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Sample records for technologies electrolysis cxs

  1. Panel 3, PEM Electrolysis Technology R&D and Near-Term Market Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology R&D and Near-Term Market Potential 5/15/14 Stephen Szymanski Director - Government Business sszymanski@protononsite.com 203.678.2338 Proton OnSite: Current Status * Industrial markets form base for commercial sales - 50% growth over last 2 years g y - Clear technology leader in PEM electrolysis - >2000 fielded units, 10 MW capacity shipped , p y pp * Continuing to scale output and manufacturing capability Industrial Markets Power Plants Energy Markets capability Power Plants

  2. Electrolysis at Forecourt Stations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CLEAN FUEL ITM Electrolysis at Forecourt Stations NREL Workshop Feb 27 & 28, 2014 Contents: * Introduction ITM Power Inc. * Target Costs * Challenges and Technology Developments - Continuous Improvements * Renewable Energy - Power pricing is the Key * HFuel PEM Electrolysis Module Spec * 100 % Renewable Hydrogen Refuelling Project ITM POWER INC. CLEAN FUEL ITM Electrolysis at Forecourt Stations INTRODUCTION - ITM POWER INC. ITM POWER INC. ENERGY STORAGE | CLEAN FUEL Established to enter the

  3. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  4. Electrolysis - Hydrogen - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Find More Like This Return to Search Electrolysis - Hydrogen Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL has invented a process that leverages nuclear technology in combination with various carbon sources to produce synthetic gases for refinement into synthetic transportation fuels/chemicals. Using solid-state electrolysis, water is decomposed to hydrogen and oxygen in one process, while carbon dioxide is

  5. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Production from Electrolysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electrolysis DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Production from Electrolysis These tables list the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) technical targets and example cost contributions for hydrogen production from water electrolysis. The tables are organized into separate sections for distributed electrolysis and central electrolysis. More information about targets can be found in the Hydrogen Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Multi-Year Research,

  6. Electrolysis of Water

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students observe the electrolysis of water using either photovoltaics or a battery as the electric energy source.

  7. Innovative Demonstration Platform: Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Establishing baselinesprotocolstargets relevant for PEM electrolysis Bryan Pivovar National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced Water Splitting Workshop Stanford April 12, 2016 ...

  8. PEM Electrolysis R&D Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R&D Webinar May 23, 2011 Presented by Dr. Katherine Ayers Outline * Key Messages About Electrolysis * Company Intro and Market Discussion - Electrolysis Technology Comparison * Infrastructure Challenges and Solutions - System Approaches: Capacity and Delivery Pressure - Materials Advancements: Cost and Efficiency Improvements * Summary and Future Vision 2 Key Takeaways for Today * Hydrogen markets exist today that can leverage advancements in on-site generation technologies * PEM

  9. Electrolysis on an Island Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis on an Island Grid Mitch Ewan Hydrogen Systems Program Manager Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 28 February 2014 High Percentages of As-Available Renewable Resources Creates Problems for Grid Systems 1300MW 75MW 5MW 200MW  Good renewable resource mix;  High electricity costs; and  Grid issues.  Provide unique opportunity for validation and deployment of new renewable and enabling technologies. 200MW

  10. Alkaline Membrane Electrolysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RPTnnnn Membrane-Based Electrolysis: Overview * Many cost and efficiency advancements still feasible for PEM electrolysis - >50% reduction in membrane thickness - >90% reduction in catalyst loading - Improved O 2 evolution activity - Part integration and high speed manufacturing - Balance of plant improvements: drying, electronics * AEM electrolysis can enable new cost curve - Will need to balance with potential efficiency loss based on OH- conduction - Durability still needs significant

  11. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  12. Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRODUCTION BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. Miller *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Giner Giner Electrochemical Systems: Monjid Hamdan *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Proton Proton OnSite: Kathy Ayers *Q&A 3 DOE EERE-FCT Goals and Objectives Develop technologies to produce hydrogen from clean, domestic resources at a delivered and dispensed cost

  13. Water Electrolysis Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Water Electrolysis Working Group Water Electrolysis Working Group The Water Electrolysis Working Group, inaugurated in May 2007, brings industry, academia, and national ...

  14. Electrolysis of Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis of Water Grades: 5-8 Topic: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Solar Owner: Florida Solar Energy Center This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by INFINIUM, Inc. at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lightweighting

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by INFINIUM, Inc. at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about scale-up of magnesium...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by INFINIUM, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about scale-up of magnesium...

  18. Electrolysis - High Temperature - Hydrogen - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrolysis - High Temperature - Hydrogen Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL has developed a high-temperature process the utilizes solid oxide fuel cells that are operated in the electrolytic mode. The first process includes combining a high-temperature heat source (e.g. nuclear reactor) with a hydrogen production facility by taking a stream of water and heating it and then splitting the water into hydrogen and oxygen product streams. A

  19. Megawatt Electrolysis Scale Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MW Electrolysis Scale Up E Anderson DOE Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop 27-28 February 2014 27 28 February 2014 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO (tm) ® Proton, Proton OnSite, Proton Energy Systems, the Proton design, StableFlow, StableFlow Hydrogen Control System and design, HOGEN, and FuelGen are trademarks or registered trademarks of Proton Energy Systems, Inc. Any other brands and/or names used herein are the property of their respective owners. Motivation - MW

  20. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  1. PEM Electrolysis H2A Production Case Study Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Brian; Colella, Whitney; Moton, Jennie; Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2013-12-31

    This report documents the development of four DOE Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) case studies for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolysis. The four cases characterize PEM electrolyzer technology for two hydrogen production plant sizes (Forecourt and Central) and for two technology development time horizons (Current and Future).

  2. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization Genevieve Saur and Todd Ramsden Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-50408 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization Genevieve Saur, Todd

  3. Wind Electrolysis - Hydrogen Cost Optimization (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.

    2011-02-01

    This presentation is about the Wind-to-Hydrogen Project at NREL, part of the Renewable Electrolysis task and the examination of a grid-tied, co-located wind electrolysis hydrogen production facility.

  4. Hydrogen Production: Electrolysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis Hydrogen Production: Electrolysis Electrolysis is a promising option for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Electrolysis is the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. This reaction takes place in a unit called an electrolyzer. Electrolyzers can range in size from small, appliance-size equipment that is well-suited for small-scale distributed hydrogen production to large-scale, central production facilities that could be tied directly to

  5. High Temperature Electrolysis 4 kW Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-09-01

    This report provides results of long-term stack testing completed in the new high-temperature steam electrolysis multi-kW test facility recently developed at INL. The report includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This facility has provided a demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis operation at the 4 kW scale with advanced cell and stack technology. This successful large-scale demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  6. Reversible Solid Oxide Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal Programs Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hosted by: ... Q1 2012 AMR 1 New scope in a no-cost time extension based on AMR ...

  7. Panel 3, Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage DOE-Industry Canada Workshop May 15, 2014 INTRODUCTION ... paying for demand management - that the system is a responsive load and can meet ...

  8. Non-Noble Metal Water Electrolysis Catalysts - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Noble Metal Water Electrolysis Catalysts Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Hydrogen-Evolution Catalysts Based on Non-Noble Metal Nickel Molybdenum Nitride Nanosheets (1,161 KB) a) TEM image of the stacked MoN nanosheets on carbon supports. The read and white arrows mark the nanosheets that lay flat and stand vertically, respectively. b) A HRTEM image with the crystal structure overlaid looking down along the

  9. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)Electrolysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and ...

  10. Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: ...

  11. Hydroxyl radical production in plasma electrolysis with KOH electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saksono, Nelson; Febiyanti, Irine Ayu Utami, Nissa; Ibrahim

    2015-12-29

    Plasma electrolysis is an effective technology for producing hydroxyl radical (•OH). This method can be used for waste degradation process. This study was conducted to obtain the influence of applied voltage, electrolyte concentration, and anode depth in the plasma electrolysis system for producing hydroxyl radical. The materials of anode and cathode, respectively, were made from tungsten and stainless steel. KOH solution was used as the solution. Determination of hydroxyl radical production was done by measuring H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount formed in plasma system using an iodometric titration method, while the electrical energy consumed was obtained by measuring the electrical current throughout the process. The highest hydroxyl radical production was 3.51 mmol reached with 237 kJ energy consumption in the power supply voltage 600 V, 0.02 M KOH, and 0.5 cm depth of anode.

