34 yttria-stabilized zirconia tubes contained in a 15-cm (od), 30-cm long INCONEL pressure vessel. The tubes are 25-cm long (active length), 0.64-cm (od), and coated on the inside with platinum to form the oxygen electrode and coated on the outside with nickel to form the hydrogen electrode. The 1000/sup 0/C steam is raised by electrically heating water. The system is designed to produce approx. 6 cc/s of hydrogen.

Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2011 13, 2011 CX-007475: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina Fuel Monitoring Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory December 13, 2011 CX-007474: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory December 12, 2011 CX-007476: Categorical Exclusion Determination CEDF - Renewable Energy Program CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory December 9, 2011 CX-007487: Categorical Exclusion Determination City of Las Vegas Electric Vehicle Program CX(s) Applied: B5.23

153

Electrolysis of Molten Iron Oxide with an Iridium Anode: The Role of Electrolyte Basicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is a carbon-free, electrochemical technique to decompose a metal oxide directly into liquid metal and oxygen gas. From an environmental perspective what makes MOE attractive is its ability ...

Kim, Hojong

154

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis: Demonstration of Improved Long-Term Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-term performance is an ongoing issue for hydrogen production based on high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE). For commercial deployment, solid-oxide electrolysis stacks must achieve high performance with long-term degradation rates of {approx}0.5%/1000 hours or lower. Significant progress has been achieved toward this goal over the past few years. This paper will provide details of progress achieved under the Idaho National Laboratory high temperature electrolysis research program. Recent long-term stack tests have achieved high initial performance with degradation rates less than 5%/khr. These tests utilize internally manifolded stacks with electrode-supported cells. The cell material sets are optimized for the electrolysis mode of operation. Details of the cells and stacks will be provided along with details of the test apparatus, procedures, and results.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R. C. O'Brien; G. Tao

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Preparation of Solar Grade Silicon Precursor by Electrolysis SiO2 in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Al-Si alloy, a precursor of solar grade silicon, was prepared by direct electrolysis in cryolite molten salt at 950 oC using high purity silica as...

156

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

157

Hydrogen generation process. Final report. [Hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical process based on electrolysis of sulfurous acid  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic feasibility of a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical hydrogen generation process based on the electrolysis of sulfurous acid was assessed. The experimental studies performed were concentrated on those areas important to the success of the process. These included the electrolysis, acid concentration, and sulfur trioxide reduction steps. Engineering and economic studies on the system were also performed to assess its potential for ultimate utilization and to provide information of value in planning the future course of the program.

Farbman, G.H.; Koump, V.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple phase boundary) Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte.

M.S. Sohal; J.E. O'Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

3D CFD Model of a Tubular Porous-Metal Supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently there is strong interest in the large-scale production of hydrogen as an energy carrier for the non-electrical market [1, 2, and 3]. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, with no consumption of fossil fuels, no production of greenhouse gases, and no other forms of air pollution. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%. A research program is under way at the INL to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. The future SOEC market includes the 1200MW GEN4 reactor which has projected 40-50% efficiency, 400 tones H2 production per day (at 5kg H2/car/300 mile day this corresponds to 80,000 cars/day). DOE is planning for 26GW of nuclear hydrogen production by 2025.

G.L. Hawkes; B.D. Hawkes; M.S. Sohal; P.T. Torgerson; T. Armstrong; M.C. Williams

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

162

High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results  

SciTech Connect

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this report. Results of initial testing showed the expected increase in open-cell voltage associated with elevated pressure. However, stack performance in terms of area-specific resistance was enhanced at elevated pressure due to better gas diffusion through the porous electrodes of the cells. Some issues such as cracked cells and seals were encountered during testing. Full resolution of these issues will require additional testing to identify the optimum test configurations and protocols.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

Manohar Motwani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-003766: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of High Rate Coating Technology for Low Cost Electrochemical Dynamic Windows CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Berkeley, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 3, 2010 CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ramgen Supersonic Shock Wave Compression and Engine Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Redmond, Washington Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 3, 2010 CX-003759: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geological Sequestration Fundamental Research Lab Move CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

165

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 13, 2010 January 13, 2010 CX-000726: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Integrated Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Technology: A Near-Zero Emissions Pathway CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/13/2010 Location(s): Birmingham, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 13, 2010 CX-000727: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Integrated Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Technology: A Near-Zero Emissions Pathway CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/13/2010 Location(s): Bridgewater, New Jersey Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 13, 2010 CX-000728: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Integrated Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Technology: A Near-Zero Emissions Pathway CX(s) Applied: A9

166

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 9, 2011 September 9, 2011 CX-006745: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Coal Conference CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/09/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 8, 2011 CX-006742: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh - Replace 25 Kilovolt Air Switch 920 Area CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/08/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 8, 2011 CX-006741: Categorical Exclusion Determination Information Technology Hub Relocation CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 09/08/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 8, 2011

167

Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800-900C, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10 x 16 skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective.

Schenewerk, William Ernest [self, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Performance Assessment of Single Electrode-Supported Solid Oxide Cells Operating in the Steam Electrolysis Mode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm{sup 2} per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes ({approx}10 {mu}m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes ({approx}1400 {mu}m thick), and modified LSM or LSCF air-side electrodes ({approx}90 {mu}m thick). The purpose of the present study is to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of voltage-current (VI) sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-term testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode. Results generally indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of an improved single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; N. Petigny

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Parametric Study Of Large-Scale Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Co-Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a largescale high-temperature co-electrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The co-electrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the Honeywell UniSim systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flow sheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard UniSim component, a custom one-dimensional co-electrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall UniSim process flow sheet. The one dimensional co-electrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the gas shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of co-electrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides); mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the UniSim flow sheet model for a 300 MW co-electrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the overall process, from production through utilization, would be climate neutral.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Process Model for the Production of Hydrogen Using High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature electrolysis (HTE) involves the splitting of stream into hydrogen and oxygen at high temperatures. The primary advantage of HTE over conventional low temperature electrolysis is that considerably higher hydrogen production efficiencies can be achieved. Performing the electrolysis process at high temperatures results in more favorable thermodynamics for electrolysis, more efficient production of electricity, and allows direct use of process heat to generate steam. This paper presents the results of process analyses performed to evaluate the hydrogen production efficiencies of an HTE plant coupled to a 600 MWt Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) that supplies both the electricity and process heat needed to drive the process. The MHR operates with a coolant outlet temperature of 950 C. Approximately 87% of the high-temperature heat is used to generate electricity at high efficiency using a direct, Brayton-cycle power conversion system. The remaining high-temperature heat is used to generate a superheated steam / hydrogen mixture that is supplied to the electrolyzers. The analyses were performed using the HYSYS process modeling software. The model used to perform the analyses consisted of three loops; a primary high temperature helium loop, a secondary helium loop and the HTE process loop. The detailed model included realistic representations of all major components in the system, including pumps, compressors, heat exchange equipment, and the electrolysis stack. The design of the hydrogen production process loop also included a steam-sweep gas system to remove oxygen from the electrolysis stack so that it can be recovered and used for other applications. Results of the process analyses showed that hydrogen production efficiencies in the range of 45% to 50% are achievable with this system.

M. G. Mc Kellar; E. A. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2012 23, 2012 CX-008929: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fundamental Investigations and Rational Design of Durable, High-Performance Cathode Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2012 CX-008928: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Efficiency Molten-Bed Oxy-Coal Combustion with Low Flue Gas Recirculation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 22, 2012 CX-008930: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Clean Cities Transportation Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 21, 2012 CX-008931: Categorical Exclusion Determination

173

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-002250: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/12/2010 Location(s): Southlake, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 12, 2010 CX-002249: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/12/2010 Location(s): Southlake, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 12, 2010 CX-002248: Categorical Exclusion Determination Competitive Renewable Grants Program - Claflin University Solar Thermal CX(s) Applied: A1, B1.5, B5.1 Date: 05/12/2010 Location(s): Orangeburg, South Carolina

174

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2012 20, 2012 CX-008446: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/20/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 20, 2012 CX-008445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/20/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 19, 2012 CX-008450: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 93 Heat Exchanger Removal at National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.31 Date: 06/19/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 19, 2012 CX-008449: Categorical Exclusion Determination

175

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 27, 2012 April 27, 2012 CX-008292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas CX(s) Applied: A11 Date: 04/27/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008307: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Reverse-Circulation Primary Cementing CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008306: Categorical Exclusion Determination

176

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 5, 2011 December 5, 2011 CX-007500: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/05/2011 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2011 CX-007063: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Incentive Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 10/19/2011 Location(s): Windsor, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2011 CX-007065: Categorical Exclusion Determination Slipstream Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel Amine-Based Post-Combustion Technology for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/18/2011 Location(s): Wilsonville, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

177

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2011 24, 2011 CX-005319: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alternative Fuel/Advanced Vehicle Technology - City of Raleigh CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Raleigh, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 24, 2011 CX-005318: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alternative Fuel/Advanced Vehicle Technology - North Carolina State University CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 24, 2011 CX-005317: Categorical Exclusion Determination University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), District Energy Service Modifications CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/24/2011

178

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2013 August 14, 2013 CX-010787: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fire Loop Soil Excavation CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B6.1 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 14, 2013 CX-010786: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 14, 2013 CX-010791: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 14, 2013 CX-010792: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega

179

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-009374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a Carbon Dioxide Chemical Sensor for Downhole Carbon Dioxide Monitoring in Carbon Sequestration CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2012 CX-009373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2012 CX-009372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

180

THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR THERMAL WATER SPLITTING PROCESSES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on thermal water splitting processes is presented. Results of the analysis show that the overall efficiency of any thermal water splitting process operating between two temperature limits is proportional to the Carnot efficiency. Implications of thermodynamic efficiency limits and the impacts of loss mechanisms and operating conditions are discussed as they pertain specifically to hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis. Overall system performance predictions are also presented for high-temperature electrolysis plants powered by three different advanced nuclear reactor types, over their respective operating temperature ranges.

J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Thermal-fluid and electrochemical modeling and performance study of a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell : analysis on SOEC resistances, size, and inlet flow conditions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory researchers are analyzing the electrochemical and thermal-fluid behavior of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for high temperature steam electrolysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The major challenges facing commercialization of steam electrolysis technology are related to efficiency, cost, and durability of the SOECs. The goal of this effort is to guide the design and optimization of performance for high temperature electrolysis (HTE) systems. An SOEC module developed by FLUENT Inc. as part of their general CFD code was used for the SOEC analysis by INL. ANL has developed an independent SOEC model that combines the governing electrochemical mechanisms based on first principals to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the operation of SOECs. The ANL model was embedded into the commercial STAR-CD CFD software, and is being used for the analysis of SOECs by ANL. The FY06 analysis performed by ANL and reported here covered the influence of electrochemical properties, SOEC component resistances and their contributing factors, SOEC size and inlet flow conditions, and SOEC flow configurations on the efficiency and expected durability of these systems. Some of the important findings from the ANL analysis are: (1) Increasing the inlet mass flux while going to larger cells can be a compromise to overcome increasing thermal and current density gradients while increasing the cell size. This approach could be beneficial for the economics of the SOECs; (2) The presence of excess hydrogen at the SOEC inlet to avoid Ni degradation can result in a sizeable decrease in the process efficiency; (3) A parallel-flow geometry for SOEC operation (if such a thing be achieved without sealing problems) yields smaller temperature gradients and current density gradients across the cell, which is favorable for the durability of the cells; (4) Contact resistances can significantly influence the total cell resistance and cell temperatures over a large range of operating potentials. Thus it is important to identify and avoid SOEC stack conditions leading to such high resistances due to poor contacts.

Yildiz, B.; Smith, J.; Sofu, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: SINGLE CELL TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOECs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus has been developed for single cell and small stack tests from different vendors. Single cells from Ceramatec Inc. show improved durability compared to our previous stack tests. Single cells from Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) demonstrate low degradation both in fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Single cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain) show stable performance in fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Electrolyte-electrode delamination is found to have significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the microstructure help to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements are performed during the tests to characterize the cell performance and degradation.

X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electrolysis of neodymium oxide. Final report for the period August 19, 1991 through February 28, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an electrolytic process for the continuous and economic production of neodymium alloys from neodymium oxide. The electrolysis of neodymium oxide continued to show promise for implementation as a low-cost process to produce high- quality neodymium or neodymium-iron alloy.

