Sample records for techniques flow test

  1. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  2. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  3. Capillary flow solderability test for printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Hernandez, C.L.; Sackinger, S.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new technique for evaluating capillary flow solderability on printed circuit boards. The test involves the flow of molten solder from a pad onto different-sized conductor lines. It simulates the spreading dynamics of either plated-through-hole (PTH) or surface mount technology (SMT) soldering. A standard procedure has been developed for the test. Preliminary experiments were conducted and the results demonstrate test feasibility. Test procedures and results are presented in this report.

  4. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

  5. Catalyst immobilization techniques for continuous flow synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Kevin David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic processes are ubiquitous in both research and industrial settings. As continuous flow processes continue to gain traction in research labs and fine and pharmaceutical chemical processes, new opportunities exist ...

  6. Continuous flow separation techniques for microchemical synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kralj, Jason G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performing multistep microchemical synthesis requires many techniques from combining micromixers in series to the development of continuous microfluidic separation tools. Safety, high heat and mass transfer rates, and cost ...

  7. Laboratory testing of closure cap repair techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persoff, P.; Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Tuck, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfill design requires a low permeability closure cap as well as a low permeability liner. The Savannah River Site, in South Carolina, has approximately 85 acres of mixed waste landfills covered with compacted kaolin clay. Maintaining low permeability of the clay cap requires both that the permeability of the compacted clay itself remain low and that the integrity of the barrier be maintained. Barrier breaches typically result from penetration by roots or animals, and especially cracks caused by uneven settling or desiccation. In this study, clay layers, 0.81 m in diameter and 7.6 cm thick, were compacted in 7 lysimeters to simulate closure caps. The hydraulic conductivity of each layer was measured, and the compacted clay layers (CCL`s) were cracked by drying. Then various repair techniques were applied and the effectiveness of each repair was assessed by remeasuring the hydraulic conductivity. Finally the repaired CCL was again dried and measured to determine how the repair responded to the conditions that caused the original failure. For a full report of this investigation see Persoff et al. Six repair techniques have been tested, four of which involve the use of injectable barrier liquids colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX) described below: (I) covering the crack with a bentonite geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), (ii) recompaction of new kaolinite at STD+3 moisture content joined to existing kaolinite that had dried and shrunk, (iii) direct injection of colloidal silica to a crack, (iv) injection of colloidal silica (CS) to wells in an overlying sand layer, (v) direct injection of polysiloxane to a crack, and (vi), injection of polysiloxane (PSX) to wells in an overlying soil layer.

  8. Analysis of SPRIHTE LOPA flow excursion tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SPRIHTE FLOPA flow excursion tests, the results of which are presented here, have been modeled using FLOPA, the assembly thermal-hydraulics limits analysis code for the LOPA. FLOPA calculations show T{sub wall} = T{sub sat} is a reliable precursor to the onset of thermal excursion at prototypic flow rates during the ECS addition phase of the LOPA. A FLOPA model was created based on nominal dimensions for the SPRIHTE rig and an assumption that the rig`s cylinders were concentrically located. This model can determine when T{sub wall} = T{sub sat} if adjustments are made to account for differences between measured and calculated subchannel flow and heat transfer rates. To make these adjustments, a multiplier {beta} was applied to the wall saturation temperature criterion (T{sub wall} = {beta} T{sub sat}, in degrees C) to match measured and calculated powers at which the saturation temperature was first exceeded at the wall. Based on preliminary test results, a multiplier of 0.878 was recommended for use in calculating LOPA limits for the K-15.1 subcycle. This multiplier provides margins of 14% to 19% between the calculated wall saturation temperature limits and the measured powers at the onset of thermal excursion. The effective margins used in the final LOPA limits, which include dimensional and heat transfer model uncertainties and biases due to eccentricities, range from 38% to 41%. It is estimated that use of the wall saturation temperature criterion lowers the K-14.1 subcycle LOPA core power limit, which is based on a Stanton number of 0.0025, from 41% to 37% of the historical full power of 2400 MW. This report describes the SPRIHTE LOPA tests, describes and evaluates the FLOPA Model for the SPRIHTE tests, discusses selection of a limit criterion for the SPRIHTE tests, and evaluates the transition between high and low flow rate criteria. Calculated results and a sample of FLOPA input for the analysis of the SPRIHTE tests are provided.

  9. Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

    1992-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

  10. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S.H. [comp.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE An optical flow MTV based technique for measuring microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE An optical flow MTV based technique for measuring microfluidic flow for accurately measuring flow fields in microfluidic flows from molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV). Limited optical access is frequently encountered in microfluidic systems. Therefore, in this contribution we

  12. Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Musgrave, Et Al., 1989)...

  13. Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

  14. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  15. Investigation of grid embedment techniques as applied to subcritical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to provide detailed flowfield solutions near the leading edge of an airfoil, two techniques of embedding a subgr1d within an overall computational gr1d have been stud1ed. These embedded grids cons1st of a Cartesian system and a body fitted system...ng airfoil characterist1cs through the use of numerical methods has 1ncreased s1gnificantly in recent years due to improved computers and increased wind tunnel testing costs. Typ1cal examples of these methods are the programs TRANDES and TRANSCON...

  16. Flight test measurements and theoretical lift prediction for flow energizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Amit Aravind

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering FLIGHT TEST MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL LIFT PREDICTION FOR FLOW ENERGIZERS A Thesis by AHIT ARAVIND PRADHAN Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Mard (Chairman of Committee...) Howard L. Chevalier (Member) Garng H. Huang (Member) gg~j(EC( C, Clogs' Malter E. Haisler (Head of Department) Hay 1986 ABSTRACT Flight Test Measurements and Theoretical Lift prediction for Flow Energizers. (May 1986) Amit Aravind Pradhan, B...

  17. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 6. Single annulus tests, transient test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1 to 2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. This report presents the experimental results for the transient portion of the single annulus test program. The test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a ribless heater and a ribbed heater under steady state as well as transient conditions. The ribbed heater testing is currently underway and will be reported separately. The steady state portion of this test program with ribless heater was completed and reported in report No. CU-HTRF-T3A. The present report presents transient test results obtained from a ribless, uniform annulus test section. A total of thirty five transients were conducted with six cases in which flow excursion occurred. No unstable conditions resulted for tests in which the steady state Q{sub ratio} OFI limit was not exceeded.

  18. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  19. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  20. Category:Flow Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashton Greens Jumppage?Elkins,FOAFFlow Test,

  1. Reversing Flow Test Facility. Technical report, March 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, P.D.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) is intended for the study of fluid flow and heat transfer under the reversing-flow conditions that occur in Stirling engines. the facility consists of four major parts: (1) Mechanical Drive - two cylinders with cam-driven pistons which generate the reversing gas flow, (2) Test Section - a U-shaped section containing instrumented test pieces, (3) Instruments -l high-speed transducers for measuring gas pressure and temperature, piston positions, and other system parameters, and (4) Data Acquisition System - a computer-based system able to acquire, store, display and analyze the data from the instruments. The RFTF can operate at pressures up to 8.0 MPa, hot-side temperatures to 800/sup 0/C, and flow-reversal frequencies to 50 Hz. Operation to data has used helium as the working gas at pressures of 3.0 and 6.0 MPa, at ambient temperature, and at frequencies from 1 to 50 Hz. The results show that both frictional and inertial parts of the pressure drop are significant in the heater, coolers and connecting tubes; the inertial part is negligible in the regenerators. In all cases, the frictional part of the pressure drop is nearly in phase with the mass flow. 18 refs., 22 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  3. Comparison of Numerical Techniques Used for Simulating Variable-Density Flow and Transport Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Comparison of Numerical Techniques Used for Simulating Variable-Density Flow and Transport code by simulating two new variable-density-flow and transport experimental data sets. The experiments transport of a sinking groundwater plume and a rising groundwater plume. The numerical techniques used

  4. Multivortex micromixing: novel techniques using Dean flows for passive microfluidic mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarsan, Arjun Penubolu

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    MULTIVORTEX MICROMIXING: NOVEL TECHNIQUES USING DEAN FLOWS FOR PASSIVE MICROFLUIDIC MIXING A Dissertation by ARJUN PENUBOLU SUDARSAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2006 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering MULTIVORTEX MICROMIXING: NOVEL TECHNIQUES USING DEAN FLOWS FOR PASSIVE MICROFLUIDIC MIXING A...

  5. Test experience with multiterminal HVDC load flow and stability programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); McNichol, J.R. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); Gulachenski, E.M.; Doe, S. (New England Power Service Co., Westboro, MA (US)); Balu, N.J. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powerful new set of load flow and stability programs for the study of HVdc systems has recently been completed. During the development of the programs novel applications of multiterminal HVdc systems were investigated, firstly on a large test system and later on actual utility models. This paper describes the test systems used, the HVdc systems studied and some of the interesting system related aspects of the HVdc system performance.

  6. IEA W-GIFT-6 SMALL SPECIMEN TEST TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IEA W-GIFT-6 SMALL SPECIMEN TEST TECHNIQUE UNDER IFMIF/EVEDA PROJECT OF BA FOR FATIGUE AND FRACTURE,t[%] Number of cycles to failure, Nf F82H-IEA HG-1.25 HG-1.25 (Hirose, Kim) RB-1 RB-7 RB-4, -7 RB-7, -10 of cycles to failure, Nf JLF-1 HG-1.25 HG-1.25 HG-6 (Hirose) RB-1 RB-8 (Nishimura&Li) F82H-IEA (Grain size

  7. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Optical plume velocimetry: a new flow measurement technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    hydrothermal systems Timothy J. Crone Ã? Russell E. McDuff Ã? William S. D. Wilcock Received: 5 November 2007 that fluid flow rates in mid- ocean ridge hydrothermal systems may be strongly influ- enced by mechanical that are transitioning between jet-like and plume-like behavior. List of symbols A area of jet nozzle, m2 B initial

  9. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  10. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 5: Single annulus tests, steady-state test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for the steady state portion of the finless single annulus test program. The objective of the experimental study was to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a finless or ribless heater and a ribbed heater. The latter program is currently underway and will be reported separately. For finless heater, testing was conducted in both a steady state and transient mode. The present report presents steady state results for a series of experiments with uniform and asymmetric heating. The demand curves obtained under uniform heating yielded OFI flow-rates which were slightly below those obtained for a circular tube geometry with the same L/D ratio; however, the single annulus had a hydraulic diameter which was approximately fifty percent larger than the circular tube. The asymmetric heating cases were selected to provide the same average power input as the uniform cases. The results for these tests indicated that the flow-rate at OFI increased with the degree of asymmetry.

  11. A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, D.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, D.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ``Geostatistics Test Problem`` is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1.

  12. A Regression Test Selection Technique for Graphical User Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesser, Carl

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Regression testing is a quality control measure to ensure that the newly modified part of the software still complies with its specified requirements and that the unmodified part has not been affected by the maintenance activity. Regression testing...

  13. Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamski, Mark Robert

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford Site in Washington state. Previous studies of these flow systems used...

  14. advanced testing techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for validation Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 120 Advanced holographic nondestructive testing system for residual stress analysis CERN Preprints Summary: The design and operating...

  15. Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique, originally presented on March 12, 2013.

  16. Current trends and innovations in porometry and porosimetry applicable to battery separator testing and development: Introducing the Micro-Flow Porometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stillwell, C.R.; Gupta, K.M. [Porous Materials Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore structure of separators is a critical property for efficiency of batteries and fuel cells. As such, porosity characterization is of great interest to those developing, as well as those manufacturing, these materials. This paper discusses the two most frequently used techniques for porosity characterization: porosimetry and porometry. The strengths and limitations of both testing techniques is discussed with a focus on appropriate test selection to obtain optimal results. This paper also describes the new user-friendly instruments now available from Porous Materials Inc. (PMI) and the recent advances that have made these techniques more useful for those involved with product development, product improvement, and quality control in the battery separator industry. This paper introduces the new Micro-Flow Porometer, which is capable of testing flow rates as low as .0001 cc/min. The usefulness of the Micro-Flow Porometer for battery separator testing is discussed and additional advances in porosimetry is introduced.

  17. A digital CDS technique and the performance testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Yan Liu; Jing-Bin Lu; Yan-Ji Yang; Bo Lu; Yu-Sa Wang; Yu-Peng Xu; Wei-Wei Cui; Wei Li; Mao-Shun Li; Juan Wang; Da-Wei Han; Tian-Xiang Chen; Jia Huo; Wei Hu; Yi Zhang; Yue Zhu; Zi-Liang Zhang; Guo-He Yin; Yu Wang; Zhong-Yi Zhao; Yan-Hong Fu; Ya Zhang; Ke-Yan Ma; Yong Chen

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Readout noise is a critical parameter for characterizing the performance of charge-coupled devices (CCDs), which can be greatly reduced by the correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit. However, conventional CDS circuit inevitably introduces new noises since it consists of several active analog components such as operational amplifiers. This paper proposes a digital CDS circuit technique, which transforms the pre-amplified CCD signal into a train of digital presentations by a high-speed data acquisition card directly without the noisy CDS circuit first, then implement the digital CDS algorithm through numerical method. The readout noise of 3.3 e$^{-}$ and the energy resolution of 121 eV@5.9keV can be achieved via the digital CDS technique.

  18. Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Lloyd W.

    Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie unmeasured because of the time required to clip plots and process samples, as well as limited access or proximity to a drying oven. We tested the digital photography biomass estimation technique for measuring

  19. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing Technique Including Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertaintythe uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (the DeltaQ test are influenced by weather induced pressures.

  20. Category:Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo BackLocationSmartTechniques page? For

  1. A testing technique for concrete under confinement at high rates of strain P. Forquin1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A testing technique for concrete under confinement at high rates of strain P. Forquin1, , F://lmsX.polytechnique.fr/LMSX/ Abstract: A testing device is presented for the experimental study of dynamic compaction of concrete under numerical simulations of tests involving a set of 4 different concrete-like behaviours and different

  2. Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete: ­ Cored Sample (Cylindrical) Indirect tensile testing (IDT) (Strength/Creep) ­ AASHTO T-322 Damage under and Flattened IDT · 1000-sec creep tests on three replicates · 0, -10, and -20 deg. C · Displacement

  3. Integrating knowledge-based techniques into well-test interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, I.W.; Fraser, J.L. [Artificial Intelligence Applications Inst., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Spirit Project was to develop a prototype of next-generation well-test-interpretation (WTI) software that would include knowledge-based decision support for the WTI model selection task. This paper describes how Spirit makes use of several different types of information (pressure, seismic, petrophysical, geological, and engineering) to support the user in identifying the most appropriate WTI model. Spirit`s knowledge-based approach to type-curve matching is to generate several different feasible interpretations by making assumptions about the possible presence of both wellbore storage and late-time boundary effects. Spirit fuses information from type-curve matching and other data sources by use of a knowledge-based decision model developed in collaboration with a WTI expert. The sponsors of the work have judged the resulting prototype system a success.