  12. RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: STACK TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X, Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; J. J. Hartvigsen; G. Tao; N. Petigny

    2012-07-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolytesupported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc., Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), and Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain), respectively for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technology developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, respectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. A three-cell short stack provided by St. Gobain, however, showed rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Improvements on electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyteelectrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

  13. Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

    2006-09-01

    Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

  14. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  15. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  16. Mathematical Analysis of High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of CO2 and O2 Production in a Closed-Loop Atmosphere Revitalization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Manohar S. Sohal; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna; Morgan B. Abney

    2010-03-01

    NASA has been evaluating two closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures based on Sabatier and Bosch carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. A number of process models have been developed and analyzed to determine the theoretical power required to recover oxygen, O2, in each case. These models include the current Sabatier and Bosch technologies and combinations of those processes with high-temperature co-electrolysis. The cases of constant CO2 supply and constant O2 production were evaluated. In addition, a process model of the hydrogenation process with co-electrolysis was developed and compared. Sabatier processes require the least amount of energy input per kg of oxygen produced. If co-electrolysis replaces solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrolysis within the Sabatier architecture, the power requirement is reduced by over 10%, but only if heat recuperation is used. Sabatier processes, however, require external water to achieve the lower power results. Under conditions of constant incoming carbon dioxide flow, the Sabatier architectures require more power than the other architectures. The Bosch, Boudouard with co-electrolysis, and the hydrogenation with co-electrolysis processes require little or no external water. The Bosch and hydrogenation processes produce water within their reactors, which aids in reducing the power requirement for electrolysis. The Boudouard with co-electrolysis process has a higher electrolysis power requirement because carbon

  17. A Feasibility Study of Steelmaking by Molten Oxide Electrolysis (TRP9956)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Sadoway; Gerbrand Ceder

    2009-12-31

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is an extreme form of molten salt electrolysis, a technology that has been used to produce tonnage metals for over 100 years - aluminum, magnesium, lithium, sodium and the rare earth metals specifically. The use of carbon-free anodes is the distinguishing factor in MOE compared to other molten salt electrolysis techniques. MOE is totally carbon-free and produces no CO or CO2 - only O2 gas at the anode. This project is directed at assessing the technical feasibility of MOE at the bench scale while determining optimum values of MOE operating parameters. An inert anode will be identified and its ability to sustain oxygen evalution will be demonstrated.

  18. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a hydrogen economy. The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  19. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Renewable Electrolysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Electrolysis Photo of wind turbines. Wind turbines can be used to produce hydrogen through a process called renewable electrolysis. NREL's renewable electrolysis research focuses on designing, developing, and testing advanced experimental and analytical methods to improve electrolyzer stack and system efficiency. Related activities include: Characterizing electrolyzer performance under variable-input power conditions Designing and developing shared power-electronics packages and

  20. Panel 3, Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage DOE-Industry Canada Workshop May 15, 2014 INTRODUCTION HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR ENERGY STORAGE AND CLEAN FUEL PRODUCTION ITM POWER INC. ITM POWER INC. ENERGY STORAGE | CLEAN FUEL Positioned well...... Energy Storage: * Pioneers of HES / P2G initiative in CA * Board member of CHBC - Title sponsor at Spring summit, 5 th May in Long beach * Committee member CHBC HES * Member of FCHEA, CHFCA, OFCC, Clean Fuel: * Founder member of H 2 USA and H 2 FIRST *

  1. High temperature electrolysis for syngas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoots, Carl M.; O'Brien, James E.; Herring, James Stephen; Lessing, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2011-05-31

    Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

  2. Experiments on a ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on a ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser at the tritium systems test assembly Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experiments on a ceramic...

  3. Techno-economic Analysis of PEM Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PEM Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production Strategic ... delivery of H 2 fuel for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). * Identify ... Case * New materials and systems with increased H 2 ...

  4. Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and

  5. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  6. Microbial Electrochemical Technology (MxCs): Challenges and Opportunit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production from Biodegradable Materials Microbial Fuel Cell Technologies-MxCs: Can ...

  7. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation, held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  8. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World

  9. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  10. Summary Report on Solid-oxide Electrolysis Cell Testing and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R.C. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2012-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. From 2003 to 2009, this work was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, under the Office of Nuclear Energy. Starting in 2010, the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research program has been sponsored by the INL Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This report provides a summaryof program activities performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and the first quarter of FY-12, with a focus on small-scale testing and cell development activities. HTE research priorities during this period have included the development and testing of SOEC and stack designs that exhibit high-efficiency initial performance and low, long-term degradation rates. This report includes contributions from INL and five industry partners: Materials and Systems Research, Incorporated (MSRI); Versa Power Systems, Incorporated (VPS); Ceramatec, Incorporated; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Glenn Research Center (NASA - GRC); and the St. Gobain Advanced Materials Division. These industry partners have developed SOEC cells and stacks for in-house testing in the electrolysis mode and independent testing at INL. Additional fundamental research and post-test physical examinations have been performed at two university partners: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Connecticut. Summaries of these activities and test results are also presented in this report.

  11. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropo

  12. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower was held September 9-10, 2003.

  13. Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste Feedstocks Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial Electrolysis Cells Bruce Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering and Evan Pugh Professor, Pennsylvania State University

  14. High Pressure PEM Electrolysis: Status, Key Issues, and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Pressure PEM Electrolysis Status, Key Issues, and Challenges Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop NREL, Golden, Colorado Monjid Hamdan Director of Engineering Giner, Inc. 89 Rumford Ave, Newton, Ma. 02466 February 27-28 th , 2014 Advantages of High Pressure PEM Electrolysis  Eliminates one or more stages of mechanical compression  Reduces system complexity  Lower drying requirements  Low maintenance  No moving parts  No contaminants  Permits hydrogen generation at

  15. Systems Engineering Provides Successful High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes two Systems Engineering Studies completed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the High Temperature Stream Electrolysis (HTSE) process. HTSE produces hydrogen from water using nuclear power and was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) for integration with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The first study was a reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) analysis to identify critical areas for technology development based on available information regarding expected component performance. An HTSE process baseline flowsheet at commercial scale was used as a basis. The NGNP project also established a process and capability to perform future RAM analyses. The analysis identified which components had the greatest impact on HTSE process availability and indicated that the HTSE process could achieve over 90% availability. The second study developed a series of life-cycle cost estimates for the various scale-ups required to demonstrate the HTSE process. Both studies were useful in identifying near- and long-term efforts necessary for successful HTSE process deployment. The size of demonstrations to support scale-up was refined, which is essential to estimate near- and long-term cost and schedule. The life-cycle funding profile, with high-level allocations, was identified as the program transitions from experiment scale R&D to engineering scale demonstration.

  16. Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    includes CO2 capture and storage technology options for hydrocarbon fuel inputs) Hydrogen production using various feedstocks (Coal, Oil, Gas, Biomass, water using Electrolysis,...

  17. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  18. High Temperature Electrolysis using Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

    2010-07-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. The cells currently under study were developed primarily for the fuel cell mode of operation. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (~10 m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (~1400 m thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes (~90 m thick). The purpose of the present study was to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of DC potential sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-duration testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode over more than 500 hours of operation. Results indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of the single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

  19. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  20. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  1. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production via Wind/Electrolysis: Milestone Completion Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report summarizes the results of a lifecycle assessment of a renewable hydrogen production process employing wind/electrolysis.

  3. Analysis of deformed palladium cathodes resulting from heavy water electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, H.K.; Jeong, E.J.; Hong, J.H.; Lee, Y.