Keller, R.; Larimer, K.T.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2009 7, 2009 CX-000411: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiber Containing Sweep Fluids for Ultra Deepwater Drilling Applications CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Norman, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 17, 2009 CX-000410: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Riserless Intervention System CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 16, 2009 CX-000375: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydrogen Separation for Clean Coal CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/16/2009 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 15, 2009 CX-000464: Categorical Exclusion Determination

186

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2013 May 17, 2013 CX-010279: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clemson University's Synchrophasor Education Engineering Program CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/17/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 17, 2013 CX-010278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Collaborative Industry-Academic Synchrophasor Engineering Program CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/17/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2013 CX-010282: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Temperature Nitrous Oxide Storage and Reduction Using Engineered Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2013 CX-010281: Categorical Exclusion Determination

187

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 CX-009271: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Governors Association Energy Project - Phase II CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/10/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2012 CX-009270: Categorical Exclusion Determination Basin-Scale Produced Water Management Tools and Options CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/10/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012 CX-009290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interagency Study on the Implementation of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering... CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012 CX-009289: Categorical Exclusion Determination

188

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 28, 2010 June 28, 2010 CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program (Summary Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 06/28/2010 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 25, 2010 CX-002795: Categorical Exclusion Determination Market Transformation and Technology Deployment - Renewable Energy Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/25/2010 Location(s): Perkinston, Mississippi Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 25, 2010 CX-002794: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Implementation of A123's Community Energy Storage (CES) System for Grid Support CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B5.1 Date: 06/25/2010 Location(s): Detroit, Michigan

189

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 2012 25, 2012 CX-008305: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Retail Biofuel Infrastructure Supporting I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.22 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.23 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2012 CX-008302: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement

190

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2011 18, 2011 CX-005626: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina Green Business Fund ? Kyma Technologies CX(s) Applied: A1, B1.4, B1.5, B5.1 Date: 04/18/2011 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 18, 2011 CX-005625: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grants for State-Sponsored Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects - New Jersey Transit Solar CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/18/2011 Location(s): Kearny, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 15, 2011 CX-005629: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina Green Business Fund ? Storms Farms CX(s) Applied: A1, B1.15, B4.11, B5.1 Date: 04/15/2011

191

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-002514: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Clean Energy Property Rebate Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/28/2010 Location(s): Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 28, 2010 CX-002513: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/28/2010 Location(s): Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 28, 2010 CX-002511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rhode Island Green Public Buildings Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/28/2010 Location(s): Rhode Island Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 28, 2010

192

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2010 10, 2010 CX-003879: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003878: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Melvindale, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Des Plaines, Illinois Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

193

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2011 29, 2011 CX-005666: Categorical Exclusion Determination DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Marrow, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 29, 2011 CX-005664: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Testing of Compact Heat Exchange Reactors (CHER) for Synthesis of Liquid Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 29, 2011 CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia

194

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 3, 2013 June 3, 2013 CX-010470: Categorical Exclusion Determination Boulder Smart Grid City - Plug-In Electric Hybrid CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.16 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 3, 2013 CX-010468: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of High Capacity Cells for Electric Vehicle Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 3, 2013 CX-010467: Categorical Exclusion Determination Metal Oxide/Nitride Heterostructured Nanowire Arrays for Ultra-Sensitive and Selective Sensors CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Connecticut Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 31, 2013 CX-010478: Categorical Exclusion Determination

195

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-008473: Categorical Exclusion Determination Effect of Climate Variability & Change in Hurricane Activity in the North Atlantic CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/07/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 7, 2012 CX-008472: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 06/07/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 4, 2012 CX-008482: Categorical Exclusion Determination Composite Riser for Ultra-Deepwater High Pressure Wells CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 4, 2012 CX-008480: Categorical Exclusion Determination Composite Riser for Ultra-Deepwater High Pressure Wells

196

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013 April 25, 2013 CX-010181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 26 Air Handlers and In-Line Return Fans Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.22, B.1.31 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2013 CX-010180: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Universal Combustion Model to Predict Premixed and Non-Premixed Turbulent Flames in Compression CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Other Location Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 25, 2013 CX-010179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling and Experimental Studies of Controllable Cavity Turbulent Jet Ignition CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

197

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 10, 2012 January 10, 2012 CX-007615: Categorical Exclusion Determination Henderson Family Young Mens Christian Association CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.2 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory January 10, 2012 CX-007614: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Ultra Lean Burn Powertrain CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory January 10, 2012 CX-007613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Ultra Lean Burn Powertrain CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory January 10, 2012 CX-007612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geological Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source

198

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2011 11, 2011 CX-005223: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/11/2011 Location(s): Raleigh, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 11, 2011 CX-005222: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/11/2011 Location(s): Youngsville, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 11, 2011 CX-005229: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Testing and Diagnostics of Radial-Jet Well-Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Reserve from Marginal Reserves CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/11/2011 Location(s): Socorro, New Mexico Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

199

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-004409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Petroleum Processing Efficiency Improvement CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 8, 2010 CX-004408: Categorical Exclusion Determination ArmorBelt Single Point Gas Lift System for Stripper Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Haskell County, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 8, 2010 CX-004407: Categorical Exclusion Determination ArmorBelt Single Point Gas Lift System for Stripper Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Pittsburg County, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 8, 2010 CX-004406: Categorical Exclusion Determination

200

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 CX-006051: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 06/07/2011 Location(s): Omaha, Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 6, 2011 CX-006055: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation and Abandonment of Monitoring Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B6.1 Date: 06/06/2011 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 4, 2011 CX-005949: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region- TerraTek CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/04/2011 Location(s): Salt Lake City, Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2013 , 2013 CX-010816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Turbulent Combustion and Emissions in Advanced Gas... CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/01/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 1, 2013 CX-010815: Categorical Exclusion Determination Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Turbulent Combustion and Emissions in Advanced Gas... CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/01/2013 Location(s): Indiana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 30, 2013 CX-010826: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Flow and Heat Transfer Inside Lean Pre-Mixed Combustor Systems under Reacting Flow Conditions CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/30/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

202

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2013 28, 2013 CX-010899: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pittsburgh Building 65 and Building 74 Loading Dock Railing Project CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.3 Date: 06/28/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 27, 2013 CX-010897: Categorical Exclusion Determination Data Mining and Playback of Hybrid Synchrophasor Data for Research and Education CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 27, 2013 CX-010896: Categorical Exclusion Determination California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 27, 2013

203

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2011 28, 2011 CX-006119: Categorical Exclusion Determination Autonomous Inspection of Subsea Facilities (Phase II) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Port Fourchon, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 28, 2011 CX-006117: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flooring Improvements CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.5 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 23, 2011 CX-006129: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optical Sensors Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/23/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 23, 2011 CX-006127: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) -

204

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2010 4, 2010 CX-002648: Categorical Exclusion Determination Surface Force Measurements Between Hydrophobic Surfaces CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/04/2010 Location(s): Blacksburg, Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 4, 2010 CX-002647: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Biochemical Techniques for the Extraction of Mercury from Waste Streams Containing Coal CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/04/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 4, 2010 CX-002646: Categorical Exclusion Determination Polymer Nanocomposites for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/04/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

205

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2011 20, 2011 CX-007453: Categorical Exclusion Determination Paving the Way with Propane: The AutoGas Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory December 20, 2011 CX-007452: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah Expansion of Alternative Fueling Infrastructure - Electric Charging Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory December 20, 2011 CX-007451: Categorical Exclusion Determination Commuter Services Compressed Natural Gas Station CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.22 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory December 20, 2011 CX-007450: Categorical Exclusion Determination

206

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 CX-005342: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Impalement Protection Over Existing Pointed Air Terminals at National Energy Technology Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 1, 2011 CX-005341: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance Coal-Based Systems - FuelCell Energy CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Alberta, Canada Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 1, 2011 CX-005340: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Greene, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

207

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2011 3, 2011 CX-006451: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research and Development of an Advanced Low Temperature Heat Recovery Absorption Chiller CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/03/2011 Location(s): Park Forest, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 3, 2011 CX-006448: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 08/03/2011 Location(s): Knightdale, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 3, 2011 CX-006446: Categorical Exclusion Determination DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 08/03/2011 Location(s): Morrow, Georgia

208

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27, 2010 27, 2010 CX-002519: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Dallas, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 27, 2010 CX-002518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gadsden State Community College Green Operations Plan CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Gadsen, Alabama Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 27, 2010 CX-002517: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Dallas, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 27, 2010

209

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2013 30, 2013 CX-010824: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/30/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 30, 2013 CX-010823: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/30/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 30, 2013 CX-010822: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/30/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 30, 2013 CX-010821: Categorical Exclusion Determination

210

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 2012 25, 2012 CX-008442: Categorical Exclusion Determination Arizona Power Partners - Smart Grid Data Access from an Advanced Meter Reading Network CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 21, 2012 CX-008448: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hurricane Natural Gas Fueling Station CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.22 Date: 06/21/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 21, 2012 CX-008447: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Shift for Good Community Program (Switch 4 Good) CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, A9, A11 Date: 06/21/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 21, 2012 CX-008444: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smart Cementing Materials and Drilling Muds for Real Time Monitoring of

211

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2013 26, 2013 CX-010900: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pittsburgh Building 84 Gas Line Project CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 06/26/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 26, 2013 CX-010898: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minnesota ethanol-85 (E85) Fueling Network Expansion Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 06/26/2013 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 25, 2013 CX-010906: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research and Development (R&D) to Prepare and Characterize Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 20, 2013 CX-010441: Categorical Exclusion Determination

212

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 CX-009354: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Resolution 3D Laser Imaging for Inspection, Maintenance, Repair and Operations - Phase II CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 09/20/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 20, 2012 CX-009353: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Sustainability Workshop (Energy Regional Innovation Cluster) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/20/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 20, 2012 CX-009352: Categorical Exclusion Determination Navy Yard Network Operations Center (Energy Regional Innovation Cluster) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.2 Date: 09/20/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 19, 2012

213

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2010 5, 2010 CX-004434: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Incentive Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/05/2010 Location(s): Stonington, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 5, 2010 CX-004400: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Brick Support Plates on Connecting Bridges - Building 58 CX(s) Applied: B2.3 Date: 11/05/2010 Location(s): Allegheny City, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 5, 2010 CX-004399: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mississippi Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/05/2010 Location(s): Mississippi Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

214

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2010 23, 2010 CX-003463: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Newark, Delaware Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Visitor's Center Conference Room CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.15 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Morgantown,West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003461: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-Cost Wet Gas Compressor for Stripper Gas Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Cambridge, Massachusetts Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003460: Categorical Exclusion Determination

215

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Rock Sampling) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Unraveling the Role of Transport, Electrocatalysis, and Surface Science in the SOFC Cathode ORR CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 29, 2012 CX-008916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a Scientific Plan for a Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Washington, DC Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

216

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2012 30, 2012 CX-009314: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roof Replacement and Fall Arrest System Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.5 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009313: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Methane Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009312: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pecan Street Smart Grid Extension Service CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009311: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional

217

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-003837: Categorical Exclusion Determination Simulation of Shale Gas Reservoirs Incorporating the Correct Physics for Capillarity CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Norman, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 9, 2010 CX-003836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Large Project Impact Fund Competitive Grants - Colby College CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Waterville, Maine Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 9, 2010 CX-003835: Categorical Exclusion Determination SmartRam Piston Pump CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

218

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2010 4, 2010 CX-003817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Appliance Technology Evaluation Center (ATEC)- Modification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/14/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 14, 2010 CX-003816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: San Bernardino Associated Government Natural Gas Truck Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/14/2010 Location(s): Rancho Dominguez, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 14, 2010 CX-003815: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hardin County General Hospital Energy Efficiency Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/14/2010 Location(s): Rosiclare, Illinois

219

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 10, 2013 May 10, 2013 CX-010285: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advancing Low Temperature Combustion and Lean Burning Engines for Light-and Heavy-Duty Vehicles CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 10, 2013 CX-010284: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction of an Autogas Refueling Network CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 8, 2013 CX-010287: Categorical Exclusion Determination Understanding Nitrous Oxide Selective Catalytic Reduction Mechanism and Activity on Copper/Chabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 05/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

220

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2013 August 14, 2013 CX-010791: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 13, 2013 CX-010799: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Lead Paint Abatement & Repainting CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.5 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 13, 2013 CX-010800: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 12, 2013 CX-010802: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-002242: Categorical Exclusion Determination Micro-X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002241: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maximizing Alternative Fuel Use and Distribution in Colorado CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Aurora, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002240: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy Oil Viscous Pressure-Volume Temperature (PVT) - Houston CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002238: Categorical Exclusion Determination

222

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2012 6, 2012 CX-007948: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Start - Development of a National Liquid Propane Refueling Network CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 02/06/2012 Location(s): California, Arizona Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 1, 2012 CX-007952: Categorical Exclusion Determination Esperanza Roof Replacement CX(s) Applied: A1, B2.1, B5.1 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 1, 2012 CX-007951: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 1, 2012 CX-007950: Categorical Exclusion Determination Environmental Protection Agency - 5th International Environmentally