  4. Development of structural health monitoring techniques using dynamics testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today`s society depends upon many structures (such as aircraft, bridges, wind turbines, offshore platforms, buildings, and nuclear weapons) which are nearing the end of their design lifetime. Since these structures cannot be economically replaced, techniques for structural health monitoring must be developed and implemented. Modal and structural dynamics measurements hold promise for the global non-destructive inspection of a variety of structures since surface measurements of a vibrating structure can provide information about the health of the internal members without costly (or impossible) dismantling of the structure. In order to develop structural health monitoring for application to operational structures, developments in four areas have been undertaken within this project: operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage identification. The developments in each of these four aspects of structural health monitoring have been exercised on a broad range of experimental data. This experimental data has been extracted from structures from several application areas which include aging aircraft, wind energy, aging bridges, offshore structures, structural supports, and mechanical parts. As a result of these advances, Sandia National Laboratories is in a position to perform further advanced development, operational implementation, and technical consulting for a broad class of the nation`s aging infrastructure problems.

  5. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

  6. Transient Water Age Distributions in Environmental Flow Systems: The Time-Marching Laplace Transform Solution Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental fluid circulations are very often characterized by analyzing the fate and behavior of natural and anthropogenic tracers. Among these tracers, age is taken as an ideal tracer which can yield interesting diagnoses, as for example the characterization of the mixing and renewal of water masses, of the fate and mixing of contaminants, or the calibration of hydro-dispersive parameters used by numerical models. Such diagnoses are of great interest in atmospheric and ocean circulation sciences, as well in surface and subsurface hydrology. The temporal evolution of groundwater age and its frequency distributions can display important changes as flow regimes vary due to natural change in climate and hydrologic conditions and/or human induced pressures on the resource to satisfy the water demand. Steady-state age frequency distributions can be modelled using standard numerical techniques, since the general balance equation describing age transport under steady-state flow conditions is exactly equivalent to...

  7. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  8. Parallel Scan-Like Testing and Fault Diagnosis Techniques for Digital Microfluidic Biochips*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Parallel Scan-Like Testing and Fault Diagnosis Techniques for Digital Microfluidic Biochips* Tao Xu, USA {tx, krish}@ee.duke.edu Abstract Dependability is an important attribute for microfluidic biochips diagnosis method based on test outcomes, for droplet-based microfluidic devices. The proposed method allows

  9. Experiments using non-intrusive particle tracing techniques for granular chute flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosato, A.D.; Dave, R.N.; Fischer, I.S.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract was to develop a system capable of non-intrusively tracking the motion of an individual particle for the study of granular flows down inclined chutes. The result of the project is a system capable of following the three-dimensional translational and rotational motion of an individual particle embedded with a flowing granular material. The basic system consists of a sphere embedded with three orthogonal transmitters emitting at different frequencies which induce voltages in an antenna array surrounding the flow regime. Analysis of the induced voltage signals within the framework of a derived model yields both the position and orientation of the sphere. Tests were performed in a small scale model chute as well as in a cylindrical vibrated granular bed, which clearly demonstrates the capability of the system. As a result of discussions at meetings held semi-annually for the Granular Flow Advanced Research Objectives (GFARO) contractors, it was deemed necessary to pursue an additional experimental program as part of this contract related to the measurement of sphere collision properties. The outcome of the work (reported in Appendix C) is the determination of certain properties which are needed for use in computer simulations and theory.

  10. Innovative Coal Solids-Flow Monitoring and Measurement Using Phase-Doppler and Mie Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Seong Lee

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel flow to individual burners is complicated and difficult to determine on coal fired boilers, since coal solids were transported in a gas suspension that is governed by the complex physics of two-phase flow. The objectives of the project were the measurements of suspended coal solids-flows in the simulated test conditions. Various extractive methods were performed manually and can give only a snapshot result of fuel distribution. In order to measure particle diameter & velocity, laser based phase-Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were carefully applied. Statistical methods were used to analyze particle characteristics to see which factors have significant effect. The transparent duct model was carefully designed and fabricated for the laser-based-instrumentation of solids-flow monitoring (LISM). The experiments were conducted with two different kinds of particles with four different particle diameters. The particle types were organic particles and saw dust particles with the diameter range of 75-150 micron, 150-250 micron, 250-355 micron and 355-425 micron. The densities of the particles were measured to see how the densities affected the test results. Also the experiment was conducted with humid particles and fog particles. To generate humid particles, the humidifier was used. A pipe was connected to the humidifier to lead the particle flow to the intersection of the laser beam. The test results of the particle diameter indicated that, the mean diameter of humid particles was between 6.1703 microns and 6.6947 microns when the humid particle flow was low. When the humid particle flow was high, the mean diameter was between 6.6728 microns and 7.1872 microns. The test results of the particle mean velocity indicated that the mean velocity was between 1.3394 m/sec and 1.4556 m/sec at low humid particle flow. When the humid particle flow was high, the mean velocity was between 1.5694 m/sec and 1.7856 m/sec. The Air Flow Module, TQ AF 17 and shell ondina oil were used to generate fog particles. After the oil was heated inside the fog generator, the blower was used to generate the fog. The fog flew along the pipe to the intersection of the laser beam. The mean diameter of the fog particles was 5.765 microns. Compared with the humid particle diameter, we observed that the mean diameter of the fog particles was smaller than the humid particles. The test results of particle mean velocity was about 3.76 m/sec. Compared with the mean velocity of the humid particles, we can observed the mean velocity of fog particles were greater than humid particles. The experiments were conducted with four different kinds of particles with five different particle diameters. The particle types were organic particles, coal particles, potato particles and wheat particles with the diameter range of 63-75 micron, less than 150 micron, 150-250 micron, 250-355 micron and 355-425 micron. To control the flow rate, the control gate of the particle dispensing hopper was adjusted to 1/16 open rate, 1/8 open rate and 1/4 open rate. The captured image range was 0 cm to 5 cm from the control gate, 5 cm to 10 cm from the control gate and 10 cm to 15 cm from the control gate. Some of these experiments were conducted under both open environment conditions and closed environment conditions. Thus these experiments had a total of five parameters which were type of particles, diameter of particles, flow rate, observation range, and environment conditions. The coal particles (diameter between 63 and 75 microns) tested under the closed environment condition had three factors that were considered as the affecting factors. They were open rate, observation range, and environment conditions. In this experiment, the interaction of open rate and observation range had a significant effect on the lower limit. On the upper limit, the open rate and environment conditions had a significant effect. In addition, the interaction of open rate and environment conditions had a significant effect. The coal particles tested (diameter between 63 and 75

  11. Experimental onset of flow instability testing by Creare, Inc. Book 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow excursions can occur during subcooled heated flow if the supply system is not adequate to meet the heated channel pressure demand. Available experimental flow instability (FI) data for ribbed annuli such as used in the SRS production reactors is very limited. Creare Inc. completed a series of FI tests which included two annular geometries; one of these included metallic ribs which separated the annulus into four sub-channels. This report summarizes the results of the onset of flow instability (OFI) testing which was completed by Creare in support of the SRS Reactor Restart Program. A copy of the final test report has been attached and the archival locations for the supporting documentation and electronic test data is also included. The purpose of this report is to: Archive the Creare Program data; inspect the data which has been archived; review the results presented by Creare; and evaluate if the Creare Program data may be used in critical applications.

  12. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: ICFT- An Initial...

  13. Test report, air flow control device for 241-SY waste tankventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuck, J.A.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the testing of a passively operated, constant air flow control device for in-duct applications on waste tank ventilation systems in the 50-1000 SCFM range.

  14. Instrumentation of a light twin aircraft for flow energizer flight tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binford, Robert Susumu

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTRUMDITATION OF A LIGHT TWIN AIRCRAFT FOR FLOW ENERGIZER FLIGHT TESTS A Thesis by ROBERT SUSUMU BINFORD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of HASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1986 MaJor SubJect: Aerospace Engineering INSTRUMENTATION OF A LIGHT TWIN AIRCRAFT FOR FLOW ENERGIZER FLIGHT TESTS A Thesis by ROBERT SUSUMU BINFORD Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Ward (Chairman of Committee) Cyrus...

  15. Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Daniel Harold

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Approved as to style and content by: David L. Rhode...

  16. Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpakiewicz, M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area (UGTA) Flow...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 12, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area...

  18. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Atrazine on Vermiculite Using a Stirred-flow Technique. L. TANG* and D. L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Atrazine on Vermiculite Using a Stirred-flow Technique. L. TANG* and D. L. SPARKS, Univ. of Delaware. The rates of atrazine adsorption-desorption on a Llano-vermiculite were measured using a stirred-low technique. Both adsorption and desorption followed a two

  19. Development of small punch testing technique and its application to evaluation of mechanical properties degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kameda, J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper summarizes a small punch (SP) testing technique developed and its application to mechanical properties characterization. It has been clearly shown on ferritic alloys that the SP test was evaluate the intergranular embrittling potency of segregated solute, such as P, Sn and Sb causing temper embrittlement, and the effects of neutron irradiation and post-irradiation annealing, giving rise to changes in the hardness and intergranular solute segregation, on the fracture properties in terms of the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A linear relation of the DBTT determined by the SP test to that by Charpy V-notched tests has been theoretically and experimentally established. In Al alloy substrates coated with amorphous and overlaying ceramics, moreover, the global and local fracture properties were well characterized by the SP test together with acoustic emission techniques.

  20. Glass durability evaluation using product consistency, single-pass flow-through, and vapor hydration tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.; Kim, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current approach to assessing chemical durability of waste glasses focuses on a suite of short-term laboratory tests such as dynamic single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests, static product consistency tests (PCT), and vapor hydration tests. The behavior of the glasses in the three types of tests is quite different, but each test provides insight into the glass corrosion process. The PCT data showed that at constant alumina, silica, and sodium levels the glass durability order for different glass systems is: Boron-series > Boron-Calcium-series > Calcium-series, while the opposite order is observed in SPFT tests. The order for vapor hydration tests is similar to that observed in the PCT tests. The PCT results are consistent with the current understanding of glass structure and are consistent with vapor hydration tests. The SPFT results can be explained using arguments based on solution chemistry.

  1. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in?process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  2. Calibration and Test Time Reduction Techniques for Digitally-Calibrated Designs: an ADC Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calibration and Test Time Reduction Techniques for Digitally-Calibrated Designs: an ADC Case Study with a digital calibration capability could achieve significant performance improvement through calibration. However, the calibration process often takes a long time--in the order of hundreds of milliseconds or even

  3. Calibration and Testing Time Reduction Techniques for a Digitally-Calibrated Pipelined ADC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calibration and Testing Time Reduction Techniques for a Digitally-Calibrated Pipelined ADC Hsiu with digital calibration capabilities could achieve significant performance improvements once the calibration process is completed; however, the calibration time is often very long ­ in the order of hundreds

  4. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

  5. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  6. Adaptation of Crack Growth Detection Techniques to US Material Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Joy L. Rempe; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some materials testing reactors (MTRs) outside the U.S., such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have deployed a technique to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. This technique incorporates a compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation. A crack in the specimen is monitored using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. A project is underway to develop and demonstrate the performance of a similar type of test rig for use in U.S. MTRs. The first year of this three year project was devoted to designing, analyzing, fabricating, and bench top testing a mechanism capable of applying a controlled stress to specimens while they are irradiated in a pressurized water loop (simulating PWR reactor conditions). During the second year, the mechanism will be tested in autoclaves containing high pressure, high temperature water with representative water chemistries. In addition, necessary documentation and safety reviews for testing in a reactor environment will be completed. In the third year, the assembly will be tested in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) and Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) will be performed.

  7. Results from the Water Flow Test of the Tank 37 Backflush Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowley, M.D.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow test was conducted in the Thermal Fluids Lab with the Tank 37 Backflush Valve to determine the pressure drop of water flow through the material transfer port. The flow rate was varied from 0 to 100 gpm. The pressure drop through the Backflush Valve for flow rates of 20 and 70 gpm was determined to be 0.18 and 1.77 feet of H2O, respectively. An equivalent length of the Backflush Valve was derived from the flow test data. The equivalent length was used in a head loss calculation for the Tank 37 Gravity Drain Line. The calculation estimated the flow rate that would fill the line up to the Separator Tank, and the additional flow rate that would fill the Separator Tank. The viscosity of the fluid used in the calculation was 12 centipoise. Two specific gravities were investigated, 1.4 and 1.8. The Gravity Drain Line was assumed to be clean, unobstructed stainless steel pipe. The flow rate that would fill the line up to the Separator Tank was 73 and 75 gpm for the 1.4 or 1.8 specific gravity fluids, respectively. The flow rate that would fill the Separator Tank was 96 and 100 gpm for the 1.4 or 1.8 specific gravity fluids, respectively. These results indicate that concentrate will not back up into the Separator Tank during evaporator normal operation, 15-25 gpm, or pot liftout, 70 gpm. A noteworthy observation during the flow test was water pouring from the holes in the catheterization tube. Water poured from the holes at 25 gpm and above. Data from the water flow test indicates that at 25 gpm the pressure drop through the Backflush Valve is 0.26 ft of H2O. A concentrate with a specific gravity of 1.8 and a viscosity of 12 cp will produce the same pressure drop at 20 gpm. This implies that concentrate from the evaporator may spill out into the BFV riser during a transfer.

  8. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for subsequent modeling studies at Climax. The objectives of the Climax Mine sub-CAU work are to (1) provide simulated heads and groundwater flows for the northern boundaries of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model, while incorporating alternative conceptualizations of the hydrogeologic system with their associated uncertainty, and (2) provide radionuclide fluxes from the three tests in the Climax stock using modeling techniques that account for groundwater flow in fractured granite. Meeting these two objectives required two different model scales. The northern boundary groundwater fluxes were addressed using the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model (Belcher, 2004) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey as a modeling framework, with refined hydrostratigraphy in a zone north of Yucca Flat and including Climax stock. Radionuclide transport was simulated using a separate model confined to the granite stock itself, but linked to regional groundwater flow through boundary conditions and calibration targets.

  9. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 10: Critical Heat Flux Test Program data tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of reports which document the flow instability testing conducted by Columbia University during 1989 through 1992. This report volume provides a hardcopy version of the twenty-six electronic media data files: CO515(A-D).DAT, CO525(A-G). DAT, CO530(A-K).DAT, CO718(A-E).DAT.

  10. Assessing the Transient Flow Behavior in Falling-head Permeameter Tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavdar, Sevgi

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    to be combined with Darcy’s Law and eventually leads to Laplace’s equation for an incompressible matrix. If the media is compressible, specific storativity should be taken into account, as well. In this study, we investigated the transiency of flow in FHP tests...

