Sample records for techniques principal elements

  1. Multivariate analysis of remote LIBS spectra using partial least squares, principal component analysis, and related techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sklute, Elizabeth [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Dyare, Melinda D [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative analysis with LIBS traditionally employs calibration curves that are complicated by the chemical matrix effects. These chemical matrix effects influence the LIBS plasma and the ratio of elemental composition to elemental emission line intensity. Consequently, LIBS calibration typically requires a priori knowledge of the unknown, in order for a series of calibration standards similar to the unknown to be employed. In this paper, three new Multivariate Analysis (MV A) techniques are employed to analyze the LIBS spectra of 18 disparate igneous and highly-metamorphosed rock samples. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis is used to generate a calibration model from which unknown samples can be analyzed. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) are employed to generate a model and predict the rock type of the samples. These MV A techniques appear to exploit the matrix effects associated with the chemistries of these 18 samples.

  2. Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis by Jessica Renee Crawford Crouch Analysis. (Under the direction of Stephen M. Pizer.) Finite element analysis provides a principled method the simulation of tissue deformation. The drawback to using finite element analysis for imaging problems

  3. PetrovGalerkin Spectral Elements 1 A PetrovGalerkin Spectral Element Technique for Heterogeneous Porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in spirit to a mixed finite element method or a Petrov­Galerkin scheme. If the sequence of orthogonal commonly used for finite element approximations [14]. The technique proceeds by integrating against ``testPetrov­Galerkin Spectral Elements 1 A Petrov­Galerkin Spectral Element Technique for Heterogeneous

  4. Techniques for Modeling Muscle-Induced Forces in Finite Element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    program was written to interface with a commercial finite element analysis tool to automatically apply: finite element analysis; muscle force; skull; muscle loading alogorithm, biting Finite element analysisTechniques for Modeling Muscle- Induced Forces in Finite Element Models of Skeletal Structures IAN

  5. CLINICAL TRIALS OFFICE The principal charge of this focus group was to identify the key elements of a Clinical Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLINICAL TRIALS OFFICE The principal charge of this focus group was to identify the key elements of a Clinical Trials Office at the LSUHSC-NO Campus. We propose that the mission of the Clinical Trials Office is to organize and enhance operational processes that support clinical research and facilitate the timely

  6. Statistical techniques applied to aerial radiometric surveys (STAARS): principal components analysis user's manual. [NURE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, C.D.; Pirkle, F.L.; Schmidt, J.S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Principal Components Analysis (PCA) has been written to aid in the interpretation of multivariate aerial radiometric data collected by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. The variations exhibited by these data have been reduced and classified into a number of linear combinations by using the PCA program. The PCA program then generates histograms and outlier maps of the individual variates. Black and white plots can be made on a Calcomp plotter by the application of follow-up programs. All programs referred to in this guide were written for a DEC-10. From this analysis a geologist may begin to interpret the data structure. Insight into geological processes underlying the data may be obtained.

  7. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THERMAL TENSIONING TECHNIQUES MITIGATING WELD BUCKLING DISTORTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THERMAL TENSIONING TECHNIQUES MITIGATING WELD BUCKLING DISTORTION. This paper presents a finite element analysis model of the thermal tensioning technique. A series of finite by the finite element simulations, the residual stresses of large size and high heat input welds are reduced

  8. The advancement of a technique using principal component analysis for the non-intrusive depth profiling of radioactive contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J. C.; Joyce, M. J. [Engineering Dept., Lancaster Univ., Lancaster. LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Mellor, M. [Createc Ltd., Derwent Mills Commercial Park, Cockermouth, Cumbria. CA13 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-intrusive technique using principal component analysis, to infer the depth of the fission fragment caesium-137, when it is buried under silica sand has been described. Using energy variances within different {gamma}-ray spectra, a complete depth model was produced for a single caesium-137 source buried under 1 mm depths ranging between 5-50 mm. This was achieved using a cadmium telluride detector and a bespoke phantom. In this paper we describe the advancement of the technique by further validating it using blind tests for applications outside of the laboratory, where not only the depth (z) but also the surface (x, y) location of {gamma}-ray emitting contamination is often poorly characterised. At present the technique has been tested at the point of maximum activity above the entrained {gamma}-ray emitting source (where the optimal x, y location is known). This is not usually practical in poorly characterized environments where the detector cannot be conveniently placed at such an optimal location to begin with and scanning at multiple points around the region of interest is often required. Using a uniform scanning time, the point of maximum intensity can be located by sampling in terms of total count rate, and converging on this optimal point of maximum intensity. (authors)

  9. Evaluation of new techniques for two dimensional finite element analysis of woven composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundapaneni, Sitaram Chowdary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOVEN COMPOSITES A Thesis by SITARAM CHOWDARY GUNDAPANENI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1992 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOVEN COMPOSITES A Thesis by SITARAM CHOWDARY GUNDAPANENI Approved...

  10. Effective Differentiated Instructional Elements for Improving Student Performance as Perceived by Secondary Principals in Exemplary Public High Schools in Texas: A Delphi Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrett, Teresa Ann

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , and product?can be invaluable resources for other teachers, particularly novice teachers, on campus, as well as for students (Carolan & Guinn, 2007). Numerous differentiated instructional elements support student interest, readiness, and learning profiles...

  11. Finite element decomposition of the human neocortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Seeling

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relationships between iso-parametric curves and principal curvature directions, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . ?. ???, . ?. . . . . . . . . . ??. ?. 25 Reparameterizing macro elements for finite element decomposition... visualization and functional analysis, building 3D surface models through serial reconstruction has received much attention in biomedical research [3], [8], [50]. Surface reconstruction techniques include volume rendering, iso-surface algorithms, parametric...

  12. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  13. Adaptive Finite Element Modeling Techniques for the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Holst; James Andrew McCammon; Zeyun Yu; Yongcheng Zhou; Yunrong Zhu

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an efficient and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the regularization technique of Chen, Holst, and Xu; this technique made possible the first a priori pointwise estimates and the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It also made possible the first provably convergent discretization of the PBE, and allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM for the PBE. However, in practice the regularization turns out to be numerically ill-conditioned. In this article, we examine a second regularization, and establish a number of basic results to ensure that the new approach produces the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization, without the ill-conditioning property. We then design an AFEM scheme based on the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori pointwise estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. The stability advantages of the new regularization are demonstrated using an FETK-based implementation, through comparisons with the original regularization approach for a model problem. The convergence and accuracy of the overall AFEM algorithm is also illustrated by numerical approximation of electrostatic solvation energy for an insulin protein.

  14. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  15. Test plan for techniques to measure and remove coatings from K West Basin fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1998-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Several types of coatings have previously been visually identified on the surface of 105-K East and 105-K West Basins fuel elements. One type of coating (found only in K West Basin) in particular was found to be a thick translucent material that was often seen to be dislodged from the elements as flakes when the elements were handled during visual examinations (Pitner 1997). Subsequently it was determined (for one element only in a hot cell) that this material, in the dry condition, could easily be removed from the element using a scraping tool. The coating was identified as Al(OH){sub 3} through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and to be approximately 60 {micro}m thick via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, brushing under water in the basin using numerous mechanical strokes failed to satisfactorily remove these coatings in their thickest form as judged by appearance. Such brushing was done with only one type of metal brush, a brush design previously found satisfactory for removing UO{sub 4}.xH{sub 2}O coatings from the elements.

  16. Numerical solution of 2-D nonlinear inverse heat conduction problems using finite-element techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachfe, R.A.; Jarny, Y.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general method is presented for solving different classes of nonlinear inverse heat conduction problems (IHCP) for two-dimensional, arbitrarily shaped bodies. It is based on the systematic use of a finite-element library. It is shown that, following this approach, the conjugate gradient method can be easily implemented. The method offers a very wide field of practical applications in inverse thermal analysis, while reducing very significantly the amount of work which remains specific for each particular IHPC. Two numerical experiments illustrate the influence of data errors and the iterative regularization principle.

  17. A Design-Oriented Framework to Determine the Parasitic Parameters of High Frequency Magnetics in Switching Power Supplies using Finite Element Analysis Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmand, Mohammad

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A DESIGN-ORIENTED FRAMEWORK TO DETERMINE THE PARASITIC PARAMETERS OF HIGH FREQUENCY MAGNETICS IN SWITCING POWER SUPPLIES USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES A Thesis by MOHAMMAD BAGHER SHADMAND Submitted to the Office... to Determine the Parasitic Parameters of High Frequency Magnetics in Switching Power Supplies using Finite Element Analysis Techniques Copyright 2012 Mohammad Bagher Shadmand A DESIGN-ORIENTED FRAMEWORK TO DETERMINE THE PARASITIC PARAMETERS OF HIGH...

  18. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction ?p ? ?p

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dey, B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Meyer, C. A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bellis, M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Williams, M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Adhikari, K. P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Adikaram, D. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Aghasyan, M. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LFN); Amaryan, M. J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Anderson, M. D. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Anefalos Pereira, S. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LFN); Ball, J. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Saclay (France). Inst. de Physique Nuclaeaire; Baltzell, N. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Battaglieri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); Bedlinskiy, I. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Biselli, A. S. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Bono, J. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Boiarinov, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Briscoe, W. J. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Brooks, W. K. [Univ. Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Burkert, V. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Carman, D. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Celentano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); Chandavar, S. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Colaneri, L. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Rome (Italy); Cole, P. L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Contalbrigo, M. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Cortes, O. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Crede, V. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); D'Angelo, A. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Rome (Italy); Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dashyan, N. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia); De Vita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); De Sanctis, E. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LFN); Deur, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Djalali, C. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Doughty, D. [Christopher Newport Univ., Newport News, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dugger, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Dupre, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); El Alaoui, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); El Fassi, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Elouadrhiri, L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fedotov, G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Fegan, S. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Fleming, J. A. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Garçon, M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Saclay (France). Inst. de Physique Nuclaeaire; Gevorgyan, N. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia); Ghandilyan, Y. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia); Gilfoyle, G. P. [Univ. of Richmond, VA (United States); Giovanetti, K. L. [James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA (Untied States); Girod, F. X. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Saclay (France). Inst. de Physique Nuclaeaire; Glazier, D. I. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Goetz, J. T. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction ? p ? ?p have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (?s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the ? production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the ? natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (? ? K?K?) and neutral- (? ? K0SK0L) KK? decay modes of the ?. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K? track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed ? mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide ?s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K??* channels with pKK? final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive ? photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ? photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  19. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction ? p ? ?p

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dey, Biplab [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Meyer, Curtis A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bellis, Matt [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Williams, M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction ? p--> ?p have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (?s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the ? production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the phi natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (?-->K+K- and neutral- (?-K0SK0L) KK? decay modes of the ?. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K-track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed ? mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide ?s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K+?* channels with pKK? final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive ? photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ? photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction. ? p --> ?p

  20. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction ?p ? ?p

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Meyer, C. A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bellis, M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Williams, M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Adhikari, K. P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Adikaram, D. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Aghasyan, M. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LFN); Amaryan, M. J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Anderson, M. D. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Anefalos Pereira, S. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LFN); Ball, J. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Saclay (France). Inst. de Physique Nuclaeaire; Baltzell, N. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Battaglieri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); Bedlinskiy, I. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Biselli, A. S. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Bono, J. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Boiarinov, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Briscoe, W. J. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Brooks, W. K. [Univ. Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Burkert, V. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Carman, D. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Celentano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); Chandavar, S. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Colaneri, L. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Rome (Italy); Cole, P. L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Contalbrigo, M. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Cortes, O. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Crede, V. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); D'Angelo, A. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Rome (Italy); Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dashyan, N. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia); De Vita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); De Sanctis, E. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LFN); Deur, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Djalali, C. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Doughty, D. [Christopher Newport Univ., Newport News, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dugger, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Dupre, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); El Alaoui, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); El Fassi, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Elouadrhiri, L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fedotov, G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Fegan, S. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Fleming, J. A. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Garçon, M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Saclay (France). Inst. de Physique Nuclaeaire; Gevorgyan, N. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia); Ghandilyan, Y. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia); Gilfoyle, G. P. [Univ. of Richmond, VA (United States); Giovanetti, K. L. [James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA (Untied States); Girod, F. X. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Saclay (France). Inst. de Physique Nuclaeaire; Glazier, D. I. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Goetz, J. T. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction ? p ? ?p have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (?s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the ? production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the ? natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (? ? K?K?) and neutral- (? ? K0SK0L) KK? decay modes of the ?. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K? track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed ? mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide ?s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K??* channels with pKK? final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive ? photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ? photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  1. ASU EFRC - Principal investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcome to Study HallGraduatePrincipal

  2. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which he has used, among other things, to show that stripes in copper-oxide superconductors are charged. This technique is now in use or under commissioning at every major...

  3. Development of a technique for ex-reactor heating of electrodes and for obtaining voltage-current characteristics of multi-cell thermionic fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalandarishvili, A.G.; Mailov, G.M.; Igumnov, B.N.; Bisko, V.A. [I.N. Vekua Sukhumi Inst. for Physics and Engineering, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of development of a technique for ex-reactor heating with simultaneous recording of voltage-current characteristics of multi-cell thermionic fuel elements (TFE). Heating pulses were applied to electrodes of a thermionic energy converter (TIC), and between these pulses in the antiphase to them there were applied shorter pulses. The TIC emitter was heated by energy of an electric current flowing from the collector (back current heating). Comparison of TIC voltage-current characteristics, obtained for direct (using electric heater) and back current (current from the collector) heating, shows that for the same conditions they differ only slightly. Significant difference may be observed in the case of different profiles along the collector working surface. Results are given of the investigation of multi-cell thermionic fuel assemblies conducted using this technique. The developed technique of the TFE diagnostics can be successfully employed to assess the device quality. Pre-loop testing of multi-cell TFE by the method of back currents allows for cost effective and expeditious thermovacuum treatment of the TFE on thermal stands and for checking of its serviceability prior to its mounting into an irradiation loop or reactor-converter, enables improvements to the TFE design, monitoring of its electric parameters, for example, after vibration testing, and TFE accelerated testing in the most arduous conditions (thermocycling, loss of vacuum, etc.).

  4. Quantum Spin Formulation of the Principal Chiral Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Schlittgen; U. -J. Wiese

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the two-dimensional principal chiral model as a quantum spin model, replacing the classical fields by quantum operators acting in a Hilbert space, and introducing an additional, Euclidean time dimension. Using coherent state path integral techniques, we show that in the limit in which a large representation is chosen for the operators, the low energy excitations of the model describe a principal chiral model in three dimensions. By dimensional reduction, the two-dimensional principal chiral model of classical fields is recovered.

  5. Modules over principal ideal rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieaux, Jules Bellin

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    957 Na)or Sub]sot: Nathematics MODULES OVER PRINCIPAL IDEAL RINGS A Thesis Jules Bellin Vieaux Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department r Student Advisor) August 1957 ACKNOWLEDGMENT I would like... to express my sincere appreciation to Dr. W. E. Koss and Dr. E. R. Keown for their aid and d. irection in the writing of this thesis. J ~ BE V TABLE OP CONTENTS Preface ~ ~ + ~ o ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ oeooe ~ ~ ~ ~oo ~ a ~ oo ~ o ~ oo. o. . e 1 I. Principal...

  6. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  7. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

  8. Modules over principal ideal rings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieaux, Jules Bellin

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    need to note, however, , the difference between the two types of "union" of a set of submodules N 1 of a module N, The first is the "set-theoretic union" con- sisting of representatives of all the distinct elements to be found in the Ni... ideal R, which cons1sts of the elements of the ring. Consider the subset B of R of all elements of the form ra + na, where r and a are ring ele- ments and n is an integer. If rla + nla, r2a + n2a s B, then la + nla 2 2a la r2a + la 2 = (rl - r2)a...

  9. Modeling Masticatory Muscle Force in Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Masticatory Muscle Force in Finite Element Analysis: Sensitivity Analysis Using Principal: electromyography; muscle force; mastication; primates; principal coordinates analysis; finite element analysis Our Origins, University of Arizona, Tempe, Arizona ABSTRACT Our work on a finite element model of the skull

  10. Principal Associate Director - Global Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, information andNetarchive PrincetonbePrincipal

  11. Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Jiang

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and ...

  12. Fibra -Principal Vm a as smart cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Fibra - Principal Vêm aí as smart cities Autor: Filipe Santa Bárbara Editora: N.D. Id: 1636658 Data, sendo interdita qualquer reprodução, mesmo que parcial #12;Fibra - Principal Vêm aí as smart cities parcial #12;Fibra - Principal Vêm aí as smart cities Autor: Filipe Santa Bárbara Editora: N.D. Id: 1636649

  13. Principal Components Analysis for Binary Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seokho

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Formulations of Principal Components Analysis . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 Generalization of Sparse Principal Components Analysis to Binary Variables... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3 Review of Estimation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Overview of Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 II SPARSE PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS FOR BI- NARY DATA...

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson associated with a W Boson using Matrix Element Technique in the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; /Oviedo U.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis a direct search for the Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson at the CDF detector in the Tevatron is presented. This search contributes predominantly in the region of low mass Higgs region, when the mass of Higgs boson is less than about 135 GeV. The search is performed in a final state where the Higgs boson decays into two b quarks, and the W boson decays leptonically, to a charged lepton (it can be an electron or a muon) and a neutrino. This work is organized as follows. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the Standard Model theory of particle physics and presents the SM Higgs boson search results at LEP, and the Tevatron colliders, as well as the prospects for the SM Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The dataset used in this analysis corresponds to 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. That is the luminosity acquired between the beginning of the CDF Run II experiment, February 2002, and May 2009. The relevant aspects, for this analysis, of the Tevatron accelerator and the CDF detector are shown in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4 the particles and observables that make up the WH final state, electrons, muons, E{sub T}, and jets are presented. The CDF standard b-tagging algorithms to identify b jets, and the neural network flavor separator to distinguish them from other flavor jets are also described in Chapter 4. The main background contributions are those coming from heavy flavor production processes, such as those coming from Wbb, Wcc or Wc and tt. The signal and background signatures are discussed in Chapter 5 together with the Monte CArlo generators that have been used to simulate almost all the events used in this thesis. WH candidate events have a high-p{sub T} lepton (electron or muon), high missing transverse energy, and two or more than two jets in the final state. Chapter 6 describes the event selection applied in this analysis and the method used to estimate the background contribution. The Matrix Element method, that was successfully used in the single t0p discovery analysis and many other analyses within the CDF collaboration, is the multivariate technique used in this thesis to discriminate signal from background events. With this technique is possible to calculate a probability for an event to be classified as signal or background. These probabilities are then combined into a discriminant function called the Event Probability Discriminant, EPD, which increases the sensitivity of the WH process. This method is described in detail in Chapter 7. As no evidence for the signal has been found, the results obtained with this work are presented in Chapter 8 in terms of exclusion regions as a function of the mass of the Higgs boso, taking into account the full systematics. The conclusions of this work to obtain the PhD are presnted in Chapter 9.

  15. Elemental Modes of Occurrence in an Illinois #6 Coal and Fractions Prepared by Physical Separation Techniques at a Coal Preparation Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.; Seidu, L; Shah, N; Huffman, G; Honaker, R; Kyger, J; Higgins, B; Robertson, J; Pal, S; Seehra, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to gain better insight into elemental partitioning between clean coal and tailings, modes of occurrence have been determined for a number of major and trace elements (S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Pb) in an Illinois No.6 coal and fractions prepared by physical separation methods at a commercial coal preparation plant. Elemental modes of occurrence were largely determined directly by XAFS or Moessbauer spectroscopic methods because the concentrations of major minerals and wt.% ash were found to be highly correlated for this coal and derived fractions, rendering correlations between individual elements and minerals ambiguous for inferring elemental modes of occurrence. Of the major elements investigated, iron and potassium are shown to be entirely inorganic in occurrence. Most (90%) of the iron is present as pyrite, with minor fractions in the form of clays and sulfates. All potassium is present in illitic clays. Calcium in the original coal is 80-90% inorganic and is divided between calcite, gypsum, and illite, with the remainder of the calcium present as carboxyl-bound calcium. In the clean coal fraction, organically associated Ca exceeds 50% of the total calcium. This organically-associated form of Ca explains the poorer separation of Ca relative to both K and ash. Among the trace elements, V and Cr are predominantly inorganically associated with illite, but minor amounts (5-15% Cr, 20-30% V) of these elements are also organically associated. Estimates of the V and Cr contents of illite are 420 ppm and 630 ppm, respectively, whereas these elements average 20 and 8 ppm in the macerals. Arsenic in the coal is almost entirely associated with pyrite, with an average As content of about 150 ppm, but some As ({approx} 10%) is present as arsenate due to minor oxidation of the pyrite. The mode of occurrence of Zn, although entirely inorganic, is more complex than normally noted for Illinois basin coals; about 2/3 is present in sphalerite, with lesser amounts associated with illite and a third form yet to be conclusively identified. The non-sulfide zinc forms are removed predominantly by the first stage of separation (rotary breaker), whereas the sphalerite is removed by the second stage (heavy media). Germanium is the only trace element determined to have a predominantly organic association.

  16. K-means Clustering via Principal Component Analysis Chris Ding chqding@lbl.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Chris

    K-means Clustering via Principal Component Analysis Chris Ding chqding@lbl.gov Xiaofeng He xhe component analysis (PCA) is a widely used statistical technique for unsuper- vised dimension reduction. K-means that principal components are the continuous solutions to the discrete cluster membership indicators for K-means

  17. 4416 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 62, NO. 8, AUGUST 2014 A Decoupling Technique for Four-Element Symmetric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ke-Li

    ], the defected ground structures [4], [5], the inserted transmission lines [6], and the coupled resonator of the system, date rate and re- liability, where M is the number of antennas on base stations. However, as the number of antenna elements increases in a com- pact wireless device, the electric distance between

  18. Principal Components Instrumental Variable Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelried, Diego; Smith, Richard J.