223

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2013 21, 2013 CX-010780: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/21/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 21, 2013 CX-010782: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Geomechanical Model for Gas Shales Based on Integration of Stress CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/21/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 20, 2013 CX-010783: Categorical Exclusion Determination Isothermal Compressed Air Energy Storage (ICAES) to Support Renewable Energy Integration - Phase Three CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08/20/2013 Location(s): New Hampshire Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

224

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2011 16, 2011 CX-006772: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Project: Phase II CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2011 Location(s): Fenton Township, Michigan Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 16, 2011 CX-006771: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Project: Phase II CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2011 Location(s): Brighton, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 16, 2011 CX-006770: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Project: Phase II CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/16/2011 Location(s): South Windsor, Connecticut Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

225

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2010 19, 2010 CX-004491: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 19, 2010 CX-004490: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah Expansion Compressed Natural Gas Refueling Sites CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Salt Lake City, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 19, 2010 CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thai Process for Heavy Oil CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

226

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2010 18, 2010 CX-004473: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Subsea Test Tree and Intervention Riser System CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 18, 2010 CX-004472: Categorical Exclusion Determination Creating Fractures Past Damage More Effectively With Less Environmental Damage CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 18, 2010 CX-004471: Categorical Exclusion Determination Creating Fractures Past Damage More Effectively With Less Environmental Damage CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/18/2010 Location(s): Bainbridge, Georgia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

227

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

362: Categorical Exclusion Determination 362: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy-Duty Liquified Natural Gas Drayage Truck Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000363: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Parcel Service (UPS) Ontario-Las Vegas Liquified Natural Gas Corridor CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Diamond Bar, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Socorro, New Mexico

228

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2009 10, 2009 CX-000336: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 10, 2009 CX-000335: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Asheville, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 10, 2009 CX-000334: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Raleigh, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

229

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 27, 2010 January 27, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

230

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 1, 2010 September 1, 2010 CX-003669: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Energy Works! Targeted Grants - Ecogy Pennsylvania Systems LLC- Longwood Garden Solar CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 09/01/2010 Location(s): Chester County, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 31, 2010 CX-003665: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Buildings Program - Hawthorne Hotel CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/31/2010 Location(s): Salem, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2010 CX-003664: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Sustainable Energy Research Laboratory CX(s) Applied: A11, B5.1 Date: 08/30/2010 Location(s): Lexington, Kentucky

231

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2010 16, 2010 CX-003449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency through Clean Combined Heat and Power (CHP) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.24, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 08/16/2010 Location(s): New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 16, 2010 CX-003448: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curriculum for Commissioning Energy Efficient Buildings CX(s) Applied: A1, A11 Date: 08/16/2010 Location(s): Portland, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 16, 2010 CX-003443: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture for Existing Post-Combustion Boilers by Self-Concentrating Amine Absorbent CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, A14

232

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2009 10, 2009 CX-000369: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Rockaway, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 10, 2009 CX-000368: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Albany, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 10, 2009 CX-000367: Categorical Exclusion Determination Long Island Regional Energy Collaborative CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Bay Shore, New York

233

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2010 29, 2010 CX-003327: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geological and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a Carbon Dioxide Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection CX(s) Applied: A8, A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 07/29/2010 Location(s): Fairbanks, Alaska Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 29, 2010 CX-003326: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Sequential Dual Evaporator Cycle for Refrigerators CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/29/2010 Location(s): Evansville, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 29, 2010 CX-003325: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Sequential Dual Evaporator Cycle for Refrigerators CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/29/2010 Location(s): Benton Harbor, Michigan

234

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 18, 2010 January 18, 2010 CX-000707: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida - Clean Fuel LLC (Shovel Ready Grant project) State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Lakeland, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 18, 2010 CX-000731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Equipment Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2010 CX-000704: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electric Drive Semiconductor Manufacturing Center - Advanced Battery Program CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): Youngwood, Pennsylvania

235

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-003795: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: San Bernardino Associated Government Natural Gas Truck Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Rancho Cucamonga, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2010 CX-003793: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Bastrop, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2010 CX-003790: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Taylor, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

236

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-003928: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 23, 2010 CX-003927: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets in Target Area (Kitsap County) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 23, 2010 CX-003926: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets and Stimulating Energy Efficiency Action CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

237

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2011 0, 2011 CX-007030: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chemistry of Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): Cambridge, Massachusetts Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 19, 2011 CX-007055: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silicon-Nanowire-Based Lithium-ion Batteries with Doubling Energy Density CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Pawcatuck, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 19, 2011 CX-007052: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silicon-Nanowire-Based Lithium-Ion Batteries with Doubling Energy Density CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Menlo Park, California

238

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 CX-006915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Compressed Natural Gas/Infrastructure Development CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Ogden, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 28, 2011 CX-006914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Kansas City, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 28, 2011 CX-006912: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Kansas City, Kansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 28, 2011 CX-006967: Categorical Exclusion Determination

239

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-001674: Categorical Exclusion Determination Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Program (Veolia) CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31, B2.5, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Veolia, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 22, 2010 CX-001672: Categorical Exclusion Determination Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Program (Miami) CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31, B2.5, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Miami, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 22, 2010 CX-001670: Categorical Exclusion Determination Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Program (Florida) CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31, B2.5, A11, B5.1

240

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2012 23, 2012 CX-008493: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liquid Carbon Dioxide Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal (LRC) Gasifiers CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Texas, Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 23, 2012 CX-008492: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 23, 2012 CX-008491: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/23/2012

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241

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2010 18, 2010 CX-001313: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grants for State-Sponsored Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects - New Jersey Transit Solar CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): Kearny, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 18, 2010 CX-001312: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Facilities Retrofit Program: Commissioning/Re-Commissioning and Metering Projects CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 18, 2010 CX-001315: Categorical Exclusion Determination Propane Truck Deployment CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, A9, B5.1 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): San Antonio, Texas

242

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2010 22, 2010 CX-001294: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drainage Truck Replacement Program in the South Coast Air Basin CX(s) Applied: A7, A9, A11 Date: 03/22/2010 Location(s): Los Angeles, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 22, 2010 CX-001297: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Start Propane Refueling, Vehicle Incentive and Outreach CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 03/22/2010 Location(s): Los Angeles, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 22, 2010 CX-001296: Categorical Exclusion Determination B2,3,5,17,19 and 36 Utility Meter Install CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.2 Date: 03/22/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia

243

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-000995: Categorical Exclusion Determination Craftmaster Manufacturing Inc. Combined Heat and Power Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02/08/2010 Location(s): Towanda, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 8, 2010 CX-000996: Categorical Exclusion Determination Divine Providence Hospital-Susquehanna Health Combined Heat and Power Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02/08/2010 Location(s): Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 7, 2010 CX-000766: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment - New Vehicle Purchase CX(s) Applied: A7, A11

244

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2010 6, 2010 CX-001813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars (Milford) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9 Date: 04/26/2010 Location(s): Milford, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 26, 2010 CX-001819: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars (Pontiac) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9 Date: 04/26/2010 Location(s): Pontiac, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 26, 2010 CX-001817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars (Warren) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9 Date: 04/26/2010 Location(s): Warren, Michigan

245

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-002341: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project - Bloomfield CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/11/2010 Location(s): Bloomfield, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 11, 2010 CX-002340: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project - Bridgeport CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/11/2010 Location(s): Bridgeport, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 11, 2010 CX-002338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project - Hartford CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/11/2010 Location(s): Hartford, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

246

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 31, 2011 March 31, 2011 CX-005483: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Biodiesel Foundation: Biodiesel Terminal Installation Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/31/2011 Location(s): Port Chester, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 31, 2011 CX-005482: Categorical Exclusion Determination Portable Raman Gas Composition Monitor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/31/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 29, 2011 CX-005481: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grant for State Sponsored Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects - Montclair State University Solar Farm CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/29/2011 Location(s): Montclair, New Jersey

247

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2011 14, 2011 CX-005037: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Test of Carbon Dioxide-Methane Method for Production of Gas Hydrate CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 01/14/2011 Location(s): North Slope Borough, Alaska Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 13, 2011 CX-004991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership (OATP) - Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/13/2011 Location(s): Hamilton, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 13, 2011 CX-004990: Categorical Exclusion Determination City of Cerritos, Photovoltaic System at the Cerritos Corporate Yard CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/13/2011 Location(s): Cerritos, California

248

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2010 24, 2010 CX-001214: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kilby Correctional Facility Boiler Replacement CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/24/2010 Location(s): Mount Meigs, Alabama Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 24, 2010 CX-001213: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decatur Work Release 10 Kilowatt Photovoltaic Array CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/24/2010 Location(s): Decatur, Alabama Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 24, 2010 CX-001206: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.13, B3.6, B4.4, B4.6, B5.1 Date: 03/24/2010 Location(s): Kern County, California Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy

249

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2010 , 2010 CX-001506: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Renewable Energy Grants CX(s) Applied: A11, B5.1 Date: 04/01/2010 Location(s): Conley, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 1, 2010 CX-001510: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Clean Energy Property Rebate CX(s) Applied: A11, B5.1 Date: 04/01/2010 Location(s): Valdosta, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 1, 2010 CX-001504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ocean Wind Energy Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9, A11 Date: 04/01/2010 Location(s): Chapel Hill, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

250

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2010 22, 2010 CX-000743: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 21, 2010 CX-000708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah All Inclusive Statewide Alternative Fuels Transportation and Education Outreach Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Murray, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 18, 2010 CX-000705: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida - Sunshine State Buildings Parking Lot Canopies - State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B2.1, B5.1

251

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 19, 2010 May 19, 2010 CX-002418: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Retrofits for State Correctional Facilities - Mobile Work Release/Work Center Facility Boiler CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31, B2.2, A9, B5.1 Date: 05/19/2010 Location(s): Pritchard, Alabama Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 19, 2010 CX-002289: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cavitation Pretreatment of a Flotation Feedstock for Enhanced Coal Recovery CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/19/2010 Location(s): Lexington, Kentucky Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 19, 2010 CX-002290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery - Advanced Underground Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 05/19/2010

252

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2011 13, 2011 CX-005817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Economic Development Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 05/13/2011 Location(s): Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 11, 2011 CX-005821: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative - Maryland Environmental Service II CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 05/11/2011 Location(s): Millersville, Maryland Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 11, 2011 CX-005820: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative - Maryland Environmental Service I CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/11/2011 Location(s): Millersville, Maryland

253

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 CX-006458: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Retail Biofuel Infrastructure Supporting I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 08/08/2011 Location(s): Detroit, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2011 CX-006456: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel Cell Program CX(s) Applied: A1, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 08/08/2011 Location(s): Weston, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 4, 2011 CX-006455: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Energy Development Authority Sustainable Business Recovery - City of Pittsburgh Natural Gas Refuse Trucks CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 08/04/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

254

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2011 3, 2011 CX-006156: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utility Metering Installation: B3, B14, B36 CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.2 Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2011 CX-006155: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wisconsin Clean Transportation Program/City of Milwaukee Compressed Natural Gas Infrastructure Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2011 CX-006154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery State Energy Program - Renewable Energy Incentives - Spencer Residence Open Loop Heat Pump System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/13/2011

255

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-001022: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of an Autogas Network (Lithia Springs) CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): Lithia Springs, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 1, 2010 CX-000957: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/01/2010 Location(s): Trenton, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 1, 2010 CX-001038: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 03/01/2010 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

256

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-004665: Categorical Exclusion Determination On-Site Controlled Environment Agriculture Production of Biomass and Biofuels CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Columbia, South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 8, 2010 CX-004664: Categorical Exclusion Determination On-Site Controlled Environment Agriculture Production of Biomass and Biofuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Tucson, Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 7, 2010 CX-004687: Categorical Exclusion Determination Centralized Cryptographic Key Management (CKMS) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.2 Date: 12/07/2010 Location(s): Oak Ridge, Tennessee

257

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2010 6, 2010 CX-002907: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Start Propane Refueling, Vehicle Incentive and Outreach (Summary Categorical Exclusion) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/06/2010 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 1, 2010 CX-002833: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B4.4, A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B5.1 Date: 07/01/2010 Location(s): Salem, Oregon Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 1, 2010 CX-002835: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Energy Harvest Mined Project Grants - Mains Dairy Farm Biogas Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/01/2010