  11. A NICE Way to Test OpenFlow Applications Marco Canini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    for introducing new func- tionality into the network, Software Defined Networking (SDN) also raises the risksFlow-capable switches enables exciting new network functionality, at the risk of pro- gramming errors that make. In testing three real applications--a MAC-learning switch, in-network server load balancing, and energy

  12. POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X.H. Wang; J. Wiseman; D.J. Sung; D. McLean; William Peters; Jim Mullins; John Hugh; G. Evans; Vince Hamilton; Kenneth Robinette; Tim Krim; Michael Fleet

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dewatering of ultra-fine (minus 150 {micro}m) coal slurry to less than 20% moisture is difficult using the conventional dewatering techniques. The main objective of the project was to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions and surfactants in combination for the dewatering of ultra-fine clean-coal slurries using various dewatering techniques on a proof-of-concept (POC) scale of 0.5 to 2 tons per hour. The addition of conventional reagents and the application of coal surface modification technique were evaluated using vacuum filtration, hyperbaric (pressure) filtration, ceramic plate filtration and screen-bowl centrifuge techniques. The laboratory and pilot-scale dewatering studies were conducted using the fine-size, clean-coal slurry produced in the column flotation circuit at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, St. Charles, VA. The pilot-scale studies were conducted at the Mayflower preparation plant in St. Charles, VA. The program consisted of nine tasks, namely, Task 1--Project Work Planning, Task 2--Laboratory Testing, Task 3--Engineering Design, Task 4--Procurement and Fabrication, Task 5--Installation and Shakedown, Task 6--System Operation, Task 7--Process Evaluation, Task 8--Equipment Removal, and Task 9--Reporting.

  13. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200?s. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  14. On the Motion of Free Material Test Particles in Arbitrary Spatial Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Martin

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the motion of free material test particles in arbitrary spatial flows is easily determined within the context of ordinary vector calculus. This may be useful for everyone, including engineers and other non-specialists, when thinking about gravitational problems. It already has valid application to simple problems such as the problems of motion in rotating and accelerating frames and to the gravitational problem of the single spherically symmetric attractor. When applied to the two body gravitational problem, it may help us determine the actual direction of the flow.

  15. Validation Analysis of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman; H. Bekhit; B. Lyles; K. Pohlmann

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site undergoing environmental restoration. The CNTA is located about 95 km northeast of Tonopah, Nevada, and 175 km southwest of Ely, Nevada (Figure 1.1). It was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (DOE's predecessor agency) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site [NTS]) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless underground nuclear test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 2000). A three-dimensional flow and transport model was created for the CNTA site (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and determined acceptable by DOE and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for predicting contaminant boundaries for the site.

  16. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  17. POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.K. PAREKH; D. TAO; J.G. GROPPO

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the UKCAER will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean-coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high-sulfur and low-sulfur clean coal. The Mayflower Plant processes coals from five different seams, thus the dewatering studies results could be generalized for most of the bituminous coals.

  18. Recent Advances in Computational Techniques for Simulation of Flow in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    are also addressed. Introduction Modeling porous media flow processes is required in many science and engineering applications. Oil recovery, environmental hydrology and groundwater flow are a few drivers in the development of porous media simulation tools. Nowadays high resolution models are constructed as a result

  19. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 7. Single tube tests, critical heat flux test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report deals with critical heat flux (CHF) measurements in vertical down flow of water at low pressures in a round Inconel tube, 96 inches long and 0.62 inch inside diameter. A total of 28 CHF points were obtained. These data were found to correlate linearly with the single variable q, defined as the heat flux required to raise the enthalpy from the inlet value to the saturation value. These results were compared to the published results of Swedish investigators for vertical upflow of water at low pressures in round tubes of similar diameters and various lengths. The parameter q depends on the inlet enthalpy and is a nonlocal variable, thus this correlation is nonlocal unless the coefficients depend upon tube length in a particular prescribed manner. For the low pressure Swedish data, the coefficients are practically independent of length and hence the correlation is nonlocal. In the present investigation only one length was employed, so it is not possible to determine whether the correlation for these data is local or nonlocal, although there is reason to believe that it is local. The same correlation was applied to a large data base (thousands of CHF points) compiled from the published data of a number of groups and found to apply, with reasonable accuracy over a wide range of conditions, yielding sometimes local and sometimes nonlocal correlations. The basic philosophy of data analysis here was not to generate a single correlation which would reproduce all data, but to search for correlations which apply adequately over some range and which might have some mechanistic significance. The tentative conclusion is that at least two mechanisms appear operative, leading to two types of correlations, one local, the other nonlocal.

  20. Flow control techniques for real-time media applications in best-effort networks using fluid models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantinou, Apostolos

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    at the application layer. An end-to-end ?uid model is used, including the source bu?er, the network and the destination bu?er. Traditional con- trol techniques, along with more advanced adaptive predictive control methods, are considered in order to provide... OF THE END-TO-END FLOW TRANSPORT SYSTEM : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 25 A. Source Bu?er Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 B. Network Dynamic Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 1. Time-Varying Time Delay Model...

  1. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sakarya, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  2. Techniques Employed to Conduct Postshot Drilling at the former Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekin, W D

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Postshot drilling provided essential data on the results of the underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), now identified as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). It was the means by which samples from the zone of interest were obtained for radiochemical analysis. This handbook describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted postshot drilling operations at the NTS, and it provides a general understanding of the process. Postshot drilling is a specialized application of rotary drilling. Accordingly, this handbook gives a brief description of rotary drilling in Section 2 to acquaint the reader with the general subject before proceeding to the specialized techniques used in postshot drilling. In Section 3, the handbook describes the typical postshot drilling situation at the former NTS and the drilling methods used. Section 4 describes the typical sequence of operations in postshot drilling at the former NTS. Detailed information on special equipment and techniques is given in a series of appendices (A through F) at the end of the handbook.

  3. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Rawls, P. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. As the contract title suggests, the main focus of the program is on proof-of-concept testing of a dewatering technique for a fine clean coal product. The coal industry is reluctant to use the advanced fine coal recovery technology due to the non-availability of an economical dewatering process. in fact, in a recent survey conducted by U.S. DOE and Battelle, dewatering of fine clean coal was identified as the number one priority for the coal industry. This project will attempt to demonstrate an efficient and economic fine clean coal slurry dewatering process.

  4. Solderability test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

  5. Solderability test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Fred (Cedar Crest, NM); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Short, Bruce (Beverly, MA); Giversen, Terri (Beverly, MA); Reed, Jimmy R. (Austin, TX)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

  6. Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference saltstone rheology and a saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0º, 2.4º, and 0.72º. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7º to 0.9º. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch.

  7. Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference Saltstone rheology and a Saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0 deg., 2.4 deg., and 0.72 deg.. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 deg. to 0.9 deg. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch. (authors)

  8. Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey, in situ measurements with high-purity germanium (HPGe) and hand-held LaBr3 systems, soil sampling with a variety of tools, and laboratory gamma spectrometric analysis of those samples. A further benefit of the measurement campaign was to gain familiarity with the many logistical aspects of performing radiological field work at NNSS ahead of the PRex. Many practical lessons concerning the proper methodologies and logistics of using the surveying and sampling equipment were noted. These Lessons Learned are compiled together in Appendix A. The vehicle-based survey was successful in that it found a previously unknown hotspot (determined to be 232Th) while it demonstrated that a better method for keeping a serpentine track without staking was needed. Some of the soil sampling equipment was found to be impractical for the application, though core sampling would not be the correct way to take soil samples for a fresh vent deposit (as opposed to an old site like DILUTED WATERS). Due to the site’s age, 137Cs was the only fission radioisotope identified, though others were searched for. While not enough samples were taken and analyzed to definitively link the 137Cs to DILUTED WATERS as opposed to other NNSS activities, results were consistent with the historical DILUTED WATERS plume. MDAs were compared for soil sampling and in situ measurements.

  9. Novel scanning electron microscope bulge test technique integrated with loading function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chuanwei; Xie, Huimin, E-mail: liuzw@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Zhanwei, E-mail: liuzw@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Membranes and film-on-substrate structures are critical elements for some devices in electronics industry and for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems devices. These structures are normally at the scale of micrometer or even nanometer. Thus, the measurement for the mechanical property of these membranes poses a challenge over the conventional measurements at macro-scales. In this study, a novel bulge test method is presented for the evaluation of mechanical property of micro thin membranes. Three aspects are discussed in the study: (a) A novel bulge test with a Scanning Electron Microscope system realizing the function of loading and measuring simultaneously; (b) a simplified Digital Image Correlation method for a height measurement; and (c) an imaging distortion correction by the introduction of a scanning Moiré method. Combined with the above techniques, biaxial modulus as well as Young's modulus of the polyimide film can be determined. Besides, a standard tensile test is conducted as an auxiliary experiment to validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  10. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Boosting the accuracy of SPH techniques: Newtonian and special-relativistic tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosswog, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore measures to increase the accuracy of SPH methods with respect to commonly used standard techniques. Our main focus here is special-relativistic SPH, but all measures can straight forwardly be applied in the Newtonian case as well. The first improvement concerns the calculation of gradients. Here a scheme that requires the (analytical) inversion of a small matrix is explored. For regular particle distributions this scheme yields gradient estimates that are many orders of magnitude more accurate than the standard SPH gradient. We apply such gradients in fully conservative special-relativistic SPH formulations and find in a large number of benchmark tests that they substantially increase SPH's accuracy. As a second measure, we explore a large number of kernel functions. The most commonly used cubic spline SPH kernel performs rather poorly, the best overall results are obtained for a high-order Wendland kernel which allows for only very little sub-resolution particle motion (noise) and enforces a very ...

  12. A Validation Process for the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Faultless Nuclear Test at Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed Hassan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many sites of groundwater contamination rely heavily on complex numerical models of flow and transport to develop closure plans. This has created a need for tools and approaches that can be used to build confidence in model predictions and make it apparent to regulators, policy makers, and the public that these models are sufficient for decision making. This confidence building is a long-term iterative process and it is this process that should be termed ''model validation.'' Model validation is a process not an end result. That is, the process of model validation cannot always assure acceptable prediction or quality of the model. Rather, it provides safeguard against faulty models or inadequately developed and tested models. Therefore, development of a systematic approach for evaluating and validating subsurface predictive models and guiding field activities for data collection and long-term monitoring is strongly needed. This report presents a review of model validation studies that pertain to groundwater flow and transport modeling. Definitions, literature debates, previously proposed validation strategies, and conferences and symposia that focused on subsurface model validation are reviewed and discussed. The review is general in nature, but the focus of the discussion is on site-specific, predictive groundwater models that are used for making decisions regarding remediation activities and site closure. An attempt is made to compile most of the published studies on groundwater model validation and assemble what has been proposed or used for validating subsurface models. The aim is to provide a reasonable starting point to aid the development of the validation plan for the groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The review of previous studies on model validation shows that there does not exist a set of specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific groundwater models. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with the latter posing a more difficult and challenging problem when it comes to validation. This report then proposes a general validation approach for the CNTA model, which addresses some of the important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia as crucial to the process. The proposed approach links model building, model calibration, model predictions, data collection, model evaluations, and model validation in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on use of collected validation data to reduce model uncertainty and narrow the range of possible outcomes of stochastic numerical models. It accounts for the stochastic nature of the numerical CNTA model, which used Monte Carlo simulation approach. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not even a theoretical possibility and is not a regulatory requirement. Rather, it highlights the importance of testing as many aspects of the model as possible and using as many diverse statistical tools as possible for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will eventually allow for regulator and public acceptance of decisions based on the model predictions.

  13. Standard Test Method for Resin Flow of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the amount of resin flow that will take place from prepreg tape or sheet under given conditions of temperature and pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Flow Test At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information RooseveltFlow Test

  15. A laboratory demonstration of an LQG technique for correcting frozen flow turbulence in adaptive optics systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudy, Alexander; Srinath, Srikar; Ammons, S Mark; Gavel, Donald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the laboratory verification of a method for re- moving the effects of frozen-flow atmospheric turbulence using a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, also known as a Kalman Filter. This method, which we term "Predictive Fourier Control," can identify correlated atmospheric motions due to layers of frozen flow turbulence, and can predictively remove the effects of these correlated motions in real-time. Our laboratory verification suggests a factor of 3 improvement in the RMS residual wavefront error and a 10% improvement in measured Strehl of the system. We found that the RMS residual wavefront error was suppressed from 35.0 nm to 11.2 nm due to the use of Predictive Fourier Control, and that the far field Strehl improved from 0.479 to 0.520.

  16. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  17. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  18. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Research and Technology Applications Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  19. Flow-induced tube vibration thresholds in heat exchangers from shellside water tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical industrial shell-and-tube heat exchanger configurations are investigated experimentally for the occurrence of potentially damaging tube vibration as a function of flowrate. The effort is part of a program to develop vibration avoidance criteria to be integrated and optimized with the advanced thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical design methods now available. The tests use a 0.6-m (2-ft)-diameter, 3.7-m (12-ft)-long shell containing a removable tube bundle whose components are readily rearranged or replaced. The 15 different full tube bundle configurations tested represent various combinations of parameters: triangular or square tube layout patterns with different orientations to the flow, number of crosspasses, sizes of nozzles, plain or finned tubes. All bundles have 19-mm (0.75-in.)-diameter tubes spaced with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25. The heat exchanger is tested with waterflow on the shellside to determine a critical threshold, above which a small increase in the flowrate initiates a fluidelastic instability resulting in large amplitude vibration. The test conditions, the critical flowrates, the vibration frequencies, and the locations of the tubes most susceptible to vibration are presented. The given data are used for a comparison with a presently recognized method of vibration prediction and will permit updated evaluations as more advanced methods become available in the future.

  20. UMTRA ground water sampling techniques: Comparison of the traditional and low flow methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the potential changes in water quality data that may occur with the conversion from MBV (multiple bore volume) to LF (low flow) sampling and provides two examples of how such a change might impact Project decisions. The existing scientific literature on LF sampling is reviewed and the new LF data from three UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites are evaluated seeking answers to the questions posed above. Several possible approaches, that the UMTRA Project may take to address issues unanswered by the literature are presented and compared, and a recommendation is offered for the future direction of the LF conversion effort.

  1. Test results of a corrosion logging technique using electromagnetic thickness and pipe analysis logging tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliyan, I.S.; Brown, G.A.; Cotton, W.J. Jr.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent innovations in subsurface corrosion practices of the Arabian American Oil Co. (ARAMCO) have reduced logging and workover costs substantially and have permitted the detection of corrosion in the outer string of two concentric casing strings. At the request of ARAMCO, Schlumberger conducted test under both simulated and field conditions. Results showed that the data required to evaluate casing corrosion in a 7-in.X9 5/8-in. completion can be obtained during a single logging run using a 21.6-in. coil spacing electromagnetic thickness tool (ETT-A /SUP TM/ ) sonde (as opposed to two runs with 17.6-in. and 21.6-in. sondes previously used). In addition, corrosion of the outer string of 9 5/8-in. or 13 3/8-in. casing can be detected by using the results of the ETT-A logs and pipe-analysis tool (PAT) logs or caliper logs. To date, the application of this technique has been very successful in ARAMCO's operations.

  2. Fatigue testing of high-density polyethylene and polycarbonate with crack length measurement using image processing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riemslag, A.C. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Lab. of Materials Science)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new automated method of measuring fatigue cracks in polymers is discussed. The new method is based on a video signal of the crack which is analyzed with image processing techniques. With this technique the crack length is measured every 20 s during a fatigue test. The accuracy of one single measurement is about 0.05 mm, but this can be increased by averaging a large number of measurements. The applied automated data collection and subsequent data processing is discussed in relation to the recommendations given in ASTM E 647, Test method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Rates. The use of the new technique is illustrated on the basis of fatigue tests performed on transparent polycarbonate (PC) and nontransparent polyethylene (PE). The fatigue behavior of PE and PC is briefly discussed.