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ,1]. The parameter µ is the absolute value of the largest correlation between any two elements of z i . 14 The determination of rn can be made through a heuristic rule designed to satisfy (A) and (B). This is inspired by usual practices in the selection of those PC... of eigenvectors (the so-called ‘loadings’) has the form C = ? ? ? ? C¯K?×s 0K?×a CˆK?×(K??s) 0a×s Ia 0a×(K??s) ? ? ? ? therefore ZC = [Z?C¯ : Za : Z?Cˆ ] . (14) The PC of Z used as instruments are Z¯ = ZC r , the first r columns of ZC . From (14) it is clear...

  19. Conflict of Interest Review CRADA Principal Investigator's Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Conflict of Interest Review CRADA Principal Investigator's Certification CRADA Principal Investigator: ______________________________ IC: ___________________________ CRADA ID Number: _________________ Collaborating Organization: ________________________________________________ CRADA Title

  20. Non-principal surface waves in deformed incompressible materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Destrade; Melanie Ottenio; Alexey V. Pichugin; Graham A. Rogerson

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stroh formalism is applied to the analysis of infinitesimal surface wave propagation in a statically, finitely and homogeneously deformed isotropic half-space. The free surface is assumed to coincide with one of the principal planes of the primary strain, but a propagating surface wave is not restricted to a principal direction. A variant of Taziev's technique [Sov. Phys. Acoust. 35 (1989) 535] is used to obtain an explicit expression of the secular equation for the surface wave speed, which possesses no restrictions on the form of the strain energy function. Albeit powerful, this method does not produce a unique solution and additional checks are necessary. However, a class of materials is presented for which an exact secular equation for the surface wave speed can be formulated. This class includes the well-known Mooney-Rivlin model. The main results are illustrated with several numerical examples.

  1. Induction and support of new principals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardlow, Rebecca Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    me to stay focused on student learning and asking the rightme to stay focused on student learning and asking the rightfocused on student achievement (Lambert, 2003). New principals’ success, when facing the steep learning

  2. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  3. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and amore »correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  4. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  5. Multidimensional Gravity on the Principal Bundles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Dzhunushaliev

    1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The multidimensional gravity on the total space of principal bundle is considered. In this theory the gauge fields arise as nondiagonal components of multidimensional metric. The spherically symmetric and cosmology solutions for gravity on SU(2) principal bundle are obtained. The static spherically symmetric solution is wormhole-like solution located between two null surfaces, in contrast to 4D Einstein-Yang-Mills theory where corresponding solution (black hole) located outside of event horizon. Cosmology solution (at least locally) has the bouncing off effect for spatial dimensions. In spirit of Einstein these solutions are vacuum solutions without matter.

  6. ELEMENT 98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W-7405-eng-48 Element 98 S. G. Thompson, K. Street, Jr. , A.3 ELliMENT 98 So Go Thompson, K. street, Jr. , A. Ghiorso

  7. The analysis of mixtures: Application of principal component analysis to XAS spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, S.R.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many samples which are subjected to XAS analysis contain the element of interest in more than one chemical form. The interpretation of the spectras from such samples is often not straightforward, particularly if appropriate model systems are not available. We have applied principal component analysis (PCA) to real and simulated systems which contain mixtures of several species for a given element PCA has been extensively used for the analysis of other types of spectra, including MS, IR and UV-VIS. The application of PCA to XAS is illustrated by examining the speciation of iron within coals. PCA can determine how many different species that contain a particular element are present in a series of spectra. In tandem with model compounds, principal component analysis can suggest which of the models may contribute to the observed XAS spectra.

  8. Vice-Chancellor Provost & Vice-Principal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Vice-Chancellor Provost & Vice-Principal PVC (Estates & Infrastructure) PVC & Head of College PVC & Head of College PVC & Head of College PVC & Head of College PVC & Head of College Registrar & Secretary PVC (Research & Knowledge Transfer) PVC (Education) College of Arts & Law College of Engineering

  9. PIXE-quantified AXSIA : elemental mapping by multivariate spectral analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Antolak, Arlyn J. (Sandia National Labs, Livermore, CA); Campbell, J. L. (University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada); Ryan, C. G. (CSIRO Exploration and Mining Bayview Road, Clayton VIC, Australia); Provencio, Paula Polyak; Barrett, Keith E. (Primecore Systems, Albuquerque, NM,); Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated, nonbiased, multivariate statistical analysis techniques are useful for converting very large amounts of data into a smaller, more manageable number of chemical components (spectra and images) that are needed to describe the measurement. We report the first use of the multivariate spectral analysis program AXSIA (Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis) developed at Sandia National Laboratories to quantitatively analyze micro-PIXE data maps. AXSIA implements a multivariate curve resolution technique that reduces the spectral image data sets into a limited number of physically realizable and easily interpretable components (including both spectra and images). We show that the principal component spectra can be further analyzed using conventional PIXE programs to convert the weighting images into quantitative concentration maps. A common elemental data set has been analyzed using three different PIXE analysis codes and the results compared to the cases when each of these codes is used to separately analyze the associated AXSIA principal component spectral data. We find that these comparisons are in good quantitative agreement with each other.

  10. A new finite element lifting surface technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocurek, James David

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 34 VITA 39 vi LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1. Planar Panel Idealization 13 2. Vortex-Box Lifting Surface Model 14 3. Vortex-Box Trailing Wake Model 4. Spanwise Distribution Of Circulation, Planar Wing 5. Chordwise Distribution Of Circulation... coordinate ? ~ circulation strength, ft /sec 2 p ~ freestream density, slugs/ft 3 o a portion of S and W velocity potential, ft /sec 2 Subscripts a, b, c points in Cartesian space i, g indicies n ~ direction normal to a surface x, y, z with respect...

  11. Principal Component Analysis Over Continuous Subspaces and Intersection of Half-spaces ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Principal Component Analysis Over Continuous Subspaces and Intersection of Half-spaces ? Anat Levin for dimensionality reduction of multivariate data with many application areas in image analysis, pattern recog Component Analysis (PCA) is one of the most pop- ular techniques for dimensionality reduction

  12. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb?¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore »are set on ?(pp??WH)×B(H?bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  13. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb?¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on ?(pp??WH)×B(H?bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  14. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a $W$ Boson Using a Matrix Element Technique at CDF in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between m{sub H} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  15. Principal Investigators - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases Archive PublicationsEconomy »Principal

  16. Principal Investigators | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.7 348,016.0stellaratorsMid-AmericaGrid Wabash ValleyPrincipal

  17. NERSC Allocations: For Principal Investigators and Managers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1Allocations NERSC Allocations: for Principal

  18. Principal Typings for Explicit Substitutions Daniel Lima Ventura1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamareddine, Fairouz

    Principal Typings for Explicit Substitutions Calculi Daniel Lima Ventura1 , Mauricio Ayala-Rinc´on1, Scotland UK {ventura,ayala}@mat.unb.br, fairouz@macs.hw.ac.uk Abstract. Having principal typings (for short

  19. Congrs de lAFC PERTINENCE DES PRINCIPES EQUATEUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    internationaux comme le Global Compact, le GRI, le Carbon Discolsure Project, les Principes Equateur, lISO 26 000

  20. Programmatic Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

  1. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  2. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hoffman, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development on the...

  3. Extension Education Projects Principal Investigator: Jesse C. LaPrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Demonstrating Stream Restoration: Natural Channel Design, Stormwater Management and Exotic Species Control Amount of Award: $152,000 Title of Award: Developing Community-Based Restoration Initiatives Principal

  4. A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public...

  5. Madelyn Creedon Confirmed as Principal Deputy Administrator for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE) Principal Deputy Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). "Madelyn Creedon's confirmation comes at a critical point for the National Nuclear...

  6. Scalability Analysis of Partitioning Strategies for Finite Element Graphs. \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    Scalability Analysis of Partitioning Strategies for Finite Element Graphs. \\Lambda Grama Y. Ananth Y. Grama ananth@cs:umn:edu Abstract Issues of partitioning Finite Element Graphs are central for implementing the Finite Element Method (FEM). Parallel formulations of finite element techniques require

  7. Answer to a question on the principal ideal theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahen, Paul-Jean

    over a (nonzero) principal ideal and satisfies n=1 pn = 0 but such that htp > 1. AMS subject (with 1). It is known that if p is a finitely generated prime ideal of D such that htp = 1, then n=1 pn) principal ideal, then does htp = 1. We show in this paper that the answer turns out to be negative

  8. Minutes: Wednesday 27 March 2013 Present : Principal (in the chair)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    in the power and energy sector had been made honorary graduates of the University at a specially-arranged Power. 11563 Principal's Report The Principal updated Senate on the following: Industry and academic leaders and Energy event held in the Glasgow Science Centre with the First Minister delivering the keynote address

  9. Three key elements necessary for successful testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time surface readout during data acquisition, downhole shutting, and appropriate pressure gauges are three key elements for successful well tests. These elements are often overlooked in designing and implementing a successful well test. This second in a series of three articles on well testing shows how these elements affected the testing of an example well. Also reviewed are the capabilities of several new testing tools and techniques.

  10. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

  14. Abstract--Principal component analysis (PCA) is a commonly applied technique for data analysis and processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masashi

    Institute "Nikola Tesla", Belgrade, Serbia (phone: +81-3-7734-2699; fax: +81-3-7734-2699; e-mail: marko@ sg

  15. Student Award Competition Finite Element EEG and MEG Simulations for Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhukov, Leonid

    than would be possible using linear elements alone. [1] D.S. Burnett. Finite Element Analysis: FromStudent Award Competition Finite Element EEG and MEG Simulations for Realistic Head Models be approximated by a technique such as the finite element method [1]. Most applications of the finite element

  16. IMPROVED SEARCH OF PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS DATABASES FOR SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC INVERSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casini, R.; Lites, B. W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Ramos, A. Asensio [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, c/Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ariste, A. Lopez [THEMIS, CNRS UPS 853, c/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a simple technique for the acceleration of spectro-polarimetric inversions based on principal component analysis (PCA) of Stokes profiles. This technique involves the indexing of the database models based on the sign of the projections (PCA coefficients) of the first few relevant orders of principal components of the four Stokes parameters. In this way, each model in the database can be attributed a distinctive binary number of 2{sup 4n} bits, where n is the number of PCA orders used for the indexing. Each of these binary numbers (indices) identifies a group of ''compatible'' models for the inversion of a given set of observed Stokes profiles sharing the same index. The complete set of the binary numbers so constructed evidently determines a partition of the database. The search of the database for the PCA inversion of spectro-polarimetric data can profit greatly from this indexing. In practical cases it becomes possible to approach the ideal acceleration factor of 2{sup 4n} as compared to the systematic search of a non-indexed database for a traditional PCA inversion. This indexing method relies on the existence of a physical meaning in the sign of the PCA coefficients of a model. For this reason, the presence of model ambiguities and of spectro-polarimetric noise in the observations limits in practice the number n of relevant PCA orders that can be used for the indexing.

  17. G-Varieties and the Principal Minors of Symmetric Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oeding, Luke

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The variety of principal minors of nxn symmetric matrices, denoted Zn, can be described naturally as a projection from the Lagrangian Grassmannian. Moreover, Zn is invariant under the action of a group G C GL(2n) isomorphic to (SL(2)xn) x Sn. One...

  18. Effect of Intermediate Principal Stress on Overconsolidated Kaolin Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    Effect of Intermediate Principal Stress on Overconsolidated Kaolin Clay Amit Prashant1 and Dayakar of overconsolidated kaolin clay is investigated using three-dimensional true triaxial testing on cubical specimens specimens under stress and strain-control modes. Undrained tests on kaolin clay show that the following vary

  19. Principal Component Analysis for Fault Detection and Structure Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Principal Component Analysis for Fault Detection and Structure Health Monitoring Nicolas Stoffels structure to ensure its health monitoring. The proposed approach is based on the PCA algorithm. Once PCA promptly and precisely [5]. FDI is also important in SHM (Structure Health Monitoring) because of aging

  20. Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast Principal Author: Ben Arikawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast March 1998 Principal Author: Ben Arikawa Electricity 1997 FORE08.DOC Page 1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE REVISED 1997 RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICE FORECAST Introduction The Electricity Analysis Office of the California Energy Commission

  1. Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine diagnostics G of a normally aspirated diesel engine contain valu­ able information on the health of the combustion chamber induced in a 4­stroke diesel engine and the ensuing vi­ bration signals recorded. Three different feature

  2. Principal Research Engineer Cooper Tire and Rubber Company,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    W. V. Mars Principal Research Engineer Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, 701 Lima Ave., Findlay, Ohio Natural Rubber Under Monotonic and Cyclic Multiaxial Stress States This work explores the monotonic and cyclic behaviors of filled, natural rubber. Results of stress-strain experiments conducted under stress

  3. Finite Element Analysis of the Schroedinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avtar S. Sehra

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to test the application of the finite element method to quantum mechanical problems, in particular for solving the Schroedinger equation. We begin with an overview of quantum mechanics, and standard numerical techniques. We then give an introduction to finite element analysis using the diffusion equation as an example. Three numerical time evolution methods are considered: the (tried and tested) Crank-Nicolson method, the continuous space-time method, and the discontinuous space-time method.

  4. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  5. Strange matrix elements of the nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, R; Woloshyn, R M; Lewis, Randy

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the disconnected contributions to matrix elements of the vector current and scalar density have been obtained for the nucleon from the Wilson action at beta=6 using a stochastic estimator technique and 2000 quenched configurations. Various methods for analysis are employed and chiral extrapolations are discussed.

  6. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  7. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Principal Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility PlantsEnd-UsePrincipal

  8. Center for Inverse Design: Principal Investigators in the Center for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruaryMetalControlInverse Design Principal

  9. Principal Investigators | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases Archive PublicationsEconomy »PrincipalEnergy

  10. Principal Associate Directorate for Science, Technology, and Engineering (PADSTE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infrastructure: Smart Grids Grid Design - develop efficient and robust integration of geographically distributed imposed by the transmission of electrical power. Grid Control - develop distributed control techniques

  11. Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring with Coupled-Filed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring) is emerging as an effective and powerful technique in structural health monitoring (SHM). Modeling to analytical calculation and experimental data. Key words: Structural Health Monitoring, PWAS, finite element

  12. Membrane bioreactor fouling behaviour assessment through principal component analysis and fuzzy clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Membrane bioreactor fouling behaviour assessment through principal component analysis and fuzzy Keywords: Factor analysis Fuzzy clustering Membrane bioreactor Membrane fouling Monitoring Principal component analysis a b s t r a c t Adequate membrane bioreactor operation requires frequent evaluation

  13. Principal Perceptions of School Capacity to Meet Requirements of No Child Left Behind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Richard Donald

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine if significant differences existed in principals’ perceptions of their school’s capacity to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements between principals whose schools failed to meet AYP requirements...

  14. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  15. POLICY STATEMENT ON PERCENT SALARY FOR PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS PAID EXCLUSIVELY FROM FEDERAL AWARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    POLICY STATEMENT ON PERCENT SALARY FOR PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS PAID EXCLUSIVELY FROM FEDERAL AWARDS awards, including federal flow through-funding. This Policy applies to all Principal Investigators whose salary is derived entirely from federal awards. This Policy does not apply to Principal Investigators who

  16. CONTEXTUALLY ADAPTIVE SIGNAL REPRESENTATION USING CONDITIONAL PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajashekar, Umesh

    is the construction of bases that are adapted to individual signal in- stances. Here we develop a new framework. Index Terms-- Adaptive basis, conditional PCA, self-similarities, image modeling, image representation traditional methods, primarily due to the cost of encoding the indices of selected basis elements

  17. Correlation structure and principal components in global crude oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, George J; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates the correlation structure of the global crude oil market using the daily returns of 71 oil price time series across the world from 1992 to 2012. We identify from the correlation matrix six clusters of time series exhibiting evident geographical traits, which supports Weiner's (1991) regionalization hypothesis of the global oil market. We find that intra-cluster pairs of time series are highly correlated while inter-cluster pairs have relatively low correlations. Principal component analysis shows that most eigenvalues of the correlation matrix locate outside the prediction of the random matrix theory and these deviating eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors contain rich economic information. Specifically, the largest eigenvalue reflects a collective effect of the global market, other four largest eigenvalues possess a partitioning function to distinguish the six clusters, and the smallest eigenvalues highlight the pairs of time series with the largest correlation coefficie...

  18. Fuel elements of thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Systems Assessment Dept.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N. [RI SIA Lutch, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

  19. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  20. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  1. Yearly average performance of the principal solar collector types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabl, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of hour-by-hour simulations for 26 meteorological stations are used to derive universal correlations for the yearly total energy that can be delivered by the principal solar collector types: flat plate, evacuated tubes, CPC, single- and dual-axis tracking collectors, and central receiver. The correlations are first- and second-order polynomials in yearly average insolation, latitude, and threshold (= heat loss/optical efficiency). With these correlations, the yearly collectible energy can be found by multiplying the coordinates of a single graph by the collector parameters, which reproduces the results of hour-by-hour simulations with an accuracy (rms error) of 2% for flat plates and 2% to 4% for concentrators. This method can be applied to collectors that operate year-around in such a way that no collected energy is discarded, including photovoltaic systems, solar-augmented industrial process heat systems, and solar thermal power systems. The method is also recommended for rating collectors of different type or manufacturer by yearly average performance, evaluating the effects of collector degradation, the benefits of collector cleaning, and the gains from collector improvements (due to enhanced optical efficiency or decreased heat loss per absorber surface). For most of these applications, the method is accurate enough to replace a system simulation.

  2. Use of principal components analysis and three-dimensional atmospheric-transport models for reactor-consequence evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Walton, J.J.; Alpert, D.J.; Johnson, J.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work explores the use of principal components analysis coupled to three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models for evaluating the environmental consequences of reactor accidents. This permits the inclusion of meteorological data from multiple sites and the effects of topography in the consequence evaluation; features not normally included in such analyses. The technique identifies prevailing regional wind patterns and their frequencies for use in the transport and dispersion calculations. Analysis of a hypothetical accident scenario involving a release of radioactivity from a reactor situated in a river valley indicated the technique is quite useful whenever recurring wind patterns exist, as is often the case in complex terrain situations. Considerable differences were revealed in a comparison with results obtained from a more conventional Gaussian plume model using only the reactor site meteorology and no topographic effects.

  3. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Brandt; Gaston Gutierrez; Michael H. L. S. Wang; Zhenyu Ye

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  4. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Oleg; Wang, Michael H L S; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by two orders of magnitude. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing e...

  5. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O.; Gutierrez, G.; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Z.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of themore »matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  6. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O. [Physikalisches Inst, Gottingen (Germany); Univ. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Gutierrez, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Wang, M. H.L.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Ye, Z. [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  7. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  8. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  9. Finite Element Analysis Skateboard Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De, Suvranu

    Finite Element Analysis Of a Skateboard Truck #12;2 Executive Summary: Engineering is and always is an element of the `truck,' which holds the wheels. Finite Element analysis will be conducted on this piece a combination of SolidWorks (for modeling) and ABAQUS (for finite element analysis). It is evident from

  10. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logg, Anders; Wells, G N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ´de´lec 1980]. (4) L2-conforming finite elements: (a) DGq, arbitrary degree discontinuous Lagrange elements; and (b) CR1, first degree Crouzeix–Raviart5 elements [Crouzeix and Raviart 1973]. Arbitrary combinations of the above elements may be used to define...

  11. Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths* and Gordon A. Fenton. The advanced method, called the random finite element method (RFEM), uses elasto- plasticity combined nonlinear finite element methods are combined with ran- dom field generation techniques. This method, called

  12. Perception of principals in the southern, urban U.S. and eastern, urban China regarding the selection, preparation, and professional development of elementary principals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jie

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this study is to explore the similarities and differences in the selection process, preparation programs and the professional development practices as perceived by elementary school principals in urban public schools in the southern U.S and urban public...

  13. Benchmarking of finite element codes for radioactive material transportation packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased power of computers and computer codes makes the use of nonlinear dynamic finite element analyses attractive for use as a tool used in the design and certification of radioactive material transportation packages. For this analysis technique to be acceptable it must be demonstrated. The technique has the ability to accurately capture the response of the packages to accident environments required by the regulations. The best method of demonstrating this ability is via a series of benchmark analyses. In this paper three benchmark problems involving significant inelastic deformations will be discussed. One of the problems has been analyzed using many different finite element codes. The other two problems involve comparison of finite element calculations to the results form physical tests. The ability of the finite element method to accurately capture the response in these three problems indicates the method should be acceptable for radioactive material transportation package design and certification.

  14. Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappell, W R

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

  15. Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental thorium uranium Relativeabundance(Si=106)Relative Abundance in the Sun · non-uniform trend G302.protons 90 234Th 145 #12;5 Alpha Decay - Loss of He Atom · Decay of Uranium-238 to Thorium-234 G302

  16. BLIND SEPARATION OF UNCORRELATED SOURCES VIA PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    BLIND SEPARATION OF UNCORRELATED SOURCES VIA PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF OBSERVATIONS, principe]@cnel.ufl.edu, luis@dicom.unican.es ABSTRACT A well-known fact in blind deconvolution) of the received signal. For blind source separation, however, a similar special case, equivalent to the situation

  17. Asset-based poverty analysis in rural Bangladesh: A comparison of principal component analysis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mound, Jon

    1 Asset-based poverty analysis in rural Bangladesh: A comparison of principal component analysis not be regarded as the views of SRI or The University of Leeds. #12;3 Asset-based poverty analysis in rural The trend towards multi-dimensional poverty assessment ..................... 5 Principal component analysis

  18. Magnetically-Assisted Statistical Assembly - a new heterogeneous integration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonstad, Clifton G. Jr.