    1995-07-01

    Earlier experiments suggested that large differences in heat release between the two sides of a palladium electrode coated with gold on one side and manganese oxide on the other cause observed electrode deformation with high-pressure D{sub 2} gas loading in an electrolysis-like cell. Similar experiments were repeated using heavy water electrolysis. Palladium/titanium coatings on one side and gold coating on the other were made for the preparation of the palladium electrodes. Biaxial bending, partial discoloration, and microcracks of palladium electrodes were observed after 18 days of electrolysis. Analysis of the deformed palladium cathodes was performed. It was discovered that to convert this configuration to a practical energy-producing cell, a coating technique must be found to reduce outward diffusion of deuterium, i.e., to maintain a high D/Pd ratio over longer periods of time. 33 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoots, C.M.

    2006-11-01

    Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include

  5. Systems for Solar Fuels Generation Utilizing PV and Electrolysis Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Newark, Delaware) - JCAP Systems for Solar Fuels Generation Utilizing PV and Electrolysis Workshop (Newark, Delaware) Systems for Solar Fuels Generation Utilizing PV and Electrolysis Workshop (Newark, Delaware) Mon, Mar 7, 2016 11:30am 11:30 Tue, Mar 8, 2016 12:30pm 12:30 University of Delaware Newark, Delaware Frances Houle, "Solar Fuels Systems Research in the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis" March 6 80th Annual Conference of the DPG & DPG Spring Meeting

  6. Hydrogen Production by High Temperature Electrolysis with Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Takashi; Fujiwara, Seiji; Kasai, Shigeo; Yamada, Kazuya

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we report our design of high temperature electrolysis plant system and the analysis results. The system efficiency increases with the increase of the steam utilization in the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) or the decrease of the hydrogen recycle (hydrogen recycle flow to product hydrogen flow) ratio,. The system efficiency is nearly independent of the SOEC operating temperature and pressure, and the air to product O{sub 2} ratio. In this study, the maximum system efficiency is 56.3%. (authors)

  7. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents

  8. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  9. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  10. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  11. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

    2011-11-01

    Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

  12. Direct Lit Electrolysis In A Metallic Lithium Fusion Blanket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon-Mercado, H.; Babineau, D.; Elvington, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Teprovich, J.; Vaquer, A.

    2015-10-13

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed.  The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fission/fusion reactors is critical in order to maintained low concentrations.  This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket, extraction is complicated at the required low levels. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering the hydrogen and deuterium thru an electrolysis step at high temperatures. 

  13. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2009-07-01

    A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

  14. Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

    2010-06-01

    The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

  15. CX-100241 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solid Oxide Based Electrolysis and Stack Technology with Ultra-High Electrolysis Current Density and Efficiency Award Number: DE-EE0006961 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Fuel Cell Technologies Office Date: 05/18/2015 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office

  16. Combined uranous nitrate production consisting of undivided electrolytic cell and divided electrolytic cell (Electrolysis ? Electrolytic cell)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Hui; Xian, Liang

    2013-07-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, mild way to make uranous ions. Undivided electrolyzers whose maintenance is less but their conversion ratio and current efficiency are low, have been chosen. However, at the beginning of undivided electrolysis, high current efficiency can also be maintained. Divided electrolyzers' conversion ratio and current efficiency is much higher because the re-oxidation of uranous on anode is avoided, but their maintenance costs are more, because in radioactive environment the membrane has to be changed after several operations. In this paper, a combined method of uranous production is proposed which consists of 2 stages: undivided electrolysis (early stage) and divided electrolysis (late stage) to benefit from the advantages of both electrolysis modes. The performance of the combined method was tested. The results show that in combined mode, after 200 min long electrolysis (80 min undivided electrolysis and 120 min divided electrolysis), U(IV) yield can achieve 92.3% (500 ml feed, U 199 g/l, 72 cm{sup 2} cathode, 120 mA/cm{sup 2}). Compared with divided mode, about 1/3 working time in divided electrolyzer is reduced to achieve the same U(IV) yield. If 120 min long undivided electrolysis was taken, more than 1/2 working time can be reduced in divided electrolyzer, which means that about half of the maintenance cost can also be reduced. (authors)

  17. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model

  18. DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. V. Virkar

    2010-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INLs test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems

  19. Experimental design, operation, and results of a 4 kW high temperature steam electrolysis experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; Tao, Greg; Zhou, Can; Housley, Gregory K.

    2015-08-06

    High temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) is a promising technology for large-scale hydrogen production. However, research on HTSE performance above the kW level is limited. This paper presents the results of 4 kW HTSE long-term test completed in a multi-kW test facility recently developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The 4 kW HTSE unit included two solid oxide electrolysis stacks operating in parallel, each of which included 40 electrode-supported planar cells. A current density of 0.41 A/cm2 was used for the long-term operation, resulting in a hydrogen production rate about 25 slpm. A demonstration of 920 hours stable operation wasmore » achieved. The paper also includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. As a result, this successful demonstration of multi-kW scale HTSE unit will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.« less

  20. Experimental design, operation, and results of a 4 kW high temperature steam electrolysis experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; Tao, Greg; Zhou, Can; Housley, Gregory K.

    2015-08-06

    High temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) is a promising technology for large-scale hydrogen production. However, research on HTSE performance above the kW level is limited. This paper presents the results of 4 kW HTSE long-term test completed in a multi-kW test facility recently developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The 4 kW HTSE unit included two solid oxide electrolysis stacks operating in parallel, each of which included 40 electrode-supported planar cells. A current density of 0.41 A/cm2 was used for the long-term operation, resulting in a hydrogen production rate about 25 slpm. A demonstration of 920 hours stable operation was achieved. The paper also includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. As a result, this successful demonstration of multi-kW scale HTSE unit will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  1. Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830°C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable

  2. THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

    2008-11-01

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

  3. DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. K. Housley; J.E. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2008-11-01

    Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

  4. Analyses of palladium cathodes used for heavy water electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, K.; Dauwalter, C.R.; Stecyk, A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the sporadic nature of the excess heat reported from heavy water electrolysis which has attributed to variability among the different palladium cathodes used. Experimental repeatability should, therefore, be enhanced if the microstructure of the palladium can be controlled. Toward this end, palladium rod samples from two heavy water electrolysis experiments were compared to a sample representative of the as-installed condition. The samples examined showed equiaxed grains and significant abnormal grain growth. The rod axes had strong textures, which were attributed to their prior thermomechanical history. The postelectrolysis palladium rods were sampled at two locations that were suspected to have operated at different average current densities. The suspected higher current density regions consisted of single-phase Pd-D{sub 0.7} microstructures. Surface-originated cracks were seen along the grain boundaries in one of two such specimens. Cracks were absent in samples from the suspected lower current density regions, which showed two-phase microstructures with Pd-D{sub 0.7} as the dominant phase. The minor phase, indexed as palladium in the X-ray pattern, was dispersed nonuniformly, mostly in the form of stringers, across the grain boundaries. It is concluded that high current densities resulted in high deuterium loadings in palladium. Smoothing effects from the electrolytic process, resulting in preferential material removal from the grain boundaries, were seen on the cathode surface. A number of high-mass impurities were seen to have deposited on the exposed surface. An initial secondary ion mass spectrometry examination of the specimen interior indicated a significant presence of mass 2 species and considerably lower concentrations of mass 3 and 4 species. Repeat analyses failed to confirm the presence of the mass 3 and 4 species.

  5. High Temperature Steam Electrolysis: Demonstration of Improved Long-Term Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R. C. O'Brien; G. Tao

    2011-11-01

    Long-term performance is an ongoing issue for hydrogen production based on high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE). For commercial deployment, solid-oxide electrolysis stacks must achieve high performance with long-term degradation rates of {approx}0.5%/1000 hours or lower. Significant progress has been achieved toward this goal over the past few years. This paper will provide details of progress achieved under the Idaho National Laboratory high temperature electrolysis research program. Recent long-term stack tests have achieved high initial performance with degradation rates less than 5%/khr. These tests utilize internally manifolded stacks with electrode-supported cells. The cell material sets are optimized for the electrolysis mode of operation. Details of the cells and stacks will be provided along with details of the test apparatus, procedures, and results.