  3. Partial order techniques for vehicle collision avoidance: application to an autonomous roundabout test-bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desaraju, Vishnu Rajeswar

    In this paper, we employ partial order techniques to develop linear complexity algorithms for guaranteed collision avoidance between vehicles at highway and roundabout mergings. These techniques can be employed by virtue ...

  4. Wind Tunnel and Flight Testing of Active Flow Control on a UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babbar, Yogesh

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Active flow control has been extensively explored in wind tunnel studies but successful in-flight implementation of an active flow control technology still remains a challenge. This thesis presents implementation of active flow control technology...

  5. On the Use of Network Flow Techniques for Assigning Evacuees to Exits.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    of these new proposals is compared to a simple shortest path approach and to a best response dynamics approach that they are practically fast. All tests are made using the ZET evacuation tool3 that implements all ap- proaches v with b(v) 0 and its demand if b

  6. NMR imaging techniques and applications in the flow behavior of fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halimi, Hassan I

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proton magnetic resonance technique can be used to determine the oil saturation in the pores of a rock. The NMR system can produce images of the molecules under investigation because the signals recorded are obtained directly from fluids contained... in liquids as well. This should enable us to obtain additional information about the fluids in the rock '4. Spin-spin relaxation has a characteristic time T~. T~ is the time constant for the decay of the precessing R-Zo component of the magnetization...

  7. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

  8. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  9. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  10. 2 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS, PACKAGING, AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY--PART B, VOL. 20, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1997 A Novel Test Technique for MCM Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    , FEBRUARY 1997 A Novel Test Technique for MCM Substrates Bruce Kim, Member, IEEE, Madhavan Swaminathan-- This paper describes a novel and low-cost test technique that is capable of detecting process related defects such as opens and shorts in multichip module (MCM) substrates. This method is an alternative to existing test

  11. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

  12. Analysis of the optics of the Final Focus Test Beam using Lie algebra based techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, G.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the analysis of the beam optics of the final focus test beam at the Stanford Linear Collider using Lie algebra. (LSP).

  13. Comparison of the results of short-term static tests and single-pass flow-through tests with LRM glass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Static dissolution tests were conducted to measure the forward dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 C and pH(RT) 11.7 {+-} 0.1 for comparison with the rate measured with single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests in an interlaboratory study (ILS). The static tests were conducted with monolithic specimens having known geometric surface areas, whereas the SPFT tests were conducted with crushed glass that had an uncertain specific surface area. The error in the specific surface area of the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests, which was calculated by modeling the particles as spheres, was assessed based on the difference in the forward dissolution rates measured with the two test methods. Three series of static tests were conducted at 70 C following ASTM standard test method C1220 using specimens with surfaces polished to 600, 800, and 1200 grit and a leachant solution having the same composition as that used in the ILS. Regression of the combined results of the static tests to the affinity-based glass dissolution model gives a forward rate of 1.67 g/(m{sup 2}d). The mean value of the forward rate from the SPFT tests was 1.64 g/(m{sup 2}d) with an extended uncertainty of 1.90 g/(m{sup 2}d). This indicates that the calculated surface area for the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests is less than 2% higher than the actual surface area, which is well within the experimental uncertainties of measuring the forward dissolution rate using each test method. These results indicate that the geometric surface area of crushed glass calculated based on the size of the sieves used to isolate the fraction used in a test is reliable. In addition, the C1220 test method provides a means for measuring the forward dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses that is faster, easier, and more economical than the SPFT test method.

  14. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 12. Single annulus transient test program data tables: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The single annulus test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the fuel assemblies used in the Savannah River Site production reactors. Data files were transmitted from Columbia University to Savannah River Site in a DOS compatible format. This report provides a hardcopy version of the electronic media data files.

  15. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  16. POC-Scale Testing of an Advanced Fine Coal Dewatering Equipment/Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. K. Karekh; D. Tao; J. G. Groppo

    1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 mm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy's program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 45 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 ? March 31, 1998.

  17. Steam turbine field testing techniques using a computerized data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, H.S.; Cotton, K.C.; Kellyhouse, W.W.; Smith, D.P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic data acquisition system for conducting full-scale ASME (1) acceptance tests of large steam turbine-generators is described. This includes the instrumentation, the interfacing hardware for analog to digital conversion and transmission of the data to the trailer mounted computer, the software that controls the acquisition of the data, and the calculation of test results. In addition, the application of this automatic data acquisition system for conducting the ASME acceptance test at Consumers Power Company's J.H. Campbell Unit 3 is discussed.

  18. Adaptive Flutter Test Vane: Low Net Passive Stiffness (LNPS) Techniques for Deflection Amplification of Piezoelectric Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnhart, Ryan

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................................................................30 4.1 Single Wing Excitation and Roll Damping .................................................................... 31 4.2 Symmetric Excitation ..................................................................................................... 34... Diagram (FBD) ........................................ 28 Figure 4.1 - Flutter Modeling Nomenclature ................................................................................ 32 Figure 4.2 - C172 Wing Mount for Modal Testing32...

  19. Capillary test specimen, system, and methods for in-situ visualization of capillary flow and fillet formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Aaron C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hosking, F. Michael (Albuquerque, NM),; Reece, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A capillary test specimen, method, and system for visualizing and quantifying capillary flow of liquids under realistic conditions, including polymer underfilling, injection molding, soldering, brazing, and casting. The capillary test specimen simulates complex joint geometries and has an open cross-section to permit easy visual access from the side. A high-speed, high-magnification camera system records the location and shape of the moving liquid front in real-time, in-situ as it flows out of a source cavity, through an open capillary channel between two surfaces having a controlled capillary gap, and into an open fillet cavity, where it subsequently forms a fillet on free surfaces that have been configured to simulate realistic joint geometries. Electric resistance heating rapidly heats the test specimen, without using a furnace. Image-processing software analyzes the recorded images and calculates the velocity of the moving liquid front, fillet contact angles, and shape of the fillet's meniscus, among other parameters.

  20. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

  1. Development of a Digital Fringe Projection Technique to Characterize the Transient Behavior of Wind-Driven Droplet/Rivulet Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    endeavor, including lava flows in geology, tertiary oil recovery, lubricant oil films in tribology, surface and environmental problems ranging from microchip manufacturing, structured packing to lava flows in geology

  2. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 pm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean-coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from July 1 - September 30, 1997.

  3. CFD Simulation and Experimental Testing of Multiphase Flow Inside the MVP Electrical Submersible Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmy Marsis, Emanuel 1983-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The MVP is a special type of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) manufactured by Baker Hughes, model no. G470, and is capable of handling multiphase flow up to 70% Gas Volume Fraction (GVF). Flows at high GVF cause conventional ESPs to surge...

  4. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick (5239 Miles Ave., Apt. A, Oakland, CA 94618); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (1622 Oxford St., #5t, Berkeley, CA 94709)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  5. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  6. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTankTest Site SwedenEnergy

  7. TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

  8. 2-D Stellar Evolution Code Including Arbitrary Magnetic Fields. I. Mathematical Techniques and Test Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. H. Li; P. Ventura; S. Basu; S. Sofia; P. Demarque

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-precision two-dimensional stellar evolution code has been developed for studying solar variability due to structural changes produced by varying internal magnetic fields of arbitrary configurations. Specifically, we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed internal structure and on the global parameters of the Sun. The high precision is required both to model very small solar changes (of order of $10^{-4}$) and short time scales (or order of one year). It is accomplished by using the mass coordinate to replace the radial coordinate, by using fixed and adjustable time steps, a realistic stellar atmosphere, elements diffusion, and by adjusting the grid points. We have also built into the code the potential to subsequently include rotation and turbulence. The current code has been tested for several cases, including its ability to reproduce the 1-D results.

  9. Experimental investigation of an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter: II - Leakage flows and wear tests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Charlotte E; Baker, Roger C; Hutchings, Ian M

    viscosities were mixtures of white spirit and multigrade motor oil. The values achieved for viscosity and resultant density are set out in Part I of this paper [1 Table 3]. To assess the effect of density change, white spirit, motor oil, water and salt water... flow rates was negligible. This suggests that the difference in the leakage f #8;#1; #8;Figure 5 Percentage leakage with the 316 SS circular piston with and without Molykote low friction coating in a water flow. #12;3.4 Effect of lubrication holes...

  10. Systematic study of polycrystalline flow during tension test of sheet 304 austenitic stainless steel at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muñoz-Andrade, Juan D., E-mail: jdma@correo.azc.uam.mx [Departamento de Materiales, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Colonia Reynosa Tamaulipas, C.P. 02200, México Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    By systematic study the mapping of polycrystalline flow of sheet 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) during tension test at constant crosshead velocity at room temperature was obtained. The main results establish that the trajectory of crystals in the polycrystalline spatially extended system (PCSES), during irreversible deformation process obey a hyperbolic motion. Where, the ratio between the expansion velocity of the field and the velocity of the field source is not constant and the field lines of such trajectory of crystals become curved, this accelerated motion is called a hyperbolic motion. Such behavior is assisted by dislocations dynamics and self-accommodation process between crystals in the PCSES. Furthermore, by applying the quantum mechanics and relativistic model proposed by Muñoz-Andrade, the activation energy for polycrystalline flow during the tension test of 304 ASS was calculated for each instant in a global form. In conclusion was established that the mapping of the polycrystalline flow is fundamental to describe in an integral way the phenomenology and mechanics of irreversible deformation processes.

  11. Integrated test plan for preliminary demonstration of the in situ permeable flow sensor in the unsaturated sediments at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration of the in situ permeable flow sensor, developed by Sandia National Laboratory, to measure air flow in unsaturated sediments. The ability of this technology to measure groundwater flow velocity in saturated sediments has already been successfully demonstrated. This preliminary test of this device in the unsaturated zone will be considered successful if in fact the flowmeters are able to detect a gas flow velocity. The field demonstration described in this integrated test plan is being conducted as part of the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The VOC-Arid ID is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the testing of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID is to identify, develop, and demonstrate technologies that may be used to characterize, remediate, and/or monitor arid or semiarid sites containing VOCs (e.g., carbon tetrachloride) with or without associated metal and radionuclide contamination. Initially, the VOC-Arid ID activities are focusing primarily on the carbon tetrachloride and associated contamination found in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. Testing of the in situ permeable flow sensor will be conducted at the location of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The data regarding subsurface air flow rates and pathways collected during the flow sensor testing will be used in the ongoing characterization of the proposed ERDF.

  12. A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

  13. On-site inspection: A brief overview and bibliography of techniques pertinent to assessing suspected nuclear test sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, C.R.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief overview and bibliography of those techniques that may have application for the evaluation of a site to determine if a high energy release event is nuclear in nature. This effort is motivated by recognition of the changing world political climate and the perception that low yield and non-proliferation issues will grow in importance as countries become increasingly involved as signators to treaties that are intended to limit the development and testing of nuclear weapons. Along with an increasing interest in such issues is the awareness of the need to implement improved capabilities for treaty monitoring programs that must deal with assessing suspicious occurrences of high energy release events. In preparing this report, it is recognized that monitoring can take two main forms. The first involves the resolution of unidentified events detected by seismic and satellite National Technical Means. Events of an indeterminate nature could occur world-wide and could induce tension in neighboring countries. If an on-site measurement capability were available, a monitoring team could be sent to the suspected site of an event to take measurements that could confirm or disprove the occurrence of a clandestine nuclear test. The second monitoring form is the confirmation that a clandestine event is not masked by a declared event. For example, a large mining explosion could mask a decoupled nuclear explosion. On-site measurements before and during the test could confirm that a clandestine event did not occur and could provide assurance that the party carrying out the explosion is not taking advantage of clandestine testing opportunities. 48 refs.

  14. A FEASIBILITY AND OPTIMIZATION STUDY TO DETERMINE COOLING TIME AND BURNUP OF ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FUELS USING A NONDESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge Navarro

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method for ATR applications the technique was tested using one-isotope, multi-isotope and fuel simulated sources. Burnup calibrations were perfomed using convoluted and deconvoluted data. The calibrations results showed burnup prediction by this method improves using deconvolution. The final stage of the deconvolution method development was to perform an irradiation experiment in order to create a surrogate fuel source to test the deconvolution method using experimental data. A conceptual design of the fuel scan system is path forward using the rugged LaBr3 detector in an above the water configuration and deconvolution algorithms.

  15. Review and discussion of the development of synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busse, L J; Collins, H D; Doctor, S R

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and capabilities of synthetic aperture focusing techniques for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT) are presented. The purpose of SAFT-UT is to produce high-resolution images of the interior of opaque objects. The goal of this work is to develop and implement methods which can be used to detect and to quantify the extent of defects and cracks in critical components of nuclear reactors (pressure vessels, primary piping systems, and nozzles). This report places particular emphasis upon the practical experimental results that have been obtained using SAFT-UT as well as the theoretical background that underlies synthetic aperture focusing. A discussion regarding high-speed and real-time implementations of two- and three-dimensional synthetic aperture focusing is also presented.

  16. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  17. Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketcham, Jerod W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

  18. Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

  19. AN ACCELERATED JITTER TOLERANCE TEST TECHNIQUE ON ATE FOR 1.5GB/S AND 3GB/S SERIAL-ATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilic, Zeljko

    AN ACCELERATED JITTER TOLERANCE TEST TECHNIQUE ON ATE FOR 1.5GB/S AND 3GB/S SERIAL-ATA Y. Fan', Y ABSTRACT In our previous publication [1], we demonstrated the ability to generate the proper mix of jitter on ATE to enable the jitter tolerance test for 1.5/3Gbps SATA applications. Obviously

  20. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  1. Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  2. Flow Test At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro Inc IosilEnergy InformationFlintFlow

  3. Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information RooseveltFlow

  4. Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration ActivityFlow

  5. Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) ExplorationMccoyFlow

  6. Ultra-fast Imaging of Two-Phase Flow in Structured Monolith Reactors; Techniques and Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heras, Jonathan Jaime

    This thesis will address the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to probe the “monolith reactor”, which consists of a structured catalyst over which reactions may occur. This reactor has emerged...

  7. JOURNAL OF ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE 16:160-166 11990) A Stopped-Flow/Rapid-Freezing Machine With Millisecond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in chemical kinetics (Johnson, 1986)with a propane jet freezing unit previously used to prepare static samples a Berger-type mixer and into a thin-walled copper flow cell (Fig. 1). After a predetermined delay, Rockford, IL) con- nected to a 1.5-mm Mark I Berger-type mixer (Re- search Instruments and Manufacturi

  8. A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, C.A.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

  9. Automatic Test Generation for Data-Flow Reactive Systems with time constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    instantaneously. We present a conformance relation for this model and we propose a test generation method using(V ) the set of variable assignments for V . Given G G(V ) and a valuation v Dom(V ), we write v |= G when G(v) true. Given a valuation v = (v1, · · · , vn) of V and A A(V ), we define the valuations v[A] as v

  10. Hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization and radial flow through permeability tests for cementitous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Christopher Andrew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    depending on the age and relative strength of the specimen. Since the specimen was sealed at both ends, the fluid would flow T es ti n g Fl u i d ( W a ter etc .) Hy d r a u l i c o i l L V D T c o i l E l ec tr i c - h y d r a u l i c p u m p Ho l... is representative of a typical driveway or sidewalk mix. C e m e n t T y p e I / I I 334 k g / m 3 564 l b s / y d 3 W a t e r 200 k g / m 3 338 l b s / y d 3 C oa r s e A g g r e g a t e ( 9 . 5 m m m a x ) 1232 k g / m 3 2079 l b s / y d 3 F i n e A g g r...