    This paper presents a new technique for the monolithic heterogeneous integration of compound semiconductor devices with silicon integrated circuits, and establishes the theoretical foundation for a key element of the ...

  19. Precision Measurement of Transition Matrix Elements via Light Shift Cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Herold; V. D. Vaidya; X. Li; S. L. Rolston; J. V. Porto; M. S. Safronova

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for accurate determination of atomic transition matrix elements at the 10^{-3} level. Measurements of the ac Stark (light) shift around "magic-zero" wavelengths, where the light shift vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the first measurement of the 5s-6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 nm and 423 nm zeros with a sequence of standing wave pulses. In conjunction with existing theoretical and experimental data, we find 0.3236(9) e a_0 and 0.5230(8) e a_0 for the 5s-6p_{1/2} and 5s-6p_{3/2} elements, respectively, an order of magnitude more accurate than the best theoretical values. This technique can provide needed, accurate matrix elements for many atoms, including those used in atomic clocks, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum information.

  20. The CEBAF Element Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

  1. Automation of the matrix element reweighting method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artoisenet; V. Lemaître; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

  2. New Technique Gives a Deeper Look into the Chemistry of Interfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Technique Gives a Deeper Look into the Chemistry of Interfaces Print A new technique developed at the ALS offers sub-nanometer depth resolution of every chemical element to be...

  3. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  4. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  5. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a variable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line.

  6. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, C.

    1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a determinable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line. 4 figs.

  7. High School Principals' Perceptions of Their Effectiveness in Leading District Initiated High School Reform: An Analysis of High School Principals Previously Engaged in High School Reform in an Urban Texas School District 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Carlos

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research has described a changed central office perspective that not only includes campus principals as part of the district's leadership team, but also focuses on developing principals' instructional abilities ...

  8. Principal Field Agronomist (Research Associate I or II) Position Summary: Research Associate I or II (Principal Field Agronomist) responsible for all field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including taking primary responsibility for maintenance and repair of all equipment, buildings, and tools or II (Principal Field Agronomist) responsible for all field operations for the CSU Crops Testing with farmers, scientists, government representatives, and crop commodity groups. The normal annual work demands

  9. Investigating the Relationship between the Perceptions of Principals and Teachers on Site-Based Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Sandra Deshon

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this record of study was to investigate the nature of relationships between the perceptions of principals and teachers on site-based decision making (SBDM) and to uncover patterns existing in relationships between and among state...

  10. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  11. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation xxx (2006) xxxxxx Computing the principal eigenvalue of the Laplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maire, Sylvain

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematics and Computers in Simulation xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Computing the principal eigenvalue. Maire / Mathematics and Computers in Simulation xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Feynman­Kac formula. We intend to use

  12. Connecting Principals' Professional Development to Practice: The Mediating Roles of Context and Phronesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Patricia Anne

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    305A080696) and conducted by the Education Leadership Research Center (ELRC) at Texas A&M University. Through the qualitative case study findings from that research project, a model emerged suggesting principals employ a progressive and recursive...

  13. Using Mentor-Coaching to Refine Instructional Supervision Skills of Developing Principals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissane-Long, Akida Lesli

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. (2003). More than Mentor-coachs: Principal Coaching.Aren't Born- They're Mentor-coached: Are We Investing EnoughAPPENDIX 9 OVERVIEW OF DAY 1 MENTOR-COACH PRINICPAL TRAINING

  14. The Relationship Between the Leadership Responsibilities of Title I School Principals and Student Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, George H.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ranging from Input with r s = .169 to Focus with r s = .018. This indicates principals of successful Title I schools are proactive with their leadership which increases student overall achievement. The second research question was an examination...

  15. PRINCIPALS' PERCEPTIONS OF BARRIERS TO DISMISSAL OF POOR-PERFORMING TEACHERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandoy, Jason Robert

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine which factors influence items that school principals consider "barriers" to dismissal of "incompetent" or "poor performing" teachers. This study determines if specific ...

  16. Title: CEL Solar Photovoltaic Power Project in El Salvador Principal Investigator: Abbas Ghassemi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    environment for El Salvador · Create partnerships with leading U.S. solar industry companies · SelectTitle: CEL Solar Photovoltaic Power Project in El Salvador Principal Investigator: Abbas Ghassemi solar resource, studying different technology options, anticipating performance, and evaluating

  17. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  18. A study of discrete and continuum joint modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, J.; Brown, S.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental study in which finite element and discrete element techniques were used to analyze a layered polycarbonate plate model subjected to uniaxial compression. Also, the two analysis techniques were used to compute the response of an eight meter diameter drift in jointed-rock. The drift was subjected to in-situ and far-field induced thermal stresses. The finite element analyses used a continuum rock model to represent the jointed-rock. A comparison of the analyses showed that the finite element continuum joint model consistently predicted less joint slippage than did the discrete element analyses, although far-field displacements compared well.

  19. Resistive hydrogen sensing element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

  20. The perceptions of novice and veteran teachers on the role of the principal in the retention of urban novice teachers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpy-Simpson, Claudine L.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , the study revealed that teachers want to know the expectation of principals and their evaluation of them as a novice. In addition, they expect principals to play a major role in providing professional development support for teaching strategies, classroom...

  1. ME 872 -Finite Element Methods Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Alejandro

    Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis (Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering problems Special topics: Lagrange multipliers, adaptive finite elements, sensitivity analysis, nonlinearME 872 - Finite Element Methods Spring 2014 Catalog Description: Theory and application

  2. FOCUS ON STUDENTS: Principal's Task Force on Student Life and Learning at McGill Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    FOCUS ON STUDENTS: Principal's Task Force on Student Life and Learning at McGill Final Report, the Principal's Task Force on Student Life and Learning at McGill was struck by Principal Heather Munroe mandate to review issues affecting student life and learning at McGill, and has aimed to make a small

  3. On-line gas chromatographic studies of rutherfordium (Element 104), hahnium (Element 105), and homologs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadkhodayan, B.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-phase isothermal chromatogaphy is a method by which volatile compounds of different chemical elements can be separated according to their volatilities. The technique, coupled with theoretical modeling of the processes occurring in the chromatogaphy column, provides accurate determination of thermodynamic properties (e.g., adsorption enthalpies) for compounds of elements, such as the transactinides, which can only be produced on an atom-at-a-time basis. In addition, the chemical selectivity of the isothermal chromatogaphy technique provides the decontamination from interfering activities necessary for the determination of the nuclear decay properties of isotopes of the transactinide elements. Volatility measurements were performed on chloride species of Rf and its group 4 homologs, Zr and Hf, as well as Ha and its group 5 homologs, Nb and Ta. Adsorption enthalpies were calculated for all species using a Monte Carlo code simulation based on a microscopic model for gas thermochromatography in open columns with laminar flow of the carrier gas. Preliminary results are presented for Zr- and Nb-bromides.

  4. Trace elements in coal by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Wilson, C.R.; Pestovich, J. Jr. [WAL Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A need and a demand exist for determining trace elements in coal and coal related by-products, especially those elements which may potentially be a health hazard. The provisions of the 1990 clean air act require that the EPA evaluate the emissions of electric utilities for trace elements and other potentially hazardous organic compounds. The coal fired electric utility industry supplies roughly 60% of the total generating capacity of 2,882,525 million kilowatt hours (nearly 3 trillion kilowatt hours) generated in the U.S. This is accomplished by 414 power plants scattered across the country that burned 813,508,000 short tons of coal in 1993. The relative volatility of some inorganic constituents in coal makes them more prone to be emitted to the atmosphere following combustion. The production of analytical data for trace elements is known to be a difficult task in coal and by-products of coal combustion (fly ash, bottom ash, gas streams, etc.), in terms of both sample collection and analytical determinations. There are several common analytical methods available to the analyst to determine trace elements in coal and coal by-products. In general analytical germs, the material to be analyzed can be totally solubilized (or extracted), or the elements analytes can be determined in the material as a solid. A relatively new elemental technique, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS) can be used with solids as well. This new analytical technique had never before been applied directly to coal. The radio frequency-glow discharge quadropole mass spectrometer was used to analyze coal directly for the first time ever by rf-GDMS. The rf-GDMS technique is described.

  5. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  6. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  7. Design of a tricycle chassis using computer-aided design and finite element analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Elliot

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite element analysis and computer-aided design are powerful tools for modeling complex systems and their responses to external stimuli. This paper explores how these techniques were employed in a highly iterative design ...

  8. Use of the iterative solution method for coupled finite element and boundary element modeling; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koteras, J.R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunnels buried deep within the earth constitute an important class geomechanics problems. Two numerical techniques used for the analysis of geomechanics problems, the finite element method and the boundary element method, have complementary characteristics for applications to problems of this type. The usefulness of combining these two methods for use as a geomechanics analysis tool has been recognized for some time, and a number of coupling techniques have been proposed. However, not all of them lend themselves to efficient computational implementations for large-scale problems. This report examines a coupling technique that can form the basis for an efficient analysis tool for large scale geomechanics problems through the use of an iterative equation solver.

  9. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  10. MEAN-FLUX-REGULATED PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS CONTINUUM FITTING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY Ly{alpha} FOREST SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Spergel, David N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Suzuki, Nao, E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuum fitting is an important aspect of Ly{alpha} forest science, since errors in the derived optical depths scale with the fractional continuum error. However, traditional methods of estimating continua in noisy and moderate-resolution spectra (e.g., Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS; S/N {approx}< 10 pixel{sup -1} and R {approx} 2000), such as power-law extrapolation or dividing by the mean spectrum, achieve no better than {approx}15% rms accuracy. To improve on this, we introduce mean-flux-regulated principal component analysis (MF-PCA) continuum fitting. In this technique, PCA fitting is carried out redward of the quasar Ly{alpha} line in order to provide a prediction for the shape of the Ly{alpha} forest continuum. The slope and amplitude of this continuum prediction is then corrected using external constraints for the Ly{alpha} forest mean flux. This requires prior knowledge of the mean flux, (F), but significantly improves the accuracy of the flux transmission, F {identical_to} exp (- {tau}), estimated from each pixel. From tests on mock spectra, we find that MF-PCA reduces the errors to 8% rms in S/N {approx} 2 spectra, and <5% rms in spectra with S/N {approx}> 5. The residual Fourier power in the continuum is decreased by a factor of a few in comparison with dividing by the mean continuum, enabling Ly{alpha} flux power spectrum measurements to be extended to {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign larger scales. Using this new technique, we make available continuum fits for 12,069 z > 2.3 Ly{alpha} forest spectra from SDSS Data Release 7 for use by the community. This technique is also applicable to future releases of the ongoing Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey, which obtains spectra for {approx}150, 000 Ly{alpha} forest spectra at low signal-to-noise (S/N {approx} 2).

  11. Elemental ABAREX -- a user's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ELEMENTAL ABAREX is an extended version of the spherical optical-statistical model code ABAREX, designed for the interpretation of neutron interactions with elemental targets consisting of up to ten isotopes. The contributions from each of the isotopes of the element are explicitly dealt with, and combined for comparison with the elemental observables. Calculations and statistical fitting of experimental data are considered. The code is written in FORTRAN-77 and arranged for use on the IBM-compatible personal computer (PC), but it should operate effectively on a number of other systems, particularly VAX/VMS and IBM work stations. Effort is taken to make the code user friendly. With this document a reasonably skilled individual should become fluent with the use of the code in a brief period of time.

  12. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  13. The Relationship Between Teachers' Stages of Concern about an Educational Innovation and Their Principals' Administrative Styles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonally, Dawn

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    List of Tables ix List of Figures x Chapter I. Introduction to the Problem 1 Problem 5 ^he Setting for This Study 5 Terms 8 II. Review of the Literature 15 Change in Education 15 Concerns-Based Adoption Model 19 Factors Affecting Change... in Education 2 5 Implementation 2 6 The Principals' Role 28 Change Facilitator Style 28 Facilitator Role in the Change Process 31 The Principal as Second Change Facilitator 34 Summary 3 7 III. Methodology 3 9 Introduction 3 9 Sample 3 9 Instruments...

  14. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  15. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  16. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  17. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  18. Faculty of Arts and Science Procedure for Review of Principal's Vision Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    of Departments. 30 Jan ­ 19 Feb Departmental responses to Principal's template prepared and discussed. 5 Feb distributed to members of Faculty. 5 Mar Faculty Board. Discussion of draft response. 19 Mar Committee of Departments. Discussion of draft response. 20 Mar ­ 1 Apr Preparation of revised Faculty response. 2 Apr

  19. Development of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim Ashfaq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    goals of climate modeling. Water supports the ecosystems as well as a wide range of human activities to improve region- al predictions of the hydrologic cycle to address climate change impacts, adaptationDevelopment of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim

  20. Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Summary of the Principal Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction ­ Problems Summary of the Principal Formulas The differential equation of motion of an oscillator acted upon by dry friction: J ¨ = -D( + m) for > 0, J ¨ = -D cases in which the effects either of viscous friction or of dry friction predominate: a = 4m T = 4 m

  1. Impact of Wind Farms on Birds and Bats in Iowa Principal Investigator: Stephen J. Dinsmore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    Impact of Wind Farms on Birds and Bats in Iowa Principal Investigator: Stephen J. Dinsmore of Natural Resources, State Wildlife Grant Goals and Objectives: Document bird use at wind farm of bird community responses at wind farms and paired control sites. This will produce a measure

  2. Principal Component Analysis Over Continuous Subspaces and Intersection of Half-spaces?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashua, Amnon

    Principal Component Analysis Over Continuous Subspaces and Intersection of Half-spaces? Anat Levin for dimensionality reduction of multivariate data with many application areas in image analysis, pattern recog for data analysis comes from its e cient computational mechanism, the fact that it is well understood

  3. Page 1 of 2 This document stipulates the responsibilities of principal investigators in managing their sponsored

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Page 1 of 2 I. Purpose This document stipulates the responsibilities of principal investigators in managing their sponsored projects. II. Policy Statement The PI has overall responsibility for the technical and fiscal management of a sponsored project, including staying within funding limits, adhering to reporting

  4. Optimization and control of large power engineering systems (principal investigation results)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, L.S.; Gorskii, Yu.M.; Krumm, L.A.; Makarov, A.A.; Merenkov, A.P.; Popyrin, L.S.; Rudenko, Yu.N.; Sher, I.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Principal scientific and practical results of investigations in the development of theory and methods of optimization and control of large power engineering systems, conducted under the scientific and methodological management of the USSR Academy of Sciences Scientific Council on complex problems of power engineering are characterized and the investigation development tasks are formulated. 52 refs.

  5. Extracting Attack Knowledge Using Principal-subordinate Consequence Tagging Case Grammar and Alerts Semantic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansari, Nirwan

    Extracting Attack Knowledge Using Principal-subordinate Consequence Tagging Case Grammar and Alerts networks from Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks has become a critical issue that must be tackled, the overwhelming volume of alerts makes it difficult for security administrators to analyze and extract the attack

  6. Best Management Practices for Hybrid Striped Bass Culture Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    in from Kansas on May 15 while sunshine bass were shipped in from Keo-Fish Farms, AR two days later. FryBest Management Practices for Hybrid Striped Bass Culture Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris Goals and Objectives: o Perform literature search on extensively-reared hybrid striped bass (HSB

  7. Student performance and leadership practices of selected elementary school principals: a cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Stacey Rae

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    percentile) or at a higher level (70th percentile or above). As a group, the principals in this study rated themselves higher overall in regard to perceived leadership practices than did their observers, but only significantly higher on three of the five...

  8. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  9. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas A Boden (CDIAC Di-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas A Boden (CDIAC Di of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) PARTNERS: National Aeronautic and Space Administra- tion's (NASA://cdiac.ornl.gov/ PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate -change

  10. Analysis of Principal Gas Products During Combustion of Polyether Polyurethane Foam at Different Irradiance Levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante Valencia, Lucas; Rogaume, Thomas; Guillaume, Eric; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the release of the principal gas species produced during the combustion of a non-flame-retarded Polyether Polyurethane Foam (PPUF) of density of 20.9 kg/m^3 in the cone calorimeter. Five irradiance levels ...

  11. Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD (Item 7a, Face Page) $ CONSORTIUM/CONTRACTUAL COSTS FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS TOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD $ PHS 398 (Rev. 6/09) Page

  12. Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR NEXT BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR NEXT BUDGET by category) OTHER EXPENSES (Itemize by category) SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR NEXT BUDGET PERIOD $ CONSORTIUM FOR NEXT BUDGET PERIOD (Item 8a, Face Page) $ Page Form Page 2PHS 2590 (Rev. 08/12) #12;

  13. Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD (Item 7a, Face Page) $ CONSORTIUM/CONTRACTUAL COSTS FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS TOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD $ Page Form Page 4 PHS 398

  14. Hydrogen Composite Tank Program Principal Investigator: Dr. Neel Sirosh, Director of Fuel Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted as an automotive fuel. However, the lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage, particularly for an onHydrogen Composite Tank Program Principal Investigator: Dr. Neel Sirosh, Director of Fuel Storage

  15. The Heaviest Elements in the Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    keep finding new elements. Where are they? Where are they? Where are they? Ytterby, Sweden is the namesake of four elements: ytterbium, yttrium, erbium, and terbium. The...

  16. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  17. A Diagnostic Technique for Multilevel Inverters Based on a Genetic-Algorithm to Select

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    it uses several dc voltage sources which would be available from batteries or fuel cells [1]. A possibleA Diagnostic Technique for Multilevel Inverters Based on a Genetic-Algorithm to Select a Principal or short circuit) occurs at a semiconductor power switch in a cell, it will cause an unbalanced output

  18. BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES presents an approach to creating a polyhedral model of building roof from LiDAR point clouds using. The normal vectors are then clustered together to determine the principal directions of the roof planes

  19. Evaluation of Covariances for Actinides and Light Elements at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: kawano@lanl.gov; Talou, P.; Young, P.G.; Hale, G.; Chadwick, M.B.; Little, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos evaluates covariances for the evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF), mainly for actinides above the resonance region and for light elements in the entire energy range. We also develop techniques to evaluate the covariance data, like Bayesian and least-squares fitting methods, which are important to explore the uncertainty information on different types of physical quantities such as elastic scattering angular distribution, or prompt neutron fission spectra. This paper summarizes our current activities of the covariance evaluation work at LANL, including the actinide and light element data mainly for criticality safety studies and transmutation technology. The Bayesian method based on the Kalman filter technique, which combines uncertainties in the theoretical model and experimental data, is discussed.

  20. Method of fabricating reflection-mode EUV diffraction elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for fabricating a well-controlled, quantized-level, engineered surface that serves as substrates for EUV reflection multilayer overcomes problems associated with the fabrication of reflective EUV diffraction elements. The technique when employed to fabricate an EUV diffraction element that includes the steps of: (a) forming an etch stack comprising alternating layers of first and second materials on a substrate surface where the two material can provide relative etch selectivity; (b) creating a relief profile in the etch stack wherein the relief profile has a defined contour; and (c) depositing a multilayer reflection film over the relief profile wherein the film has an outer contour that substantially matches that of the relief profile. For a typical EUV multilayer, if the features on the substrate are larger than 50 nm, the multilayer will be conformal to the substrate. Thus, the phase imparted to the reflected wavefront will closely match that geometrically set by the surface height profile.

  1. Reliability checks on the Indo-US Stellar Spectral Library using Artificial Neural Networks and Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinder P. Singh; Manabu Yuasa; Nawo Yamamoto; Ranjan Gupta

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indo-US coud\\'{e} feed stellar spectral library (CFLIB) made available to the astronomical community recently by Valdes et al. (2004) contains spectra of 1273 stars in the spectral region 3460 to 9464 \\AA at a high resolution of 1 \\AA FWHM and a wide range of spectral types. Cross-checking the reliability of this database is an important and desirable exercise since a number of stars in this database have no known spectral types and a considerable fraction of stars has not so complete coverage in the full wavelength region of 3460-9464 \\AA resulting in gaps ranging from a few \\AA to several tens of \\AA. In this paper, we use an automated classification scheme based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to classify all 1273 stars in the database. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) is carried out to reduce the dimensionality of the data set before the spectra are classified by the ANN. Most importantly, we have successfully demonstrated employment of a variation of the PCA technique to restore the missing data in a sample of 300 stars out of the CFLIB.

  2. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  3. An application of stochastic finite element method in structural reliabiity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Sanjay

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN APPLICATION OF STOCHASTIC FINITE ELEMENT METHOD IN STRUCTURAL RELIABILITY A Thesis by SANJAY AGRAWAL Approved as to style and content by: Kostas apadimitriou (Chair of Committee) John M... of the beam on the buckling load. The statistical methodology can be efficiently used with available FORM/SORM reliability techniques to compute the probability of failure of the beam due to buckling. Random fields are used to quantify the modeling...

  4. Analysis of the principal's perceptions of the implementation and impact of the accelerated reader and other selected reading strategies used by Texas gold performance elementary schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Olivia Carol

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ) to identify the principal??s perception of the levels of implementation and impact of selected reading strategies used by selected elementary schools in Texas to improve student success in reading and (2) to determine the principal??s perception of the extent...