  6. Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Biodegradable Materials | Department of Energy Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production from Biodegradable Materials Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production from Biodegradable Materials Presentation by Jason Ren, University of Colorado Boulder, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. bio_h2_workshop_ren.pdf (437.03 KB) More

  7. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  8. Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.S. Sohal; J.E. O'Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

    2009-05-01

    An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple

  9. 3D CFD Model of a Tubular Porous-Metal Supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.L. Hawkes; B.D. Hawkes; M.S. Sohal; P.T. Torgerson; T. Armstrong; M.C. Williams

    2007-10-01

    Currently there is strong interest in the large-scale production of hydrogen as an energy carrier for the non-electrical market [1, 2, and 3]. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, with no consumption of fossil fuels, no production of greenhouse gases, and no other forms of air pollution. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%. A research program is under way at the INL to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. The future SOEC market includes the 1200MW GEN4 reactor which has projected 40-50% efficiency, 400 tones H2 production per day (at 5kg H2/car/300 mile day this corresponds to 80,000 cars/day). DOE is planning for 26GW of nuclear hydrogen production by 2025.

  10. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  11. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  12. Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest

    2009-09-01

    Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective.

  13. Performance Assessment of Single Electrode-Supported Solid Oxide Cells Operating in the Steam Electrolysis Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; N. Petigny

    2011-11-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm{sup 2} per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes ({approx}10 {mu}m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes ({approx}1400 {mu}m thick), and modified LSM or LSCF air-side electrodes ({approx}90 {mu}m thick). The purpose of the present study is to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of voltage-current (VI) sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-term testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode. Results generally indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of an improved single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

  14. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  15. Time-delayed apparent excess heat generation in electrolysis fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-04-10

    This paper reports that in many recent electrolysis fusion experiments, excess heat, tritium, and neutron production have been reported as intermittent bursts. These burst phenomena are described in terms of a surface reaction mechanism involving hysteresis of deuterium solubility in palladium as a function of the metal temperature. Excess heat generation is shown to be attributable to a hitherto neglected time-delayed chemical process due to the solubility hysteresis of deuterium in palladium. Negative results of no apparent excess heat generation from light-water electrolysis experiments is attributed to the fact that the solubility hysteresis of hydrogen occurs at a higher temperature range than that for deuterium. Apparent excess heat generation is expected to be also observable in blank electrolysis experiments with light water at higher pressures.

  16. The influence of deposits on palladium cathodes in D[sub 2]O electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lihn, C.J.; Wan, C.C.; Wan, C.M.; Perng, T.P. )

    1993-11-01

    Platinum and silicon have been found deposited on the palladium cathode during the electrolysis of a 0.1 M LiOD solution with a platinum anode in a glass cell. Various techniques including surface analysis, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical permeation were used to study the surface deposits, electrochemical deuterium-sorption behavior, and permeation rate of deuterium into palladium, respectively. It was shown that palladium cathodes were contaminated by platinum and silicon deposits after a certain period of electrolysis. These deposits could affect the electrochemical processes during electrolysis. The contamination may be a cause of the sporadic results reported in [open quotes]cold fusion[close quotes] research. 18 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Alex J; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  18. A Process Model for the Production of Hydrogen Using High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. Mc Kellar; E. A. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

    2006-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis (HTE) involves the splitting of stream into hydrogen and oxygen at high temperatures. The primary advantage of HTE over conventional low temperature electrolysis is that considerably higher hydrogen production efficiencies can be achieved. Performing the electrolysis process at high temperatures results in more favorable thermodynamics for electrolysis, more efficient production of electricity, and allows direct use of process heat to generate steam. This paper presents the results of process analyses performed to evaluate the hydrogen production efficiencies of an HTE plant coupled to a 600 MWt Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) that supplies both the electricity and process heat needed to drive the process. The MHR operates with a coolant outlet temperature of 950 C. Approximately 87% of the high-temperature heat is used to generate electricity at high efficiency using a direct, Brayton-cycle power conversion system. The remaining high-temperature heat is used to generate a superheated steam / hydrogen mixture that is supplied to the electrolyzers. The analyses were performed using the HYSYS process modeling software. The model used to perform the analyses consisted of three loops; a primary high temperature helium loop, a secondary helium loop and the HTE process loop. The detailed model included realistic representations of all major components in the system, including pumps, compressors, heat exchange equipment, and the electrolysis stack. The design of the hydrogen production process loop also included a steam-sweep gas system to remove oxygen from the electrolysis stack so that it can be recovered and used for other applications. Results of the process analyses showed that hydrogen production efficiencies in the range of 45% to 50% are achievable with this system.

  19. THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR THERMAL WATER SPLITTING PROCESSES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien

    2008-11-01

    A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on thermal water splitting processes is presented. Results of the analysis show that the overall efficiency of any thermal water splitting process operating between two temperature limits is proportional to the Carnot efficiency. Implications of thermodynamic efficiency limits and the impacts of loss mechanisms and operating conditions are discussed as they pertain specifically to hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis. Overall system performance predictions are also presented for high-temperature electrolysis plants powered by three different advanced nuclear reactor types, over their respective operating temperature ranges.

  20. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  1. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Gary Grider (second from right) with the 2015 Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize. Also pictured (left to right): Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory; Terry Wallace, Program Associate Director for Global Security at Los Alamos; and Lee

  2. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The HiWAIS technology is a significant step forward in the warfighter support arena. Honeybees for Explosive Detection Honeybees for Explosive Detection Los Alamos researchers have ...

  3. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  4. Electrolysis of neodymium oxide. Final report for the period August 19, 1991 through February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K.T.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an electrolytic process for the continuous and economic production of neodymium alloys from neodymium oxide. The electrolysis of neodymium oxide continued to show promise for implementation as a low-cost process to produce high- quality neodymium or neodymium-iron alloy.

  5. RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: SINGLE CELL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien

    2012-07-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOECs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus has been developed for single cell and small stack tests from different vendors. Single cells from Ceramatec Inc. show improved durability compared to our previous stack tests. Single cells from Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) demonstrate low degradation both in fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Single cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain) show stable performance in fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Electrolyte-electrode delamination is found to have significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the microstructure help to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements are performed during the tests to characterize the cell performance and degradation.

  6. Water electrolysis on La1-xSrxCoO3-δ perovskite electrocatalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mefford, J. Tyler; Rong, Xi; Abakumov, Artem M.; Hardin, William G.; Dai, Sheng; Kolpak, Alexie; Johnston, Keith P.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2016-03-23

    Here, perovskite oxides are attractive candidates as catalysts for the electrolysis of water in alkaline energy storage and conversion systems. However, the rational design of active catalysts has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the mechanism of water electrolysis on perovskite surfaces. Key parameters that have been overlooked include the role of oxygen vacancies, B–O bond covalency, and redox activity of lattice oxygen species. Here we present a series of cobaltite perovskites where the covalency of the Co–O bond and the concentration of oxygen vacancies are controlled through Sr2+ substitution into La1–xSrxCoO3–δ. We attempt to rationalize the highmore » activities of La1–xSrxCoO3–δ through the electronic structure and participation of lattice oxygen in the mechanism of water electrolysis as revealed through ab initio modelling. Using this approach, we report a material, SrCoO2.7, with a high, room temperature-specific activity and mass activity towards alkaline water electrolysis.« less

  7. Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microbial Electrochemical Technology (MxCs): Challenges and Opportunities 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report Hydrogen and Biogas Production using Microbial ...

  8. Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis of Magnesium: Scale-Up...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm035derezinski2011o.pdf (938.78 KB) More Documents & ...