  11. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well. Appendix A, Gladys McCall Site (Cameron Parish, LA): Final report, October 1985--October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor ``pills`` directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  12. Elucidating the event-by-event flow fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions via the event shape selection technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Huo; Jiangyong Jia; Soumya Mohapatra

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of large event-by-event flow fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC provides an opportunity to study a broad class of flow observables. This paper explores the correlations among harmonic flow coefficients $v_n$ and their phases $\\Phi_n$, and the rapidity fluctuation of $v_n$. The study is carried out usin Pb+Pb events generated by the AMPT model with fixed impact parameter. The overall ellipticity/triangularity of events is varied by selecting on the eccentricities $\\epsilon_n$ or the magnitudes of the flow vector $q_n$ for n=2 and 3, respectively. The responses of the $v_n$, the event-plane correlations, and the rapidity fluctuations, to the change in $\\epsilon_n$ and $q_n$ are then systematized. Strong positive correlations are observed among all even harmonics $v_2, v_4$, and $v_6$ (all increase with $q_2$), between $v_2$ and $v_5$ (both increase with $q_2$) and between $v_3$ and $v_5$ (both increase with $q_3$), consistent with the effects of nonlinear collective response. In contrast, an anti-correlation is observed between $v_2$ and $v_3$ similar to that seen between $\\epsilon_2$ and $\\epsilon_3$. These correlation patterns are found to be independent of whether selecting on $q_n$ or $\\epsilon_n$, validating the ability of $q_n$ in selecting the initial geometry. A forward/backward asymmetry of $v_n(\\eta)$ is observed for events selected on $q_n$ but not on $\\epsilon_n$, reflecting dynamical fluctuations exposed by the $q_n$ selection. Many event-plane correlators show good agreement between $q_n$ and $\\epsilon_n$ selections, suggesting that their variations with $q_n$ are controlled by the change of $\\epsilon_n$ in the initial geometry. Hence these correlators may serve as promising observables for disentangling the fluctuations generated in various stages of the evolution of the matter created in heavy ion collisions.

  13. 2248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 60, NO. 7, JULY 2012 Simple Test and Modeling of RFID Tag Backscatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    (RFID) is a well-known and widely de- ployed use of RF energy harvesting. This brings significant2248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 60, NO. 7, JULY 2012 Simple Test inventory performance. Index Terms--Backscatter, power harvesting, radio frequency identification (RFID

  14. Design methodologies for built-in testing of integrated RF transceivers with the on-chip loopback technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onabajo, Marvin Olufemi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances toward increased integration and complexity of radio frequency (RF) andmixed-signal integrated circuits reduce the effectiveness of contemporary testmethodologies and result in a rising cost of testing. The focus in this research...

  15. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  16. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  17. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

  18. Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

  19. A Comprehensive Review of the Tests Completed on the Flow Loop at the Energy Systems Laboratory (Draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The changing weight of the water is measured to determine the flow rate for comparison with the candidate sensor. Flowloop History Paper: Updated Dec. 1992 : Page 3 The electronic signals from the load cells, candidate meter, ultrasonic meter, differential... equipment such as the flow meters and the Btu transducers. ENEMY SKKMS LABORATORY TECHNICAL REPORT REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION HP APT \\Jt |\\ JH^ 1 1 Flowloop History Paper: Updated Dec. 1992: Page 1 The first task of the facility was to determine the overall...

  20. Message Flow Modulator Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Robert Stephen

    operational environment at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center with scenarios developed by an independent in testing and demonstrating the flow modulator at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center. #12;MESSAGE FLOW

  1. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

  2. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramowitz, Howard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Cecil, Richard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; D'Angelo, Nicholas [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Callow, Richard A. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  3. Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  4. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  5. TRAC-PF1/MOD-1 analysis of Loss-Of-Flow Test L9-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. As part of our independent assessment of code version TRAC-PF1/MOD1, we analyzed Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) L9-4 and compared the test data to the calculated results. This was an anticipated-transient-without-scram test in which the pumps were tripped, the steam generator main feedwater discontinued, and the main steam-outlet valve closed. This data comparison is the first extensive test of TRAC's reactor-kinetics models. The comparisons show that TRAC can calculate the power generation within a nuclear reactor if the program is supplied with adequate reactor-kinetics input specifications. The data comparisons also indicate that TRAC calculated the thermal-hydraulic parameters within LOFT well with only minor discrepancies. A number of models within TRAC-PF1/MOD1 were verified for the first time. They include the reactor-kinetics models, the trip-activated time-step controls, and the LOFT pump-coastdown calculations. In general, the final input description is adequate to analyze the experiment. The calculations indicate the importance and difficulty of obtaining accurate and applicable reactor-kinetics input data. They also indicate the need to include the effects of xenon-poisoning buildup in the analysis.

  6. TESTING THE ACCRETION FLOW WITH PLASMA WAVE HEATING MECHANISM FOR SAGITTARIUS A* BY THE 1.3 mm VLBI MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026 (China); Takahashi, Rohta [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shen Zhiqiang, E-mail: mlhuang@ustc.edu.c [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vicinity of the supermassive black hole associated with the compact radio source Sagittarius (Sgr) A* is believed to dominate the observed emission at wavelengths near and shorter than approx1 millimeter. We show that a general relativistic accretion flow, heated via the plasma wave heating mechanism, is consistent with the polarization and recent millimeter-VLBI observations of Sgr A* for an inclination angle of approx45{sup 0}, position angle of approx140{sup 0}, and spin approx<0.9. Structure in visibilities produced by the black hole shadow can potentially be observed by 1.3 mm-VLBI on the existing Hawaii-CARMA and Hawaii-SMT baselines. We also consider eight additional potential millimeter-VLBI stations, including sites in Chile and New Zealand, finding that with these the basic geometry of the emission region can be reliably estimated.

  7. Automation of radiochemical analysis by applying flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, David

    of detection systems, including scintillation counting, a-spectrometers, proportional counters, mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry. ª 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: Flow-analysis technique; Flow

  8. SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W. Burgess, J. B. Chesser, V. B. Graves, and S.L. Schrock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W remote handling techniques and tools for replacing target system components. During the past year and analytical data. These included a welded-tube heat exchanger, an electromagnetic flow meter, a hydraulically

  9. Postprint of article in Information and Software Technology (2012) On the adoption of MC/DC and control-flow adequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /DC and control-flow adequacy for a tight integration of program testing and statistical fault localization*,** Bo programs using three adequacy criteria, 16 test case prioritization techniques, and four statistical fault, Beijing, China A B S T R A C T Context: Testing and debugging consume a significant portion of software

  10. Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

  11. Flow Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park atFisiaFlorida: Energy Resources Jump

  12. Message Flow Modulator Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Robert Stephen

    operational environment at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center with scenarios developed by an independent in testing and demonstrating the flow modulator at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center. #12; MESSAGE

  13. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulsa Fluid Flow

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The developments of fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) is a common occurrence. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas-oil-and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of the hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. The recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is very crucial to any multiphase separation technique that is employed either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole to know inlet conditions such as the flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. The overall objective was to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict the flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). The project was conducted in two periods. In Period 1 (four years), gas-oil-water flow in pipes were investigated to understand the fundamental physical mechanisms describing the interaction between the gas-oil-water phases under flowing conditions, and a unified model was developed utilizing a novel modeling approach. A gas-oil-water pipe flow database including field and laboratory data was formed in Period 2 (one year). The database was utilized in model performance demonstration. Period 1 primarily consisted of the development of a unified model and software to predict the gas-oil-water flow, and experimental studies of the gas-oil-water project, including flow behavior description and closure relation development for different flow conditions. Modeling studies were performed in two parts, Technology Assessment and Model Development and Enhancement. The results of the Technology assessment study indicated that the performance of the current state of the art two-phase flow models was poor especially for three-phase pipeline flow when compared with the existing data. As part of the model development and enhancement study, a new unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase pipe flow was developed. The new model is based on the dynamics of slug flow, which shares transition boundaries with all the other flow patterns. The equations of slug flow are used not only to calculate the slug characteristics, but also to predict transitions from slug flow to other flow patterns. An experimental program including three-phase gas-oil-water horizontal flow and two-phase horizontal and inclined oil-water flow testing was conducted utilizing a Tulsa University Fluid Flow Projects Three-phase Flow Facility. The experimental results were incorporated into the unified model as they became available, and model results were used to better focus and tailor the experimental study. Finally, during the Period 2, a new three-phase databank has been developed using the data generated during this project and additional data available in the literature. The unified model to predict the gas-oil-water three phase flow characteristics was tested by comparing the prediction results with the data. The results showed good agreements.

  14. Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers. The Mesozoic red-bed fills of the Newark (NY for inferring the flow directions of the Quaternary continental glaciers. The most-recent glacier (Woodfordian that this glacier did not reach much of Long Island and thus did not deposit the Harbor Hill Moraine. The next

  15. System-level design and RF front-end implementation for a 3-10ghz multiband-ofdm ultrawideband receiver and built-in testing techniques for analog and rf integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdes Garcia, Alberto

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Edgar Sánchez Sinencio Committee Members, Jose Silva Martinez... MultiBand-OFDM UltraWideBand Receiver and Built-in Testing Techniques for Analog and RF Integrated Circuits. (May 2006) Alberto Valdes Garcia, B.S. (Hons.), ITESM Campus Toluca Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Edgar Sánchez-Sinencio This work...

  16. A new localized corrosion monitoring technique for the evaluation of oilfield inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, S.L.; Griffin, A.M.; Garcia, J.G. Jr. [Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals, L.P., Sugar Land, TX (United States); Yang, B. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow induced localized corrosion (FILC) is one of the major problems in the oilfield. Presently very few effective techniques are available for monitoring localized corrosion in oilfields. A new electrochemical technique was developed to provide a simple and effective way to monitor localized corrosion. The technique requires a potentiostat and a ZRA (zero resistance ammeter) as the measurement instrument. A special setup was designed to create a small anode and a large cathode. The technique was tested in a recirculating flow loop simulating FILC conditions. This technique was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor in mitigating localized corrosion. It can be further applied, both in the laboratory and in the field, to other areas where FILC is severe. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  18. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  19. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, No. 4, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from July 1 - September 29, 1995.

  20. Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, Vol. 248, No. 3 (2001) 795799 Testing a new small-volume technique for determining 234Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    small-volume technique for determining 234Th in seawater C. R. Benitez-Nelson,1* K. O. Buesseler,2 M the soluble parent uranium-238 (T1/2 = 4.5.109 y), and its particle reactive daughter, 234 Th (T1/2 = 24.1 d for the measurement of 234Th in seawater which involves small volumes, little processing, and direct measurement

  1. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  2. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  3. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ventilation effectiveness in large industrial premisesventilation of the room would cause discomfort to the occupants. (They accepted as a premise

  4. Fermionic renormalization group flows Technique and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    ­dimensional (t, t )­Hubbard model in the regime relevant for high­ temperature superconductivity. The purpose

  5. REVIEW OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Progress ReportRECOVERY9747

  6. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Barr, J.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Repasky, K.S.; Lewicki, J.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, T.; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Wielopolski, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  7. An optical investigation of air particle flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Denise R

    This thesis is a fundamental study of air-particle flow fields where the experimental parameters are characteristics of coal-fired electricity generating stations. The optical flow field measurement technique Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV...

  8. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  9. Simulation of FCC riser flow with multiphase heat transfer and cracking reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S. L.; Zhou, C. Q.; Energy Systems

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code ICRKFLO was developed for simulations of three-dimensional three-phase reacting flows in Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser reactors. It calculates the product yields based on local flow properties by solving the fundamental conservation principles of mass, momentum, and energy for the flow properties associated with the gas, liquid, and solid phases. Unique phenomenological models and numerical techniques were developed specifically for the FCC flow simulation. The models include a spray vaporization model, a particle-solid interaction model, and an interfacial heat transfer model. The numerical techniques include a time-integral approach to overcome numerical stiffness problems in chemical kinetics rate calculations and a hybrid hydrodynamic-kinetic treatment to facilitate detailed kinetics calculations of cracking reactions. ICRKFLO has been validated with extensive test data from two pilot and one commercial FCC units. It is proven to be useful for advanced development of FCC riser reactors.

  10. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

  11. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.

  12. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  13. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  14. SUBMITTED TO THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FLOW CONTROL, REVISED VERSION 1 Fluid Flow Control: a Vision-Based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUBMITTED TO THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FLOW CONTROL, REVISED VERSION 1 Fluid Flow Control, by visualizing a fluid flow, dense flow velocity maps can be computed via optical flow techniques by diminishing the fuel consumption of their aircrafts through drag reduction [1]. In contrast, in other

  15. Two-dimensional AMR simulations of colliding flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niklaus, Markus; Niemeyer, Jens C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colliding flows are a commonly used scenario for the formation of molecular clouds in numerical simulations. Due to the thermal instability of the warm neutral medium, turbulence is produced by cooling. We carry out a two-dimensional numerical study of such colliding flows in order to test whether statistical properties inferred from adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations are robust with respect to the applied refinement criteria. We compare probability density functions of various quantities as well as the clump statistics and fractal dimension of the density fields in AMR simulations to a static-grid simulation. The static grid with 2048^2 cells matches the resolution of the most refined subgrids in the AMR simulations. The density statistics is reproduced fairly well by AMR. Refinement criteria based on the cooling time or the turbulence intensity appear to be superior to the standard technique of refinement by overdensity. Nevertheless, substantial differences in the flow structure become apparent. In...

  16. Posters Testing of Newtonian Nudging Technique

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations719711731

  17. Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWaterEnergyWeeklyWelivit AGWell

  18. Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd a MarineAdd

  19. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Topical report, LNCFS Levels 1 and 3 test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from the third phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICC-1) project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The purpose of this project was to study the NO{sub x} emissions characteristics of ABB Combustion Engineering`s (ABB CE) Low NO{sub x} Concentric Firing System (LNCFS) Levels I, II, and III. These technologies were installed and tested in a stepwise fashion at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2. The objective of this report is to provide the results from Phase III. During that phase, Levels I and III of the ABB C-E Services Low NO{sub x} Concentric Firing System were tested. The LNCFS Level III technology includes separated overfire air, close coupled overfire air, clustered coal nozzles, flame attachment coal nozzle tips, and concentric firing. The LNCFS Level I was simulated by closing the separated overfire air nozzles of the LNCFS Level III system. Based upon long-term data, LNCFS Level HI reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 45 percent at full load. LOI levels with LNCFS Level III increased slightly, however, tests showed that LOI levels with LNCFS Level III were highly dependent upon coal fineness. After correcting for leakage air through the separated overfire air system, the simulated LNCFS Level I reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 37 percent. There was no increase in LOI with LNCFS Level I.