258

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 CX-006042: Categorical Exclusion Determination Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2011 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 7, 2011 CX-006050: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 06/07/2011 Location(s): Kansas City, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 7, 2011 CX-006054: Categorical Exclusion Determination San Diego Gas & Electric Borrego Springs Microgrid Demo (Utility Integration of Distributed Energy Storage Systems) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.11, B4.4 Date: 06/07/2011 Location(s): Borrego Springs, California

259

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2010 0, 2010 CX-002626: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 06/10/2010 Location(s): Kansas City, Kansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 10, 2010 CX-002625: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania E85 Corridor Project - Sheetz Gas Station/Store #191 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/10/2010 Location(s): Carlisle, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 10, 2010 CX-002622: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania E85 Corridor Project - Sheetz Gas Station/Store #426 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/10/2010 Location(s): Carlisle, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

260

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-002510: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rhode Island Non-Utility Scale Renewable Energy Loan, Grants Initiative CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/28/2010 Location(s): Rhode Island Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 28, 2010 CX-002515: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Clean Energy Property Rebate Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/28/2010 Location(s): Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 27, 2010 CX-002522: Categorical Exclusion Determination Danada Solar Energy and Lighting Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Wheaton, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2010 16, 2010 CX-004689: Categorical Exclusion Determination Single-Molecule Imaging System Combined with Nano-Fluidic Chip to Understand Fluid Flow in Shale Gas CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/16/2010 Location(s): Golden, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 16, 2010 CX-004688: Categorical Exclusion Determination Single-Molecule Imaging System Combined with Nano-Fluidic Chip to Understand Fluid Flow in Shale Gas CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/16/2010 Location(s): Rolla, Missouri Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 16, 2010 CX-004755: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: Program Support/Administration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 12/16/2010 Location(s): Maine Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

262

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 27, 2010 December 27, 2010 CX-004778: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas using an In-Duct Scrubber CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 12/27/2010 Location(s): Point Comfort, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 27, 2010 CX-004777: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas using an In-Duct Scrubber CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 12/27/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 27, 2010 CX-004776: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas using an In-Duct Scrubber CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6

263

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2010 30, 2010 CX-004106: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Oil: Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery for America?s Small Oil Producers CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Socorro, New Mexico Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 30, 2010 CX-004105: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Resolution Three-Dimensional Laser Imaging for Inspection, Maintenance, Repair and Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 30, 2010 CX-004100: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Resolution Three-Dimensional Laser Imaging for Inspection, Maintenance, Repair and Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Boulder, Colorado

264

Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Energy Technology National Energy Technology Laboratory Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by National Energy Technology Laboratory. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010917: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 25, 2013 CX-010916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

266

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Vehicles Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2012 CX-008810: Categorical Exclusion Determination One Nevada Optimization of Microwave Telecommunication System CX(s) Applied: B1.19, B4.6 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): Nevada, Nevada Offices(s): Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program January 24, 2012 CX-007677: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 01/24/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

267

3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

3D CFD Model of a Multi-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis stack performance and steam electrolysis in the Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment. The model is made of 60 planar cells stacked on top of each other operated as Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC). Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc1. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Inlet and outlet plenum flow and distribution are considered. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC userdefined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation overpotential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered.

G.L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

3-D CFD MODEL OF A MULTI-CELL HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS STACK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis stack performance and steam electrolysis in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment. The model is made of 60 planar cells stacked on top of each other operated as Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC). Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. and tested at INL. Inlet and outlet plenum flow and distribution are considered. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density, and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Brian Hawkes

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program experimental and modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Performance of Single Electrode-Supported Cells Operating in the Electrolysis Mode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900C. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (~10 m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (~1400 m thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented.

J. E. O'Brien; G. K. Housley; D. G. Milobar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Durability of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be 71 US¢/kg H2, equivalent to 30 $/barrel crude oil using the higher heating value (HHV) [1]. The CO production cost was found to be 5.6 US¢/kg equivalent to 34 $/barrel crude oil using the HHV. Figure 1 of the SOEC technology i.e. issues such as a potential H2 production price as low as 0.71 US$/kg H2 using

273

Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy [Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft.

Carter, P H; Dittman, M D; Kare, J T; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Annual highlights of the energy technology programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the programs in the energy technology area during 1977. The objective, scope, significent accomplishments in 1977, principal activities planned for 1978, and publications are presented for each program. The Energy Storage and Conversion Division programs are in two broad areas: electrolysis-based hydrogen energy storage systems and related technologies and conservation in buildings and community systems. The Engineering Division programs include work in solar energy, fossil energy, and combustion technology areas. The Conservation Program Management Group has responsibilities of national scope involving R and D projects carried out in coordination with industry and universities. (MCW)

None

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2011 13, 2011 CX-006752: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility - Department of Energy Graduate Automotive Technology Education Center of Excellence CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 09/13/2011 Location(s): Columbus, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 13, 2011 CX-006751: Categorical Exclusion Determination University of Alabama at Birmingham Graduate Automotive Technology Education Center for Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing for Automotive Technologies CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 09/13/2011 Location(s): Birmingham, Alabama Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 13, 2011 CX-006748: Categorical Exclusion Determination

277

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 5, 2011 October 5, 2011 CX-007114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)/Infrastructure Development (Station Upgrade) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/05/2011 Location(s): West Jordan, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 5, 2011 CX-007112: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin - 3-Dimension Seismic Survey CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 10/05/2011 Location(s): Colleton County, South Carolina Office(s): Fossil Energy October 5, 2011 CX-007111: Categorical Exclusion Determination Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project (Iatan Generating Station) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/05/2011 Location(s): Platte County, Missouri

278

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 CX-006926: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Inverter Design CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Golden, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office September 28, 2011 CX-006921: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 28, 2011 CX-006919: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): University Park, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River

279

Progress In High Temperature Electrolysis At The Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The United States is considering the development of a domestic hydrogen-based energy economy. Hydrogen is of particular interest as a secondary energy carrier because it has the potential to be storable, transportable, environmentally benign, and useful in many chemical processes. Obviously, before a hydrogen economy can be implemented, an efficient and environmentally friendly means for large scale hydrogen production must be identified, proven, and developed. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, from a long-term perspective, methane reforming is not a viable process for large-scale production of hydrogen since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. The U. S. National Research Council has recommended the use of water-splitting technologies to produce hydrogen using energy derived from a nuclear reactor. For the past several years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been actively studying the use of solid oxide fuel cells in conjunction with nuclear power for large-scale, high-temperature, electrolytic hydrogen production.

Carl M. Stoots; James E.O' Brien; J. Steve Herring; Joseph Hartvigsen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Results of tritium experiments on ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium diffusers for application to fusion reactor fuel cleanup systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly have demonstrated that ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium alloy diffuser developed in Japan are possible components for a fusion reactor fuel cleanup system. Both components have been successfully operated with tritium for over a year. A failure of the first electrolysis cell was most likely the result of an over voltage on the ceramic. A simple circuit was developed to eliminate this mode of failure. The palladium diffusers tubes exhibited some degradation of mechanical properties as a result of the build up of helium from the tritium decay, after 450 days of operation with tritium, however the effects were not significant enough to affect the performance. New models of the diffuser and electrolysis cell, providing higher flow rates and more tritium compatible designs are currently being tested with tritium. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Underwater microdischarge in arranged microbubbles produced by electrolysis in electrolyte solution using fabric-type electrode  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed microdischarge was generated in microbubbles produced by electrolysis in an electrolyte solution without external gas feed by using a fabric-type electrode. The electrode structure not only allowed low-voltage ignition of the atmospheric-pressure discharge in hydrogen or oxygen containing microbubbles but also worked effectively in producing and holding the bubbles on its surface. The generation of reactive species was verified by optical emissions from the produced microplasmas, and their transport into the solution was monitored by the change in hydrogen concentration.

Sakai, Osamu; Kimura, Masaru; Tachibana, Kunihide [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Shirafuji, Tatsuru [Innovation Collaboration Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto-daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Stacks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created for detailed analysis of a high-temperature electrolysis stack (solid oxide fuel cells operated as electrolyzers). Inlet and outlet plenum flow distributions are discussed. Maldistribution of plena flow show deviations in per-cell operating conditions due to non-uniformity of species concentrations. Models have also been created to simulate experimental conditions and for code validation. Comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are discussed. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the electrolysis mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Annual highlights of the energy technology programs  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Storage and Conversion Division reports summary activities in the following: electrolysis-based hydrogen energy storage systems; an electrochemically regenerative hydrogen--halogen energy storage system; fuel cells (materials and electrolysis); high temperature water electrolysis; hydrogen energy storage systems for automobile propulsion; program planning for research related to energy conservation; New York Energy Office oil retrofit pilot program; burner-boiler/furnace testing; and proposed programs. The Engineering Division reports on solar-assisted heat pump systems; solar cooling subsystems and systems; solar demonstration project in Northeast U.S.; hardware simulators for tests of solar cooling/heating systems; fossil-energy programs; catalytic process for conversion of synthesis gas to methanol; coal-fired heater; coal/oil mixture combustion; rotating fluidized bed containing limestone for removal of sulfur from hot gases; improved oil and gas burners; residue and waste fuels; and proposed programs. The Conservation Program Management Group reports on conservation program management; space conditioning, diagnostics, and controls technology for conservation in buildings; and energy conservation in residential buildings. Funding for 1978 and 1979 for each program is indicated. (MCW)

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2010 31, 2010 CX-001453: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/31/2010 Location(s): Fort Worth, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 31, 2010 CX-001452: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Advanced Reservoir Characterization Techniques Date: 03/31/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 30, 2010 CX-001462: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Buildings - United Teen Equality Center CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B2.5, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 03/30/2010 Location(s): Lowell, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

285

TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. Cristescu et al.

286

Magnesium Technology 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... K-27: Measuring Heat Transfer during Twin Roll Casting of Metals ... of Mg-Ni Alloy by Consumable Cathode Molten Salt Electrolysis.

287

Electrolysis Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicle · 65% CO2 emissions reduction required from grid mix to equal distributed steam methane reformed

288

Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

An electrospray ion source and method of operation includes the application of pulsed voltage to prevent electrolysis of analytes with a low electrochemical potential. The electrospray ion source can include an emitter, a counter electrode, and a power supply. The emitter can include a liquid conduit, a primary working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, and a spray tip, where the liquid conduit and the working electrode are in liquid communication. The counter electrode can be proximate to, but separated from, the spray tip. The power system can supply voltage to the working electrode in the form of a pulse wave, where the pulse wave oscillates between at least an energized voltage and a relaxation voltage. The relaxation duration of the relaxation voltage can range from 1 millisecond to 35 milliseconds. The pulse duration of the energized voltage can be less than 1 millisecond and the frequency of the pulse wave can range from 30 to 800 Hz.

Kertesz, Vilmos (Knoxville, TN); Van Berkel, Gary (Clinton, TN)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Initial Operation of the High Temperature Electrolysis Integrated Laboratory Scale Experiment at INL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated laboratory scale, 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other integral issues. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation.

C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold: 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in their early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were modeled using the process code HYSYS; a three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. A high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production plant was coupled to the reactor and power conversion unit by means of an intermediate heat transport loop. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative heat exchanger size and turbomachinery work were estimated for the different working fluids. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. The helium working fluid produced the highest overall plant efficiency for the three-shaft and reheat cycle; however, the nitrogen-helium mixture produced similar efficiency with smaller component sizes. The CO2 working fluid is recommend in the combined cycle configuration.

Barner, Robert Buckner

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy ofGaP_{1-x}N_x Photocorroded as a Result of Hydrogen Productionthrough Water Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells produce hydrogen gas through the sunlight driven electrolysis of water. By extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and storing solar energy in the H-H bond, they offer a promising renewable energy technology. Addition of dilute amounts of nitrogen to III-V semiconductors has been shown to dramatically increase the stability of these materials for hydrogen production. In an effort to learn more about the origin of semiconductor photocorrosion in PEC cells, three samples of p-type GaP with varying levels of nitrogen content (0%, 0.2%, 2%) were photocorroded and examined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). GaPN samples were observed to be more efficient during the hydrogen production process than the pure GaP samples. Sample surfaces contained gallium oxides in the form of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ga(OH){sub 3} and phosphorus oxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}), as well as surface oxides from exposure to air. A significant shift in intensity from bulk to surface peaks dramatic nitrogen segregation to the surface during photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Further investigations, including using a scanning electron microscope to investigate sample topography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis for solution analyses, are under way to determine the mechanism for these changes.