  9. Preliminary study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-02-01

    A preliminary laboratory-scale study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts investigated the (1) solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ in molten salts, (2) electrochemical behavior of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/, and (3) electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ with the determination of current efficiency as a function of current density. The solubility measurements show that MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte at 1023 K can dissolve up to 3.3 mol % sulfide. The molar ratio of sulfur to aluminum in the eutectic is about one, which suggests that some sulfur remains undissolved, probably in the form of MgS. The experimental data and thermodynamic calculations suggest that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolves in the eutectic to form AlS/sup +/ species in solution. Addition of AlCl/sub 3/ to the eutectic enhances the solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/; the solubility increases with increasing AlCl/sub 3/ concentration. The electrode reaction mechanism for the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ was elucidated by using linear sweep voltammetry. The cathodic reduction of aluminum-ion-containing species to aluminum proceeds by a reversible, diffusion-controlled, three-electron reaction. The anodic reaction involves the two-electron discharge of sulfide-ion-containing species, followed by the fast dimerization of sulfur atoms to S/sub 2/. Electrolysis experiments show that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolved in molten MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic or in eutectic containing AlCl/sub 3/ can be electrolyzed to produce aluminum and sulfur. In the eutectic at 1023 K, the electrolysis can be conducted up to about 300 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the saturation solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Although these preliminary results are promising, additional studies are needed to elucidate many critical operating parameters before the technical potential of the electrolysis can be accurately assessed. 20 figures, 18 tables.

  10. Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ preparation and use in electrolysis process for aluminum production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, C.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    A continuous process for producing aluminum sulfide and for electrolyzing the aluminum sulfide to form metallic aluminum in which the aluminum sulfide is produced from aluminum oxide and COS or CS/sub 2/ in the presence of a chloride melt which also serves as the electrolysis bath. Circulation between the reactor and electrolysis cell is carried out to maintain the desired concentration of aluminum sulfide in the bath.

  11. Surface topography of a palladium cathode after electrolysis in heavy water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, D.S. ); Dash, J.; Keefe, P.S. )

    1993-12-01

    Electrolysis was performed with a palladium cathode and an electrolyte containing both hydrogen and deuterium ions. The cathode bends toward the anode during this process. Examination of both the concave and the convex surfaces with the scanning electron microscope, scanning tunneling microscope, and atomic force microscope shows unusual surface characteristics. Rimmed craters with faceted crystals inside and multitextural surfaces were observed on an electrolyzed palladium cathode but not on palladium that has not been electrolyzed. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  12. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal

  13. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%,more » respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.« less

  14. Performance of Single Electrode-Supported Cells Operating in the Electrolysis Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; G. K. Housley; D. G. Milobar

    2009-11-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900C. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (~10 m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (~1400 m thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented.

  15. Panel 3, PEM Electrolysis Technology R&D and Near-Term Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    enhancement, power-to-gas, etc. * Ancillary services ... RINs (Federal), other market based credits. * Cost ... CAISO Renewable Integration (4 Hr) ITC Wind firming (DA vs ...

  16. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power

  17. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandegrift, George F.; Krumpelt, Michael; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  18. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

  19. Performance evaluation of a continuous-flow bioanode microbial electrolysis cell fed with furanic and phenolic compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-07-04

    Furanic and phenolic compounds, formed during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, are problematic byproducts in down-stream biofuel processes. A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is an alternative technology to handle furanic and phenolic compounds and produce renewable hydrogen (H2). In this study, we evaluated the performance of a continuous-flow bioanode MEC fed with furanic and phenolic compounds at different operating conditions. All hydraulic retention times (HRTs) tested (6-24 h) resulted in complete transformation of the parent compounds at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.2g L-1 per d and applied voltage of 0.6 V. Increasing the OLR to 0.8 g L-1more » per d at an HRT of 6h resulted in an increased H2 production rate from 0.07 to 0.14 L Lanode 1 per d, but an OLR of 3.2 g L-1 per d did not lead to a higher H2 production rate. Significant methane production was observed at an OLR of 3.2 g L-1 per d. The lack of increased H2 production at the highest OLR tested was due to a limited rate of exoelectrogenesis but not fermentation, evidenced by the accumulation of high acetate levels and higher growth of fermenters and methanogens over exoelectrogens. Increasing applied voltage from 0.6 to 1.0V at an OLR of 3.2 g L-1 per d and HRT of 6h enhanced exoelectrogenesis and resulted in a 1.7-fold increase of H2 production. Under all operating conditions, more than 90% of the biomass was biofilm-associated. Lastly, the present study provides new insights into the performance of continuous-flow bioelectrochemical systems fed with complex waste streams resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.« less

  20. Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary

    2011-12-27

    An electrospray ion source and method of operation includes the application of pulsed voltage to prevent electrolysis of analytes with a low electrochemical potential. The electrospray ion source can include an emitter, a counter electrode, and a power supply. The emitter can include a liquid conduit, a primary working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, and a spray tip, where the liquid conduit and the working electrode are in liquid communication. The counter electrode can be proximate to, but separated from, the spray tip. The power system can supply voltage to the working electrode in the form of a pulse wave, where the pulse wave oscillates between at least an energized voltage and a relaxation voltage. The relaxation duration of the relaxation voltage can range from 1 millisecond to 35 milliseconds. The pulse duration of the energized voltage can be less than 1 millisecond and the frequency of the pulse wave can range from 30 to 800 Hz.

  1. Initial Operation of the High Temperature Electrolysis Integrated Laboratory Scale Experiment at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2008-06-01

    An integrated laboratory scale, 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation.

  2. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  3. U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2011-12-01

    This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

  4. Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiernan, Joan E.

    1991-01-01

    Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and l BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

  5. 3D CFD Electrochemical and Heat Transfer Model of an Integrated-Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James E. O'Brien

    2008-10-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in a new novel integrated planar porous-tube supported solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model is of several integrated planar cells attached to a ceramic support tube. This design is being evaluated with modeling at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  6. ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

    2010-11-01

    An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

  7. SISGR-Fundamental Experimental and Theoretical Studies on a Novel Family of Oxide Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumta, Prashant

    2014-10-03

    Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts with significant reduction of expensive noble metal contents (E.g. IrO2, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance as the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would constitute a major breakthrough in the generation of hydrogen by water electrolysis. Accomplishing such a system would not only result reduction of the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, but also help attain the targeted hydrogen production cost [< $ 3.0 / gallon gasoline equivalent (gge)] comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, it was demonstrated that fluorine doped IrO2 thin films and nanostructured high surface area powders display remarkably higher electrochemical activity, and comparable durability as pure IrO2 electro-catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis. Furthermore, corrosion resistant SnO2 and NbO2 support has been doped with F and coupled with IrO2 or RuO2 for use as an OER electro-catalyst. A solid solution of SnO2:F or NbO2:F with only 20 - 30 mol.% IrO2 or RuO2 yielding a rutile structure in the form of thin films and bulk nanoparticles displays similar electrochemical activity and stability as pure IrO2/RuO2. This would lead to more than 70 mol.% reduction in the noble metal oxide content. Novel nanostructured ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 thin films of different compositions FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRO-CATALYSTS WITH REDUCED NOBLE METAL CONTENT FOR PEM BASED WATER ELECTROLYSIS 4 have also been studied. It has been shown that (Ir0.40Sn0.30Nb0.30)O2 shows similar electrochemical activity and enhanced chemical robustness as compared to pure IrO2. F doping of the ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 catalyst helps in further decreasing the noble metal oxide content of the catalyst. As a result, these reduced noble metal oxide catalyst systems would

  8. 4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

  9. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  10. Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiernan, Joan E.

    1990-01-01

    Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and laminar flow conditions at an average detention time of six hours. Both the polyurethane foams and the foam regenerate solution are re-used. The treatment is a cost-effective process for waste-waters which are not treatable, or are not cost-effectively treatable, by conventional process series.

  11. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reequipping and Engineering CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 09062011 ... Aptera All-Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 0620...