  20. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  1. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  2. Evaluation and enhancement of Texas ramp metering strategies, compliance, and alternative enforcement techniques: Go with the flow Houston. Public outreach plan (revised); Interim research report, September 1995--October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, S.; Fette, B.; Busler, L.; Miller, K.; Messer, C.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the public outreach plan on the implementation of ramp meters along the Katy Freeway in Houston, Generally, ramp metering is neither beloved nor understood by the public. To gain public awareness, acceptance, compliance and continued support, ramp metering operations should be reinforced by a strong, ongoing public information and outreach campaign that communicates the need for and benefits of the program. Because the term `ramp metering` exhibits restrictions on the public, the phrase `Flow Signals` was developed to better describe the benefits of ramp metering; enhanced flow of traffic, fewer bottlenecks, and fewer trip delays. The logo, `Go with the Flow Houston,` and a graphic identity were developed to help communicate the theme throughout the various media where both the primary and secondary messages are intended to reach 15 different audiences. These media will include: a PSA, both static and changeable message signs, a brochure, Internet web site information, letters to specific audience and media relations efforts.

  3. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, James Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large scale test rig is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance properties and flow characteristics of labyrinth seals. A novel test facility with multiple cavities that provides 2D, planar flow at a scale...

  4. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  5. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  6. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique...

  7. Multiphase cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Thomas

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the multiphase nature of the intracluster medium whose neglect can lead to overestimates of the baryon fraction of clusters by up to a factor of two. The multiphase form of the cooling flow equations are derived and reduced to a simple form for a wide class of self-similar density distributions. It is shown that steady-state cooling flows are \\emph{not} consistent with all possible emissivity profiles which can therefore be used as a test of the theory. In combination, they provide strong constraints on the mass distribution within the cooling radius.

  8. Superhydrophobic Materials Technology-PVC Bonding Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Scott R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Efird, Marty [VeloxFlow, LLC

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the technology maturation project was to develop an enhanced application technique for applying diatomaceous earth with pinned polysiloxane oil to PVC pipes and materials. The oil infiltration technique is applied as a spray of diluted oil in a solvent onto the superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth substrate. This makes the surface take on the following characteristics: • wet?cleanable • anti?biofouling • waterproof • anti?corrosion. The project involved obtaining input and supplies from VeloxFlow and the development of successful techniques that would quickly result in a commercial license agreement with VeloxFlow and other companies that use PVC materials in a variety of other fields of use.

  9. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  10. Experimental Tests of Cooling: Expectations and Additional Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of established techniques for cooling a beam, the choice forionization cooling is a viable technique. The large initialionization cooling, so an experimental test of the technique

  11. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  12. Software Verification and Testing Lecture Notes: Testing I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struth, Georg

    of Testing Methods dynamic testing: software component is executed with concrete input values (in a realSoftware Verification and Testing Lecture Notes: Testing I #12;Motivation verification: · powerful · automated techniques rather limited testing: (as "poor man's verification") · can only detect presence

  13. Uncertainty quantification using multiscale methods for porous media flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dostert, Paul Francis

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    numerical models. When solving the flow and transport through heterogeneous porous media some type of upscaling or coarsening is needed due to scale disparity. We describe multiscale techniques used for solving the spatial component of the stochastic flow...

  14. Development of AeroView: an interactive flow diagnostics laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galls, Samuel Fernando

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research includes the development of a set of experimental flow-diagnostics techniques for low speed aerodynamics applications and an interactive software for flow field data acquisition and presentation called AeroView. The data collection...

  15. Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

  16. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  17. A Mixed Finite Element Framework for Modeling Coupled Fluid Flow ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birendra Jha

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and in enhanced oil recovery techniques such as steam assisted gravity ..... When fluid flows through a porous medium there are three forces acting, per unit.

  18. Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the...

  19. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  20. THE ROTATING TARGET FLOW TEST FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    @idom.com) Fernando Sordo, ESS Bilbao Tom McManamy, ORNL/SNS #12;Status of the RTFT 4th HPTW of a RotaAng Target for ESS · In 2009 ESS Bilbao worked out a preliminary design for a rotaZng target for ESS. · Disc formed by un-clad tungsten bricks cooled

  1. The characterization and testing of candidate immobilization forms for the disposal of plutonium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakel, A. J.; Buck, E. C.; Chamberlain, D. B.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Fortner, J. A.; Marra, J. C.; Mcgrail, B. P.; Mertz, C. J.; Peeler, D. K.; Shaw, H. F.; Strachan, D. M.; Van Konynenburg, R. A.; Vienna, J. D.; Wolf, S. F.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Candidate immobilization forms for the disposal of surplus weapons-useable are being tested and characterized. The goal of the testing program was to provide sufficient data that, by August 1997, an informed selection of a single immobilization form could be made so that the form development and production R and D could be more narrowly focused. Two forms have been under consideration for the past two years: glass and ceramic. In August, 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected ceramic for plutonium disposition, halting further work on the glass material. In this paper, we will briefly describe these two waste forms, then describe our characterization techniques and testing methods. The analytical methods used to characterize altered and unaltered samples are the same. A full suite of microscopic techniques is used. Techniques used include optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopies. For both candidate immobilization forms, the analyses are used to characterize the material for the presence of crystalline phases and amorphous material. Crystalline materials, either in the untested immobilization form or in the alteration products from testing, are characterized with respect to morphology, crystal structure, and composition. The goal of these analyses is to provide data on critical issues such as Pu and neutron absorber volubility in the immobilization form, thermal stability, potential separation of absorber and Pu, and the long-term behavior of the materials. Results from these analyses will be discussed in the presentation. Testing methods include MCC-1 tests, product consistency tests (methods A and B), unsaturated ''drip'' tests, vapor hydration tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and pressurized unsaturated flow tests. Both candidate immobilization forms have very low dissolution rates; examples of typical test results will be reported.

  2. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  3. Message Flow Modeling Oscar Nierstrasz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    Message Flow Modeling Oscar Nierstrasz and Dennis Tsichritzis Computer Systems Research Group University of Toronto ABSTRACT A message management system provides users with a facility for automatically handling messages. This paper describes a technique for characterizing the behaviour of such a system

  4. Genetic algorithm based tomographic flow visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Donald Paul

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reconstruction techniques have been used in various fields for many years. As early as 1917, J. Radon developed the mathematical techniques necessary to perform a reconstruchon of a test object fiom its projections. Radon's work, however, was theoretical...

  5. Structural testing of the North Wind 250 composite rotor joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W; Link, H [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Coleman, C [Northern Power Systems, Moretown, VT (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Wind 250 wind turbine is under development at Northern Power Systems (NPS) in Moretown, VT. The turbine uses a unique, flow-through, teetered-rotor design. This design eliminates structural discontinuities at the blade/hub interface by fabricating the rotor as one continuous structural element. To accomplish this, the two blade spars are joined at the center of the rotor using a proprietary bonding technique. Fatigue tests were conducted on the full-scale rotor joint at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Subsequent tests are now underway to test the full-scale rotor and hub assembly to verify the design assumptions. The test articles were mounted in dedicated test fixtures. For the joint test, a constant moment was generated across the joint and parent material. Hydraulic actuators applied sinusoidal loading to the test article at levels equivalent to 90% of the extreme wind load for over one million cycles. When the loading was increased to 112% of the extreme wind load, the joint failed by buckling. Strain levels were monitored at 14 locations inside and outside of the blade joint during the test. The tests were used to qualify this critical element of the rotor for field testing and to provide information needed to improve the structural design of the joint.

  6. application test reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flow reactors (OFRs). A micro-bioreactor (working (more) Reis, N. 2006-01-01 4 Web Application Testing with Customized Test Requirements Computer Technologies and...

  7. Evaluation of bubbler/diaphragm techniques to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.J.; Hickman, B.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if a bubbler technique can be used to determine the surface level in the waste tanks. Two techniques were evaluated. The first technique is a standard bubbler system in which a tube is placed below the surface of the liquid to be measured and air pressure inside a tube is increased until bubbles begin to become emitted from the tube. The air pressure then is a function of the pressure at the bottom of the tube. The second technique involves a system similar to the standard bubbler technique, but instead of bubbles being released into the material to be gauged, air pressure is increased against a diaphragm until enough pressure is applied to overcome the pressure of the liquid at the given depth, at which time the air then flows in a return loop back to a vent. The advantage of the diaphragm system is that it is a sealed system; thus no air is released into the waste tank materials, and it is not possible for the waste tank materials to get into the air flow. Based on the results of the tests conducted in this program, it appears that the bubbler and diaphragm systems that were tested could not be used for accurate measurements of the level in the waste tanks. Both exhibited deposits of simulated waste tank material at the end of the devices which affected the ability of the gauge to accurately determine changes in the surface level even though the measured value of the level was inaccurate. Further investigations into the cause of this inaccuracy may be warranted. Alternate diaphragm materials may improve the performance of this gauge.

  8. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunker, Bryan E., E-mail: bryan.yunker@ucdenver.edu; Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado – Denver/Anschutz, 12700 East 19th Avenue, MS 8607, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado – Denver/Anschutz, 12700 East 19th Avenue, MS 8607, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Dodd, Gerald D., E-mail: gerald.dodd@ucdenver.edu; Chang, Samuel; Scherzinger, Ann L. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop L954, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop L954, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Chen, S. James, E-mail: james.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Colorado 80045 and Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop B132, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Feng, Yusheng, E-mail: yusheng.feng@utsa.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas – San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, Mail Stop: AET 2.332, San Antonio, Texas 78249–0670 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas – San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, Mail Stop: AET 2.332, San Antonio, Texas 78249–0670 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  9. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of worn labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Brian Frank

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale flow visualization test facility is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance and flow characteristics of worn labyrinth seals. Wear in labyrinth seals is a consequence of contact between the rotating...

  10. Enzyme entrapped nanoporous scaffolds formed through flow induced gelation in microfluidic filter device for sensitive biosensing of organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Donglai; Shao, Guocheng; Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel and versatile processing method was developed for the formation of gel scaffolds with in-situ AChE-AuNPs immobilization for biosensing of organophosphorus compounds. The biosensor designed by our new approach shows high sensitivity, selectivity and reactivation efficiency. This flow induced immobilziation technique opens up new pathways for designing simple, fast, biocompatible, and cost-effective process for enhanced sensor performance and on-site testing of a variety of toxic organophosphorus compounds.

  11. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  12. Laboratory analysis of fluid flow and solute transport through a variably saturated fracture embedded in porous tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Y.; Haldeman, W.R.; Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory techniques are developed that allow concurrent measurement of unsaturated matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity of fractured rock blocks. Two Apache Leap tuff blocks with natural fractures were removed from near Superior, Arizona, shaped into rectangular prisms, and instrumented in the laboratory. Porous ceramic plates provided solution to block tops at regulated pressures. Infiltration tests were performed on both test blocks. Steady flow testing of the saturated first block provided estimates of matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity. Fifteen centimeters of suction applied to the second block top showed that fracture flow was minimal and matrix hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude less than the first block saturated matrix conductivity. Coated-wire ion-selective electrodes monitored aqueous chlorided breakthrough concentrations. Minute samples of tracer solution were collected with filter paper. The techniques worked well for studying transport behavior at near-saturated flow conditions and also appear to be promising for unsaturated conditions. Breakthrough curves in the fracture and matrix, and a concentration map of chloride concentrations within the fracture, suggest preferential flows paths in the fracture and substantial diffusion into the matrix. Average travel velocity, dispersion coefficient and longitudinal dispersivity in the fracture are obtained. 67 refs., 54 figs., 23 tabs.

  13. Investigation of Countercurrent Helium-Air Flows in Air-ingress Accidents for VHTRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard; Oh, Chang

    2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an extensive experimental database for the air- ingress phenomenon for the validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. This research is intended to be a separate-effects experimental study. However, the project team will perform a careful scaling analysis prior to designing a scaled-down test facility in order to closely tie this research with the real application. As a reference design in this study, the team will use the 600 MWth gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) developed by General Atomic. In the test matrix of the experiments, researchers will vary the temperature and pressure of the helium— along with break size, location, shape, and orientation—to simulate deferent scenarios and to identify potential mitigation strategies. Under support of the Department of Energy, a high-temperature helium test facility has been designed and is currently being constructed at Ohio State University, primarily for high- temperature compact heat exchanger testing for the VHTR program. Once the facility is in operation (expected April 2009), this study will utilize high-temperature helium up to 900°C and 3 MPa for loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) depressurization and air-ingress experiments. The project team will first conduct a scaling study and then design an air-ingress test facility. The major parameter to be measured in the experiments is oxygen (or nitrogen) concentration history at various locations following a LOCA scenario. The team will use two measurement techniques: 1) oxygen (or similar type) sensors employed in the flow field, which will introduce some undesirable intrusiveness, disturbing the flow, and 2) a planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging technique, which has no physical intrusiveness to the flow but requires a transparent window or test section that the laser beam can penetrate. The team will construct two test facilities, one for high-temperature helium tests with local sensors and the other for low- temperature helium tests with the PLIF technique. The results from the two instruments will provide a means to cross-calibrate the measurement techniques.

  14. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser testbed.

  15. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied, using CO2 as the transferred species and sodium hydroxide as the alkaline agent in water. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the parametric dependencies. The experimental data were empirically correlated.

  16. A NEW TEST METRIC AND A NEW SCAN ARCHITECTURE FOR EFFICIENT VLSI TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A NEW TEST METRIC AND A NEW SCAN ARCHITECTURE FOR EFFICIENT VLSI TESTING A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED. To overcome the difficulty and cost of VLSI testing, we need to search for better testing techniques. Chip testing can be classified into two categories: production testing and characterization testing

  17. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  18. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

  19. Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa) Louisianna State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA) Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland))

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 {times} 10{sup 6} microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period.

  20. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  1. Techniques for determining physical zones of influence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamann, Hendrik F; Lopez-Marrero, Vanessa

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for analyzing flow of a quantity in a given domain are provided. In one aspect, a method for modeling regions in a domain affected by a flow of a quantity is provided which includes the following steps. A physical representation of the domain is provided. A grid that contains a plurality of grid-points in the domain is created. Sources are identified in the domain. Given a vector field that defines a direction of flow of the quantity within the domain, a boundary value problem is defined for each of one or more of the sources identified in the domain. Each of the boundary value problems is solved numerically to obtain a solution for the boundary value problems at each of the grid-points. The boundary problem solutions are post-processed to model the regions affected by the flow of the quantity on the physical representation of the domain.

  2. JOHNSON-MATTHEY DIFFUSER CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, P; James Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H; Gregg Morgan, G

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuser/permeator commercially fabricated by Johnson-Matthey was purchased for characterization testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A test system was fabricated to not only feed and bleed flows and pressures, but also permeate pressure for flows up to 20 SLPM.

  3. CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmeyer, William J.

    APPENDIX A CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS FOR LIQUID FLOWS #12;APPENDIX A CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS FOR LIQUID FLOWS 2 Cv Q P Sg net gpm net = / Cv = Q P / Sg 75 is used to relate the pressure loss of a valve to the discharge of the valve at a given valve opening

  4. Generalized one-dimensional, steady, compressible flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, F.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present development and testing of a generalized method for analytically examining 1D steady flow of perfect gases allows area change, heat transfer, friction, and mass injection. Generalized flow functions are developed, and sample tables are calculated and tested for both simple cases and combined changes. Normal shocks are noted to occur from the supersonic portion of these loci to the subsonic portion, in a manner analogous to simple-change behavior. 9 refs.