Mayer, Marie A.; /Illinois U., Urbana /SLAC

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydrogen storage via metal hydrides for utility and automotive energy storage applications. [HCl electrolysis for H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently supported by ERDA to develop the technology and techniques for storing hydrogen via metal hydrides. Hydrogen is able to react with a wide variety of metal and metal alloy materials to form hydride compounds of hydrogen and metals. These compounds differ in stability--some are relatively unstable and can be readily formed and decomposed at low temperatures. The use of these systems for hydrogen storage involves the design of heat exchanger and mass transfer systems, i.e., removal of heat during the charging reaction and addition of heat during the discharge reaction. The most notable example of a metal hydride material is iron titanium which shows promise of being economical for a number of near term hydrogen storage applications. Recent work and progress on the development of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage connected with utility energy storage applications and natural gas supplementation are discussed and electric-to-electric storage system is described in some detail. A system of energy storage involving the electrolysis of hydrochloric acid is described which would utilize metal hydrides to store the hydrogen. In addition, the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in automotive systems is described.

Salzano, F J; Braun, C; Beaufrere, A; Srinivasan, S; Strickland, G; Reilly, J J; Waide, C

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 21, 2011 January 21, 2011 CX-005058: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Reservoir Contact for Increased Production and Recovery of Gas Shale Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/21/2011 Location(s): Salt Lake City, Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 20, 2011 CX-005057: Categorical Exclusion Determination Area of Interest 1, Carbon Dioxide at the Interface: Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/20/2011 Location(s): Eau Claire, Wisconsin Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 20, 2011 CX-005056: Categorical Exclusion Determination Area of Interest 1, Carbon Dioxide at the Interface: Nature and Dynamics of

297

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2010 12, 2010 CX-000782: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/12/2010 Location(s): Camden, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 12, 2010 CX-000781: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 02/12/2010 Location(s): New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 10, 2010 CX-000775: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama (Drill)

298

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 18, 2013 September 18, 2013 CX-010933: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Lithium (Li)-ion Cells for Electric Vehicles (EV) Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 18, 2013 CX-010932: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Lithium (Li)-ion Cells for Electric Vehicles (EV) Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2013 CX-010779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Predictive Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Modeling and Validation for High-Pressure Turbulent Flames and Flashback in Hydrogen-Enriched Gas

299

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2011 22, 2011 CX-005287: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure Project: Essex Company Resource Recovery Facility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): Newark, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 18, 2011 CX-005283: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Retail Biofuel Infrastructure Supporting I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/18/2011 Location(s): Miami, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 18, 2011 CX-005282: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Retail Biofuel Infrastructure Supporting I-75 Green

300

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2010 20, 2010 CX-003720: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act - Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Regional Demonstration Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 09/20/2010 Location(s): Los Angeles County, California Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 20, 2010 CX-003727: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets and Stimulating Energy Efficiency Action CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 09/20/2010 Location(s): Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 20, 2010 CX-003726: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Waste-to-Energy Project

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301

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2011 19, 2011 CX-005634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Hydrocarbon Samples and/or Qualitative/Quantitative Analysis of Hydrocarbon Mixtures CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 19, 2011 CX-005633: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fast Responding Voltage Regulator and Dynamic VAR Compensator with Direct Medium Voltage Connection CX(s) Applied: A1, A11, B3.6, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): San Jose, California Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 19, 2011 CX-005632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fast Responding Voltage Regulator and Dynamic VAR Compensator with Direct

302

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2011 3, 2011 CX-006170: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Way Energy Efficient Buildings Project for Non-Profit Facilities Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Huntington Woods, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2011 CX-006169: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Way Energy Efficient Buildings Project for Non-Profit Facilities CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Pontiac, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2011 CX-006168: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Way Energy Efficient Buildings Project for Non-Profit Facilities CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Wayne, Michigan

303

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2009 20, 2009 CX-000438: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Modular Curriculum for Training University Students in Industry Standard Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Methods CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8 Date: 11/20/2009 Location(s): Odessa, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 20, 2009 CX-000437: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Modular Curriculum for Training University Students in Industry Standard Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Methods CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8 Date: 11/20/2009 Location(s): Odessa, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 20, 2009 CX-000373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Measurements of 222 Radon, 220 Radon, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Natural Carbon Dioxide Fields in Wyoming: Monitoring, Verification, and

304

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-001158: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Bloomington, Indiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001153: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Wilmington) Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Wilmington, Delaware Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 11, 2010 CX-001152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processable Small-Molecule Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Niskayuna) CX(s) Applied: B3.6

305

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

421: Categorical Exclusion Determination 421: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000420: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000419: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide

306

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-002486: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Renewable Energy Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B4.6, A1, B4.11 Date: 06/03/2010 Location(s): Sunnyvale, California Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2, 2010 CX-002945: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Green Energy Works Targeted Grant - Native Energy Biogas Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B1.31, A9, B5.1 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Franklin County, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2, 2010 CX-002505: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Program for Municipalities, Schools, Hospitals, Public Colleges

307

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-003053: Categorical Exclusion Determination Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration Project (Only for University of Southern California's Portion of the Work) CX(s) Applied: A11, B3.6 Date: 07/19/2010 Location(s): Marina del Ray, California Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 19, 2010 CX-003054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficient/Comfortable Buildings through Multivariate Integrated Controls (ECoMIC) CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 07/19/2010 Location(s): Westchester, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 19, 2010 CX-003052: Categorical Exclusion Determination Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration Project (Only for General Electric Work in

308

3D CFD Electrochemical and Heat Transfer Model of an Integrated-Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in a new novel integrated planar porous-tube supported solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model is of several integrated planar cells attached to a ceramic support tube. This design is being evaluated with modeling at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

Grant Hawkes; James E. O'Brien

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and l BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

Tiernan, Joan E. (38 Clay Ct., Novato, CA 94947)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322C and 750C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Test Plan for Long-Term Operation of a Ten-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document defines a test plan for a long-term (2500 Hour) test of a ten-cell high-temperature electrolysis stack to be performed at INL during FY09 under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This test was originally planned for FY08, but was removed from our work scope as a result of the severe budget cuts in the FY08 NHI Program. The purpose of this test is to evaluate stack performance degradation over a relatively long time period and to attempt to identify some of the degradation mechanisms via post-test examination. This test will be performed using a planar ten-cell Ceramatec stack, with each cell having dimensions of 10 cm 10 cm. The specific makeup of the stack will be based on the results of a series of shorter duration ten-cell stack tests being performed during FY08, funded by NGNP. This series of tests was aimed at evaluating stack performance with different interconnect materials and coatings and with or without brazed edge rails. The best performing stack from the FY08 series, in which five different interconnect/coating/edge rail combinations were tested, will be selected for the FY09 long-term test described herein.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy Efficient New Metal Production Technology - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011... for Steel Production: Molten Oxide Electrolysis: Antoine Allanore1; Luis ... Intrinsic Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Magnetite Concentrate...

313

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 16, 2009 November 16, 2009 CX-000409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wireless Subsea Communications System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/16/2009 Location(s): Boston, Massachusetts Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 16, 2009 CX-000308: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut Revision 2 - Retrofit 9 State Buildings CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, B1.15, B1.23, B1.24, B1.31, B2.1, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 11/16/2009 Location(s): Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 16, 2009 CX-000435: Categorical Exclusion Determination Novel Oxygen Carriers for Coal-fueled Chemical Looping Combustion CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/16/2009 Location(s): Bowling Green, Kentucky

314

MHK Technologies/Floating anchored OTEC plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

anchored OTEC plant anchored OTEC plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Floating anchored OTEC plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization LAUSDEO Incorporated Technology Resource Click here OTEC Technology Type Click here OTEC - Closed Cycle Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Anchored floating OTEC plant Small volume above ocean surface so that device can avoid damage due to severe weather Water depth must exceed 600 meters Prefer to use power line to transmit electricity to shore facility Can use electrolysis to produce hydrogen and transport hydrogen to floating or shore facility Mooring Configuration The preferred mooring configuration is gravity base with three bottom weights The weights can be at depths up to 3000 meters

315

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Biofuels Biofuels Biotechnology and Medecine Biotechnology & Medicine Chemistry Developing World Energy Efficient Technologies Energy Environmental Technologies...

316

SPE water electrolysis technology development for large scale hydrogen production. Progress report No. 4, June 15, 1976--September 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Porous carbon fiber paper was selected as the cathode membrane and electrode assembly support based on over 1200 hr operational evaluation. Three potential anode supports are under test. All three appear technically satisfactory after 500 to 1200 hr operational evaluation on each. Optimization of molds and molding techniques for a foil backed ribbed carbon collector of bipolar design, including ribbed flow fields, manifolds, ports and sealing surfaces, is in process. Over 2800 hr demonstrated at 300/sup 0/F on platinum screened cell. Over 2200 hr demonstrated at 300/sup 0/F on cell with carbon cloth cathode current collector. Forty-eight hours screening tests of 56 different anode catalysts have been completed. A 500-hr life test program of 12 anode catalyst types which showed promise on the screening tests has been started. Attempts to stabilize RuO/sub x/ for use as an anode catalyst are being pursued. Low loaded cathodes on graphite substrates show performance to within 25 MV of baseline. Optimization of substrate thickness and fabrication procedures is continuing. Twenty-five low loaded anodes catalyst/substrate combinations have all shown poor performance stability with time. Continued development of the grafted TFS membrane has shown greatly improved physical characteristics and encouraging performance for samples in the 25 to 45 percent graft level range. In the cell and SPE optimization work, initial testing of cells with tandem (anion/cation monobed followed by cation only) deionizers show improved voltage invariance. Evaluation of a hydraulically loaded cell test fixture which eliminates gaskets and gives uniform cell compression was completed. Hydraulic fixtures are being factored into the low cost current collector and high temperature operation tasks.

1976-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

SPE water electrolysis technology development for large scale hydrogen production. Progress report No. 6, January 1, 1977--March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of the following studies is reported: low cost current collector development, high temperature operation, catalytic electrode development, low cost polymer development, evaluation of the effect of hydrogen enrichment on older gas pipelines, cell and SPE optimization, cell assembly design, stack assembly design, manufacturing process development, and system analysis and definition.

Not Available

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

318

System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322C and 750C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Demonstration and System Analysis of High Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Using SOFCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, an integrated laboratory scale (ILS), 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) facility has been developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other integral issues. Additionally, a reference process model of a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The reference plant design is driven by a 600 megawatt thermal high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.01106 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohmcm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.36 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation. The paper will also present the optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant which may be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

TEST RESULTS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM/CO2 CO-ELECTROLYSIS IN A 10-CELL STACK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature coelectrolysis experiments with CO2 / H2O mixtures were performed in a 10-cell planar solid oxide stack. Results indicated that stack apparent ASR values were shown not to vary significantly between pure steam electrolysis and steam / CO2 coelectrolysis values. Product gas compositions measured via an online micro gas chromatograph (GC) showed excellent agreement to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model developed for this study. Experimentally determined open cell potentials and thermal neutral voltages for coelectrolysis compared favorably to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis and energy balance model, also developed for this study.

James E. O'Brien; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Method for heavy-water extraction from non-electrolytic hydrogen streams using a combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange system  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for heavy-water extraction from nonelectrolytic hydrogen streams using a modified combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange-heavy water process (Cecehwp). The method comprises contacting feed water in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas originating partly from such nonelectrolytic hydrogen stream and partly from an electrolytic hydrogen stream so as to enrich the feed water with deuterium extracted from both the non-electrolytic and electrolytic hydrogen gas, and passing the deuterium enriched water to an electrolyzer wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed through the catalyst column.

Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.; Leroy, R.L.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and laminar flow conditions at an average detention time of six hours. Both the polyurethane foams and the foam regenerate solution are re-used. The treatment is a cost-effective process for waste-waters which are not treatable, or are not cost-effectively treatable, by conventional process series.

Tiernan, Joan E. (Novato, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Small Closed-Cycle Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange Test System for Water Detritiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

H. Boniface; S. Suppiah; K. Krishnaswamy; L. Rodrigo; J. Robinson; P. Kwon

326

cast shop technology i  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M.D. Hurd, L.J. Laviolette and M.E. Lewellyn. Mitigation of ... The Determination of the Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields in Aluminum Electrolysis [pp. 253-259

327

Commercial-Scale Performance Predictions for High-Temperature Electrolysis Plants Coupled to Three Advanced Reactor Types  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system analyses that have been developed to assess the hydrogen production performance of commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plants driven by three different advanced reactor power-cycle combinations: a high-temperature helium cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle, a supercritical CO2-cooled reactor coupled to a direct recompression cycle, and a sodium-cooled fast reactor coupled to a Rankine cycle. The system analyses were performed using UniSim software. The work described in this report represents a refinement of previous analyses in that the process flow diagrams include realistic representations of the three advanced reactors directly coupled to the power cycles and integrated with the high-temperature electrolysis process loops. In addition, this report includes parametric studies in which the performance of each HTE concept is determined over a wide range of operating conditions. Results of the study indicate that overall thermal-to- hydrogen production efficiencies (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) in the 45 - 50% range can be achieved at reasonable production rates with the high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept, 42 - 44% with the supercritical CO2-cooled reactor and about 33 - 34% with the sodium-cooled reactor.