  12. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  13. Process Modeling Results of Bio-Syntrolysis: Converting Biomass to Liquid Fuel with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; M. G. McKellar; R. Wood; M. M. Plum

    2010-06-01

    A new process called Bio-Syntrolysis is being researched at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigating syngas production from renewable biomass that is assisted with high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE). The INL is the world leader in researching HTSE and has recently produced hydrogen from high temperature solid oxide cells running in the electrolysis mode setting several world records along the way. A high temperature (~800°C) heat source is necessary to heat the steam as it goes into the electrolytic cells. Biomass provides the heat source and the carbon source for this process. Syngas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, can be used for the production of synthetic liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch processes. This concept, coupled with fossil-free electricity, provides a possible path to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and increased energy independence, without the major infrastructure shift that would be required for a purely hydrogen-based transportation system. Furthermore, since the carbon source is obtained from recyclable biomass, the entire concept is carbon-neutral

  14. Electrolysis of uranium nitride containing fission product elements (Mo, Pd, Nd) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Takumi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2007-07-01

    The electrolysis of burnup-simulated uranium nitride, UN, containing representative solid fission product elements (Mo, Pd, Nd) was investigated in the molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt with 0.54 wt% UCl{sub 3} from the view point of application of pyrochemical reprocessing to nitride fuel cycle. It was found from cyclic voltammetry and anodic polarization curve measurement that anodic dissolution of UN began at about -0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode in all samples. After the electrolysis at the constant anodic potential of -0.65 {approx} -0.60 V vs. Ag/AgCl, most of UN was dissolved into LiCl- KCl as UCl{sub 3} at the anode, and U was recovered in the liquid Cd cathode in all samples. Further, Nd was dissolved into LiCl-KCl as NdCl{sub 3}, while Mo and Pd were not dissolved but remained at the anode. (authors)

  15. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completely transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to

  16. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completelymore » transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable hydrocarbon fuels.« less

  17. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

    2010-10-01

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  18. Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the US DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, on held January 17, 2013.

  20. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the

  1. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen-Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2010-06-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  2. Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

  3. Tritium generation and large excess heat evolution by electrolysis in light and heavy water-potassium carbonate solutions with nickel electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Notoya, Reiko; Noya, Yohichi; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki

    1994-09-01

    The generation of tritium was quantitatively measured in an electrolytic cell with a nickel cathode and a platinum anode in potassium carbonate-light and heavy water solutions. Simultaneously, the evolution of a large amount of excess heat (70 to 170{degrees} for the input power) was observed during electrolysis of these solutions. The tritium generation by electrolysis provides some of the most conclusive evidence for so-called cold fusion, along with the calcium generation described in a previous paper. On the basis of the current experiments and the knowledge of the knetics of a hydrogen evolution reaction in an alkaline solution, the nuclear reactions taking place are worth mentioning. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated

  5. Scale-Up of Magnesium Production by Fully Stabilized Zirconia Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat in Diesel Engines | Department of Energy 03 DEER Conference Presentation: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2003_deer_martin.pdf (1.44 MB) More Documents & Publications Quantum Well Thermoelectrics and Waste Heat Recovery Multilayer Thin-Film Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Applications High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation | Department of Energy

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit

  6. Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how NREL operated both commercially available low-temperature electrolyzer technologies (PEM and alkaline) to evaluate their response to commands to increase and decrease stack power that shorten frequency disturbances on an alternating current (AC) mini-grid. Results show that both the PEM and alkaline electrolyzers are capable of adding or removing stack power to provide sub-second response that reduced the duration of frequency disturbances.

  7. Faradaic efficiencies less than 100% during electrolysis of water can account for reports of excess heat in `cold fusion` cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.E.; Hansen, L.D.; Jones, S.E.; Shelton, D.S.; Thorne, J.M.

    1995-05-04

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate claims of excess heat generation during water electrolysis. Several cells were constructed and operated similarly to low-current-density cells described in the literature. All produced excess heat as defined and calculated in the literature reports, but the production of excess heat could be readily terminated by the introduction of various barriers to the migration of hydrogen and oxygen. Remarkably, published reports of excess heat fail to disprove the presence of decreased faradaic efficiency (e.g., current that oxidizes H{sub 2} or reduces O{sub 2}) or systematic calorimetric errors. Illustrative examples of both problems are given. Thus, failure to rule out prosaic explanations probably invalidates all the currently available reports of excess heat in both light water-Ni/Pt and heavy water-Pd/Pt cells. There is no compelling evidence that excess heat is of a nuclear origin in such electrolytic cells. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. HYBRID SULFUR FLOWSHEETS USING PEM ELECTROLYSIS AND A BAYONET DECOMPOSITION REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M; William Summers, W

    2008-05-30

    A conceptual design is presented for a Hybrid Sulfur process for the production of hydrogen using a high-temperature nuclear heat source to split water. The process combines proton exchange membrane-based SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer technology being developed at Savannah River National Laboratory with silicon carbide bayonet decomposition reactor technology being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Both are part of the US DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The flowsheet otherwise uses only proven chemical process components. Electrolyzer product is concentrated from 50 wt% sulfuric acid to 75 wt% via recuperative vacuum distillation. Pinch analysis is used to predict the high-temperature heat requirement for sulfuric acid decomposition. An Aspen Plus{trademark} model of the flowsheet indicates 340.3 kJ high-temperature heat, 75.5 kJ low-temperature heat, 1.31 kJ low-pressure steam, and 120.9 kJ electric power are consumed per mole of H{sub 2} product, giving an LHV efficiency of 35.3% (41.7% HHV efficiency) if electric power is available at a conversion efficiency of 45%.

  9. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To support DOE's goal to provide clean and secure energy, the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) invests in research and development that:

  11. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technology Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Acceleration NREL offers technology-specific assistance to federal and private industry to help address market barriers to sustainable energy technologies. Learn more ...

  12. Vacuum electrolysis of quartz

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, James Claude

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure is directed to a method for processing quartz used in fabricating crystal resonators such that transient frequency change of resonators exposed to pulse irradiation is virtually eliminated. The method involves heating the crystal quartz in a hydrogen-free atmosphere while simultaneously applying an electric field in the Z-axis direction of the crystal. The electric field is maintained during the cool-down phase of the process.

  13. Electrolysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy from a battery, water (H2O) can be dissociated into the diatomic molecules of hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2). This process is a good example of the the application of the...

  14. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willit, James L.; Ackerman, John P.; Williamson, Mark A.

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  15. Energy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Energy Technologies Area (ETA) Building Technology & Urban Systems Energy Analysis & Environmental...

  16. Exploration Technologies - Technology Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Amanda I.; Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur; Reinhardt, Tim; Solomon, Samantha; James, Mallory

    2011-06-01

    This assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the Geothermal Technology Program's research and development.

  17. Exploration Technologies Technology Needs Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Exploration Technologies Needs Assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the program's research and development.

  18. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  19. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Technologies Available for Licensing...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Workforce Development Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Materials Technologies Ed Owens Jerry Gibbs Will Joost eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $36.9 M Lightweight Materials $28.0 M Values are FY14 enacted Propulsion Materials $8.9 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M

  3. Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003 Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003 The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a ...

  4. CX-011727: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    INFINIUM, Inc. - Clean, Efficient Aluminum Electrolysis via SOM Anodes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/22/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts, Massachusetts Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

  5. CX-100740 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100740 Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell (SOEC) System for Efficient Hydrogen Production at High Current Density Award Number: DE-EE0007646 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Fuel Cell Technologies Office Date: 8/18/2016 Location(s): CT Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) to demonstrate the potential of a solid oxide

  6. Available Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    application. Search Our Technologies submit Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Biotechnology Biotechnology Chemistry Chemistry Energy Energy High Performance Computing:...