  5. Element

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4DimitriJuneEnergy(FebruaryDepartmental

  6. Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    /dissertation documents have a uniform appearance and are suitable for archiving. The requirements follow the guidelines to the following guidelines are acceptable. · All margins must be at least 1.25" and may not be more than 1/dissertation should be double-spaced. #12;Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements 2012 version Paragraph Indentation

  7. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  8. Fast acting multiple element valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Jefferson Y. S. (Orange, CA); Wada, James M. (Torrance, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of slide valve elements having plural axial-spaced annular parts and an internal slide are inserted into a bulkhead in a fluid conduit from a downstream side of the bulkhead, locked in place by a bayonet coupling and set screw, and project through the bulkhead into the upstream conduit. Pneumatic lines connecting the slide valve element actuator to pilot valves are brought out the throat of the valve element to the downstream side. Pilot valves are radially spaced around the exterior of the valve to permit the pneumatic lines to be made identical, thereby to minimize adverse timing tolerances in operation due to pressure variations. Ring manifolds surround the valve adjacent respective pilot valve arrangements to further reduce adverse timing tolerances due to pressure variations, the manifolds being directly connected to the respective pilot valves. Position sensors are provided the valve element slides to signal the precise time at which a slide reaches or passes through a particular point in its stroke to initiate a calibrated timing function.

  9. The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    more nodes and elements (1 element 9 elements) - Changed from GTStrudl to SAP 2000. - Linear elastic computer model * DOE Project 2 - 15'-20' element size deemed...

  10. An Examination of Potential Racial and Gender Bias in the Principal Version of the Interactive Computer Interview System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiPonio, Joseph Michael

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The primary object of this study was to determine whether racial and/or gender bias were evidenced in the use of the ICIS-Principal. Specifically, will the use of the ICIS-Principal result in biased scores at a ...

  11. Long Fibre Composite Modelling Using Cohesive User's Element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozak, Vladislav; Chlup, Zdenek [Institute of Physics of Material AS of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The development glass matrix composites reinforced by unidirectional long ceramic fibre has resulted in a family of very perspective structural materials. The only disadvantage of such materials is relatively high brittleness at room temperature. The main micromechanisms acting as toughening mechanism are the pull out, crack bridging, matrix cracking. There are other mechanisms as crack deflection etc. but the primer mechanism is mentioned pull out which is governed by interface between fibre and matrix. The contribution shows a way how to predict and/or optimise mechanical behaviour of composite by application of cohesive zone method and write user's cohesive element into the FEM numerical package Abaqus. The presented results from numerical calculations are compared with experimental data. Crack extension is simulated by means of element extinction algorithms. The principal effort is concentrated on the application of the cohesive zone model with the special traction separation (bridging) law and on the cohesive zone modelling. Determination of micro-mechanical parameters is based on the combination of static tests, microscopic observations and numerical calibration procedures.

  12. Vol. 38, No. 2 (2005) BioTechniques 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsets to be tagged, puri- fied, and analyzed. As a result, this technique is able to identify novel), generally consist of three basic elements (Figure 1). The warhead consists of a reactive func- tional group interactions, and prevents steric congestion. The warhead is perhaps to most critical component of an ABP

  13. Electrothermal Analysis and Optimization Techniques for Nanoscale Integrated Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    of finite difference methods, finite element methods, or Green function based methods, each of which in the design of electrical circuits. This paper overviews several methods for the analysis and optimization overview a restricted set of thermal optimization methods, specifically, placement techniques for thermal

  14. The Origin of the Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murphy, Edward

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  15. Element of an inductive coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An element for an inductive coupler in a downhole component comprises magnetically conductive material, which is disposed in a recess in annular housing. The magnetically conductive material forms a generally circular trough. The circular trough comprises an outer generally U-shaped surface, an inner generally U-shaped surface, and two generally planar surfaces joining the inner and outer surfaces. The element further comprises pressure relief grooves in at least one of the surfaces of the circular trough. The pressure relief grooves may be scored lines. Preferably the pressure relief grooves are parallel to the magnetic field generated by the magnetically conductive material. The magnetically conductive material is selected from the group consisting of soft iron, ferrite, a nickel iron alloy, a silicon iron alloy, a cobalt iron alloy, and a mu-metal. Preferably, the annular housing is a metal ring.

  16. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  17. Self supporting heat transfer element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Story, Grosvenor Cook (Livermore, CA); Baldonado, Ray Orico (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an improved internal heat exchange element arranged so as to traverse the inside diameter of a container vessel such that it makes good mechanical contact with the interior wall of that vessel. The mechanical element is fabricated from a material having a coefficient of thermal conductivity above about 0.8 W cm.sup.-1.degree. K.sup.-1 and is designed to function as a simple spring member when that member has been cooled to reduce its diameter to just below that of a cylindrical container or vessel into which it is placed and then allowed to warm to room temperature. A particularly important application of this invention is directed to a providing a simple compartmented storage container for accommodating a hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  18. Application of L1 Minimization Technique to Image Super-Resolution and Surface Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talavatifard, Habiballah

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface reconstruction and image enhancement non-linear finite element technique based on minimization of L1 norm of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Since minimization in the L1 norm is computationally expensive, we seek...

  19. Multiscale Simulation and Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Richards' Equation in Heterogeneous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Seul Ki

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we develop multiscale finite element methods and uncertainty quantification technique for Richards' equation, a mathematical model to describe fluid flow in unsaturated porous media. Both coarse-level and fine-level numerical...

  20. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  1. The elements of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, D.J.; Thomson, J.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction to the principles of nuclear fission power generation. Describes the physical processes which occur in a nuclear reactor and discusses the theory behind the calculations. Also covers heat transfer in reactors, thermodynamic power cycles, reactor operators, and radiation shielding. Material covered includes topics on the effects of nuclear radiation on humans, the safety of nuclear reactors and of those parts of the nuclear fuel cycle which deal with fuel element manufacture and the reprocessing of irradiated fuel.

  2. Convergence analysis of sectional methods for solving breakage population balance equations -I. The fixed pivot technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdeburg, Universität

    . Numerical methods fall into several categories: stochastic methods, [16, 19], finite element methods, [4 techniques become computationally very expensive in such cases. A wide variety of finite element methods, weighted residuals, the method of orthogonal collocation and Galerkin's method are also used for solving

  3. The Baldwin Effect and Black Hole Accretion: A Spectral Principal Component Analysis of a Complete QSO Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaohui Shang; Beverley J. Wills; Edward L. Robinson; D. Wills; Ari Laor; Bingrong Xie; Juntao Yuan

    2002-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique set of UV-optical spectrograms of 22 low redshift QSOs are investigated using principal component analysis. We find three significant principal components over the broad wavelength range from Ly\\alpha to H\\alpha. They together account for about 78% of the sample intrinsic variance. We present strong arguments that the first principal component represents the Baldwin effect, relating equivalent widths to the luminosity (i.e. accretion rate), but only emission-line cores are involved. The second component represents continuum variations, probably dominated by intrinsic reddening. The third principal component directly relates QSO UV properties to the optical principal component 1 found by Boroson & Green (1992). It is the primary cause of scatter in the Baldwin relationships. It is also directly related to broad emission-line width and soft X-ray spectral index, and therefore probably driven by Eddington accretion ratio. We demonstrate how Baldwin relationships can be derived using our first principal component, virtually eliminating the scatter caused by the third principal component. This rekindles the hope that the Baldwin relationships can be used for cosmological study.

  4. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  5. Galaxy Redshifts: Improved Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens

    1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of random noise in determining errors and confidence levels for galaxy redshifts obtained by cross-correlation techniques. The main finding is that confidence levels have previously been overestimated, and errors inaccurately calculated in certain applications. New formul\\ae\\ are presented.

  6. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  7. GARDIENNAGE Help Desk technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    --> Relais vers Garde GTPW ASCENSEURS 1ère impulsion Dispatching UCL (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) Dispatching UCL --> SECURITAS LEW ALARMES CDC (Système EBI -Enterprise Building Integrator -Honeywell GTPW téléphonique ) TECHNIQUES CDC (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) GTPW (Heures ouvrables) CDC (En dehors des heures

  8. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  9. Plasma Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer for Elemental and Isotopic Measurements: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.; Duan, Yixiang; Scherrer, Susan T.; Koirala, Sudip P.; Jang, Ping-Rey; Miller, George P.; Mazzotti, Fabio J.

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies using Plasma Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (plasma-CRDS) show much promise of this newly developed technique for ultra-sensitive elemental/isotopic measurements. Plasma-CRDS, since its introduction in 1997, has experienced three major stages: (i) the early stage demonstration of the technical feasibility, (ii) the recent advancement on its technical improvements and extensive applications for elemental/isotopic measurements as well as plasma diagnostics and (iii) the most recent progress on the improvement of the instrument configurations based on a diode laser-compact microwave plasma-CRDS. Research and development in many aspects of this technique is vigorously under processing in our laboratories. This paper reports a brief review on the plasma-CRDS technique, its applications and the most recent advancement. Discussions on future developments toward a new generation of plasma- CRDS-based spectrometers for ultra-sensitive elemental/isotopic measurements are also presented.

  10. Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2012-13

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas plays: natural gas

  11. Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2012-13

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas plays: natural

  12. Technical Sessions Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag:8,, 20153 To.T. J. KulpP. DaumPrincipal

  13. Principal Investigators' Meetings | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.7 348,016.0stellaratorsMid-AmericaGrid WabashPrincipal

  14. High School Principals' Perceptions of Their Effectiveness in Leading District Initiated High School Reform: An Analysis of High School Principals Previously Engaged in High School Reform in an Urban Texas School District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Carlos

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    school reform. However, to date, research has not provided examples of a successful relationship between campus principals as a collective group and the district (central office) leadership team attempting to implement district-wide high school reform...

  15. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  16. Element Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,Electrosolar Jump to:Element Energy Ltd

  17. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  18. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  19. Probabilistic finite element analysis of marine risers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leder, H. Vern

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review 1. 2 Research Study 10 2 FORMULATION OF THE SECOND ? MOMENT ANALYSIS METHOD 13 2. 1 Finite Element Equations 2. 2 Random Vector Formulation 2. 3 The Correlation Function 2. 4 Random Field Discretization 2. 5 Taylor Series Expansion 2. 6... ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 APPLICATION OF PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT METHODS TO MARINE RISER ANALYSES 4. 1 Finite Element Model . 4. 1. 1 Formulation of the Equation of Motion 4. 1. 2 Finite Element Discretization 4. 1. 3...

  20. Synthesis of new thermoelectrics using modulated elemental reactants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornbostel, M.D.; Sellinschegg, H.; Johnson, D.C.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of new, metastable ternary crystalline compounds with the skutterudite crystal structure have been synthesized using modulated elemental reactants. The initial reactants are made up of multiple repeats of a {approximately}25 {angstrom} thick unit containing elemental layers of the desired ternary metal, iron and antimony. Low temperature annealing (150 C) results in interdiffusion of the elemental layers to form amorphous reaction intermediates. Annealing these intermediates at temperatures between 200 C and 250 C results in exothermic crystallization of the desired skutterudite crystal structure. Most of the new compounds prepared are only kinetically stable, decomposing exothermically to form thermodynamically more stable mixtures of binary compounds and elements. Low angle x-ray diffraction studies show that the resulting films are exceedingly smooth. These films have an ideal geometry for measuring properties of importance for thermoelectric devices--the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity. Thermal conductivity can be measured using a modification of the 3{omega} technique of Cahill. Samples can be produced rapidly, allowing for systematic screening and subsequent optimization as a function of composition and doping levels.

  1. Diffractive optical elements for spectroscopy Hallvard Angelskar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Diffractive optical elements for spectroscopy by Hallvard Angelsk°ar Submitted in partial;Abstract Diffractive optical elements can be used in spectroscopy instruments to fulfill several tasks to precisely fabricate complex diffractive optical elements with feature sizes below the micrometer scale

  2. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Omori; Y. Maeda; N. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka

    2011-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to give a notion of deformation of expressions for elements of algebra. Deformation quantization (cf.[BF]) deforms the commutative world to a non-commutative world. However, this involves deformation of expression of elements of algebras even from a commutative world to another commutative world. This is indeed a deformation of expressions for elements of algebra.

  3. Finite Element Analysis in Vertebrate Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite Element Analysis in Vertebrate Biomechanics CALLUM F. ROSS* Department of Organismal Biology presents a series of papers that apply the method of finite element analysis (FEA) to questions ontogenetic or phylogenetic transformations. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: finite-element analysis

  4. Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Michel

    ' & $ % Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with Mass Lumping Using Computer Algebra. (3D, combinatorial analysis, new third order element) 2 #12; ' & $ % Guidelines for the construction of nodes must be ~ P k unisolvent. 2. Finite element must be continuous. 3. Quadrature formula must satisfy

  5. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Principal Investigator (PI) Conference Sponsored by the NSTC SOST, hosted by the University of South Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Principal Investigator (PI) Conference Sponsored Ballroom · Oil/dispersant - extent and fate Tom Ryerson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration · Oil/dispersant - impacts and mitigation in coastal

  6. Principal Typings for Explicit Substitutions Calculi Daniel Lima Ventura , Mauricio Ayala-Rincon , and Fairouz Kamareddine2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Principal Typings for Explicit Substitutions Calculi Daniel Lima Ventura , Mauricio Ayala´ilia, Bras´ilia D.F., Brasil {ayala,ventura}@mat.unb.br 2 School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences

  7. Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)], E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC (F), Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

  8. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  9. Innovative Technologies and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samano, R.; Swinford, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2014 Innovative Technologies and Techniques ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 What’s New in Energy Efficient Cooling Systems? ? Director of Energy Management ? Moving Away From... Refrigerants ? LEED ? Reducing the Carbon Footprint ? Improving Indoor Air Quality - IAQ ? High Efficiency Fans and Motors ? Economizers ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Outside Air Management Experts...

  10. An Analysis of the Relationship between Principal Employment Interview Scores and the Achievement Scores of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostmeyer, Susan

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRINCIPAL EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW SCORES AND THE ACHIEVEMENT SCORES OF STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES BY SUSAN S. OSTMEYER Submitted to the graduate degree program in Educational Leadership... for SUSAN S. OSTMEYER certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: AN ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRINCIPAL EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW SCORES AND THE ACHIEVEMENT SCORES OF STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES...

  11. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motamarri, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nowak, M.R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Leiter, K.; Knap, J. [U.S. Army Research Labs, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, MD 21001 (United States)] [U.S. Army Research Labs, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, MD 21001 (United States); Gavini, V., E-mail: vikramg@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688 atoms using modest computational resources, and good scalability of the present implementation up to 192 processors.

  12. Coherent coupling of optical gain elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ury, I.; Yariv, A

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent light source is described comprising: a non-linear photorefractive medium; a laser for illuminating the photorefractive medium; a mirror on the opposite side of the photorefractive medium from the laser and aligned for retroreflecting light back toward the laser; and optical gain elements. Each optical gain element has its optical axis aligned with the photo-refractive medium, each optical gain element having a reflective end remote from the photorefractive medium, the laser and optical gain elements being sufficiently aligned that laser light scattered from the photorefractive medium illuminates all of the optical gain elements for amplification and producing a coherent output beam.

  13. Jet finding techniques at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet finding techniques at hadron colliders, including pile-up removal tricks, jet deconstruction, etc

  14. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    11 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 1 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2 #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 3July 29, 2013 Data Mining

  15. Submitted to: Finite Elements in Analysis and Design Finite Element Analysis over Tangled Simplicial Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Krishnan

    Submitted to: Finite Elements in Analysis and Design 1 Finite Element Analysis over Tangled In modern finite element analysis (FEA), a mesh is said to be `tangled' if it contains one or more inverted are also illustrated. 1. INTRODUCTION In modern finite element analysis (FEA), the underlying mesh

  16. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  17. Natural resource validation: A primer on concepts and techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural resource valuation has always had a fundamental role in the practice of cost-benefit analysis of health, safety, and environmental issues. The authors provide an objective overview of resource valuation techniques and describe their potential role in environmental restoration/waste management (ER/WM) activities at federal facilities. This handbook considers five general classes of valuation techniques: (1) market-based techniques, which rely on historical information on market prices and transactions to determine resource values; (2) nonmarket techniques that rely on indirect estimates of resource values; (3) nonmarket techniques that are based on direct estimates of resource values; (4) cross-cutting valuation techniques, which combine elements of one or more of these methods; and (5) ecological valuation techniques used in the emerging field of ecological economics. The various valuation techniques under consideration are described by highlighting their applicability in environmental management and regulation. The handbook also addresses key unresolved issues in the application of valuation techniques generally, including discounting future values, incorporating environmental equity concerns, and concerns over the uncertainties in the measurement of natural resource values and environmental risk.

  18. Element Abundances at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I review measurements of element abundances in different components of the high redshift universe, including the Lyman alpha forest, damped Lyman alpha systems, and Lyman break galaxies. Although progress is being made in all three areas, recent work has also produced some surprises and shown that established ideas about the nature of the damped Lyman alpha systems in particular may be too simplistic. Overall, our knowledge of metal abundances at high z is still very sketchy. Most significantly, there seems to be an order of magnitude shortfall in the comoving density of metals which have been measured up to now compared with those produced by the star formation activity seen in Lyman break galaxies. At least some of the missing metals are likely to be in hot gas in galactic halos and proto-clusters.

  19. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  20. Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air for the presence of minor amounts of elements, particularly transition metals, rare earth elements, actinides, and alkali and alkaline earth elements. The invention...

  1. Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

  2. Assessment of Models for Pedestrian Dynamics with Functional Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chraibi, M; Gottschalk, H; Saadi, M; Seyfried, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many agent based simulation approaches have been proposed for pedestrian flow. As such models are applied e.g.\\ in evacuation studies, the quality and reliability of such models is of vital interest. Pedestrian trajectories are functional data and thus functional principal component analysis is a natural tool to asses the quality of pedestrian flow models beyond average properties. In this article we conduct functional PCA for the trajectories of pedestrians passing through a bottleneck. We benchmark two agent based models of pedestrian flow against the experimental data using PCA average and stochastic features. Functional PCA proves to be an efficient tool to detect deviation between simulation and experiment and to asses quality of pedestrian models.

  3. Element Labs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| OpenElectromagnetic Profiling TechniquesLabs Jump

  4. Element Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| OpenElectromagnetic Profiling TechniquesLabs

  5. Coupled near and far field thermal plume analysis using finite element techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, John T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the open cycle cooling process for thermal power plants requires significant effluent discharges into aquatic environments. Both engineering and environmental considerations require accurate prediction of resulting ...

  6. Abstract Analytical techniques used to examine the chemical speciation of multiple trace elements are impor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    disposal method for coal fly ash is deposition and gravitational settling in aquatic settling basins. Fly a largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) collected from a coal fly ash basin and results were compared, to a lesser extent, gonad tissue extract. In liver, muscle and gill of the ash basin bass, Se was predomi

  7. Trace element analysis of Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahar, Sean

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or in the planning stages, Near surface lignite re- sources are estimated to be 21 billion metric tons in Texas, while deep basin reserves are estimated at 31 billion metric tons. Near (3] surface reserves alone could fulfill Texas' electrical needs for 100 years... for environmental and health concerns trace element characterization of lignites is important. A needed avenue of research is charact- erization of trace element pathways in lignite fired power plants. :hat is to say what percentage of a certain element...

  8. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zyserman

    layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments – p.

  9. Electronic Structure of the Heaviest Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium resemble those of these 4d and 5d elements and for this reason most of the textbooks and standard works on chemistry

  10. Low exchange element for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brogli, Rudolf H. (Aarau, CH); Shamasunder, Bangalore I. (Encinitas, CA); Seth, Shivaji S. (Encinitas, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow exchange element is presented which lowers temperature gradients in fuel elements and reduces maximum local temperature within high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The flow exchange element is inserted within a column of fuel elements where it serves to redirect coolant flow. Coolant which has been flowing in a hotter region of the column is redirected to a cooler region, and coolant which has been flowing in the cooler region of the column is redirected to the hotter region. The safety, efficiency, and longevity of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor is thereby enhanced.

  11. Rapporteur's Report - workshop on rare earth elements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative, cambridge, Massachusetts december 3, 2010...

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Drilling Using DEFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Joel D.; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vijayaraghavan, A. (2005), “Drilling of Fiber- ReinforcedFINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF DRILLING USING DEFORM J. Gardner,of Comprehensive Drilling Simulation Tool” ABSTRACT DEFORM-

  13. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  14. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  15. Spectral analysis method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an element is described and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which has a region of interest which corresponds with a small amount of an element to be detected; providing nonparametric assumptions about a shape of the gamma-ray spectrum in the region of interest, and which would indicate the presence of the element to be detected; and applying a statistical test to the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum based upon the nonparametric assumptions to detect the small amount of the element to be detected.

  16. PARTIALLY PENALIZED IMMERSED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    each interface element, it uses IFE functions constructed with piecewise ...... strate this, we plot errors of a classic bilinear IFE solution and a NPP IFE solution in.

  17. A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATE FOR THE H(div) CONFORMING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT FOR THE COUPLED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yanqiu

    for the Darcy equation, and vice versa. Special techniques usually need to be employed. In [3], a conformingA POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATE FOR THE H(div) CONFORMING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT FOR THE COUPLED DARCY pro- posed for the coupled Darcy-Stokes flow in [30], which imposes normal con- tinuity

  18. Finite element analysis of the distortion of a crystal monochromator from synchrotron radiation thermal loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, W.R.; Hoyer, E.H.; Thompson, A.C.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first crystal of the Brown-Hower x-ray monochromator of the LBL-EXXON 54 pole wiggler beamline at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is subjected to intense synchrotron radiation. To provide an accurate thermal/structural analysis of the existing monochromator design, a finite element analysis (FEA) was performed. A very high and extremely localized heat flux is incident on the Si (220) crystal. The crystal, which possesses pronouncedly temperature-dependent orthotropic properties, in combination with the localized heat load, make the analysis ideally suited for finite element techniques. Characterization of the incident synchrotron radiation is discussed, followed by a review of the techniques employed in modeling the monochromator and its thermal/structural boundary conditions. The results of the finite element analysis, three-dimensional temperature distributions, surface displacements and slopes, and stresses, in the area of interest, are presented. Lastly, the effects these results have on monochromator output flux and resolution are examined.