  5. Two-Phase Flow Pressure Drop of High Quality Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, J. M.; Coffield, R. D.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-phase pressure drop across a straight test pipe was experimentally determined for high Reynolds (Re) number steam flow for a flow quality range of 0.995 to 1.0. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties associated with the effects of two-phase flow on pressure drop. Two-phase flow develops in steam piping because a small fraction of the steam flow condenses due to heat loss to the surroundings. There has been very limited two-phase pressure drop data in open literature for the tested flow quality range. The two-phase pressure drop data obtained in this test has enabled development of a correlation between friction factor, Reynolds number, and flow quality.

  6. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; John P. Hurley

    2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    As DOE continues to advance new power systems, materials issues are often pivotal in determining the ultimate efficiency that can be reached in the system. Refractory performance in slagging gasification represents one of these issues. The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The focus of the proposed work is to test the corrosion resistance of commercially available refractories to flowing coal slag, and propose the mechanisms of corrosion for the conditions studied. Corrosion is the degradation of material surfaces or grain boundaries by chemical reactions with melts, liquids, or gases, causing loss of material and consequently a decrease in strength of the structure. In order to develop methods of reducing corrosion, the microstructure that is attacked must be identified along with the mechanism and rates of attack. Once these are identified, methods for reducing corrosion rates can be developed. The work will take advantage of equipment and experimental techniques developed at the EERC under funding from several DOE programs. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) will be utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. To date, efforts have focused on final shakedown of the CADCAF and obtaining representative samples of slag and refractory for testing.

  7. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the underground coal gasification field test at the Hoe Creek site No. 2, Wyoming, helium pulses were introduced to develop information to characterize the flow field, and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Quantitative analysis of the tracer response curves shows an increasing departure from a plug flow regime with time because of the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex non-uniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model. 17 refs.

  9. Low volume flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  10. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Bryant

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

  11. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi#12;cations. The cost-e#11;ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  12. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost­effective­ ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris­ tics of test

  13. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi cations. The cost-e ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  14. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi [Department of Offshore Process and Energy Systems Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  15. Visualization of Flows and Transfer Capability in Electric Networks Thomas J. Overbye James D. Weber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of power system flow values, contouring of transmission line flow values, data aggregation techniques power flows, the scheduled power flows, and the capacity of the transmission system. This paper presents. Introduction The electric power business throughout the world is restructuring its institutional arrangements

  16. The simulation of a 1-inch break loss-of-coolant accident at the ROSA-IV/AP600 test facility using RELAP5/AP600 test facility using RELAP5/MOD3.2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, Robert Beverly

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    different nodalization techniques, split cold leg with cross-flow and split without cross-flow junctions, were performed. The nodalization patterns had little difference in calculating the temperatures in the cold legs. Split cold leg without cross-flow...

  17. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  18. Fig. 1 Subtraction technique principle Fig. 2 Relationship between flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were scanned at 3T (Siemens Tim Trio) with the VFL (Siemens SPACE, Sampling Perfection with Application

  19. Approximation Techniques for Incompressible Flows with Heterogeneous Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgado Gonzalez, Abner Jonatan

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .21) and Mh := qh 2 C 0( ) : qhjT 2 Pk; 8T 2 Th : (3.22) For a proof the reader can consult standard references, for instance [16, 34, 27]. Finally, we de ne the discrete solution space Xh := Xh Mh; normed by k kX: Clearly, Xh X: For the sequel... (1.1) when the function is truncated above and below. We introduce a straightforward nite element scheme, such as Pk 1 for each component of the velocity and Pk for the pres- sure, similar to the scheme studied by J.E. Roberts and J.-M. Thomas...

  20. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    modeling with TOUGH and eTOUGH * Stochastic and deterministic joint inversion - Use seismic to provide the architecture of the system plus wells, - Use EMresistivity,...

  1. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  2. Dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Graydon L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

  3. CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Smith, B. L. (Barton L.); Martin, R. A. (Richard A.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

  4. Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Hoe Creek No. 2 (Wyoming) underground-coal-gasification field test, researchers introduced helium pulses to characterize the flow field and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Flow models such as the axial-dispersion and parallel tanks-in-series models allowed interpretation of the in situ combustion flow field from the residence time distribution of the tracer gas. A quantitative analysis of the Hoe Creek tracer response curves revealed an increasing departure from a plug-flow regime with time, which was due to the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex nonuniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery, and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    deep into the formation, changing the flow pattern from radial to linear flow. The dynamic conductivity test was used for this research to evaluate the effect of closure stress, temperature, proppant concentration, and flow back rates on fracture...

  6. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudouy, B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  7. Impingement cooling and heat transfer measurement using transient liquid crystal technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yizhe

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer study on jet impingement cooling is presented. The study focuses on the effect of impingement jet flow rate, jet angle, and flow exit direction on various target surface heat transfer distributions. A two-channel test section...

  8. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  9. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  10. Test Two: The ‘Controlled Fire’ 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowlard, Adam; Steinhaus, Thomas; Abecassis Empis, Cecilia; Torero, Jose L

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of Test Two was to demonstrate the effectiveness of ventilation changes and smoke management on the growth of a compartment fire and to display the potential for these techniques to be incorporated ...

  11. Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jerry Don

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

  12. A constitutive law for dense granular flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Jop; Yoël Forterre; Olivier Pouliquen

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

  13. High Performance Computing linear algorithms for two-phase flow in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    High Performance Computing linear algorithms for two-phase flow in porous media Robert Eymard High Performance Computing techniques. This implies to handle the difficult problem of solving

  14. Freshwater Flow Charts - 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiper, G V

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the following: (1) Explanation of Charts Showing Freshwater Flow in 1995; (2) Estimated U.S. Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (3) Estimated California Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (4) Estimated New Mexico Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); and (5) Web locations and credits.

  15. Novel microsystem applications with new techniques in LTCC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Okandan, Murat; Rohde, Steven Barney; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wroblewski, Brian D.; Walker, Charles A.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) enables development and testing of critical elements on microsystem boards as well as nonmicroelectronic meso-scale applications. We describe silicon-based microelectromechanical systems packaging and LTCC meso-scale applications. Microfluidic interposers permit rapid testing of varied silicon designs. The application of LTCC to micro-high-performance liquid chromatography (?-HPLC) demonstrates performance advantages at very high pressures. At intermediate pressures, a ceramic thermal cell lyser has lysed bacteria spores without damaging the proteins. The stability and sensitivity of LTCC/chemiresistor smart channels are comparable to the performance of silicon-based chemiresistors. A variant of the use of sacrificial volume materials has created channels, suspended thick films, cavities, and techniques for pressure and flow sensing. We report on inductors, diaphragms, cantilevers, antennae, switch structures, and thermal sensors suspended in air. The development of 'functional-as-released' moving parts has resulted in wheels, impellers, tethered plates, and related new LTCC mechanical roles for actuation and sensing. High-temperature metal-to-LTCC joining has been developed with metal thin films for the strong, hermetic interfaces necessary for pins, leads, and tubes.

  16. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  17. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  18. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  19. Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machemehl, J. L.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sediment samples were siphoned from the flow with a stainless steel-pipette sediment sampler. Sediment concentrations were found with a filtering technique. Sediment samples were taken with and without rainfall to evaluate the relative effect...

  20. Numerical Study of Flow and Heat Transfer in Rotating Microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Pratanu

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer in rotating microchannels is important for centrifugal microfluidics, which has emerged as an advanced technique in biomedical applications and chemical separations. The centrifugal force...

  1. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The sep-aration control technique studied is called 'synthetic jet actuation'. The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous...

  2. Development of decontamination techniques for decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikura, T.; Miwa, T.; Onozawa, T.; Ohtsuka, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Plant and Components Dept.; Ishigure, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and System Science

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NUPEC has been developing various techniques to safely and efficiently decommission large commercial nuclear power plants. The development work, referred to as the verification tests, has been performed since 1982. The verification tests on decontamination techniques have focused on the reduction of both occupational radiation exposure and radioactive waste volume. Experiments on various decontamination methods have been carried out. Prospects of applying efficient decontamination techniques to commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning are bright due to the experimental results.

  3. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  4. Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qussai Marashdeh

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi-phase flow systems in high temperature and high pressure conditions, typical in many industrial applications.

  5. MATCHED-INDEX-OF-REFRACTION FLOW FACILITY FOR FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Donald M. McEligot; Richard Skifton; Hugh McIlroy

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant challenges face reactor designers with regard to thermal hydraulic design and associated modeling for advanced reactor concepts. Computational thermal hydraulic codes solve only a piece of the core. There is a need for a whole core dynamics system code with local resolution to investigate and understand flow behavior with all the relevant physics and thermo-mechanics. The matched index of refraction (MIR) flow facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a unique capability to contribute to the development of validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes through the use of state-of-the-art optical measurement techniques, such as Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). PIV is a non-intrusive velocity measurement technique that tracks flow by imaging the movement of small tracer particles within a fluid. At the heart of a PIV calculation is the cross correlation algorithm, which is used to estimate the displacement of particles in some small part of the image over the time span between two images. Generally, the displacement is indicated by the location of the largest peak. To quantify these measurements accurately, sophisticated processing algorithms correlate the locations of particles within the image to estimate the velocity (Ref. 1). Prior to use with reactor deign, the CFD codes have to be experimentally validated, which requires rigorous experimental measurements to produce high quality, multi-dimensional flow field data with error quantification methodologies. Computational thermal hydraulic codes solve only a piece of the core. There is a need for a whole core dynamics system code with local resolution to investigate and understand flow behavior with all the relevant physics and thermo-mechanics. Computational techniques with supporting test data may be needed to address the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant during the transition from turbulent to laminar flow, including the possibility of an early laminarization of the flow (Refs. 2 and 3) (laminarization is caused when the coolant velocity is theoretically in the turbulent regime, but the heat transfer properties are indicative of the coolant velocity being in the laminar regime). Such studies are complicated enough that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models may not converge to the same conclusion. Thus, experimentally scaled thermal hydraulic data with uncertainties should be developed to support modeling and simulation for verification and validation activities. The fluid/solid index of refraction matching technique allows optical access in and around geometries that would otherwise be impossible while the large test section of the INL system provides better spatial and temporal resolution than comparable facilities. Benchmark data for assessing computational fluid dynamics can be acquired for external flows, internal flows, and coupled internal/external flows for better understanding of physical phenomena of interest. The core objective of this study is to describe MIR and its capabilities, and mention current development areas for uncertainty quantification, mainly the uncertainty surface method and cross-correlation method. Using these methods, it is anticipated to establish a suitable approach to quantify PIV uncertainty for experiments performed in the MIR.

  6. Parametric testing and evaluation of a free-piston Stirling engine/linear compressor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, W.; Antoniak, Z.; Hogan, J.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3 Kw free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) driving a linear Rankine cycle vapor compressor has been under development by the Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute and General Electric Company as a heat activated heat pump (HAHP) for residential applications since 1976. This paper presents data obtained from recent testing on the FPSE/linear compressor unit. System performance and engine/compressor matching and control tests and analyses are presented and discussed. Engine component performance and loss test data are also presented. A description of the low-cost real-time digital data acquisition system is included. Engine/compressor test results show maximum engine power levels over 3 Kw, close to the design goal of 3.2 Kw. However, maximum efficiency is approximately 25 percent, 5 points below the design goal. The test results are used to construct maps of engine performance and compressor performance. These maps support the engine/compressor matching techniques. Confirmation of the control system features needed to provide matched engine/compressor operation is presented. Loss measurements under engine oscillating flow conditions show that quasi-steady models of oscillating flow substantially underestimate losses, and that various Stirling engine models predict significantly different component losses. Both performance and component loss test results are combined with simulation trends to identify design improvements to the current hardware and the projected performance increases.

  7. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Analysis and testing the performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis and testing the performance of a centrifugal two phase flow separator Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  8. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  9. Low differential pressure and multiphase flow measurements by means of differential pressure devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justo, Hernandez Ruiz,

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    performance in the gas mass flow rate estimation was exhibited by the slotted and standard plates for the air-water flow, while poor results were obtained for the air-oil and air-water oil flows. The performance of all the flow meter tested in the analysis...

  10. Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis* Department of Computer and then rendered using an unstructured volume rendering technique. Unless a detailed refinement of the flow volume-dimensional texture mapping and an interval volume segmentation coupled with a tetrahedron projection-based renderer

  11. A laser Doppler method for noninvasive measurement of flow velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, G.L.

    1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is a powerful optical technique for noninvasively obtaining experimental flow-velocity data. This paper describes the principle of operation and various optical configurations of the laser Doppler velocimeter. As a sample application, we describe an experimental apparatus for measuring the velocity flow field around a cylinder, and give our experimental results.

  12. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  13. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels.

  14. Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

    2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt chloride was developed for nondestructive determination of surface moisture content. Fundamental new understanding of drying characteristics in wood and fiber has been provided that can be used by researchers to improve drying of wood and fiber. The three techniques for measuring moisture content and gradients provided in this study are efficient, practical, and economical - easy to apply by industry and researchers. An energy consumption worksheet is provided as a first step toward reducing energy consumed during drying of lumber and strandboard flakes. However, it will need additional verification and testing.

  15. A consistent and conservative scheme for MHD flows with complex boundaries on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Ni, Ming-Jiu, E-mail: mjni@ucas.ac.cn

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical simulation of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows with complex boundaries has been a topic of great interest in the development of a fusion reactor blanket for the difficulty to accurately simulate the Hartmann layers and side layers along arbitrary geometries. An adaptive version of a consistent and conservative scheme has been developed for simulating the MHD flows. Besides, the present study forms the first attempt to apply the cut-cell approach for irregular wall-bounded MHD flows, which is more flexible and conveniently implemented under adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) technique. It employs a Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) approach to represent the fluid–conducting wall interface that makes it possible to solve the fluid–solid coupling magnetic problems, emphasizing at how electric field solver is implemented when conductivity is discontinuous in cut-cell. For the irregular cut-cells, the conservative interpolation technique is applied to calculate the Lorentz force at cell-center. On the other hand, it will be shown how consistent and conservative scheme is implemented on fine/coarse mesh boundaries when using AMR technique. Then, the applied numerical schemes are validated by five test simulations and excellent agreement was obtained for all the cases considered, simultaneously showed good consistency and conservative properties.

  16. Measurement of steam quality in two-phase critical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, John William

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow orifice meter 4 Vapor-phase orifice meter 5 Steam quality adjustment valves 6 Critical flow test section 12 13 15 17 7 Two-phase mixture vent to atmosphere passage through test section 8 Fluke data logger 9 Condenser apparatus 18 21...-water 15 Steam quality as a function of vapor-phase Reynolds number for critical flow of steam-water . . . . . . . . , . . . . 48 16 Steam quality as a function of pressure measured upstream from critical flow orifice 17 Steam quality as a function...