M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Process Modeling Results of Bio-Syntrolysis: Converting Biomass to Liquid Fuel with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

A new process called Bio-Syntrolysis is being researched at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigating syngas production from renewable biomass that is assisted with high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE). The INL is the world leader in researching HTSE and has recently produced hydrogen from high temperature solid oxide cells running in the electrolysis mode setting several world records along the way. A high temperature (~800C) heat source is necessary to heat the steam as it goes into the electrolytic cells. Biomass provides the heat source and the carbon source for this process. Syngas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, can be used for the production of synthetic liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch processes. This concept, coupled with fossil-free electricity, provides a possible path to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and increased energy independence, without the major infrastructure shift that would be required for a purely hydrogen-based transportation system. Furthermore, since the carbon source is obtained from recyclable biomass, the entire concept is carbon-neutral

G. L. Hawkes; M. G. McKellar; R. Wood; M. M. Plum

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four origin, gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, status as a Vietnam-era veteran, or disability

332

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

333

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide for Direct Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850C in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Cell area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Herring, J. S.; Hartvigsen, J. J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Steam for the Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850C in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Prospects for hydrogen production by water electrolysis to be competitive with conventional methods. [Areas of research to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

With the impending unavailability of oil and natural gas, hydrogen will be produced on a large scale in the United States (1) from coal, or (2) by water electrolysis using electricity derived from nuclear or solar energy. In many parts of the world which lack fossil fuels, the latter will be the only possible method. The cost of purification of hydrogen produced from fossil fuels will increase its cost to about the same level as that of electrolytic hydrogen. When hydrogen is required in relatively small quantities too, the electrolytic method is advantageous. To minimize the cost of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis, it is necessary to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies. Areas of research, which will be necessary to achieve these goals are: (1) maximization of surface areas of electrodes; (2) use of thin electrolyte layers; (3) increase of operating temperature in alkaline water electrolysis cells to about 120-150/sup 0/C; (4) selection and evaluation of separator materials; (5) electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen electrode reaction; (6) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes; and (7) photoelectrochemical effects. The progress made to date and proposed studies on these topics are briefly dealt with in this paper. The General Electric Solid Polymer Water Electrolyzer and Teledyne Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells, both operating at about 120-150/sup 0/C, look mostpromising in achieving the goals of low capital cost and high energy efficiency. (auth)

Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Combined System of Monothermal Chemical Exchange Process with Electrolysis and Thermal Diffusion Process for Enriching Tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

Asashi Kitamoto; Katsuo Hasegawa; Takashi Masui

337

Tritium-Enrichment via CECE-Process with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HOT ELLY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

W. Keil; E. Erdle

338

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Renewable Electrolysis Integrated Systems Development and Testing - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kevin Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 384-7091 Email: Kevin.Harrison@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Contributors: Chris Ainscough and Michael Peters Subcontractor: Marc Mann, Spectrum Automation Controls, Arvada, CO Project Start Date: October 1, 2003 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Validate stack and system efficiency and contributing * sub-system performance of DOE-awarded advanced electrolysis systems Collaborate with industry to optimize and demonstrate *

340

Optimized Flow Sheet for a Reference Commercial-Scale Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from the development and optimization of a reference commercialscale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540 C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.176 10 6 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohmcm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 49.07% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.45 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. The information presented in this report is intended to establish an optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant so that parameters can be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; E. A. Harvego; J. S. Herring

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technology Search  

home \\ technologies \\ search. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: Software: Patents: Technology Search. ... Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, ...

342

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design.

343

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Webinar Archives 1 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars and state and regional initiatives webinars held in 2011 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2011: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis - Spotlight on Giner and Proton Science Magazine Article Highlight: Moving Towards Near Zero Platinum Fuel Cells I2CNER: An International Collaboration to Enable a Carbon-Neutral, Energy Economy Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration December 13, 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has launched a hydrogen storage materials database to collect and disseminate materials data and accelerate advanced materials research and development. Marni Lenahan of BCS Incorporated demonstrated the functionality of the database including accessing and extracting data, submitting new material property data for inclusion, and performing organized searches.

344

Technology Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security & Defense Homeland Security & Defense Information Technology & Communications Information Technology & Communications Sensors, Electronics &...

345

Webinars for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program, 2011  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Webinars presented in 2011: 1) Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration - EERE has launched a hydrogen storage materials database to collect and disseminate materials data and accelerate advanced materials research and development. Marni Lenahan of BCS Incorporated demonstrated the functionality of the database including accessing and extracting data, submitting new material property data for inclusion, and performing organized searches; 2) Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton - Available commercially, Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) electrolysis is a hydrogen-production technology that can enable a zero carbon footprint when used with renewable resources. Leaders in these research efforts, Monjid Hamdan of Giner Electrochemical Systems and Kathy Ayers of Proton Onsite discussed recent progress, as well as future scenarios for renewable hydrogen production by PEM electrolysis; 3) Science Magazine Article Highlight: Moving Towards Near Zero Platinum Fuel Cells - Dr. Piotr Zelenay of Los Alamos National Laboratory described his innovative work with a family of non-precious metal catalysts that approach the performance of platinum-based systems at a cost sustainable for high-power fuel cell applications. This strategy uses polyaniline as a precursor to a carbon-nitrogen template for high-temperature synthesis of catalysts incorporating iron and cobalt; 4) I2CNER: An International Collaboration to Enable a Carbon-Neutral, Energy Economy; 5) Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production - Dr. Tasios Melis of the University of California at Berkeley, a pre-eminent researcher in the field of Photobiological Hydrogen Production, provided an overview of his invention disclosing methods and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing the expression of the novel TLA1 gene, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae [copied from http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/webinar_archives_2011.html

346

CARBON TECHNOLOGY: Session V: Cathode - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECA (Electrically Calcined Anthracite) is the main raw material for the carbon part of the electrolysis cells. Demand for increased potlife and more efficient...

347

Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohmcm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how NREL operated both commercially available low-temperature electrolyzer technologies (PEM and alkaline) to evaluate their response to commands to increase and decrease stack power that shorten frequency disturbances on an alternating current (AC) mini-grid. Results show that both the PEM and alkaline electrolyzers are capable of adding or removing stack power to provide sub-second response that reduced the duration of frequency disturbances.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2009 4, 2009 CX-000332: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kentucky Revision 2 - Industrial Facility Retrofit Showcase CX(s) Applied: B1.4, B1.15, B1.22, B1.23, B1.24, B1.31, B2.1, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/04/2009 Location(s): Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 3, 2009 CX-000331: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kentucky Revision 2 - Commercial Office Building Retrofit Showcase CX(s) Applied: B1.4, B1.5, B1.15, B1.23, B1.24, B1.31, B2.1, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/03/2009 Location(s): Lexington, Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 2, 2009 CX-000330: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Virginia Revision 1 - Energy Efficiency in State Buildings:

350

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2009 6, 2009 CX-000305: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Kentucky Revision 1 - Green Bank Loan Program - School for Deaf CX(s) Applied: B1.4, B1.5, B1.15, B1.22, B1.24, B1.31, B2.1, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 11/06/2009 Location(s): Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 6, 2009 CX-000304: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Kentucky Revision 1 - Green Bank Loan Program - School for Blind CX(s) Applied: B1.4, B1.5, B1.15, B1.22, B1.24, B1.31, B2.1, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 11/06/2009 Location(s): Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

351

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

352

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

353

Faience Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

Nicholson, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

There are no technology records available that match the search query. Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords.

355

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

HYBRID SULFUR FLOWSHEETS USING PEM ELECTROLYSIS AND A BAYONET DECOMPOSITION REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design is presented for a Hybrid Sulfur process for the production of hydrogen using a high-temperature nuclear heat source to split water. The process combines proton exchange membrane-based SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer technology being developed at Savannah River National Laboratory with silicon carbide bayonet decomposition reactor technology being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Both are part of the US DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The flowsheet otherwise uses only proven chemical process components. Electrolyzer product is concentrated from 50 wt% sulfuric acid to 75 wt% via recuperative vacuum distillation. Pinch analysis is used to predict the high-temperature heat requirement for sulfuric acid decomposition. An Aspen Plus{trademark} model of the flowsheet indicates 340.3 kJ high-temperature heat, 75.5 kJ low-temperature heat, 1.31 kJ low-pressure steam, and 120.9 kJ electric power are consumed per mole of H{sub 2} product, giving an LHV efficiency of 35.3% (41.7% HHV efficiency) if electric power is available at a conversion efficiency of 45%.

Gorensek, M; William Summers, W

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test test Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Energy ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES Aerosol Sealing Aerosol Remote Sealing System Clog-free Atomizing and Spray Drying Nozzle Air-stable Nanomaterials for Efficient OLEDs Solvent Processed Nanotube Composites OLEDS with Air-stable Structured Electrodes APIs for Online Energy Saving Tools: Home Energy Saver and EnergyIQ Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost Dynamic Solar Glare Blocking System Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Electrochromic Windows with Multiple-Cavity Optical Bandpass Filter Electrochromic Window Technology Portfolio Universal Electrochromic Smart Window Coating

358

HYFIRE II: fusion/high-temperature electrolysis conceptual-design study. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

As in the previous HYFIRE design study, the current study focuses on coupling a Tokamak fusion reactor with a high-temperature blanket to a High-Temperature Electrolyzer (HTE) process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Scaling of the STARFIRE reactor to allow a blanket power to 6000 MW(th) is also assumed. The primary difference between the two studies is the maximum inlet steam temperature to the electrolyzer. This temperature is decreased from approx. 1300/sup 0/ to approx. 1150/sup 0/C, which is closer to the maximum projected temperature of the Westinghouse fuel cell design. The process flow conditions change but the basic design philosophy and approaches to process design remain the same as before. Westinghouse assisted in the study in the areas of systems design integration, plasma engineering, balance-of-plant design, and electrolyzer technology.

Fillo, J.A. (ed.)

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Integrated Operation of the INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

Carl Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

360

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

BSA 08-04: High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

362

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Receive Technology Updates. Get email notifications about new or improved technologies in your area of interest. Subscribe

363

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Biotechnology and Medicine DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS CANCER CANCER PROGNOSTICS 14-3-3 Sigma as a Biomarker of Basal Breast Cancer ANXA9: A Therapeutic Target and Predictive Marker for Early Detection of Aggressive Breast Cancer Biomarkers for Predicting Breast Cancer Patient Response to PARP Inhibitors Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Analysis Using Selected Gene Expression Comprehensive Prognostic Markers and Therapeutic Targets for Drug-Resistant Breast Cancers Diagnostic Test to Personalize Therapy Using Platinum-based Anticancer Drugs Early Detection of Metastatic Cancer Progenitor Cells

365

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

366

Electrolysis based hydrogen storage systems. Annual report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the period January 1, 1976 to December 31, 1976, on an ERDA-sponsored program aimed at improvement in the cost and efficiency of electrolytic hydrogen production and development of the technique of using metal hydrides for hydrogen storage for stationary and transportation applications. The work on electrolytic hydrogen production includes work on advanced barrier materials for alkaline cells, studies of nickel alloy based and oxide catalysts for oxygen evolution. Related work on the program involving the H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ electrochemical cell for energy storage is described. Work on hydrogen storage subsystems involving storage reservoir designs for the Hydrogen Technology Advanced-Component Test System (HYTACTS), engineering and metal hydride material test beds and tests of candidate container materials is presented. Progress on the development of new metal hydride materials and tailoring and testing of new alloy systems is summarized. This work emphasizes improvement in the initial activation step, high-cycle test of selected materials and the physical characteristics of cycled materials. The efforts on natural gas supplementation, hydrogen storage systems analysis and the project management of the ERDA Hydrogen Program by BNL are summarized.

Salzano, F J

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electrolysis based hydrogen storage system. Semiannual report, January 1--June 30, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was accomplished during the period January 1 to June 30, 1977 on an ERDA-sponsored program aimed at improving the cost and efficiency of electrolytic hydrogen production and at developing the technique of using metal-hydride hydrogen storage for stationary and transportation applications. The related work of organizations having subcontracts with BNL is included; and the effort on natural-gas supplementation, systems analysis, and project management of the ERDA Hydrogen Program by BNL are summarized. Work in the hydrogen production area includes hardware development and cell materials testing for both acid and alkaline water electrolyzers. Also reported is related work on development of the reversible H/sub 2/-Cl/sub 2/ electrochemical cell which is the key component in an electrical energy storage system proposed for utility use. In the area of Hydrogen Storage Subsystems, the progress is reported on solutions to the hydride expansion problem, design of the Hydrogen Technology Advanced Component Test System, design of two hydrogen reservoirs, improved Fe-Ti-based hydrides, and studies on the recovery of storage capacity following poisoning by impurities in the hydrogen.