  19. Unstructured spectral element methods of simulation of turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.D. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Karniadakis, G.E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)] [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a spectral element-Fourier algorithm for simulating incompressible turbulent flows in complex geometries using unstructured quadrilateral meshes. To this end, we compare two different interface formulations for extending the conforming spectral element method in order to allow for surgical mesh refinement and still retain spectral accuracy: the Zanolli iterative procedure and variational patching based on auxiliary {open_quotes}mortar{close_quotes} functions. We present an interpretation of the original mortar element method as a patching scheme and develop direct and iterative solution techniques that make the method efficient for simulations of turbulent flows. The properties of the new method are analyzed in detail by studying the eigenspectra of the advection and diffusion operators. We then present numerical results that illustrate the flexibility as well as the exponential convergence of the new algorithm for nonconforming discretizations. We conclude with simulation studies of the turbulent cylinder wake at Re = 1000 (external flow) and turbulent flow over riblets at Re = 3280 (internal flow). 36 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Siebert, A.; Bienayme, O. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Campbell, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Gibson, B. K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmi, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Asiago I-36012 (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury, St. Mary RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25 Degree-Sign and with magnitudes in the range 9 elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, with a mean error of {approx}0.2 dex, as judged from accuracy tests performed on synthetic and real spectra. Abundances are estimated through a dedicated processing pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

  1. Imaging techniques utilizing optical fibers and tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilke, M.; King, N.S.P.; Gray, N.; Johnson, D.; Esquibel, D.; Nedrow, P.; Ishiwata, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional, time-dependent images generated by neutrons, gamma rays, and x-rays incident on fast scintillators are relayed to streak and video cameras over optical fibers. Three dimensions, two spatial and one temporal, have been reduced to two, one in space and time utilizing sampling methods permitting reconstruction of a time-dependent, two-dimensional image subsequent to data recording. The manner in which the sampling is done optimized the ability to reconstruct the image via a maximization of entropy algorithm. This method uses four linear fiber optic arrays typically 30 meters long and up to 35 elements each. A further refinement of this technique collapses the linear array information into four single fibers by wavelength multiplexing. This permits economical transmission of the data over kilometer distances to the recording equipment.

  2. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of Field Element Line...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    action management, and continuous improvement (lessons learnedoperating experiencebest practices). For each assurance element, SFO defined sub-elements and associated...

  3. An Assessment of Some Preconditioning Techniques in Shell Michele BENZI x , Reijo KOUHIA --and Miroslav T UMA z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tùma, Miroslav

    words preconditioning, conjugate gradient, finite elements, shells Preconditioning Techniques Republic Revised manuscript submitted to Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering, February 1998 Summary Preconditioned Krylov subspace methods have proved to be efficient in solving large, sparse linear

  4. Seamless Integration of Global Dirichlet-to-Neumann Boundary Condition and Spectral Elements for Transformation Electromagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhiguo; Rong, Zhijian; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present an efficient spectral-element method (SEM) for solving general two-dimensional Helmholtz equations in anisotropic media, with particular applications in accurate simulation of polygonal invisibility cloaks, concentrators and circular rotators arisen from the field of transformation electromagnetics (TE). In practice, we adopt a transparent boundary condition (TBC) characterized by the Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DtN) map to reduce wave propagation in an unbounded domain to a bounded domain. We then introduce a semi-analytic technique to integrate the global TBC with local curvilinear elements seamlessly, which is accomplished by using a novel elemental mapping and analytic formulas for evaluating global Fourier coefficients on spectral-element grids exactly. From the perspective of TE, an invisibility cloak is devised by a singular coordinate transformation of Maxwell's equations that leads to anisotropic materials coating the cloaked region to render any object inside invisible to observe...

  5. A multiresolution finite element method based on a new locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element with a new multi-resolution analysis (MRA) is proposed and a multireolution finite element method is hence presented. The MRA framework is formulated out of a mutually nesting displacement subspace sequence. The MRA endows the proposed element with the resolution level (RL) to adjust the element node number, thus modulating structural analysis accuracy accordingly. As a result, the traditional 4-node rectangular Mindlin plate element and method is a mono-resolution one and also a special case of the proposed element and method. The meshing for the monoresolution plate element model is based on the empiricism while the RL adjusting for the multiresolution is laid on the rigorous mathematical basis. The accuracy of a structural analysis is actually determined by the RL, not by the mesh. The rational MRA enables the implementation of the multiresolution Mindlin plate element method to be more rational and efficient than that of the conventional monoresolution or o...

  6. 3-D Finite Element Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the JET LB-SRP Divertor Element (Tungsten Lamella Design)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-D Finite Element Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the JET LB-SRP Divertor Element (Tungsten Lamella Design)

  7. Modeling and Driving Piezoelectric Resonant Blade Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for extracting the parameters of the PRB equivalent circuit model: two are direct methods and one is basedrf rjf Figure 3. Equivalent circuit model of the PRB element. Cin is the dielectric capacitance element will bend the van attached to it and the whole structure will vibrate. Optimum operation

  8. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  9. The Superheavy Elements and Anti-Gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasovski, Petar K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Saints Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The essence of any propulsion concept is to overcome gravity. Anti-gravity is a natural means to achieve this. Thus, the technology to pursue anti-gravity, by using superheavy elements, may provide a new propulsion paradigm. The theory of superluminal relativity provides a hypothesis for existence of elements with atomic number up to Z = 145, some of which may possess anti-gravity properties. Analysis results show that curved space-time exists demonstrating both gravitic and anti-gravitic properties not only around nuclei but inside the nuclei as well. Two groups of elements (Z < 64 and 63 < Z <145) exist that demonstrate these capabilities. The nuclei of the first group of elements have the masses with only the property of gravity. The nuclei of the elements of the second group have the masses with both properties: gravity and anti-gravity in two different ranges of curved space-time around the nuclei.. The hypothetical element with Z = 145 is the unique among all elements whose nucleus has only anti-gravity property. It is proposed that this element be named Hawking, in honour of Stephen W. Hawking.

  10. INTRODUCTION TO THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    in popularity with the finite difference method in the areas of heat transfer and fluid mechanics. 1DRAFT Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD 1.1 Historical perspective: the origins of the finite el- ement method The finite element method constitutes a general tool for the numerical solution

  11. Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickert, R.G.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH/sup -/, CO/sup - -//sub 3/) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states.

  12. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  13. Principal Component Analysis of Molecular Clouds: Can CO reveal the dynamics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertram, Erik; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S; Roman-Duval, Julia; Federrath, Christoph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to study the gas dynamics in numerical simulations of typical MCs. Our simulations account for the non-isothermal nature of the gas and include a simplified treatment of the time-dependent gas chemistry. We model the CO line emission in a post-processing step using a 3D radiative transfer code. We consider mean number densities n_0 = 30, 100, 300 cm^{-3} that span the range of values typical for MCs in the solar neighbourhood and investigate the slope \\alpha_{PCA} of the pseudo structure function computed by PCA for several components: the total density, H2 density, 12CO density, 12CO J = 1 -> 0 intensity and 13CO J = 1 -> 0 intensity. We estimate power-law indices \\alpha_{PCA} for different chemical species that range from 0.5 to 0.9, in good agreement with observations, and demonstrate that optical depth effects can influence the PCA. We show that when the PCA succeeds, the combination of chemical inhomogeneity and radiative transfer effects can influence the observ...

  14. Spitzer spectral line mapping of supernova remnants: I. Basic data and principal component analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, David A; Kaufman, Michael J; Snell, Ronald L; Melnick, Gary J; Bergin, Edwin A; Sonnentrucker, Paule

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of spectroscopic mapping observations carried out toward small (1 x 1 arcmin) regions within the supernova remnants W44, W28, IC443, and 3C391 using the Infrared Spectrograph of the Spitzer Space Telescope. These observations, covering the 5.2 - 37 micron spectral region, have led to the detection of a total of 15 fine structure transitions of Ne+, Ne++, Si+, P+, S, S++, Cl+, Fe+, and Fe++; the S(0) - S(7) pure rotational lines of molecular hydrogen; and the R(3) and R(4) transitions of hydrogen deuteride. In addition to these 25 spectral lines, the 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3 and 12.6 micron PAH emission bands were also observed. Most of the detected line transitions have proven strong enough to map in several sources, providing a comprehensive picture of the relative distribution of the various line emissions observable in the Spitzer/IRS bandpass. A principal component analysis of the spectral line maps reveals that the observed emission lines fall into five distinct groups, each of which may...

  15. Quantifying the Effect of the Principal-Agent Problem on USResidential Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant

    2006-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) initiated andcoordinated this project to investigate the effects of market failures inthe end-use of energy that may isolate some markets or portions thereoffrom energy price signals in five member countries. Quantifying theamount of energy associated with market failures helps to demonstrate thesignificance of energy efficiency policies beyond price signals. In thisreport we investigate the magnitude of the principal-agent (PA) problemaffecting four of the major energy end uses in the U.S. residentialsector: refrigeration, water heating, space heating, and lighting. Usingdata from the American Housing Survey, we develop a novel approach toclassifying households into a PA matrix for each end use. End use energyvalues differentiated by housing unit type from the Residential EnergyConsumption Survey were used to estimate the final and primary energy useassociated with the PA problem. We find that the 2003 associated siteenergy use from these four end uses totaled over 3,400 trillion Btu,equal to 35 percent of the site energy consumed by the residentialsector.

  16. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  17. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model Michael A. Berthaume a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model Michael A. Berthaume a s t r a c t We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how 2011 Accepted 18 January 2012 Available online 27 January 2012 Keywords: Probabilistic analysis Finite

  18. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  19. GIS solutions for ecosystem management in developing countries: A case study of Sao Tome and Principe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, L.; Barrasso, T. [Booz, Allen & Hamilton Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Pinto da Costa, H. [ECO Sao Tome e Principe (Sao Tome and Principe)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to promote awareness of the application of the Geographic information system (GIS) technology to the management of ecosystems in developing countries. The adoptation of systematic environmental research and management techniques by national and local conservation programs helps ensure the sustainability of important biological resources.

  20. FOCUS ON STUDENTS: Final Report, Appendix G Summary of Recommendations of the Principal's Task Force on Student Life and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    FOCUS ON STUDENTS: Final Report, Appendix G Summary of Recommendations of the Principal's Task Force on Student Life and Learning at McGill December 2006 Page 38 1. ACADEMIC ADVISING AND MENTORING opportunities and availability to take on mentoring roles vis-à-vis students, focused on shared academic

  1. A Model to Develop Mathematics Education: Modify the Public Traditional Perceptions of Mathematics-Case of UAE Schools' Principals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    that the successful of mathematics reform demands the support of the full educational community including school principals, parents, and students. One of the most important group that affect mathematics reform is school reform. Without this condition, all the efforts in changing mathematics curricula and training

  2. Research With Students My principal research activities lie in information systems security with particular emphasis on access control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of security, and secure transaction processing. My recent research has expanded beyond information systemsResearch With Students My principal research activities lie in information systems security and mining, semantic web and multimedia delivery. 1 Major Results · Security solutions for workflow systems

  3. Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER Watershed Zones of Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER degradation dominate the landscape in Haiti and there is little accurate soil-fertility research available in five major watershed regions of Haiti: Gonaives, Archaie/Cabaret, Cul-de-Sac, Kenscoff, and Mirebalais

  4. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 46 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident Coverage y 24-Hour Business Travel y

  5. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 53 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident NOTE: The insurance coverage described

  6. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and plans for future experiments.

  7. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  8. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  9. Spitzer spectral line mapping of supernova remnants: I. Basic data and principal component analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Neufeld; David J. Hollenbach; Michael J. Kaufman; Ronald L. Snell; Gary J. Melnick; Edwin A. Bergin; Paule Sonnentrucker

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of spectroscopic mapping observations carried out toward small (1 x 1 arcmin) regions within the supernova remnants W44, W28, IC443, and 3C391 using the Infrared Spectrograph of the Spitzer Space Telescope. These observations, covering the 5.2 - 37 micron spectral region, have led to the detection of a total of 15 fine structure transitions of Ne+, Ne++, Si+, P+, S, S++, Cl+, Fe+, and Fe++; the S(0) - S(7) pure rotational lines of molecular hydrogen; and the R(3) and R(4) transitions of hydrogen deuteride. In addition to these 25 spectral lines, the 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3 and 12.6 micron PAH emission bands were also observed. Most of the detected line transitions have proven strong enough to map in several sources, providing a comprehensive picture of the relative distribution of the various line emissions observable in the Spitzer/IRS bandpass. A principal component analysis of the spectral line maps reveals that the observed emission lines fall into five distinct groups, each of which may exhibit a distinct spatial distribution: (1) lines of S and H2 (J > 2); (2) the H2 S(0) line; (3) lines of ions with appearance potentials less than 13.6 eV; (4) lines of ions with appearance potentials greater than 13.6 eV, not including S++; (5) lines of S++. Lines of group (1) likely originate in molecular material subject to a slow, nondissociative shock that is driven by the overpressure within the supernova remnant, and lines in groups (3) - (5) are associated primarily with dissociative shock fronts with a range of (larger) shock velocities. The H2 S(0) line shows a low-density diffuse emission component, and - in some sources - a shock-excited component.

  10. High voltage power supply systems for electron beam and plasma technologies. Its new element base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dermengi, P.G.; Kureghan, A.S.; Pokrovsky, S.V.; Tchvanov, V.A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming technique and high voltage technique supplementing each other more and more unite in indivisible constructions of modern apparatuses and systems and applicated in modern technologies providing its high efficiency. Specially worked out, ecologically clean, inertial, inflammable perfluororganic liquid is used in elements and electronic apparatuses simultaneously as insulating and cooling media. This liquid is highly fluid, fills tiny cavities in construction elements and in the places of high concentration of losses, where maximum local overheating of active parts or apparatus constructions takes place, it transforms to boiling state with highly intensive taking off of heat energy from cooled surface point. For instance, being cooled by mentioned perfluororganic liquid, copper wire can conduct current to 50 A/mm{sup 2} density, but in ordinary conditions of transformers, reactors and busses, current density can reach only few Amperes. Possibility of considerable increasing of current density, that is reached by means of intensive cooling, provided by worked out liquid, and taking into account its incredibly high insulating features (liquid has electric strength to 50 KV/mm) allows to provide optimum heat regime of active parts of transformers. reactors, condenser, semiconductor devices, resistors, construction elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general. Particularly high effect of decreasing of weight and dimensions characteristics of elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general can be reached under working out of special constructions of each element and apparatus details, adapted to use of mentioned liquid as insulating and cooling media.

  11. Table of Contents Problem Solving Techniques 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aziz, Adnan

    element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.13 Robot battery capacity house majority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 3.7 Load balancing

  12. An iterative technique for solving equations of statistical equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Lucy

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Superlevel partitioning is combined with a simple relaxation procedure to construct an iterative technique for solving equations of statistical equilibrium. In treating an $N$-level model atom, the technique avoids the $N^{3}$ scaling in computer time for direct solutions with standard linear equation routines and also does not fail at large $N$ due to the accumulation of round-off errors. In consequence, the technique allows detailed model atoms with $N \\ga 10^{3}$, such as those required for iron peak elements, to be incorporated into diagnostic codes for analysing astronomical spectra. Tests are reported for a 394-level Fe II ion and a 1266-level Ni I--IV atom.

  13. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  14. Magnetic bearing element with adjustable stiffness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact magnetic bearing element is provided which is made of permanent magnet discs configured to be capable of the adjustment of the bearing stiffness and levitation force over a wide range.

  15. Transition Matrix Elements for Pion Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed E. Kelabi

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained the transition matrix elements for pion photoproduction by considering the number of gamma matrices involved. The approach based on the most general conditions of gauge invariance, current conservation and transversality. The approach is fairly consistent with literatures.

  16. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  17. Magnetostatics of synthetic ferrimagnet elements Olivier Fruchart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coupled antiferromagnetically thanks to the RKKY interaction present in an ultrathin metal spacer layer in flat elements as dipolar field are very short-ranged in two dimensions12 . In this Letter we re- port

  18. Stretchable semiconductor elements and stretchable electrical circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Seoul, KR); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  19. Elemental analysis of Edwards Formation flint: a comparison of sample areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinley, Ann Neil

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and K. In order to test the reliability of this technique, USGS standard rocks, AVG-1, GSP-1, and G-2 were also analyzed. Means and standard deviations of each element determined were calculated. The elemental values ranged from . 03 ppm... and their advice concerning my work. I wish to thank Dr. H. Shafer for collecting the rock samples used in this work. I would also like to thank the reactor personnel for their assistance. My sincere appreciation goes to Dr. John NcGinley, Dr. David Moore, Mrs...

  20. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  1. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Wetteland, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stimac, J. [Philippine Geothermal, Makati City, (Philippines); Larocque, A.C.L. [Dept. of Geol. Sci., Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Brearley, A. [Dept. Earth and Planet. Sci., Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques.

  2. An evaluated neutronic data file for elemental cobalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guenther, P.; Lawson, R.; Meadows, J.; Sugimoto, M.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Howerton, R.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive evaluated neutronic data file for elemental cobalt is described. The experimental data base, the calculational methods, the evaluation techniques and judgments, and the physical content are outlined. The file contains: neutron total and scattering cross sections and associated properties, (n,2n) and (n,3n) processes, neutron radiative capture processes, charged-particle-emission processes, and photon-production processes. The file extends from 10/sup /minus/5/ eV to 20 MeV, and is presented in the ENDF/B-VI format. Detailed attention is given to the uncertainties and correlations associated with the prominent neutron-induced processes. The numerical contents of the file have been transmitted to the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. 143 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Review : integration of EMI technique with global vibration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Suteng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, the development of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been skyrocketing because of the serious consequences that come with structural failure. Traditional damage detection techniques, also known as ...

  4. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  5. Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

  6. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Frederick August

    Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

  7. 3.3 Construction of vector edge elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 3.1: Linear tetrahedral element. 3.3 Construction of vector edge elements. Let us first consider the linear tetrahedral element, as seen in Figure 3.1. Within.

  8. Element-based concrete design with three-dimensional finite element models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Huberty, K.; Winch, S. [Nuclear Power Technologies Div., Sargent and Lundy, 55 East Monroe, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shell element based design of a typical shear wall using analytical results from a three-dimensional finite element model subjected to a combination of vertical and lateral loads is evaluated. The axial and flexural force resultants from each element for every load combination are used to calculate the required reinforcing for each element. Strength for axial loads (P) and out-of-plane flexure (M) in structural walls is determined according to the same P-M interaction procedures used for columns. After each element has been evaluated, a required reinforcing map for each face of each element in the wall is presented along with a constructible reinforcement pattern enveloping the required reinforcing. In order to determine whether the element-based approach meets the requirements of the section cut approach to design, which is typically employed in manual calculations, the total in-plane moment (M) and total vertical axial force (P) across the entire length of the wall is calculated and the P-M points are plotted on an in-plane P-M interaction diagram. It is concluded that element-based design for a structural wall ensures that reinforcement is provided where required by the three-dimensional finite element analysis while still providing sufficient reinforcing to satisfy the section cut approach to design. (authors)

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology March...

  10. An analysis between teacher trust in the principal and teacher burnout as identified by teachers in selected Texas public schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyanes, Jason W.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    involves creating and sustaining trust. According to MacNeil, Spuck and Ceyanes (1998), the concept of trust building is equally if not greater than the importance of principal leadership. MacNeil, Spuck and Ceyanes (1998) state that “in the absence... to accept 18 vulnerability based upon positive expectations of the intentions or behavior of another” (p. 395). MacNeil and Ceyanes (1998) define trust as the reliability of the relationship that exists between people, developed over time caused...

  11. 4 F. Boyer, UJF Projet JAVANAISE, UE Etude et Projet d'intergiciels, M2PGI Principe d'utilisation de Velocity dans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pous, Damien

    4© F. Boyer, UJF Projet JAVANAISE, UE Etude et Projet d'intergiciels, M2PGI Principe d;5© F. Boyer, UJF Projet JAVANAISE, UE Etude et Projet d'intergiciels, M2PGI Principe d'utilisation de) Hello World, Welcome to Velocity Velocity Engine #12;6© F. Boyer, UJF Projet JAVANAISE, UE Etude et

  12. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilk, Philip A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elementsof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements byof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements by

  13. adaptive finite element: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties and performance of the adaptive finite element approach to the design of nano-photonic components. Central issues are the construction of vectorial finite elements...

  14. adaptive finite elements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties and performance of the adaptive finite element approach to the design of nano-photonic components. Central issues are the construction of vectorial finite elements...

  15. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online...

  16. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Discusses progress...

  17. 3800 Green Series Cost Elements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (formerly EPP) Program 3800 Green Series Cost Elements 06112014 (Rev. 7) 3800 Green Series Cost Elements More Documents & Publications 1 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

  18. The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on...

  19. axial element protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ser-142 (14). Ser-129 is believed to be a substrate for glycogen synthase kinase 3 Brownfield, Mark S. 84 Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  20. EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the...

  1. Acoustic techniques for localizing holdup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vnuk, D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material that does not come out of a process as product or waste is called holdup. When this is fissile material, its location and quantity must be determined to improve safeguards and security as well as safety at the facility. The most common method for detecting and measuring holdup is with radiation based techniques. When using them, one must consider equipment geometry, geometry of holdup, and effects of background radiation when converting the radiation measurement into a fissile material quantity. We are developing complementary techniques that use tiny acoustic transducers, which are unaffected by background radiation, to improve holdup measurements by aiding in determining the above conversion factors for holdup measurements. Thus far, we have applied three techniques, Acoustic Interferometry, Pulse Echo, and bending Wave Propagation, of which the latter appears most effective. This paper will describe each of these techniques and show how they may ultimately reduce costs and personnel radiation exposure while increasing confidence I and accuracy of holdup measurements.