  7. Licensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Licensing Technology Licensing Technology The primary function of Los Alamos Licensing Program is to move Los Alamos technology to the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. Our intellectual property may be licensed for commercial use, research applications, and U.S. government use. Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Although Los Alamos's primary mission is national security, our technologies

  8. Technology Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intellectual Property » Technology Opportunities Technology Opportunities We deliver innovation through an integrated portfolio of R&D work across our key national security sponsoring agencies, enhanced by the ideas developed through our strategic internal investments. Contact Business Development Team Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-9090 Email Periodically, the Laboratory notifies the public of technologies and capabilities that may be of interest. These technologies may

  9. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT 1 Advanced Composites Materials and their Manufacture 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ................................................................................................ 2 4 2. Technology Potential and Assessment .................................................................................................. 4 5 2.1 The Potential for Advanced Composites for Clean Energy Application Areas

  10. Water Panel Discussion: Federal Reduction Update & Cooling Water Savings

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Water Electrolysis Working Group Water Electrolysis Working Group The Water Electrolysis Working Group, inaugurated in May 2007, brings industry, academia, and national laboratories together to overcome the technical barriers to commercializing electrolysis technology for the production of hydrogen for transportation and industrial use. Description Technical Targets Progress and Financial Opportunities Contacts Description Water electrolysis is the conversion of electrical energy into chemical

  11. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  12. Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology transfer Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government and research centers for their "uncommon creativity and initiative in conveying innovations from their facilities to industry and local government." Scientists and engineers from more than 650 federal government laboratories and research centers compete for the 30 awards presented each year.

  13. Technology Partnering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transfer and Related Technology Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities Fiscal Years 2009-2013 Report to Congress May 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary The Report on Technology Transfer and Related Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities for Fiscal Year 2009-2013 is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act of 2000: It is

  14. Fuels Technologies

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Displacement of petroleum n Approach n Example Project Accomplishments n Research Directions Fuels Technologies R&D Budget by Activities Major Activities FY 2007 ...

  15. NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-7353. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  16. Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co...

  17. Understanding the impact of flow rate and recycle on the conversion of a complex biorefinery stream using a flow-through microbial electrolysis cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Alex J.; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2016-06-16

    We investigated the effect of flow rate and recycle on the conversion of a biomass-derived pyrolysis aqueous phase in amicrobial electrolysis cell (MEC) to demonstrate production of renewable hydrogen in biorefinery. A continuous MEC operation was investigated under one-pass and recycle conditions usingthe complex, biomass-derived, fermentable, mixed substrate feed at a constant concentration of 0.026 g/L,while testing flow rates ranging from 0.19 to 3.6 mL/min. This corresponds to an organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.54₋10 g/L-day. Mass transfer issues observed at low flow rates were alleviated using high flow rates.Increasing the flow rate to 3.6 mL/min (3.7 min HRT) duringmore » one-pass operation increased the hydrogen productivity 3-fold, but anode conversion efficiency (ACE) decreased from 57.9% to 9.9%. Recycle of the anode liquid helped to alleviate kinetic limitations and the ACE increased by 1.8-fold and the hydrogen productivity by 1.2-fold compared to the one-pass condition at the flow rate of 3.6 mL/min (10 g/L-d OLR). High COD removal was also achieved under recycle conditions, reaching 74.2 1.1%, with hydrogen production rate of 2.92 ± 0.51 L/L-day. This study demonstrates the advantages of combining faster flow rates with a recycle process to improve rate of hydrogen production from a switchgrass-derived stream in the biorefinery.« less

  18. Utilizing the Inherent Electrolysis in a Chip-Based Nanoelectrospray Emitter System to Facilitate Selective Ionization and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Metallo Alkylporphyrins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system was used to ionize metallo alkylporphyrins for mass spectrometric detection and structure elucidation by mass spectrometry. Different ionic forms of model compounds (nickel (II), vanadyl (II), copper (II) and cobalt (II) octaethylporphyrin) were created by using two different types of conductive pipette tips supplied with the device. These pipette tips provide the conductive contact to solution at which the electrolysis process inherent to electrospray takes places in the device. The original unmodified, bare carbon-impregnated plastic pipette tips, were exploited to intentionally electrochemically oxidize (ionize) the porphyrins to form molecular radical cations for detection. Use of modified pipette tips, with a surface coating devised to inhibit analyte mass transport to the surface, was shown to limit the ionic species observed in the mass spectra of these porphyrins largely, but not exclusively, to the protonated molecule. Under the conditions of these experiments, the effective upper potential limit for oxidation with the uncoated pipette tip was 1.1 V or less and the coated pipette tips effectively prevented the oxidation of analytes with redox potentials greater than about 0.25 V. Product ion spectra of either molecular ionic species could be used to determine the alkyl chain length on the porphyrin macrocycle. The utility of this electrochemical ionization approach for the analysis of naturally occurring samples was demonstrated using nickel geoporphyrin fractions isolated from Gilsonite bitumen. Acquiring neutral loss spectra as a means to improve the specificity of detection in these complex natural samples was also illustrated.

  19. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  20. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roll to Roll (R2R) Processing 1 Technology Assessment 2 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 5 1.1. Introduction to R2R Processing..................................................................................................... 2 6 1.2. R2R Processing Mechanisms ......................................................................................................... 3 7 2.

  1. Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008 Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Patrick B.

    2009-06-19

    Presentation illustrating various technology commercialization opportunities and unexploited investment gaps for the Vehicle Technologies Program.

  2. Tag: technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tags

    technology<...

  3. Technology Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To reduce solar technology risks, DOE and its partners evaluate the performance and reliability of novel photovoltaic (PV) hardware and systems through laboratory and field testing. The focus of...

  4. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D ...

  5. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving ...

  6. Information Technology - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Technology

  7. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  8. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  9. Plasma technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlitz, H.G.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes the uses of plasma technology for the thermal destruction of hazardous wastes such as PCBs, dioxins, hydrocarbons, military chemicals and biological materials; for metals recovery from steel making dusts. One advantage of the process is that destruction of wastes can be carried out on site. Systems in several countries use the excess thermal energy for district heating.

  10. CSP technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  11. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodorou, Y.

    2007-02-15

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT

  14. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies Emerging Technologies R&D Program Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. karma.sawyer@ee.doe.gov BTO Goal Reduce building energy use by ...

  15. NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer October 25, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Did you know? The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer is the nationwide network of federal laboratories that provides the forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking laboratory mission technologies and expertise with the marketplace. In consonance with the Federal Technology Transfer Act of

  16. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies to serve as an overview of the HIT Catalyst program activities, including a summary of the selection process undertaken to identify, evaluate and prioritize the current HITs, descriptions of the technologies and markets for each HIT, and plans for deployment. High

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and ...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle ... FY14EDTAnnualReport.pdf (15.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will ...

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Ombuds NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to help resolve issues and concerns regarding the laboratory's technology partnership,...

  1. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  2. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  3. Technology Partnership Agreements | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Investment Agreements Technology Investment Agreements Guidance Policy Flash 2006-31 - Technology Investment Agreements Financial Assistance Letter 2006-03 - Guidance for Awarding Technology Investment Agreements Final Rule - Financial Assistance Regulations - Technology Investment Agreements Templates Company Template (Expenditure-Based) Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) Company Template (Fixed Support) Consortium Support (Fixed Support) Training Technology Investment

  4. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    reactions going to completion without side reactions, and lower demands on materials of construction. Three university research groups from PSU, USC, and TU as well as a group from ANL have been collaborating on the development of enabling technologies for the Cu-Cl cycle, including experimental work on the Cu-Cl cycle reactions, modeling and simulation, and particularly electrochemical reaction for hydrogen production using a CuCl electrolyzer. The Consortium research was distributed over the participants and organized in the following tasks: (1) Development of CuCl electrolyzer (PSU), (2) Thermodynamic modeling of anolyte solution (PSU), (3) Proton conductive membranes for CuCl electrolysis (PSU), (4) Development of an analytical method for online analysis of copper compounds in highly concentrated aqueous solutions (USC), (5) Electrodialysis as a means for separation and purification of the streams exiting the electrolyzer in the Cu-Cl cycle (USC), (6) Development of nanostructured electrocatalysts for the Cu-Cl electrolysis (USC), (7) Cu-Cl electrolyzer modeling (USC), (8) Aspen Plus modeling of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (TU), (9) International coordination of research on the development of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (ANL). The results obtained in the project clearly demonstrate that the Cu-Cl alternative thermochemical cycle is a promising and viable technology to produce hydrogen efficiently.

  5. Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    00PM EDT Online The Innovative Technologies for Bioenergy Technologies Incubator 2 FOA Informational Webinar will be held Wednesday, September 2, 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ET. Standard...