Salzano, F.J.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Tools & Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Weprovide leadership for transforming workforce development through the power of technology. It develops corporate educational technology policy and enables the use of learning tools and...

369

Available Technologies  

The technologys subnanometer resolution is a result of superior ... Additional R&D will be required ... U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF SCIENCE ...

370

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

371

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Organization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contacts Organization Chart for the Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Technologies and Deployment, Technology Managers Advanced Combustion Engines, Technology...

372

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Information Technology Validation Search Search Help Technology Validation EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Technology Validation Printable Version Share this resource...

373

MHK Technologies/OMI Combined Energy System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OMI Combined Energy System OMI Combined Energy System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OMI Combined Energy System.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Motion International LLC OMI Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Combined Energy System CES consists of four sub system components a seawater wave pump a hydro turbine electric generator a reverse osmosis filtration unit and an electrolysis hydrogen generation unit The CES is designed to operate on a large offshore platform which is essentially a modified version of a standard modular offshore drilling unit The system produces potable water electricity and hydrogen which is delivered to shore through service piping and cabling The OMI WavePump is technically described as a mass displacement wave energy conversion device The patented seawater pump and heart of the CES is an innovative design which uses a small number of simple moving components for minimal maintenance and wear The hydro turbine electric generator is driven by the output of multiple WavePumps which provide a constant flow of high volume high pressure seawater

374

Development and Validation of a One-Dimensional Co-Electrolysis Model for Use in Large-Scale Process Modeling Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one-dimensional chemical equilibrium model has been developed for analysis of simultaneous high-temperature electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (coelectrolysis) for the direct production of syngas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. For adiabatic or specified-heat-transfer conditions, the electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. Alternately, for isothermal operation, it allows for determination of outlet composition, mean Nernst potential, operating voltage, electrolyzer power, and the isothermal heat requirement for specified inlet gas flow rates, operating temperature, current density and area-specific resistance. This model has been developed for incorporation into a system-analysis code from which the overall performance of large-scale coelectrolysis plants can be evaluated. The one-dimensional co-electrolysis model has been validated by comparison with results obtained from a 3-D computational fluid dynamics model and by comparison with experimental results.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; C. M. Stoots

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Chemistry - Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

376

Technology Analysis - Heavy Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the GPRA benefits estimates for EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program's heavy vehicle technology research activities. Argonne researchers develop the benefits analysis using four...

377

Available Technologies  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Thermal management for: microelectronic devices; solar cells and solar energy management systems ; refrigerators

378

Available Technologies  

Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. Monitoring and Imaging; Remediation; Modeling; Imaging & Lasers.

379

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use renewable wind and solar power to provide a local supplyGlatzmaier et al. , 1998 Solar Power-Tower Electrolysis 200PV Electrolysis n.s. 10 MW of solar power Small-Medium Grid-

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

past, particularly with regard to solar PV development andNear Term/Future NRC, 2004 Solar PV Electrolysis 1,267 kg/continued) Production Method Solar PV Electrolysis n.s. 10

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

382

Speaker biographies for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar titled Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis … Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Professional Bios - Kathy Ayers and Monjid Hamdan Professional Bios - Kathy Ayers and Monjid Hamdan Kathy Ayers, Director of Research, Proton Energy Systems Kathy Ayers is the Director of Research at Proton Energy Systems. She is responsible for developing the long term research direction for improvements in performance, reliability, and cost of Proton's electrolyzer cell stack as well as overseeing Proton's military and

383

Electrolysis High Temperature Hydrogen  

INL has developed a high-temperature process the utilizes solid oxide fuel cells that are operated in the electrolytic mode. The first process includes combining a high-temperature heat source (e.g. nuclear reactor) with a hydrogen production facility ...

384

Controlled-Potential Electrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Metals determined by controlled-potential coulometry...27 Silver Pt Ag + ?? Ag(s) 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 14 , 28 Technetium Hg Tc 7+ ?? Tc 3+ Acetate-tripolyphosphate 29 Thallium Pt Tl + ?? Tl 3+ 1 M HCl 30 Tin Hg Sn 4+ Sn(Hg) 3 M KBr, 0.2 M HBr 31 Titanium Hg Ti 4+ ?? Ti 3+ 6??9 M H 2 SO 4 32 Uranium Hg U 6+ ?? U 4+ 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 33 Vanadium Pt V 5+ ?? V 4+ V 4+ ?? V 5+ 1.5...

385

Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elements of the cell stack cost reduction and efficiency improvement work performed in the early stage of the program is being continued in subsequent DOE sponsored programs and through internal investment by Proton. The results of the trade study of the 100 kg H2/day system have established a conceptual platform for design and development of a next generation electrolyzer for Proton. The advancements started by this program have the possibility of being realized in systems for the developing fueling markets in 2010 period.

Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Non-Nuclear Energy - Idaho National Laboratory - Technology ...  

Non-Nuclear Energy Reducing Contact Resistance in Tubular Fuel Cell and Electrolysis Cell Geometry Bundles. Related Patents: 8,389,180. Contact: David R. Anderson

387

Processing Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013... relevant polymers and hybrid nanocomposite material systems. ... technology to perform lightweight manufacturing of car components.

388

Technology Transfer  

A new search feature has been implemented, which allows searching of technology transfer information across the Department of Energy Laboratories.

389

Technology Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... get started on understanding accessibility in elections and voting technology. ... bibliography was created by the Georgia Tech Research Institute ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technology Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Book:PrefaceTechnology as the Strategic AdvantageWhen I began writing this book I struggled with the direction I wanted it to take. Is this book to be about business, technology, or even the business of technology? I ...

Cooper Smith

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

392

Technology '90  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards, and Codes in Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

394

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Green Energy Works Targeted Grant - Biogas - Anergy Dairy Farm Biodigesters CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B5.1 Date: 02162010...

395

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Regenerators for Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08262010...

396

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination New Mechanistic Models of Creep-Fatigue Interactions for Gas Turbine Components CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08072013 Location(s): Oregon...

397

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning and Priorities CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04222010 Location(s): Denver, Colorado Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy...

398

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of an Advanced, Lithium Ion, 12 Volt Start Stop Battery CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04302013 Location(s): California...

399

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 CX-003365: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Combustion Controls - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Vehicles CX(s) Applied: A9, A11...

400

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2012 CX-008326: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Consortium CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing Process for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Integrated Substrate CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07302013 Location(s):...

402

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Rock Sampling) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date:...

403

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Area of Interest 3 Deployment of Flex Combined Heat and Power System (Funding Opportunity Announcement 0000016) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06...

404

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 30, 2012 CX-009317: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electrochemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

405

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2012 CX-008944: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08162012 Location(s): Maryland...

406

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 28, 2011 CX-006930: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Inverter Design CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09282011 Location(s): Torrance, Los Angeles...

407

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 CX-006524: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fuel Properties to Enable Lifted-Flame Combustion CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08232011 Location(s): Madison, Wisconsin...

408

Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 News Stories (and older) 6 News Stories (and older) 12.21.2005___________________________________________________________________ Genzyme acquires gene therapy technology invented at Berkeley Lab. Read more here. 07.19.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Symyx, a start up company using Berkeley Lab combinatorial chemistry technology licensed by the Technology Transfer Department and developed by Peter Schultz and colleagues in the Materials Sciences Division, will be honored with Frost & Sullivan's 2005 Technology Leadership Award at their Excellence in Emerging Technologies Awards Banquet for developing enabling technologies and methods to aid better, faster and more efficient R&D. Read more here. 07.11.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Nanosys, Inc., a Berkeley Lab startup, is among the solar nanotech companies investors along Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park hope that thinking small will translate into big profits. Read more here.

409

NETL: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are designed to: enhance domestic oil and natural gas supplies through advanced exploration and production technology; examine water related concerns; investigate...

410

Technology Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Novel Solvent Extraction Process With Bottom Gas Injection for Liquid Waste ... Membrane Technology for Treatment of Wastes Containing Dissolved Metals:...

411

Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... These wastes are found in the market. ... Cherian1; Michael Kirksey1; Sandwip Dey2; 1Spheric Technologies Inc; 2Arizona State University

412

Transmission Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electronically (shift-by-wire) and performed by a hydraulic system or electric motor. In addition, technologies can be employed to make the shifting process smoother than...

413

Metering Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are looking to replace meters that only measure kilowatt-hours with advanced meters with greater features and functions. This White Paper describes the smart metering technology that is already available or will be available in the near future. It also provides a high-level overview of the wired and wireless communication technologies used in the metering industry.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

BSA 11-30: Enhanced Alkane production by Aldehyde Decarbonylase Fusion Constructs; BSA 12-36: Oil Accumulation in Plant Leaves; Find a Technology.

415

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

There are 9 technologies tagged "cancer". BSA 01-02: ... a limited-liability company founded by the Research Foundation for the State University of ...

416

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Courtesy of ZCorp The Rapid Prototyping Laboratory (RPL) supports internal design, manufacturing, and process development with three rapid prototyping (RP) technologies:...

417

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parts Brazing large complex parts The joining and heat-treating technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging department include brazing, heat-treating, diffusion...

418

Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

419

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research

420

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter hydrogen and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially

422

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Sandia Cooler's innovative, compact design combines a fan and a finned metal heat sink into a single element, efficiently transferring heat in microelectronics and reducing energy use. Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Learn More

423

Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Multi-Path Transportation Futures * Idling Studies * EDrive Vehicle Monthly Sales Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Technology Analysis truck Heavy vehicle techologies are one subject of study. Research Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation Heavy Vehicle Technologies Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study Idling Studies Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Reports Propane Vehicles: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities (pdf; 525 kB) Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities (pdf; 696 kB) Regulatory Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles (pdf; 1.02 MB)

424

Fabrication Technology  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Fabrication Technology thrust area is to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), to conduct the future business of LLNL. The specific goals continue to be to (1) develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability; (3) document findings and models in journals; (4) transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance the collective understanding of fabrication processes. The strategy to ensure success is changing. For technologies in which they are expert and which will continue to be of future importance to LLNL, they can often attract outside resources both to maintain their expertise by applying it to a specific problem and to help fund further development. A popular vehicle to fund such work is the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with industry. For technologies needing development because of their future critical importance and in which they are not expert, they use internal funding sources. These latter are the topics of the thrust area. Three FY-92 funded projects are discussed in this section. Each project clearly moves the Fabrication Technology thrust area towards the goals outlined above. They have also continued their membership in the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Center, a multidisciplinary research and graduate program established to provide the new technologies needed by high-technology institutions in the US. As members, they have access to and use of the results of their research projects, many of which parallel the precision engineering efforts at LLNL.

Blaedel, K.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review on Facebook Tweet...

426

National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries. Here youll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the ...

427

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects The NREL...

428

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Capabilities The...

429

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal News...

430

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

431

Building Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: About on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

432

Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

433

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

Blaedel, K.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

PNNL: Available Technologies - Browse Technologies by Portfolio  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Browse Technologies by Portfolio. Select a technology portfolio to view ...

435

Idaho National Laboratory - Technology Transfer - Technologies ...  

Idaho National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing ... Fossil Energy; Information Technology; Manufacturing ; Materials; National Security; Non-Nuclear ...

436

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

437

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

438

NETL: Technology Transfer - Available Technologies for Partnership  

Technology Transfer Available Technologies for Partnership Software and Modeling. Month Posted. Partnership Opportunity. Patent Information. 12/2011: ...

439

Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies  

SciTech Connect

The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Healthy technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the biggest struggles user experience teams face is breaking through traditional notions of product strategy, planning and development to bring actionable awareness to the bigger picture around delivering full experiences that people really care ... Keywords: design management, design process, ethnography, experience, healthy technology, industry, lifecycle, metaphor, platform, reliability, research, security, strategy, sustainability

Ashwini Asokan; Michael .J. Payne

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Technologies Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaporation systems n Potential mining applications (produced water) nIndustry applications for which silicaLicensable Technologies Applications: n Cooling tower systems n Water treatment systems n Water needed n Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) n Enables

442

Manufacturing technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Vacuum Technology  

SciTech Connect

The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

Biltoft, P J

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Pervasive Information Technology Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pervasive Information Technology. Pervasive information technology is the trend towards increasingly ubiquitous connected ...