  2. Experimental techniques and measurement accuracies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.; DiIorio, G.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief description of the experimental tools available for fusion neutronics experiments is given. Attention is paid to error estimates mainly for the measurement of tritium breeding ratio in simulated blankets using various techniques.

  3. Challenges for a reliable shell model description of the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that the neutrinos are Majorana particles and the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay is observed, a reliable 0{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix element is necessary to decide the neutrino mass hierarchy and the minimum neutrino mass. Many nuclear structure techniques, including the shell model, are presently used to calculate these matrix elements. In the last few years one could see a slow convergence of these results, but not yet at a level of 20 several shell model effective interactions and varying other parameters, finding results in a range that spans about 20In this contribution we describe challenges for obtaining reliable shell model 0{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix elements, with emphasis to {sup 76}Ge and {sup 82}Se decays.

  4. Finite element meshing approached as a global minimization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITKOWSKI,WALTER R.; JUNG,JOSEPH; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.; LEUNG,VITUS J.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to generate a suitable finite element mesh in an automatic fashion is becoming the key to being able to automate the entire engineering analysis process. However, placing an all-hexahedron mesh in a general three-dimensional body continues to be an elusive goal. The approach investigated in this research is fundamentally different from any other that is known of by the authors. A physical analogy viewpoint is used to formulate the actual meshing problem which constructs a global mathematical description of the problem. The analogy used was that of minimizing the electrical potential of a system charged particles within a charged domain. The particles in the presented analogy represent duals to mesh elements (i.e., quads or hexes). Particle movement is governed by a mathematical functional which accounts for inter-particles repulsive, attractive and alignment forces. This functional is minimized to find the optimal location and orientation of each particle. After the particles are connected a mesh can be easily resolved. The mathematical description for this problem is as easy to formulate in three-dimensions as it is in two- or one-dimensions. The meshing algorithm was developed within CoMeT. It can solve the two-dimensional meshing problem for convex and concave geometries in a purely automated fashion. Investigation of the robustness of the technique has shown a success rate of approximately 99% for the two-dimensional geometries tested. Run times to mesh a 100 element complex geometry were typically in the 10 minute range. Efficiency of the technique is still an issue that needs to be addressed. Performance is an issue that is critical for most engineers generating meshes. It was not for this project. The primary focus of this work was to investigate and evaluate a meshing algorithm/philosophy with efficiency issues being secondary. The algorithm was also extended to mesh three-dimensional geometries. Unfortunately, only simple geometries were tested before this project ended. The primary complexity in the extension was in the connectivity problem formulation. Defining all of the interparticle interactions that occur in three-dimensions and expressing them in mathematical relationships is very difficult.

  5. A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant 3 April 2014 Accepted 20 May 2014 Keywords: Fast multipole BEM 2-D multi-crack problems Constant elements Crack opening displacements Stress intensity factors a b s t r a c t A fast multipole boundary

  6. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  7. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  8. Trace element analysis of Texas lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahar, Sean

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Gluskoter, and N. F. Shimp: Occurence and Distribution of Potentiall Volatile Trace Elements in Coal. Illinois State Geological Survey. Urbana, IL. (July, 1974). 39 [26] Andren, A. W. , D. H. Klein, and Y. Talmi: Selenium in Coal- Fired Plant Emissions.... Envir. Sci. and Tech. , 9:856, (Sept. , 1975). [27] Gluskoter, H. J. , R. R. Ruch, W. G. Miller, R. A. Cahill, G. B. Breher and J, K. Kuhn: Trace Elements in Coal: Occur- rence and Distribution. Illinois State Geological Sur- vey. Urbane, Illinois...

  9. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed.

  10. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  11. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described.

  12. Visualizing Higher Order Finite Elements: FY05 Yearly Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elementsinto regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which thealgorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomialapproximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analyticalsolution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and mo-mentim. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate.Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and thesecoefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of free-dom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution.Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increas-ing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number offinite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some typesof simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedomthan increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation hasdetermined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools donot exist for visual inspection of the solution.This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finiteelement simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicialregions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. Therequirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the placeswhere the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacingalgorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.3 AcknowledgementThe authors would like to thank David Day and Louis Romero for their insight into poly-nomial system solvers and the LDRD Senior Council for the opportunity to pursue thisresearch. The authors were supported by the United States Department of Energy, Officeof Defense Programs by the Labratory Directed Research and Development Senior Coun-cil, project 90499. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation,a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contractDE-AC04-94-AL85000.4

  13. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  14. A study of arbitrary rotations of shells of revolution by the finite element method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbaum, James Byron

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Haisler, Jr. Various nonlinear shell theories are reviewed, discussed, and one is selected for implementation into the solution code SNASOR III. The theory selected, Novozhilov's, is discussed in greater detail, comparing his nonlinear equations... to the ones in SNASOR III. The changes required to employ Novozhilov's nonlinear theory in SNASOR III are illustrated. The finite element method is then briefly discussed, nonlinear solution techniques are reviewed and the mod- ified incremental stiffness...

  15. Iron and s-elements abundance variations in NGC5286: comparison with anomalous globular clusters and Milky Way satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, A F; Karakas, A I; Casagrande, L; Yong, D; Shingles, L; Da Costa, G; Norris, J E; Stetson, P B; Lind, K; Asplund, M; Collet, R; Jerjen, H; Sbordone, L; Aparicio, A; Cassisi, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high resolution spectroscopic analysis of 62 red giants in the Milky Way globular cluster NGC5286. We have determined abundances of representative light proton-capture, alpha, Fe-peak and neutron-capture element groups, and combined them with photometry of multiple sequences observed along the colour-magnitude diagram. Our principal results are: (i) a broad, bimodal distribution in s-process element abundance ratios, with two main groups, the s-poor and s-rich groups; (ii) substantial star-to-star Fe variations, with the s-rich stars having higher Fe, e.g. _s-rich - _s-poor ~ 0.2~dex; and (iii) the presence of O-Na-Al (anti-)correlations in both stellar groups. We have defined a new photometric index, c_{BVI}=(B-V)-(V-I), to maximise the separation in the colour-magnitude diagram between the two stellar groups with different Fe and s-element content, and this index is not significantly affected by variations in light elements (such as the O-Na anticorrelation). The variations in the overall metal...

  16. Adaptive Anisotropic Mesh Technique For Coupled Problems: Application To Welding Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adaptive Anisotropic Mesh Technique For Coupled Problems: Application To Welding Simulation M, such as welding for instance, is the control of the mesh, that is an appropriate mastering of the spatial welding. We demonstrate that the use of an anisotropic adaptive finite element method can result

  17. Review of uranium bioassay techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

  18. Generalized finite element method for Helmholtz equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidajat, Realino Lulie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reduces the pollution effect due to wave number and we are able to obtain a highly accurate solution with a much smaller number of degrees-of-freedom compared with the classical Finite Element Method. The q-convergence of the handbook functions...

  19. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open Table 1. Rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names.......................................................................................6 Table 2. Non-rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names

  20. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  1. Two-element free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.; Yariv, A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between the electrons and the radiation in a free-electrons laser leads to a shift and a spread of the electron velocity distribution. The electron dynamics of a two-element system are studied in the small signal region. It is found that the efficiency and gain can be increased through introduction of an adjustable drift distance between two identical wigglers.

  2. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  3. Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in snow and ice sampled at Colle designed, built and tested. Melt water from inner part of ice core section was pumped to an ICP-SFMS and ICP-OES. Melt water from outer section was on-line extracted by solid-phase cartridges for semi

  4. Neutron based elemental characterization of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dep, L.; Vourvopoulos, G. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An elemental characterization system based on a 14 MeV neutron generator is described. The results of sulfur content measurement in coal with a precision acceptable to the coal industry are presented. The preliminary results of measuring carbon, oxygen, and sodium are shown.

  5. Plutonium-the element of surprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Plutonium-the element of surprise G.R.ChoppinandB.E.Stout This year marked the soth annivrsary ol the original isolation o{ plutonium, making ita relativenewcomerto the PeriodicTable.Ovrthe past 50 years plutonium has become more familiar to tho generslpublic than manyothor,olderelem6nts

  6. Finite Element Analysis in Functional BRIAN G. RICHMOND,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite Element Analysis in Functional Morphology BRIAN G. RICHMOND,1 * BARTH W. WRIGHT,1 IAN GROSSE element analysis. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: finite-element analysis; mastication; primates; biome This article reviews the fundamental principles of the finite element method and the three basic steps (model

  7. Modeling Elastic Properties in Finite-Element Analysis: How Much

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Elastic Properties in Finite- Element Analysis: How Much Precision Is Needed to Produce analysis was investigated using a finite-element model of a Macaca fascicularis skull. Four finite-element realistically using the orthotropic elastic properties employed in analysis 4. Results suggest that finite-element

  8. Math/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    for Elliptic Problems by Philippe G. Ciarlet (1978). 3. An Analysis of the Finite Element Method by GilbertMath/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001) Lectures: MW 3:30{4:50, room 121 RAI Professor Element Methods by Susanne C. Brenner and L. Ridgway Scott (1994). 2. The Finite Element Method

  9. Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals Rare earth elements (REEs) compose in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical proper es, rare earth elements are typically. Briefing Paper 02/12 Jim Hein | May 2012 www.isa.org.jm Table 1: Rare Earth Elements This paper

  10. Finite element methods for 3D eddy current prob-lems in bounded domains subject to realistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo

    Finite element methods for 3D eddy current prob- lems in bounded domains subject to realistic techniques to approximate eddy current prob- lems. The focus of the article is on the analysis of weak]), magnetostatics ([59, 60, 80, 81, 109, 110, 114]), eddy current ([1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26

  11. A reciprocal space approach for locating symmetry elements in Patterson superposition maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrixson, T.

    1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the location and possible existence of symmetry elements in Patterson superposition maps has been developed. A comparison of the original superposition map and a superposition map operated on by the symmetry element gives possible translations to the location of the symmetry element. A reciprocal space approach using structure factor-like quantities obtained from the Fourier transform of the superposition function is then used to determine the best'' location of the symmetry element. Constraints based upon the space group requirements are also used as a check on the locations. The locations of the symmetry elements are used to modify the Fourier transform coefficients of the superposition function to give an approximation of the structure factors, which are then refined using the EG relation. The analysis of several compounds using this method is presented. Reciprocal space techniques for locating multiple images in the superposition function are also presented, along with methods to remove the effect of multiple images in the Fourier transform coefficients of the superposition map. In addition, crystallographic studies of the extended chain structure of (NHC{sub 5}H{sub 5})SbI{sub 4} and of the twinning method of the orthorhombic form of the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} are presented. 54 refs.

  12. Erasure Techniques in MRD codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; R. Sujatha; R. S. Raja Durai

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is organized into six chapters. The first chapter introduces the basic algebraic structures essential to make this book a self contained one. Algebraic linear codes and their basic properties are discussed in chapter two. In chapter three the authors study the basic properties of erasure decoding in maximum rank distance codes. Some decoding techniques about MRD codes are described and discussed in chapter four of this book. Rank distance codes with complementary duals and MRD codes with complementary duals are introduced and their applications are discussed. Chapter five introduces the notion of integer rank distance codes. The final chapter introduces some concatenation techniques.

  13. Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

  14. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Fischer, Donald F. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR).

  15. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

  16. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    1 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 3 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;2013/08/12 2 #12;33 Chapter 3: Data Preprocessing n Data Preprocessing: An Overview n Data Quality n Major Tasks in Data Preprocessing n Data Cleaning n Data Integration n Data

  17. Dissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Telluride Photovoltaics The goal of increasing the efficiency of solar cell devices is a universal oneDissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques for Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics. Increased photovoltaic (PV) performance means an increase in competition with other energy tech- nologies

  18. Prediction of rainwater acidity using trace element concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vong, R.J.; Peterson, R.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is of interest to be able to estimate the contribution of an anthropogenic emission source to downwind rainwater chemistry. The authors here consider the closure of a large copper smelter which operated in a region where background and other emission sources should contribute smaller amounts of atmospheric sulfur than the smelter. An additional simplification existed in that meteorology associated with rain was relatively well known and consistent. A field experiment was conducted in the winters of 1985 and 1986 to collect rainwater at sites upwind and downwind of the Tacoma, Washington smelter. The smelters SO{sub 2} emissions, their conversion to SO{sub 4}= via three oxidants (O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} - Fe catalyzed reactions), diffusion, transport, and aerosol/gas scavenging previously have been estimated while adjusting model parameters until the predictions fit the rainwater data. To take advantage of the unique experimental design afforded by the closure of the smelter, statistical analysis was performed on NO{sub 3}-, SO{sub 4}(xs)= (excess of seasalt), and pH data; analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed that the smelter had a significant (p < .01) influence on rainwater pH and SO{sub 4}(xs). The analysis presented here extends the ANOVA by applying a multivariate regression technique to new data for trace element concentrations for the same rain samples. To predict rainwater acidity, they derive fingerprints from trace element data, identify a source or process related to that fingerprint, and compare the predicted contributions for pre- and post- closure samples.

  19. Tipping elements in the Earth's climate system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenton, T.M. [Univ. of East Anglia and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Norwich (GB). School of Environmental Sciences; Held, H.; Lucht, W.; Rahmstorf, S. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany); Kriegler, E. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany)]|[Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy; Hall, J.W. [Newcastle Univ. and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (GB). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Schellnhuber, H.J. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany)]|[Oxford Univ. and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (GB). Environmental Change Inst.

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The term 'tipping point' commonly refers to a critical threshold at which a tiny perturbation can qualitatively alter the state or development of a system. Here the authors introduce the term 'tipping element' to describe large-scale components of the Earth system that may pass a tipping point. They critically evaluate potential policy-relevant tipping elements in the climate system under anthropogenic forcing, drawing on the pertinent literature and a recent international workshop to compile a short list, and they assess where their tipping points lie. An expert elicitation is used to help rank their sensitivity to global warming and the uncertainty about the underlying physical mechanisms. Then the authors explain how, in principle, early warning systems could be established to detect the proximity of some tipping points.

  20. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  1. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  2. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D. (Reno, NV); Sulchek, Todd A. (Oakland, CA); Feigin, Stuart C. (Reno, NV)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  3. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  4. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  5. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  6. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  7. Apollo 16: a trace element perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief summary of some inferences regarding the Apollo 16 site that can be arrived at from incompatible element-geochemical data is presented. We use a set of elements not exploited to address some of the questions about the geology of the Apollo 16 site and the evolution of the highlands crust. Others have recognized the great difficulty in disentangling the complex history of the highlands on the basis of petrographic and compositional data. We have previously attempted to reconcile a relatively few interelement relationships with information from many other sources. The Apollo 16 site and the significance of Apollo 16 samples have been examined from the perspectives of data on Cl, P, Ru and Os for the most part and also, in a few cases, data on the heavy metals Pb, Tl and Bi.

  8. Finite element solution of multi-scale transport problems using the least squares based bubble function enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yazdani; V. Nassehi

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an optimum technique based on the least squares method for the derivation of the bubble functions to enrich the standard linear finite elements employed in the formulation of Galerkin weighted-residual statements. The element-level linear shape functions are enhanced with supplementary polynomial bubble functions with undetermined coefficients. The best least squares minimization of the residual functional obtained from the insertion of these trial functions into model equations results in an algebraic system of equations whose solution provides the unknown coefficients in terms of element-level nodal values. The normal finite element procedures for the construction of stiffness matrices may then be followed with no extra degree of freedom incurred as a result of such enrichment. The performance of the proposed method has been tested on a number of benchmark linear transport equations with the results compared against the exact and standard linear element solutions. It has been observed that low order bubble enriched elements produce more accurate approximations than the standard linear elements with no extra computational cost despite employing relatively crude mesh. However, for the solution of strongly convection or reaction dominated problems significantly higher order enrichments as well as extra mesh refinements will be required.

  9. A Case Study of Principal Leadership in the Practice of Multicultural Education in High-Achieving Schools Serving Hispanic Students in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Sylvia 1954-

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the educational experiences and leadership behaviors of five South Texas high school principals, in the context of the practice of multicultural education and Hispanic student achievement...

  10. The photoelastic determination of the principal stresses in polygons having round central holes and subjected to a concentrated diagonal compressive load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priddy, Tommy Glynn

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE PHOTOELASTIC DETERMINATION OF THE PRINCIPAL STRESSES IN POLYGONS HAVING ROUND CENTRAL HOLES AND SUMECTED TO A CONCENTRATED DIAGONAL COMPRESSIVE LOAD A Thesis TOMMY GLYNN PRIDDX Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agrioultural...

  11. Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration...

  12. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  13. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  14. Trace element partitioning in Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acevedo, Lillian Esther

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lignites and largest individual deposits in Texas occur in the Wilcox group north of the Colorado River; the lowest quality lignite occurs in the Jackson group (2). A comparison between the elemental composition of lignite from the wilcox formation..., Rb, Sc, Th, U, V, Y, Yb, Zn and Zr are positively correlated and B decreases 10 in concentration with increasing levels of ash (15) Combustion. Texas can supply a large portion of its energy needs with its near surface lignite sources (21...

  15. INTERIM REPORT ON CONCRETE DEGRADATION MECHANISMS AND ONLINE MONITORING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Neal, Kyle; Kosson, David; Adams, Douglas

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing fleets of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, though most these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. The online monitoring of concrete structure conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory will develop and demonstrate concrete structures health monitoring capabilities. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Therefore, the structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University proposes to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses available techniques and ongoing challenges in each of the four elements of the proposed framework with emphasis on degradation mechanisms and online monitoring techniques.

  16. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Gerald M. (Fremont, CA); Cowan, II, Robert L. (Fremont, CA); Davies, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  17. Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heubeck, Norman B. (Schenectady, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000.degree. F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics.

  18. Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heubeck, N.B.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

  19. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  20. 3760 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 57, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2010 Noise-Adjusted Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jenny (Qian)

    material measurements (uranium ore), and target measurements (depleted uranium) at various depths. Compared to other widely used algorithms for depleted uranium, the proposed technique can provide better performance techniques may be poor when a target, e.g., depleted uranium, is buried. The problem be- comes more

  1. Graph partitioning advance clustering technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhulatha, T Soni

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering is a common technique for statistical data analysis, Clustering is the process of grouping the data into classes or clusters so that objects within a cluster have high similarity in comparison to one another, but are very dissimilar to objects in other clusters. Dissimilarities are assessed based on the attribute values describing the objects. Often, distance measures are used. Clustering is an unsupervised learning technique, where interesting patterns and structures can be found directly from very large data sets with little or none of the background knowledge. This paper also considers the partitioning of m-dimensional lattice graphs using Fiedler's approach, which requires the determination of the eigenvector belonging to the second smallest Eigenvalue of the Laplacian with K-means partitioning algorithm.

  2. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imashuku, Susumu, E-mail: imashuku.susumu.2m@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  3. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  4. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  5. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Chung (Richland, WA); Whitney, Paul (Richland, WA); Thomas, Jim (Richland, WA)

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.

  6. Comparison of Holdup Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lousteau, Angela L [ORNL] [ORNL; Stooksbury, John C [ORNL] [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of uranium holdup, the residual material left in process equipment such as pipes or ducts, is an integral element of material control and accountability. Not only are the measurements important for accountability, they are also important for criticality safety. The goal in measuring holdup is to quantify the amount of material in the pipes to verify that all material is accounted for (inventory in [inventory out + holdup] = 0) and to ensure that the amount of material heldup is not a criticality risk. There are a number of ways to measure holdup in process equipment; however, this paper will evaluate only two methods (i.e., Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS-4) and In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS)) for specific measurement scenarios. The comparison will use measurements of well-known reference materials in various configurations and will examine the results, uncertainties, repeatability, time required, portability, and cost of each system.

  7. SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1 Introduction In this paper we consider the range of security security has been exerted. However, the techniques described are of general applicability by a security technique; in doing so we will distinguish between security features and security techniques (or

  8. A Note on the Finite Element Method with Singular Basis Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Hideaki

    finite element analysis that incorporates singular element functions. A need for introducing * *some singular elements as part of basis functions in certain finite element analysis arises o* *ut A Note on the Finite Element Method with Singular Basis

  9. Ce-MXRF: the power of separation with bench top element sensitive detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, T. C. (Thomasin C.); Joseph, M. R. (Martha R.); Havrilla, G. J. (George J.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a proven separation technique that offers highly efficient separation, rapid analysis, and minute sample consumption. When combined with a element specific detection scheme, it can be used for chemical speciation of biologically and environmentally relevant species such as metal containing proteins. In this study, a new tool was developed for separation and elemental detection. Specifically, a simple CE apparatus was constructed using a thin-walled fused Si capillary and interfaced with a bench top micro x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) system. X-ray excitation and detection of the separated sample volumes was performed using an EDAX Eagle II micro x-ray fluorescence system equipped with a Rh target excitation source and a SiLi detector. It was demonstrated that the system could be used for the separation and detection of two metals from one another, specifically Cu{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. Free Co{sup 2+} could also be isolated from Co{sup 2+} bound to cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B-12). Other systems that were explored were the separation of two organics, ferritin from cyanocobalamin as well as the separation of the different Cu and Zn isoforms of metallothinein. CE-MXRF was also used to separate the important serum isoforms of transferrin. Direct comparisons were made between CE-MXRF system and other elemental separation techniques such as CE-PIXE, CE-synchrotron-XRF, and CE-ICPMS.

  10. INDIVIDUAL REFORM ELEMENTS .63Average course exam score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    INDIVIDUAL REFORM ELEMENTS .63Average course exam score .11In class clicker score .02Lecture: · Correlations with effort/curricular elements are positive but not high, indicating no individual course reform

  11. A fabrication method for integrated filter elements with inductance cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, David J.