  6. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Construction | Department of Energy UQM Technologies, Inc. at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Electric Drive Systems edt044_ley_2016_o_web.pdf (1.13 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction Unique Lanthide-Free Motor

  8. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer NETL Sorbent Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorbent Technologies Licensed for Use in Biomass-to- Biofuel Conversion Process with Carbon Capture and Storage Success Story The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has granted a license for two of its patented sorbent technologies: carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) removal and water-gas shift (WGS) reaction enhancement to CogniTek Management Systems "CogniTek," a renewable energy systems developer. CogniTek plans to implement a regenerable magnesium sorbent,

  9. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton | Department of Energy by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Presentation slides and speaker biographies from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton" held on May 23, 2011. Water Electrolysis

  10. Forest products technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-07-18

    Report highlights DOE Industrial Technology Program co-funded R&D resulting in commercial energy-efficient technologies and emerging technologies helping the forest products industry save energy.

  11. Mineral accretion technology for coral reef restoration, shore protection, and adaptation to rising sea level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hilbertz, W.

    1997-12-31

    Electrolysis of seawater is used to precipitate limestone on top of underwater steel structures to create growing artificial reefs to enhance coral growth, restore coral reef habitat, provide shelter for fish, shellfish, and other marine organisms, generate white sand for beach replenishment, and protect shore lines from wave erosion. Films and slides will be shown of existing structures in Jamaica, Panama, and the Maldives, and projects being developed in these and other locations will be evaluated. The method is unique because it creates the only artificial reef structures that generate the natural limestone substrate from which corals and coral reefs are composed, speeding the settlement and growth of calcareous organisms, and attracting the full range of other reef organisms. The structures are self-repairing and grow stronger with age. Power sources utilized include batteries, battery chargers, photovoltaic panels, and windmills. The cost of seawalls and breakwaters produced by this method is less than one tenth that of conventional technology. Because the technology is readily scaled up to build breakwaters and artificial islands able to keep pace with rising sea level it is capable of playing an important role in protecting low lying coastal areas from the effects of global climate change.

  12. NETL: SOFC Core Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Technology Core Technology-This key technology conducts applied research and development on technologies - exclusive of the cell components - that improve the cost, performance, robustness, reliability, and endurance of SOFC stack or balance-of-plant (BOP) technology. Projects in the Core Technology portfolio focus on interconnects and seals, identify and mitigate stack-related degradation, develop computational tools and models, and conduct laboratory- and bench-scale testing to improve

  13. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  14. Technology Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies, including Technical Advisory Groups and the Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap. Technical Advisory Groups E3T engages stakeholders of electric power industries in...

  15. Green Purchasing & Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

  17. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, ...

  18. Hydropower Program Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01

    New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

  19. NREL: Technology Transfer - Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you may have about NREL's technology transfer opportunities. Partnering with NREL Anne Miller, 303-384-7353 Licensing NREL Technologies Eric Payne, 303-275-3166 Printable Version...

  20. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY ... of the nation's energy system and secure U.S. leadership ...

  1. First National Technology Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First National Technology First National Technology Center Center Electronic Equipment - manufactured to withstand 8 milliseconds of voltage disruption CBEMA Curve - Chips ...

  2. Promising Technologies List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about promising new and underutilized energy-saving technologies available for Federal and commercial building sector deployment. To identify promising technologies,...

  3. GT Solar Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: GT Solar Technologies (formerly GT Equipment Technologies) Place: Merrimack, New Hampshire...

  4. Sun Materials Technology aka Shanyang Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology aka Shanyang Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sun Materials Technology (aka Shanyang Technology) Place: Yilan County, Taiwan Product: A US-Taiwan JV company...

  5. Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc (Quantum Technologies) Place: Irvine,...

  6. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Integration and Education DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology Integration and Education Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies ...

  7. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review … Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Integration 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review Technology Integration Technology integration merit review results PDF icon 2010amr08.pdf ...

  8. Blue Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue Spark Technologies (formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc.) Place: Westlake, Ohio...

  9. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This ...

  10. NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-275-3051. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements...

  11. Hydrogen delivery technology roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-11-15

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen delivery technology for transportation applications.

  12. Innovative Process Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Process Technologies Research Team Members Key Contacts Innovative Process Technologies Innovative Process Technologies is concerned with the development of innovative costeffective technologies that promote efficiency, environmental performance, availability of advanced energy systems, and the development of computational tools that shorten development timelines of advanced energy systems. NETL, working with members of the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), will focus on

  13. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  14. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel PlatinumChromium Alloy for the Manufacture of Improved Coronary Stents Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Partners A coronary...

  15. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The unique technology allows operators to optimize the processing to improve material yield, decrease energy use, and improve safety systems. Specialty metals, such as titanium or ...

  16. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COORDINATORS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mark Hartney, Director of the Office of Strategic Planning, SLAC, discussed technology transfer at SLAC. Bob Hwang, Director, Transportation Energy Center, Combustion Research Facility, SNL presented on technology transfer at SNL. Elsie Quaite-Randall, Chief Technology Transfer Officer, Innovation and Partnerships Office, LBNL, presented on technology transfer at LBNL. Richard A. Rankin, Director, Industrial Partnerships Office and Economic Development Office (Interim), LLNL, presented on technology transfer at LLNL.

  17. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MST Materials Science and Technology Providing world-leading, innovative, and agile materials science and technology solutions for national security missions. MST is metallurgy. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and technology for Los Alamos National Laboratory. READ MORE MST is engineered materials. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and

  18. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer NETL Technology for Safer,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology for Safer, Cleaner Corrosion-Protecting Metal Coatings Licensed by Pittsburgh Start-Up Success Story Corrosion-related issues cost the U.S. economy $276 billion a year. The Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) teamed up with Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to create a revolutionary, cost-effective technology to reduce that impact-work that resulted in the creation of a new CMU/NETL spin-off that signed a licensing agreement with the laboratory in June. The

  19. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  20. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Technology Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate has two primary discretionary avenues for its investment in technologies: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the ''Tech Base'' program. This volume summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts in FY2004. The Engineering Technical Reports exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of researching and developing (LDRD), and reducing to practice (technology-base) the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources. This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Tech Base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. The objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; and (4) the initial scoping and

  1. SSL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rapid advances in SSL technology make it easy to forget that this technology is still at a relatively early stage of development, and much of its potential remains untapped. The 10th annual DOE SSL...

  2. Photovoltaics: A Diverse Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This video illustrates the diversity of photovoltaic (PV) technology, which is due to innovations in PV materials, reductions in manufacturing costs, and expanding uses of the technology. A brief...

  3. Technology Readiness Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-09-15

    The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-4.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Program Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-06-19

    The Vehicle Technologies Program takes a systematic approach to Program implementation. Elements of this approach include the evaluation of new technologies, competitive selection of projects and partners, review of Program and project improvement, project tracking, and portfolio management and adjustment.

  5. Tag: technology transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17all en CNS, UT chemical sensing technology wins R&D 100 Award http:www.y12.doe.govnewspress-releasescns-ut-chemical-sensing-technology-wins-rd-100-award

  6. Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November 2000.  Pursuant to Section 11, Technology Partnerships Ombudsman, each DOE national...

  7. SSL Technology Development Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rapid advances make it easy to forget that SSL technology is still at a relatively early stage of development, and much of its potential remains untapped. The 10th annual DOE SSL Technology...

  8. Technology Deployment Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find technology deployment case studies below. Click on each individual project link to see the full case study. You can also view a map of technology deployment case studies.

  9. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology - 2016 February NIF Optics Damage Repair is 2015 Top Technology Pick ... of what takes place when NIF's 192 laser beams enter the pencil eraser-sized gold ...

  10. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use Electricity Use Residential Transportation 21 quads 27 quads Commercial 18 quads Industrial 31 quads U.S. Energy Bill for Buildings: $410 billion per year 2 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Emerging Technologies Building Codes Appliance Standards Residential Buildings Integration Commercial Buildings