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

System Analyses of High and Low-Temperature Interface Designs for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, an evaluation of a low-temperature heat-pump interface design for a nuclear-driven high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production plant was performed using the UniSim process analysis software. The lowtemperature interface design is intended to reduce the interface temperature between the reactor power conversion system and the hydrogen production plant by extracting process heat from the low temperature portion of the power cycle rather than from the high-temperature portion of the cycle as is done with the current Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reference design. The intent of this design change is to mitigate the potential for tritium migration from the reactor core to the hydrogen plant, and reduce the potential for high temperature creep in the interface structures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) operating at a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa and a reactor outlet temperature of 900C. The lowtemperature heat-pump loop is a water/steam loop that operates between 2.6 MPa and 5.0 MPa. The HTE hydrogen production loop operated at 5 MPa, with plant conditions optimized to maximize plant performance (i.e., 800C electrolysis operating temperature, area specific resistance (ASR) = 0.4 ohm-cm2, and a current density of 0.25 amps/cm2). An air sweep gas system was used to remove oxygen from the anode side of the electrolyzer. Heat was also recovered from the hydrogen and oxygen product streams to maximize hydrogen production efficiencies. The results of the UniSim analysis showed that the low-temperature interface design was an effective heat-pump concept, transferring 31.5 MWt from the low-temperature leg of the gas turbine power cycle to the HTE process boiler, while consuming 16.0 MWe of compressor power. However, when this concept was compared with the current INL reference direct Brayton cycle design and with a modification of the reference design to simulate an indirect Brayton cycle (both with heat extracted from the high-temperature portion of the power cycle), the latter two concepts had higher overall hydrogen production rates and efficiencies compared to the low-temperature heatpump concept, but at the expense of higher interface temperatures. Therefore, the ultimate decision on the viability of the low-temperature heat-pump concept involves a tradeoff between the benefits of a lower-temperature interface between the power conversion system and the hydrogen production plant, and the reduced hydrogen production efficiency of the low-temperature heat-pump concept compared to concepts using high-temperature process heat.

E. A. Harvego; J. E. O'Brien

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Validation Testing of Hydrogen Generation Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of testing performed by ORNL for Photech Energies, Inc. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the efficacy of Photech's hydrogen generation reactor technology, which produces gaseous hydrogen through electrolysis. Photech provided several prototypes of their proprietary reactor for testing and the ancillary equipment, such as power supplies and electrolyte solutions, required for proper operation of the reactors. ORNL measured the production of hydrogen gas (volumetric flow of hydrogen at atmospheric pressure) as a function of input power and analyzed the composition of the output stream to determine the purity of the hydrogen content. ORNL attempted measurements on two basic versions of the prototype reactors-one version had a clear plastic outer cylinder, while another version had a stainless steel outer cylinder-but was only able to complete measurements on reactors in the plastic version. The problem observed in the stainless steel reactors was that in these reactors most of the hydrogen was produced near the anodes along with oxygen and the mixed gases made it impossible to determine the amount of hydrogen produced. In the plastic reactors the production of hydrogen gas increased monotonically with input power, and the flow rates increased faster at low input powers than they did at higher input powers. The maximum flow rate from the cathode port measured during the tests was 0.85 LPM at an input power of about 1100 W, an electrolyte concentration of 20%. The composition of the flow from the cathode port was primarily hydrogen and water vapor, with some oxygen and trace amounts of carbon dioxide. An operational mode that occurs briefly during certain operating conditions, and is characterized by flashes of light and violent bubbling near the cathode, might be attributable to the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen in the electrolyte solution.

Smith, Barton [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

High-Efficiency, Ultra-High Pressure Electrolysis With Direct Linkage to PV Arrays - Phase II SBIR Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this Phase II SBIR, Avalence LLC met all proposed objectives. Because the original Phase III partner pulled out of the project, several alternative sites/partners were used to achieve the goals. The on-site operation and PV measurements were performed on a smaller unit at General Motors proving grounds in Milford, MI. The actual equipment targeted for AC Transit will be delivered to Robins Air Force Base in September of 2009 to support the fueling of a fuel cell powered fork lift and 'Bobcat'. In addition the Transit Agency Site Requirements and Constraints were performed for the Greater New Haven Transit District (GNHTD) for the Hamden, CT Public Works building that will be the site for a similar fueling station to be delivered in the Spring of 2010. The Detailed Design Package was also based on the Design for the GNHTD unit. The work on this project successfuly demonstrated the potential of Avalence's high pressure technology to address the need for renewably produced hydrogen fuel for transportation applications. Several follow-on projects in a numerber of related applications are now underway as a result of this SBIR project.

Martin A Shimko

2009-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

449

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomassorganic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastesthat can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

451

TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report originated in the authors participation in a multi-country study of national innovation systems and their impact on new technology development, sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Our task was to look at the U.S. national innovation systems impact on the commercial development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for residential power applications. Early drivers of PEM fuel cell innovation were the aerospace and defense programs, in particular the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which used fuel cells on its spacecraft. In the early 1990s, deregulation hit the electric utility industry, which made utilities and entrepreneurs see the potential in generating electricity from distributed power. Throughout the 1990s, the Department of Energy funded a significant portion of civilian fuel cell research, while the Department of Defense and NASA funded more esoteric military and space applications. In 1998, the Department of Commerces Advanced Technology Program (ATP) awarded the first of 25 fuel cell projects, as prospects for adoption and commercialization of fuel cell technologies improved.

John M. Nail; Gary Anderson; Gerald Ceasar; Christopher J. Hansen; John M. Nail; Gerald Ceasar; Christopher J. Hansen; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Hratch G. Samerjian; Acting Director; Marc G. Stanley; Director Abstract

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Technology disrupted  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Papatheodorou, Y. [CH2M Hill (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Building Technologies Office: About Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies The Emerging Technologies team funds the research and development of cost-effective, energy-efficient building technologies within five years of commercialization. Learn more about the: Key Technologies Benefits Results Key Technologies Specific technologies pursued within the Emerging Technologies team include: Lighting: advanced solid-state lighting systems, including core technology research and development, manufacturing R&D, and market development Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC): heat pumps, heat exchangers, and working fluids Building Envelope: highly insulating and dynamic windows, cool roofs, building thermal insulation, façades, daylighting, and fenestration Water Heating: heat pump water heaters and solar water heaters

454

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LTCC multi-chip module LTCC multi-chip module A high density LTCC multi-chip module Electronic Packaging PDF format (150 kb) The Electronic Packaging technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging Department are a resource for all aspects of microelectronic packaging. From design and layout to fabrication of prototype samples, the staff offers partners the opportunity for concurrent engineering and development of a variety of electronic packaging concepts. This includes assistance in selecting the most appropriate technology for manufacturing, analysis of performance characteristics and development of new and unique processes. Capabilities: Network Fabrication Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC) Thick Film Thin Film Packaging and Assembly Chip Level Packaging MEMs Packaging

455

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meso-Machining Meso-Machining PDF format (182 kb) Sandia's Micro-Electro Discharge Machine (Micro-EDM) (above). On the upper right inset is the Micro-EDM electode in copper that was made with the LIGA (electroforming) process. On the lower right inset is a screen fabricated into .006 inch kovar sheet using the Micro-EDM electrode. The walls of the screen are .002 inch wide by .006 inch deep. Meso-machining technologies being developed at Sandia National Laboratories will help manufacturers improve a variety of production processes, tools, and components. Meso-machining will benefit the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and defense industries by creating feature sizes from the 1 to 50 micron range. Sandia's Manufacturing Science and Technology Center is developing the

456

Offshore Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, and the roadmapping exercise that produced it, is the result of a series of transparent workshops held across the nation. A wealth of information was produced to compliment internal sources like the Energy Information Administration. The active participation of the Department's stakeholders is greatly appreciated. Walter Rosenbusch, Director of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) deserves special recognition. His partnership, participation and input were instrumental to the success of this effort. I also would like to thank my friend Governor Mark White for his participation and support of this effort. In addition, I thank the following workshop chairs and moderators for their participation and contribution to the roadmapping efforts: Mary Jane Wilson, WZI, Inc.; Ron Oligney, Dr. Michael Economides, and Jim Longbottom, University of Houston; John Vasselli, Houston Advanced Research Center; and Art Schroeder, Energy Valley. This report, however, does not represent the end of such long-range planning by the Department, its national labs, and its stakeholders. Rather it is a roadmap for accelerating the journey into the ultradeepwater Western Gulf of Mexico. The development of new technologies and commercialization paths, discoveries by marine biologists, and the fluctuations of international markets will continue to be important influences. With that in mind, let the journey begin. Emil Pea Deputy Assistant Secretary for Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology OFFSHORE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP FOR THE ULTRA-DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO U.S. Department of Energy Maximumhistm,183 oil product,0 ratd for Gulf of Mexico wells. Taller barsindicat higherproduct44 ratdu The dat show numerous deepwat, oil wells producedat significant2 higherrate tt ever seen in t, Gulf of ...

Roadmap For The; Deepwater Gulf; Of Mexico

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Testing technology  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin from Sandia National Laboratories presents current research highlights in testing technology. Ion microscopy offers new nondestructive testing technique that detects high resolution invisible defects. An inexpensive thin-film gauge checks detonators on centrifuge. Laser trackers ride the range and track helicopters at low-level flights that could not be detected by radar. Radiation transport software predicts electron/photon effects via cascade simulation. Acoustic research in noise abatement will lead to quieter travelling for Bay Area Rapid Transport (BART) commuters.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy their decision making process relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement. Future topics will concentrate on more practical aspects including applications software, product

459

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Emerging Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technologies electrolysis cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Technology and the Box  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalcrowd our daily life. Technology, like the term box, cancommon understanding of technology though, is not as a

Maitland, Padma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Technology acceptance in organizations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New technology has changed how people do business. With rapid development of technology, it has been difficult for businesses and organizations to successfully implement technology (more)

Stewart, Laurie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Events on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

464

Technology Transfer: Success Stories: Licensed Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Licensed Technologies Licensed Technologies Here are some of our licensees and the technologies they are commercializing; see our Start-Up Company page for more of our technology licenses. Company (Licensee) Technology Life Technologies Corp. Cell lines for breast cancer research Bristol Myers Squibb; Novartis; Plexxikon Inc.; Wyeth Research; GlaxoSmithKline; Johnson & Johnson; Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Genzyme Software for automated macromolecular crystallography Shell International Exploration and Production; ConnocoPhillips Company; StatOil ASA; Schlumburger Technology Corportation; BHP Billiton Ltd.; Chevron Energy Technology Company; EniTecnologie S.p.A. Geo-Hydrophysical modeling software Microsoft Home Energy Saver software distribution Kalinex Colorimetric bioassay

465

Idaho National Laboratory - Technology Transfer - Technologies ...  

Idaho National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing ... Environmental Flow-Through Reactor for the In Situ Assessment of Remediation Technologies in Vadose ...

466

Solar Energy Technologies Program Technology Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

Not Available

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

NETL: Technology Transfer - History of Technology Transfer  

History of Technology Transfer Technology transfer differs from providing services or products (e.g., acquisition) and financial assistance (e.g., ...

468

Technoeconomic Evaluation of Large-Scale Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale production of electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen could increase use of baseload and off-peak surplus power. To be competitive, however, water electrolysis will require low-cost electricity.

1985-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

469

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 15050 of 26,764 results. 41 - 15050 of 26,764 results. Download CX-006891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Kansas City, Kansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006891-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Scale-Up of Low-Cost Zero-Emissions Magnesium by Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies Electrolysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/29/2011 Location(s): Natick, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006895-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006897: Categorical Exclusion Determination

470

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 7610 of 28,905 results. 01 - 7610 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Scale-Up of Low-Cost Zero-Emissions Magnesium by Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies Electrolysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/29/2011 Location(s): Natick, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006895-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001349: Categorical Exclusion Determination Support for C6 Resources, LLC Phase 1 Project (North California Carbon Dioxide Reduction Project - Forestville) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/15/2010 Location(s): Forestville, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001349-categorical-exclusion-determination

471

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 CX-004402: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11082010 Location(s): Monroeville,...

472

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2009 CX-000382: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cemex Commercial-Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration for the Cement Industry CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 11...

473

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91: Categorical Exclusion Determination Commercial Renewable Energy Systems - Davidson College Solar CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 04012010 Location(s): Davidson, North Carolina...

474

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Improving Reservoir Contact for Increased Production and Recovery of Gas Shale Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01212011 Location(s): Salt Lake City, Utah...

475

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Green Energy Works Targeted Grant - Native Energy Biogas Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B1.31, A9, B5.1 Date: 06022010 Location(s):...