    This paper outlines a fabrication method for integrated filter elements. An integrated filter element is a three- (or more) terminal device comprising a capacitor and coupled air-core magnetic windings, in which the magnetic ...

  12. Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mercury Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury In addition to banning the export of elemental mercury from the United States as of January 1, 2013, the Mercury...

  13. GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power A report discussing the intentions of the GNEP. GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear...

  14. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Frederick

    The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases ...

  15. Notes 01. Modeling of mechanical (lumped parameter) elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental elements in mechanical systems: inertias, stiffness and damping elements. Equivalent spring coefficients and associated potential energy. Equivalent mass or inertia coefficients and associated kinetic energy. Equations of motion of a...

  16. On Some Versions of the Element Agglomeration AMGe Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lashuk, I; Vassilevski, P

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper deals with element-based AMG methods that target linear systems of equations coming from finite element discretizations of elliptic PDEs. The individual element information (element matrices and element topology) is the main input to construct the AMG hierarchy. We study a number of variants of the spectral agglomerate element based AMG method. The core of the algorithms relies on element agglomeration utilizing the element topology (built recursively from fine to coarse levels). The actual selection of the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is based on solving large number of local eigenvalue problems. Additionally, we investigate strategies for adaptive AMG as well as multigrid cycles that are more expensive than the V-cycle utilizing simple interpolation matrices and nested conjugate gradient (CG) based recursive calls between the levels. The presented algorithms are illustrated with an extensive set of experiments based on a matlab implementation of the methods.

  17. Adaptive Finite Element Method for Time-domain Maxwell's ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuhao Cao supervised under Professor Cai

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 11, 2013 ... Avoiding the pollution of the finite element approximation, a.k.a. the spurious modes. Lowest-order element's DoFs associated with edges, and.

  18. Nanoporous Elements in Microfluidics for Multiscale Manipulation of Bioparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Grace D.

    Solid materials, such as silicon, glass, and polymers, dominate as structural elements in microsystems including microfluidics. Porous elements have been limited to membranes sandwiched between microchannel layers or polymer ...

  19. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements ...

  20. Element specific measurements of the structural properties and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Element specific measurements of the structural properties and magnetism of CoxZn1-xO. Element specific measurements of the structural properties and magnetism of CoxZn1-xO....

  1. Flexible finite-element modeling of global geomagnetic depth sounding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Flexible Finite-Element Modeling ofOF THE DISSERTATION Flexible Finite-Element Modeling ofin Chapter 2. The method is flexible enough to allow for a

  2. The Composition of Interstellar Grains Toward Zeta Ophiuchi: Constraining the Elemental Budget Near the Diffuse-Dense Cloud Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poteet, Charles A; Draine, Bruce T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward Zeta Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H2O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H2O ice mantles on large (a ~ 2.8 microns) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of elemental Mg and Si along the line of sight are present in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of eleme...

  3. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick (5239 Miles Ave., Apt. A, Oakland, CA 94618); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (1622 Oxford St., #5t, Berkeley, CA 94709)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  4. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  5. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  6. Alpha decay chains from element 113

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu; C. Samanta

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical estimates of $\\alpha$-decay half lives of several nuclei in the decay from element 113 are presented. Calculations in a WKB framework using DDM3Y interaction and experimental Q-values are in good agreement with the experimental data. Half life calculations are found to be quite sensitive to the Q-values and angular momenta transfers. Calculated decay lifetime decreases, owing to more penetrability as well as thinner barrier, as Q-value increases. Deviations to this predominant behaviour observed in some recent experimental data may be attributed to non zero spin-parities in some cases.

  7. Heat Exchanger With Internal Pin Elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerstmann, Joseph (Framingham, MA); Hannon, Charles L. (Arlington, MA)

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat exchanger/heater comprising a tubular member having a fluid inlet end, a fluid outlet end and plurality of pins secured to the interior wall of the tube. Various embodiments additionally comprise a blocking member disposed concentrically inside the pins, such as a core plug or a baffle array. Also disclosed is a vapor generator employing an internally pinned tube, and a fluid-heater/heat-exchanger utilizing an outer jacket tube and fluid-side baffle elements, as well as methods for heating a fluid using an internally pinned tube.

  8. Electrical connection structure for a superconductor element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lallouet, Nicolas; Maguire, James

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to an electrical connection structure for a superconductor element cooled by a cryogenic fluid and connected to an electrical bushing, which bushing passes successively through an enclosure at an intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and the temperature of the cryogenic fluid, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, said bushing projecting outside the ambient temperature enclosure. According to the invention, said intermediate enclosure is filled at least in part with a solid material of low thermal conductivity, such as a polyurethane foam or a cellular glass foam. The invention is applicable to connecting a superconductor cable at cryogenic temperature to a device for equipment at ambient temperature.

  9. Eddy current measurement of tube element spacing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latham, Wayne Meredith (Forest, VA); Hancock, Jimmy Wade (Lynchburg, VA); Grut, Jayne Marie (Madison Heights, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of electromagnetically measuring the distance between adjacent tube elements in a heat exchanger. A cylindrical, high magnetic permeability ferrite slug is placed in the tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. A bobbin or annular coil type probe operated in the absolute mode is inserted into a second tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. From prior calibrations on the response of the eddy current coil, the signals from the coil, when sensing the presence of the ferrite slug, are used to determine the spacing between the tubes.

  10. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohweller, D.J. [Astro Aerospace Corp., Carpinteria, CA (United States); Butler, T.Af. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  11. Element Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,Electrosolar Jump to:Element Energy Ltd Jump

  12. Super Heavy Element Discovery | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper Heavy Element

  13. Nature Elements Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen Energy InformationNatsource EuropeNature Elements

  14. Nature Elements Holding AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen Energy InformationNatsource EuropeNature ElementsNature

  15. Nu Element Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural PubNovaNMRE |Nu Element Inc

  16. First-Principles Calculation of Principal Hugoniot and K-Shell X-ray Absorption Spectra for Warm Dense KCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Shijun; Kang, Wei; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra of warm dense KCl are calculated using the first-principles molecular dynamics method. Evolution of electronic structures as well as the influence of the approximate description of ionization on pressure (caused by the underestimation of the energy gap between conduction bands and valence bands) in the first-principles method are illustrated by the calculation. Pressure ionization and thermal smearing are shown as the major factors to prevent the deviation of pressure from global accumulation along the Hugoniot. In addition, cancellation between electronic kinetic pressure and virial pressure further reduces the deviation. The calculation of X-ray absorption spectra shows that the band gap of KCl persists after the pressure ionization of the $3p$ electrons of Cl and K taking place at lower energy, which provides a detailed understanding to the evolution of electronic structures of warm dense matter.

  17. Residual stresses in weld overlay tubes: A finite element study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taljat, B.; Zacharia, T.; Wang, X.L.; Keiser, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Feng, Z. [Edison Welding Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Jirinec, M.J. [Welding Services, Inc., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual stresses and strains in a tube with circumferential weld overlay were analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The objective of this work was to develop and verify a FE model, to determine the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in the weld overlay tube, and to evaluate the significance of two contributing factors to residual stress: (1) difference in material properties between tube and weld material, and (2) thermal gradients in the weld. An axisymmetric FE model was developed to simulate the circumferential two-layer welding process of alloy 625 overlay on SA210 tube. The first layer was modeled as a gas metal arc welding process with filler metal, whereas the autogenous gas tungsten arc welding process was modeled for the second layer. Neutron diffraction technique was used to experimentally determine residual elastic strains in the weld overlay tube. Comparison with the FE results shows overall good agreement. Both the experimental and FE results show high compressive stresses at the inside tube surface and high tensile stresses in the weld overlay. This suggests that weld overlay may be used to relieve tensile or produce compressive stresses at the inside tube surface, which is significant for applications where crack initiation is found at the root pass of the joining weld.

  18. electroseismic monitoring of co2 sequestration: a finite element ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Zyserman

    Keywords: Electroseismic Modeling, Poroelasticity, CO2 sequestration, Finite element methods. 2000 AMS ... carbon dioxide emissisons into the atmosphere.

  19. Shielded regeneration heating element for a particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust system includes a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream from an engine. The PF filters particulates within an exhaust from the engine. A heating element heats particulate matter in the PF. A catalyst substrate or a flow converter is disposed upstream from said heating element. The catalyst substrate oxidizes the exhaust prior to reception by the heating element. The flow converter converts turbulent exhaust flow to laminar exhaust flow prior to reception by the heating element.

  20. A User's Guide to the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Bradley E.

    The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to

  1. Residential Energy Efficiency Financing: Key Elements of Program Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents key programmatic elements and context of financing initiatives, including contractor support, rebates, quality assurance, and more.

  2. Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

  3. Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:Drill CoreTechniques

  4. Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric PowerTechniques Jump

  5. Geodesic Finite Elements of Higher Order Oliver Sander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions. As a side product we can define geodesic finite elements for non-simplex reference elements of a simplex by the weighted average (v1, . . . , dd+1; w) := arg min qM d+1 i=1 wi dist(vi, q)2 , (1) where w are barycentric coordinates on the simplex. Based on this formula a finite element theory could be constructed

  6. Finite Element Methods for Radiosity \\Lambda Paul S. Heckbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    Finite Element Methods for Radiosity \\Lambda Paul S. Heckbert Carnegie Mellon University Global global illu­ mination: finite element methods and Monte Carlo methods. The former approach yields radiosity methods and the latter approach yields ray tracing methods, generally speaking. Finite element

  7. The Use and Usefulness of the Cybersecurity Data Element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Strategic Workforce Planning #12;· The OPM cybersecurity data elements were published in the Guide their cybersecurity professionals The OPM Data element will: #12;Workforce Planning Succession Management InterlockingThe Use and Usefulness of the Cybersecurity Data Element Federal Computer Security Program Forum

  8. ANALYSIS OF SOME MOVING SPACETIME FINITE ELEMENT METHODS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bank, Randolph E.

    ANALYSIS OF SOME MOVING SPACE­TIME FINITE ELEMENT METHODS \\Lambda RANDOLPH E. BANK y AND RAFAEL F. SANTOS z Abstract. Two space­time finite element methods for solving time­dependent partial differential equations are defined and analyzed. The methods are based on the use of isoparametric finite elements

  9. Analysis of PostProcessing for Nonconforming Finite Element Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieweck, Friedhelm

    Analysis of Post­Processing for Nonconforming Finite Element Solutions F. Schieweck \\Lambda of a conforming finite element function v C h 2 V C h . One ``nice'' feature of our analysis­processing procedure where a conforming approximation is computed from a nonconforming finite element solution

  10. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD IN FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    completed this course should be able to perform quick analysis of small problems using the finite element of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer An Introduction to Finite Element Analysis Using "Galerkin Weak of Euler's Equation in Finite Element Analysis Generalized Form of Euler's Equation in Three Dimensional

  11. STATIC ANALYSIS OF SANDWICH PLATES BY FINITE ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STATIC ANALYSIS OF SANDWICH PLATES BY FINITE ELEMENTS V. MANET, W.-S. HAN AND A. VAUTRIN ´Ecole des continuity at hal-00663233,version1-26Jan2012 #12;Static analysis of sandwich plates by finite elements 3 and are presented in this paper. 2. Hybrid sandwich finite elements In this section, we present the development

  12. Medially Based Meshing with Finite Element Analysis of Prostate Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouch, Jessica R.

    Medially Based Meshing with Finite Element Analysis of Prostate Deformation Jessica R. Crouch1 have approached prostate imaging problems using meth- ods that incorporate finite element analysis. Assume the prostate is a linearly elastic body and compute its deformation using finite element analysis

  13. Automated Finite Element Analysis for Deformable Registration of Prostate Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Automated Finite Element Analysis for Deformable Registration of Prostate Images Jessica R, Marco Zaider Abstract-- Two major factors preventing the routine clinical use of finite element analysis the effort required to apply finite element analysis to image registration. Encouraging results are presented

  14. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF A CLASS OF STRESSFREE MARTENSITIC MICROSTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo

    FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF A CLASS OF STRESS­FREE MARTENSITIC MICROSTRUCTURES BO LI Abstract. This work is concerned with the finite element approximation of a class of stress­free martensitic microstructures modeled by multi­well en­ ergy minimization. Finite element energy­minimizing sequences are first

  15. Complex Wavenumber Fourier Analysis of the PVersion Finite Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lonny L.

    Complex Wavenumber Fourier Analysis of the P­Version Finite Element Method Lonny L. Thompson wave solutions. This type of analysis amounts to a discrete Fourier synthesis of the finite element bands in the context of finite element analysis were not fully understood, although there is some

  16. A finite element analysis of pneumatic-tire/sand interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    A finite element analysis of pneumatic-tire/sand interactions during off-road vehicle travel M pneumatic tire and sand during off-road vehicle travel. Keywords Finite element analysis, Road vehicles and for other tire/sand combinations. Since the finite element analysis of the tire/sand interaction enables

  17. Static Analysis of Sandwich Plates by Hybrid Finite Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Static Analysis of Sandwich Plates by Hybrid Finite Elements V. Manet and W.-S. Han Materials analysis tool. The subject of the present work concerns the development of hybrid sandwich finite elements into acount. The present work concerns the development of hybrid sandwich finite elements mod- elling

  18. Combined Finite Element --Finite Volume Method ( Convergence Analysis )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdeburg, Universität

    Combined Finite Element -- Finite Volume Method ( Convergence Analysis ) M'aria Luk idea is to combine finite volume and finite element methods in an appropriate way. Thus nonlinear grid. Diffusion terms are discretized by the conforming piecewise linear finite element method

  19. Building Finite Element Analysis Programs in Distributed Services Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1. Building Finite Element Analysis Programs in Distributed Services Environment Jun Peng1 and Kincho H. Law2 Abstract Traditional finite element analysis (FEA) programs are typically built on a dedicated computer using the developments offered by a finite element analysis (FEA) program. Typically

  20. AN ADAPTIVE SURFACE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD BASED ON VOLUME MESHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demlow, Alan

    studied in this paper. The paper of Dziuk [12] contains the first analysis of a finite element methodAN ADAPTIVE SURFACE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD BASED ON VOLUME MESHES ALAN DEMLOW AND MAXIM A. OLSHANSKII Abstract. In this paper we define an adaptive version of a recently introduced finite element

  1. Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1 , Vladik Kreinovich2 , Pavel Sol´in2 advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher-order finite element methods (hp

  2. Introduction to Finite Element Methods \\Lambda Paul S. Heckbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    Introduction to Finite Element Methods \\Lambda Paul S. Heckbert Carnegie Mellon University Global be solved numerically. In this chapter we explain some of the basics of the finite element method Illumination course notes, SIGGRAPH '93, Anaheim, Aug. 1993 4­1 #12; 4­2 Introduction to Finite Element Methods

  3. A multiscale preconditioner for stochastic mortar mixed finite elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yotov, Ivan

    physical models in different subdomains. The mortar finite element method is a generalization is the stochastic collocation method [4,40,39]. It combines a finite element discretiza- tion in physical space the approximation properties of the stochastic finite element method [5,37], making it more efficient than MCS

  4. The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

  5. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emrich, William J. Jr. [NASA--Marshall Space Flight Center, M.S. ER24, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  6. Element Abundances through the Cosmic Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The horizon for studies of element abundances has expanded dramatically in the last ten years. Once the domain of astronomers concerned chiefly with stars and nearby galaxies, this field has now become a key component of observational cosmology, as technological advances have made it possible to measure the abundances of several chemical elements in a variety of environments at redshifts up to z = 4, when the universe was in its infancy. In this series of lectures I summarise current knowledge on the chemical make-up of distant galaxies observed directly in their starlight, and of interstellar and intergalactic gas seen in absorption against the spectra of bright background sources. The picture which is emerging is one where the universe at z = 3 already included many of the constituents of today's galaxies-even at these early times we see evidence for Population I and II stars, while the `smoking gun' for Population III objects may be hidden in the chemical composition of the lowest density regions of the intergalactic medium, yet to be deciphered.

  7. Chemical Elements at High and Low Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The past few years have seen a steady progress in the determination of element abundances at high redshifts, with new and more accurate measures of metallicities in star-forming galaxies, in QSO absorbers, and in the intergalactic medium. We have also become more aware of the limitations of the tools at our disposal in such endeavours. I summarise these recent developments and--in tune with the theme of this meeting--consider the clues which chemical abundance studies offer to the links between the high redshift galaxy populations and today's galaxies. The new data are `fleshing out' the overall picture of element abundances at redshifts z = 2 - 3 which has been gradually coming into focus over the last decade. In particular, we can now account for at least 40% of the metals produced by the global star formation activity in the universe from the Big Bang to z = 2.5, and we have strong indications of where the remainder are likely to be found.

  8. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A. (Proctor & Gamble Company, West Chester, OH); Mrozek, Randy A. (Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  9. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  10. Model building techniques for analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.

  11. Constraining the 0?2? matrix elements by nuclear structure observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Freeman; J. P. Schiffer

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery that neutrinos have finite rest mass has led to renewed interest in neutrinoless double beta decay. The development of large-scale experiments to search for neutrinoless double beta decay has increased the probability of a credible observation of the process in the near future. The reliability of calculations of the associated nuclear matrix elements is likely soon to become a critical issue. In this paper experimental techniques that access properties of the ground-state wave functions of double beta decay candidates, the occupancies of valence single- particle orbitals and pairing correlations, are summarized and the experimental data for candidate nuclei are reviewed. The results are discussed in relation to questions concerning which aspects of nuclear structure may play an important role in determining the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay.

  12. The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

  13. Development of a heavy-ion identification method using a combined time-of-flight [delta]E-E technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanus, Roy Gene

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nagatani Identification of heavy-ion reaction products produced at the Texas A&H Variable Energy Cyclotron has been done primarily through the use of the AE-E detector telescope technique. The telescope is formed by placing two detectors together... of the partzcles eo their total initial energy, they can uniquely be identified. However, this technique for identification of heavy-ion reaction prod- ucts is adequate only for isotopes up through those of oxygen. Beyond oxygen, only element identification can...

  14. Method of holding optical elements without deformation during their fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hed, P. Paul (80 Milaw Ct., San Ramon, CA 94583)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for securing and removing an optical element to and from a blocking tool without causing deformation of the optical element. A lens tissue is placed on the top surface of the blocking tool. Dots of UV cement are applied to the lens tissue without any of the dots contacting each other. An optical element is placed on top of the blocking tool with the lens tissue sandwiched therebetween. The UV cement is then cured. After subsequent fabrication steps, the bonded blocking tool, lens tissue, and optical element are placed in a debonding solution to soften the UV cement. The optical element is then removed from the blocking tool.

  15. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  16. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  17. GEO+, a finite element program on a personal computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillin, Clement Gerard

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and BW' is the difference between the largest and smallest node numbers for an element e. If it, i2, i3, and i4 are the node numbers of a 4- noded quadrilateral element e, the maximum element node number difference BWe is given by: BW'=Max( [ii...-is[, [i2-i3[, [i3-i4[, [i4-ii[, [i3-ii[, [i2-i4[) (84) One way to minimize the bandwidth is to number the nodes such that BWe is as small as possible in each element, and thereby keep the numbers of each element as close as possible. This property...

  18. PARALLEL COMPUTING OF UNSATURATED SOILS USING ELEMENT-BY-ELEMENT AND DOMAIN DEOMPOSITON METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augarde, Charles

    the processors with minimum data exchanges and load balancing. The linear system of equations was solved using and primary unknowns. The mass balance of water flow leads to the following equation: ( ) 0=+ ww wr div t n as in compacted soils used as fill material. The accurate analysis of unsaturated soils by the finite element

  19. Abundance gradients in the Milky Way for alpha elements, Iron peak elements, Barium, Lanthanum and Europium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cescutti; F. Matteucci; P. Francois; C. Chiappini

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the abundance gradients in the disk of the Milky Way for several chemical elements (O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, Co, V, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, Ba, La and Eu), and compare our results with the most recent and homogeneous observational data. We adopt a chemical evolution model able to well reproduce the main properties of the solar vicinity. We compute, for the first time, the abundance gradients for all the above mentioned elements in the galactocentric distance range 4 - 22 kpc. The comparison with the observed data on Cepheids in the galactocentric distance range 5-17 kpc gives a very good agreement for many of the studied elements. In addition, we fit very well the data for the evolution of Lanthanum in the solar vicinity for which we present results here for the first time. We explore, also for the first time, the behaviour of the abundance gradients at large galactocentric distances by comparing our results with data relative to distant open clusters and red giants and select the best chemical evolution model model on the basis of that. We find a very good fit to the observed abundance gradients, as traced by Cepheids, for most of the elements, thus confirming the validity of the inside-out scenario for the formation of the Milky Way disk as well as the adopted nucleosynthesis prescriptions.

  20. Abundant p-singular elements in finite classical groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Alice C; Praeger, Cheryl E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, Isaacs, Kantor and Spaltenstein proved that for a finite simple d-dimensional classical group G, and for any prime divisor p of |G| distinct from the characteristic, the proportion of p-singular elements (elements with order divisible by p) is at least c/d for some constant c. We define a new subfamily of p-singular elements, called p-abundant elements, which leave invariant certain "large" subspaces of the natural G-module. We find explicit upper and lower bounds for the proportion of p-abundant elements in G, and prove that it approaches a (positive) limiting value as d \\rightarrow \\infty. It turns out that the limiting proportion of p-abundant elements is at least a constant multiple of the lower bound for the proportion of all p-singular elements derived by Issacs, Kantor and Spaltenstein.

  1. Uncertainty Analysis on the Design of Thermal Conductivity Measurement by a Guarded Cut-Bar Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Phillips; Changhu Xing; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban1

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique adapted from the guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow method was selected for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a nuclear fuel compact over a temperature range characteristic of its usage. This technique fulfills the requirement for non-destructive measurement of the composite compact. Although numerous measurement systems have been created based on the guarded comparative method, comprehensive systematic (bias) and measurement (precision) uncertainty associated with this technique have not been fully analyzed. In addition to the geometric effect in the bias error, which has been analyzed previously, this paper studies the working condition which is another potential error source. Using finite element analysis, this study showed the effect of these two types of error sources in the thermal conductivity measurement process and the limitations in the design selection of various parameters by considering their effect on the precision error. The results and conclusions provide valuable reference for designing and operating an experimental measurement system using this technique.

  2. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  3. Subranging technique using superconducting technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Deepnarayan (Hawthorne, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subranging techniques using "digital SQUIDs" are used to design systems with large dynamic range, high resolution and large bandwidth. Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) embodying the invention include a first SQUID based "coarse" resolution circuit and a second SQUID based "fine" resolution circuit to convert an analog input signal into "coarse" and "fine" digital signals for subsequent processing. In one embodiment, an ADC includes circuitry for supplying an analog input signal to an input coil having at least a first inductive section and a second inductive section. A first superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is coupled to the first inductive section and a second SQUID is coupled to the second inductive section. The first SQUID is designed to produce "coarse" (large amplitude, low resolution) output signals and the second SQUID is designed to produce "fine" (low amplitude, high resolution) output signals in response to the analog input signals.

  4. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  5. Electrical bushing for a superconductor element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirebeau, Pierre; Lallouet, Nicolas; Delplace, Sebastien; Lapierre, Regis

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to an electrical bushing serving to make a connection at ambient temperature to a superconductor element situated in an enclosure at cryogenic temperature. The electrical bushing passes successively through an enclosure at intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and cryogenic temperature, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, and it comprises a central electrical conductor surrounded by an electrically insulating sheath. According to the invention, an electrically conductive screen connected to ground potential surrounds the insulating sheath over a section that extends from the end of the bushing that is in contact with the enclosure at cryogenic temperature at least as far as the junction between the enclosure at intermediate temperature and the enclosure at ambient temperature. The invention is more particularly applicable to making a connection to a superconductor cable.

  6. Elements of a nuclear criticality safety program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States are quite successful, as compared with other safety disciplines, at protecting life and property, especially when regarded as a developing safety function with no historical perspective for the cause and effect of process nuclear criticality accidents before 1943. The programs evolved through self-imposed and regulatory-imposed incentives. They are the products of conscientious individuals, supportive corporations, obliged regulators, and intervenors (political, public, and private). The maturing of nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States has been spasmodic, with stability provided by the volunteer standards efforts within the American Nuclear Society. This presentation provides the status, relative to current needs, for nuclear criticality safety program elements that address organization of and assignments for nuclear criticality safety program responsibilities; personnel qualifications; and analytical capabilities for the technical definition of critical, subcritical, safety and operating limits, and program quality assurance.

  7. CEES Directorate & Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Department Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Area of Focus Electrochemical energy storage Professional Summary Senior Investigators...

  8. Methodology Principal results Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neha T. Patel; Ajit Gupta; Amar Nath P

    Strong positive growth responses to salinity by Ceriops tagal, a commonly occurring mangrove of the Gujarat coast of India

  9. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Physics, USA, 2008 Loeb Lecturer in Physics, Harvard University, USA, 2008 Einstein Lecturer, Weizmann Institute, Israel, 2009 Visiting Lecturer, University of British...

  10. Identifying Effective School Principals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Kandyce; Flores, Santa; Huang, Emily; Igwe, Carolyn; McDonald, Leslie; Stroud, Ryan; Willis, Rebecca; Dugat, Amber

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on standardized testing has been in place in Texas for many years. Gronberg, Jansen, Taylor, & Booker (2004, 1) write, ?Texas has been at the forefront of the transition from process or input-based evaluation of schools to outcome... or school demographics. Like SAT and ACT scores, dropout rates are also only relevant at the high school level. While dropout rates would be useful as a measure of school completion rates, Gronberg et al. (2004) found dropout reports to be unreliable...

  11. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconductor-semiconductor hybrid structures and high-temperature superconductors. In 1992, she joined the senior physics faculty at the University of Illinois at...

  12. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K. E. Gray, W.-K. Kwok, and U. Welp, Emission of Coherent THz Radiation from Superconductors, Science 318 (2007) 1291-1293. A. E. Koshelev, Electrodynamics of the Josephson...

  13. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (with tenure since 1992) 1998-present: Leader of Neutron Scattering Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory 2000-present: Senior Physicist,...

  14. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of NdFeAsO1-xFx single crystals U. Welp, R. Xie, A. E. Koshelev, W. K. Kwok, P. Cheng, L. Fang, H. H. Wen, Phys. Rev. B 78, 140510 (2008). Anisotropic phase diagram and...

  15. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Dr. Andreas Rydh, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, January 25, 2002. Chairman, External Advisory Committee for the National High Field...

  16. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    peopleprofile.asp?aleggett Background Anthony J. Leggett was born in London, England in March 1938.He attended Balliol College, Oxford where he majored in Literae...

  17. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www.bnl.govcmpmsd Educational Background 1972 B.Sc. Physics, Imperial College, London 1978 Ph.D. Physics, Warwick University, England Thesis title: Interaction of He...

  18. Energy Programs | Principal Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FL August 1996: B. Sc. degree in Theoretical Physics, University of Belgrade, Serbia Professional Affiliations Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins...

  19. SIMULATING ASTEROID RUBBLE PILES WITH A SELF-GRAVITATING SOFT-SPHERE DISTINCT ELEMENT METHOD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J. [Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-431UCB (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper applies a soft-sphere distinct element method Granular Dynamics code to simulate asteroid regolith and rubble piles. Applications to regolith studies in low gravity are also studied. Then an algorithm to calculate self-gravity is derived and incorporated for full-scale simulations of rubble-pile asteroids using Granular Dynamics techniques. To test its validity, the algorithm's results are compared with the exact direct calculation of the gravitational forces. Further avenues to improve the performance of the algorithm are also discussed.

  20. Closed formula for the matrix elements of the volume operator in canonical quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1996-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a closed formula for the matrix elements of the volume operator for canonical Lorentzian quantum gravity in four spacetime dimensions in the continuum in a spin-network basis. We also display a new technique of regularization which is state dependent but we are forced to it in order to maintain diffeomorphism covariance and in that sense it is natural. We arrive naturally at the expression for the volume operator as defined by Ashtekar and Lewandowski up to a state independent factor.

  1. Permeability computation on a REV with an immersed finite element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laure, P. [Laboratoire J.-A. Dieudonne, CNRS UMR 6621, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice, Cedex 02 (France); Puaux, G.; Silva, L.; Vincent, M. [MINES ParisTech, CEMEF-Centre de Mise en Forme des Materiaux, CNRS UMR 7635, BP 207 1 rue Claude, Daunesse 06904 Sophia Antipolis cedex (France)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method to compute permeability of fibrous media is presented. An immersed domain approach is used to represent the porous material at its microscopic scale and the flow motion is computed with a stabilized mixed finite element method. Therefore the Stokes equation is solved on the whole domain (including solid part) using a penalty method. The accuracy is controlled by refining the mesh around the solid-fluid interface defined by a level set function. Using homogenisation techniques, the permeability of a representative elementary volume (REV) is computed. The computed permeabilities of regular fibre packings are compared to classical analytical relations found in the bibliography.

  2. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  3. Optimization Online - Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugurel Ionut Andreica

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 23, 2008 ... Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several Multidimensional Geometric Data Management and Analysis Problems. Mugurel Ionut ...

  4. A New Technique for Determining Europium Abundances in Solar-Metallicity Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peek, Kathryn M G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique for measuring the abundance of europium, a representative r-process element, in solar-metallicity stars. Our algorithm compares LTE synthetic spectra with high-resolution observational spectra using a chi-square-minimization routine. The analysis is fully automated, and therefore allows consistent measurement of blended lines even across very large stellar samples. We compare our results with literature europium abundance measurements and find them to be consistent; we also find our method generates smaller errors.

  5. Laser forming is a flexible sheet metal forming technique using laser-induced thermal deformation to shape sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    forming process. Keywords: Laser Forming, Nontraditional Manufacturing, Sheet Metal, Finite Element73 Abstract Laser forming is a flexible sheet metal forming technique using laser-induced thermal deformation to shape sheet metal without hard tooling or external forces. Concave laser forming can be readily

  6. ARPEFS as an analytic technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two modifications to the ARPEFS technique are introduced. These are studied using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) as a model system. The first modification is the obtaining of ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves at temperatures as low as our equipment will permit. While adding to the difficulty of the experiment, this modification is shown to almost double the signal-to-noise ratio of normal emission p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) {chi}(k) curves. This is shown by visual comparison of the raw data and by the improved precision of the extracted structural parameters. The second change is the replacement of manual fitting of the Fourier filtered {chi}(k) curves by the use of the simplex algorithm for parameter determination. Again using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) data, this is shown to result in better agreement between experimental {chi}(k) curves and curves calculated based on model structures. The improved ARPEFS is then applied to p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) and ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) R30{degree}S/Ni(111). For p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) we find a S-Cu bond length of 2.26 {Angstrom}, with the S adatom 1.31 {Angstrom} above the fourfold hollow site. The second Cu layer appears to be corrugated. Analysis of the p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) data indicates that the S adatom adatom adsorbs onto the FCC threefold hollow site 1.53 {Angstrom} above the Ni surface. The S-Ni bond length is determined to be 2.13 {Angstrom}, indicating an outwards shift of the first layer Ni atoms. We are unable to assign a unique structure to ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3)R30{degree}S/Ni(111). An analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of ARPEFS as an experimental and analytic technique is presented, along with a summary of problems still to be addressed.

  7. Nonconforming formulations with spectral element methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sert, Cuneyt

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with Nx negationslash= Ny). ...... 91 41 Instantaneous temperature contours for cases 2, 4, 6 and 8 ...... 93 42 Instantaneous temperature and velocity profiles at axial locations of x = 5 (solid-lines) and x = 10 (dashed-lines) ............ 96 43... and Demkowicz [22]. An hp adaptive strategy coupled with CAM is given by Ainsworth and Senior [23]. One of the few number of CAM and SEM combinations can be found in [24]. Zanolli patching technique, introduced by Funaro et al. [25], is an iterative procedure...

  8. The Relationships of Diesel Fuel Properties, Chemistry, and HCCI Engine Performance as Determined by Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W [Rincon Ranch Consulting

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet common fuel specifications such as cetane number and volatility, a refinery must blend a number of refinery stocks derived from various process units in the refinery. Fuel chemistry can be significantly altered in meeting fuel specifications. Additionally, fuel specifications are seldom changed in isolation, and the drive to meet one specification may significantly alter other specifications or fuel chemistry. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines depend on the kinetic behavior of a fuel to achieve reliable ignition and are expected to be more dependent on fuel specifications and chemistry than today's conventional engines. Regression analysis can help in determining the underlying relationships between fuel specifications, chemistry, and engine performance. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used in this work, because of its ability to deal with co-linear variables and to uncover 'hidden' relationships in the data. In this paper, a set of 11 diesel fuels with widely varying properties were run in a simple HCCI engine. Fuel properties and engine performance are examined to identify underlying fuel relationships and to determine the interplay between engine behavior and fuels. Results indicate that fuel efficiency is mainly controlled by a collection of specifications related to density and energy content and ignition characteristics are controlled mainly by cetane number.

  9. Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

  10. Uncertainty evaluation for the matrix 'solidified state' of fissionable elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliescu, Elena; Iancso, Georgeta [National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering-'Horia Hulubei', Str.Reactorului 30, P.O. BOX MG-6, Magurele (Romania)

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In case of the analysis of the radioactive liquid samples, no matter the relative physical analysis method used, two impediments act that belong to the behavior in time of the dispersion state of the liquid samples to be analyzed and of the standard used in the analysis. That is, one of them refers to the state of the sample to be analyzed when being sampled, which 'alter' during the time elapsed from sampling up to the analysis of the sample. The other impediment is the natural change of the dispersion state of the standard radioactive solutions, due to the occurrence and evolution in time of the radiocolloidal and pseudo-radiocolloidal states. These radiocolloidal states are states of aggregation and they lead to the destruction of the homogeneity of the solutions. Taking into consideration the advantages offered by the relative physical methods of analysis as against the chemical or the radiochemical ones, different ways of eliminating these impediments have been tried. We eliminated these impediments processing the liquid reference materials (the solutions calibrated in radionuclides of interest), immediately after the preparation. This processing changes the liquid physical state of the reference materials in a 'solidified state'. Through this procedure the dispersion states of the samples, practically, can no longer be essentially modified in time and also ensure the uniform distribution of the radionuclides of interest in the elemental matrix of the samples 'state solidified'. The homogeneity of the distribution of the atoms of the radionuclides from the samples 'solidified state' was checked up through the track micromapping technique of the alpha particles. Through this technique, in the chemically etched track detectors that were put in direct contact with the sample for a determined period of time, the alpha exposure time of the detectors, micromaps of alpha tracks were obtained. These micromaps are retorts through tracks of the distributions atoms of fissionable elements (Thorium e.g.), of which, heavy charged particles, in this case the alpha radiations naturally emitted, were registered in the CR-39 track detectors. The density of alpha track from the obtained track micromaps was studied through common optic microscopy. Micromaps were studied counting the tracks on equal areas, in different measurement points. For the study of the foils prepared within the paper, the studied area was of 4.9 mm2, formed of 10 fields of 0.49 mm2 area each. The estimation of the uncertainty was carried out for all the sizes that were measured within the paper, no matter if they participate, directly or indirectly, in the estimation of the uncertainty regarding the homogeneity of the Thorium atoms distribution in the 'solidified state' foils of the standard solution calibrated in Thorium, such as: i) the weighted masses, ii) the dropped volumes of solution, iii) the alpha duration of exposure of the detectors, iv) the area studied on the surface of the micromap and v) the densities of alpha tracks. The procedure suggested allowed us to considerate that the homogeneity of alpha tracks distribution, on the surface and in thickness, is within the limits of 3.1%.

  11. Eaton Throat-Valve Element prototype concept. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, M.R.; Arendts, J.G.; Berry, R.A.; Korth, G.E.; Schwieder, P.R.; Sekot, J.P.; Snow, S.D.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an ongoing effort to improve techniques for simulating nuclear blasts, the US Army Research Laboratory has been studying the merits of computer-controlled valves. The valve studies have been aimed at providing the Department of Defense with the capacity to conduct nuclear blast and thermal survivability testing on full-scale tactical vehicles. This report documents the development and findings of a computer model that simulates the behavior of the Eaton-Throat Valve Element (ETVE) prototype, and describes a proposed modification concept for the ETVE. The computer model reveals three main findings: (1) the ETVE chatters during the open cycle, (2) the chatter is caused by the high gas forces on the sliding sleeve as the driver gas passes through its portholes, and (3) the chatter is aggravated because there is insufficient damping in the system. The INEL recommends opening the ETVE by sliding the sleeve toward the downstream end of the valve instead of toward the upstream end, as the ETVE is presently configured, and to provide additional damping to the system. However, neither of these configuration changes can be achieved easily, and a redesign and analysis f the ETVE must be completed prior to performing any work on the current ETVE prototype. The ETVE simulation model proved to be an extremely valuable tool in analyzing the qualitative nature of the valve`s operation. Further development of the model is recommended for quantitative analysis and design of the ETVE. This report explains the model and stress analysis findings, and proposes a redesign concept.

  12. Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; Fu., G.; Breslau, J.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

  13. VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL SIMULATION TECHNIQUE FOR NATURAL CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on advanced passive cooling techniques. Systems Analysis andand fabrica- tion techniques. Cooling Systems Research. This

  14. Abundance gradients in the Milky Way for alpha elements, Iron peak elements, Barium, Lanthanum and Europium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cescutti, G; François, P; Chiappini, C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the abundance gradients in the disk of the Milky Way for several chemical elements (O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, Co, V, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, Ba, La and Eu), and compare our results with the most recent and homogeneous observational data. We adopt a chemical evolution model able to well reproduce the main properties of the solar vicinity. We compute, for the first time, the abundance gradients for all the above mentioned elements in the galactocentric distance range 4 - 22 kpc. The comparison with the observed data on Cepheids in the galactocentric distance range 5-17 kpc gives a very good agreement for many of the studied elements. In addition, we fit very well the data for the evolution of Lanthanum in the solar vicinity for which we present results here for the first time. We explore, also for the first time, the behaviour of the abundance gradients at large galactocentric distances by comparing our results with data relative to distant open clusters and red giants and select the best chemical evol...

  15. Evaluation of flyash surface phenomena and the application of surface analysis technology. Summary report: Phase I. [44 elements; 86 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.D.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors governing the formation of flyash surfaces during and following coal combustion are reviewed. The competing chemical and physical processes during the evolution of inorganic material in coal during combustion into flyash are described with respect to various surface segregation processes. Two mechanisms leading to surface enrichment are volatilization-condensation processes and diffusion processes within individual flyash particles. The experimental evidence for each of these processes is reviewed. It is shown that the volatilization-condensation process is the major factor leading to trace element enrichment in smaller flyash particles. Evidence also exists from surface analyses of flyash and representative mineral matter that diffusion processes may lead to surface enrichment of elements not volatilized or cause transport of surface-condensed elements into the flyash matrix. The semiquantitative determination of the relative importance of these two processes can be determined by comparison of concentration versus particle size profiles with surface-depth profiles obtained using surface analysis techniques. A brief description of organic transformations on flyash surfaces is also presented. The various surface analytical techniques are reviewed and the relatively new technique of Static-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy is suggested as having significant advantages in studies of surfaces and diffusion processes in model systems. Several recommendations are made for research relevant to flyash formation and processes occurring on flyash surfaces.

  16. Comparison of different pressing techniques for the preparation of n-type silicon-germanium thermoelectric alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harringa, J.L.; Cook, B.A.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements to state-of-the-art Si{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} thermoelectric alloys have been observed in laboratory-scale samples by the powder metallurgy techniques of mechanical alloying and hot pressing. Incorporating these improvements in large scale compacts for the production of thermoelectric generator elements is the next step in achieving higher efficiency RTGs. This paper discusses consolidation of large quantities of mechanically alloyed powders into production size compacts. Differences in thermoelectric properties are noted between the compacts prepared by the standard technique of hot uniaxial pressing and hot isostatic pressing. Most significant is the difference in carrier concentration between the alloys prepared by the two consolidation techniques.

  17. Miniature inverted repeat transposable elements in rice - origin and function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Guojun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    was established. The absence of an observed transposition event, together with the mutated ancestral elements identified by in silico analysis, led to a conclusion that Kiddo and its autonomous elements are not presently active. To overcome laborious and time... dramatic structural differences from LTR retrotransposons (51,68- 70), their transposition mechanism is thought to be different from that of the typical retrovirus. The autonomous LINE elements encode a protein with both endonuclease and reverse...

  18. Rotordynamic evaluation of hybrid damper seals with metal mesh elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhamidipati, Laxmi Narasimha Kameswara Sarma

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . CHAPTFR 1 INTRODUCTION Literature Review II RESEARCH OBJECTIVES AND METHOD. Obj ective Method . III LEAKAGE TESTS . . . . I 0 Experimental Apparatus and Instrumentation. . . Procedure Results IV ROTATING TESTS . . . . I 0 . . . . 10 . . . . I... metal mesh elements. Figure 1: The New MHS Figure 2: New Metal Mesh Elements Figure 3: Comparison between Old and New Metal Mesh Elements 10 CHAPTER III LEAKAGE TESTS Since the primary objective of a seal is to prevent leakage from the high...

  19. ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satterfield, Timothy J.; Katz, Andrea M.; Sibley, Adam R.; MacAlpine, Gordon M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX 78212 (United States); Uomoto, Alan [Carnegie Institution for Science, The Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters that transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in He II {lambda}4686, H{beta}, He I {lambda}5876, [O I] {lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731, [S III] {lambda}9069, and [C I] {lambda}{lambda}9823, 9850. We present both raw and flux-calibrated emission-line images. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO cycle, helium burning, carbon burning, and oxygen burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

  20. Stratigraphic statistical curvature analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtson, C.A.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCAT applies statistical techniques to dipmeter data to identify patterns of bulk curvature, determine transverse and longitudinal structural directions, and reconstruct cross sections and contour maps. STRAT-SCAT applies the same concepts to geometric interpretation of multistoried unimodal, bimodal, or trough-type cross-bedding and also to seismic stratigraphy-scale stratigraphic structures. Structural dip, which comprises the bulk of dipmeter data, is related to beds that (statistically) were deposited with horizontal attitudes; stratigraphic dip is related to beds that were deposited with preferentially oriented nonhorizontal attitudes or to beds that assumed such attitudes because of differential compaction. Stratigraphic dip generates local zones of departure from structural dip on special SCAT plots. The RMS (root-mean-square) of apparent structural dip is greatest in the (structural) T-direction and least in the perpendicular L-direction; the RMS of stratigraphic dip (measured with respect to structural dip) is greatest in the stratigraphic T*-direction and least in the stratigraphic L*-direction. Multistoried, cross-bedding appears on T*-plots as local zones of either greater scatter or statistically significant departure of stratigraphic median dip from structural dip. In contrast, the L*-plot (except for trough-type cross-bedding) is sensitive to cross-bedding. Seismic stratigraphy-scale depositional sequences are identified on Mercator dip versus azimuth plots and polar tangent plots as secondary cylindrical-fold patterns imposed on global structural patterns. Progradational sequences generate local cycloid-type patterns on T*-plots, and compactional sequences generate local cycloid-type patterns on T*-plots, and compactional sequences generate local half-cusp patterns. Both features, however, show only structural dip on L*-plots.