  17. Diesel Engine Idling Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

  18. Aqueous carrier waveguide in a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Engh, G. van den; Northrup, M.A.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquid of a flow cytometer itself acts as an optical waveguide, thus transmitting the light to an optical filter/detector combination. This alternative apparatus and method for detecting scattered light in a flow cytometer is provided by a device which views and detects the light trapped within the optical waveguide formed by the flow stream. A fiber optic or other light collecting device is positioned within the flow stream. This provides enormous advantages over the standard light collection technique which uses a microscope objective. The signal-to-noise ratio is greatly increased over that for right-angle-scattered light collected by a microscope objective, and the alignment requirements are simplified. 6 figs.

  19. Statistical Modeling of Photovoltaic Reliability Using Accelerated Degradation Techniques (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Jones, W.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a cutting-edge life-testing technique, accelerated degradation testing (ADT), for PV reliability testing. The ADT technique is a cost-effective and flexible reliability testing method with multiple (MADT) and Step-Stress (SSADT) variants. In an environment with limited resources, including equipment (chambers), test units, and testing time, these techniques can provide statistically rigorous prediction of lifetime and other interesting parameters, such as failure rate, warranty time, mean time to failure, degradation rate, activation energy, acceleration factor, and upper limit level of stress. J-V characterization can be used for degradation data and the generalized Eyring model can be used for the thermal-humidity stress condition. The SSADT model can be constructed based on the cumulative damage model (CEM), which assumes that the remaining test united are failed according to cumulative density function of current stress level regardless of the history on previous stress levels.

  20. Analysis of Injection-Backflow Tracer Tests in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocabas, I.; Horne, R.N.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer tests have been an important technique for determining the flow and reservoir characteristics in various rock matrix systems. While the interwell tracer tests are aimed at the characterization of the regions between the wells, single-well injection-backflow tracer tests may be useful tools of preliminary evaluation, before implementing long term interwell tracer tests. This work is concerned with the quantitative evaluation of the tracer return profiles obtained from single well injection-backflow tracer tests. First, two mathematical models of tracer transport through fractures, have been reviewed. These two models are based on two different principles: Taylor Dispersion along the fracture and simultaneous diffusion in and out of the adjacent matrix. Then the governing equations for the transport during the injection-backflow tests have been solved. Finally the results were applied to field data obtained from Raft River and East Mesa geothermal fields. In order to determine the values of the parameters of the models that define the transport mechanisms through fractures a non-linear optimization technique was employed. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Physical Model Development and Benchmarking for MHD Flows in Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakanth Munipalli; P.-Y.Huang; C.Chandler; C.Rowell; M.-J.Ni; N.Morley; S.Smolentsev; M.Abdou

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced simulation environment to model incompressible MHD flows relevant to blanket conditions in fusion reactors has been developed at HyPerComp in research collaboration with TEXCEL. The goals of this phase-II project are two-fold: The first is the incorporation of crucial physical phenomena such as induced magnetic field modeling, and extending the capabilities beyond fluid flow prediction to model heat transfer with natural convection and mass transfer including tritium transport and permeation. The second is the design of a sequence of benchmark tests to establish code competence for several classes of physical phenomena in isolation as well as in select (termed here as “canonical”,) combinations. No previous attempts to develop such a comprehensive MHD modeling capability exist in the literature, and this study represents essentially uncharted territory. During the course of this Phase-II project, a significant breakthrough was achieved in modeling liquid metal flows at high Hartmann numbers. We developed a unique mathematical technique to accurately compute the fluid flow in complex geometries at extremely high Hartmann numbers (10,000 and greater), thus extending the state of the art of liquid metal MHD modeling relevant to fusion reactors at the present time. These developments have been published in noted international journals. A sequence of theoretical and experimental results was used to verify and validate the results obtained. The code was applied to a complete DCLL module simulation study with promising results.

  2. Characterization techniques for surface-micromachined devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, N.F.; Irwin, L.; Tanner, D.M.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a microengine as the primary test vehicle, the authors have examined several aspects of characterization. Parametric measurements provide fabrication process information. Drive signal optimization is necessary for increased microengine performance. Finally, electrical characterization of resonant frequency and quality factor can be more accurate than visual techniques.

  3. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  4. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  5. Characterizing flow fluctuations with moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajeev S. Bhalerao; Jean-Yves Ollitrault; Subrata Pal

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a complete set of multiparticle correlation observables for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. These include moments of the distribution of the anisotropic flow in a single harmonic, and also mixed moments, which contain the information on correlations between event planes of different harmonics. We explain how all these moments can be measured using just two symmetric subevents separated by a rapidity gap. This presents a multi-pronged probe of the physics of flow fluctuations. For instance, it allows to test the hypothesis that event-plane correlations are generated by non-linear hydrodynamic response. We illustrate the method with simulations of events in A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT) model.

  6. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today.

  7. Direct measurement of isothermal flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and high strain rates with application to Ta and Ta-W alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.; Isaacs, J.B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is developed for measuring the flow stress of metals over a broad range of strains, strain rates, and temperatures, in uniaxial compression. It utilizes a recent, enhanced version of the classical (Kolsky) compression split Hopkinson bar, in which a sample is subjected to a single stress pulse of a predefined profile, and then recovered without being subjected to any other additional loading. For the present application, the UCSD`s split Hopkinson bar is further enhanced by the addition of a new mechanism by means of which the incident and transmission bars of the split Hopkinson construction are moved into a constant-temperature furnace containing the sample, and gently brought into contact with the sample, as the elastic stress pulse reaches and loads the sample. Using several samples of the same material and testing them at the same strain rate and temperature, but different incremental strains, an accurate estimate of the material`s isothermal flow stress can be obtained. Additionally, the modified Hopkinson technique allows the direct measurement of the change in the (high strain-rate) flow stress with a change of the strain rate, while the strain and temperature are kept constant, i.e., the strain rate can be increased or decreased during the high strain-rate test. The technique is applied to obtain both quasi-isothermal and adiabatic flow stresses of tantalum (Ta) and a tantalum-tungsten (Ta-W) alloy at elevated temperatures. These experimental results show the flow stress of these materials to be controlled by a simple long-range plastic-strain-dependent barrier, and a short-range thermally activated Peierls mechanism. For tantalum, a model which fits the experimental data over strains from a few to over 100%, strain rates from quasi-static to 40,000/s, and temperatures from {minus}200 to 1,000 C, is presented and discussed.

  8. Flight test techniques for aircraft parameter estimation in ground effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, James Matthew

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of attack CDU Variation of drag with airspeed CDq Variation of drag with pitch rate CDa Variation of drag with angle of attack /rad or /deg CDSe Variation of drag with elevator deflection /rad or /deg CL0 Lift coefficient at zero angle of attack CLU... Variation of lift with airspeed CL* Variation of lift with pitch rate CLa Variation of lift with angle of attack /rad or /deg CLSe Variation of lift with elevator deflection /rad or /deg Clp Variation of rolling moment with roll rate Clr Variation...

  9. Computer Techniques for Cogeneration Plant Design and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J. C.

    alternate ambient conditions, gas turbine part load operation, alternate gas turbine fuel, zero steam turbine production. The off-design run follows a calcula ion procedure similar to a design run. The first step is to calculate the GT performance... AND 259. DEGF -- - -- - ----- -- ----- -----.-- - -- -- ------ .---- - -- - --- - - ---- --- - ----~ -------------- ---- ------------- -- -- - GAS IURB INE LOAD 1 - 100.0 AM8. ORY BULB TEMP. OEGF - 66.0 PLANT HEAT 9ALANCE RELATIVE HUMIDITY 60...

  10. Category:Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.png

  11. In-service filter testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terada, K.; Woodard, R.W.; Jensen, R.T.

    1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the observations, test results, and conclusions of three separate in-service tests beginning in November 1979 and concluding in September 1983. The in-service tests described in this report produced encouraging results on filters constructed with fiberglass medium containing 5% Nomex and separators of aluminum foil coated with a thin film of vinyl-epoxy polymer. Filters containing medium with Kevlar fiber additives demonstrated they merited further evaluation. Other types of filters tested include separatorless filters (Flanders SuperFlow) and one filter with fiberglass separators. Asbestos-containing filters were used for comparison until their supply was exhausted. All filters tested were judged to have performed satisfactorily under the test conditions.

  12. Development of an equivalent homogenous fluid model for pseudo-two-phase (air plus water) flow through fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, J.; Indraratna, B. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Civil Engineering

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture flow of two-phase mixtures is particularly applicable to the coal mining and coal bed methane projects in Australia. A one-dimensional steady-state pseudo-two-phase flow model is proposed for fractured rock. The model considers free flow of a compressible mixture of air and water in an inclined planar fracture and is based upon the conservation of momentum and the 'cubic' law. The flow model is coupled to changes in the stress environment through the fracture normal stiffness, which is related to changes in fracture aperture. The model represents the individual air and water phases as a single equivalent homogenous fluid. Laboratory testing was performed using the two-phase high-pressure triaxial apparatus on 54 mm diameter (approximately 2: 1 height: diameter) borehole cores intersected by induced near-axial fractures. The samples were of Triassic arenaceous fine-medium grained sandstone (known as the Eckersley Formation) that is found locally in the Southern Coalfield of New South Wales. The sample fracture roughness was assessed using a technique based upon Fourier series analysis to objectively attribute a joint roughness coefficient. The proposed two-phase flow model was verified using the recorded laboratory data obtained over a range of triaxial confining pressures (i.e., fracture normal stresses).

  13. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Francesca S. (Livermore, CA); Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  15. Advanced Flow Diagnostics and Experimental Aerodynamics Laboratory Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    ) techniques: 2-D PIV, Stereoscopic PIV, Dual-plane Stereoscopic PIV. ­ Molecule-based flow diagnostic of complex thermal-flow phenomena: ­ Renewable Energy, wind energy, wind turbine aeromechanics. ­ Bio-flows and micro-scale heat transfer. ­ Icing physics, aircraft icing, power line icing and wind turbine icing

  16. Domain decomposition for coupled Stokes and Darcy flows q Danail Vassilev a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yotov, Ivan

    and fluid flow Stokes­Darcy flow Beavers­Joseph­Saffman condition Mixed finite element a b s t r a c t A non iteration. Finite element techniques appropriate for the type of each subdomain problem are used-overlapping domain decomposition method is presented to solve a coupled Stokes­ Darcy flow problem in parallel

  17. Gravity as Quantum Foam In-Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new information-theoretic Process Physics provides an explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. The older Newtonian and General Relativity theories for gravity are analysed. It is shown that Newtonian gravity may be written in the form of an in-flow. General Relativity is also analysed as an in-flow, for those cases where it has been tested. An analysis of various experimental data demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Jaseja et al, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The experimental data suggests that the in-flow is turbulent, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. A new in-flow theory of gravity is proposed which passes all the tests that General Relativity was claimed to have passed, but as well the new theory...

  18. Gravity as Quantum Foam In-Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new information-theoretic Process Physics provides an explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. The older Newtonian and General Relativity theories for gravity are analysed. It is shown that Newtonian gravity may be written in the form of an in-flow. General Relativity is also analysed as an in-flow, for those cases where it has been tested. An analysis of various experimental data demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Jaseja et al, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The experimental data suggests that the in-flow is turbulent, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. A new in-flow theory of gravity is proposed which passes all the tests that General Relativity was claimed to have passed, but as well the new theory suggests that the so-called spiral galaxy rotation-velocity anomaly may be explained without the need of `dark matter'. Various other gravitational anomalies also appear to be explainable. Newtonian gravity appears to be strictly valid only outside of spherically symmetric matter systems.

  19. Solar cycle variations of large scale flows in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we study the large-scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique. We use observations from four different times to study possible temporal variations in flow velocity. We find definite changes in both the zonal and meridional components of the flows. The amplitude of the zonal flow appears to increase with solar activity and the flow pattern also shifts towards lower latitude with time.

  20. Analysis of pressure drops under reversing flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krazinski, J.L.; Holtz, R.E.; Uherka, K.L.; Lottes, P.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines pressure-drop data from the Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The data comprise part of an initial series of measurements conducted with pressurized helium gas under reversing flow conditions. The characteristics of fluid pressure drops in compressible, reversing flows are discussed in the paper and compared with pressure-drop measurements for steady, incompressible flows. The methodology used to calculate instantaneous mass flows in the test section of the RFTF is summarized. The measured pressure drops are analyzed in terms of their frictional and inertial components. Pressure-drop data are presented for both tubes and wire mesh regenerators over a range of flow reversal frequencies. The results are discussed with reference to other experimental data and analytical models available in the literature. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Air flow characteristics of dry and liquid loaded packed and fluidized systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millsap, George Wayne

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acknowledgnent s List of Tables List of Figures Introduction Description of s Fluidised Bed Obgectives Application 1 2 3 Description of Apparatus Test Procedure Preparation of Bed Material Beds With Upward Flow of Air Beds With Upward Flow of Air... obgectives of thi ~ investigation were: (1) to deternine the air flow-pressure drop relationships in a dry bed of unifornly sised spherical particles in both the packed and fluidised regines of air flow; (3) to deternine under the sane air flow conditions...

  2. Three key elements necessary for successful testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time surface readout during data acquisition, downhole shutting, and appropriate pressure gauges are three key elements for successful well tests. These elements are often overlooked in designing and implementing a successful well test. This second in a series of three articles on well testing shows how these elements affected the testing of an example well. Also reviewed are the capabilities of several new testing tools and techniques.

  3. Autoignition in turbulent two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borghesi, Giulio

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and spatial evolution of the macroscopic properties of the flow. These equations will be given in Chapter 2 and are known as the Navier-Stokes equa- tions. Depending on the application considered, different numerical techniques for solving the Navier... clusters worldwide will lead to a relaxation of these constraints in the future: simulations of flows with values of Re up to O(103) are starting to become common, and, in recent years, a turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame with a jet Reynolds number of 11...

  4. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  5. Radioactive Testing Results in Support of the In-Tank Precipitation Facility - Filtrate Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents results investigating the decomposition of excess NaTPB in presence of filtrate from one of the Cycle I Demonstration tests, fulfilling a request by CST Engineering and the ITP Flow Sheet Team.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR MERIDIONAL FLOWS DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Antia, H. M., E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed available full-disk data from the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO using the 'ring diagram' technique to determine the behavior of solar meridional flows over solar cycle 23 in the outer 2% of the solar radius. We find that the dominant component of meridional flows during solar maximum was much lower than that during the minima at the beginning of cycles 23 and 24. There were differences in the flow velocities even between the two minima. The meridional flows show a migrating pattern with higher-velocity flows migrating toward the equator as activity increases. Additionally, we find that the migrating pattern of the meridional flow matches those of sunspot butterfly diagram and the zonal flows in the shallow layers. A high-latitude band in meridional flow appears around 2004, well before the current activity minimum. A Legendre polynomial decomposition of the meridional flows shows that the latitudinal pattern of the flow was also different during the maximum as compared to that during the two minima. The different components of the flow have different time dependences, and the dependence is different at different depths.

  7. Galaxy Redshifts: Improved Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens

    1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of random noise in determining errors and confidence levels for galaxy redshifts obtained by cross-correlation techniques. The main finding is that confidence levels have previously been overestimated, and errors inaccurately calculated in certain applications. New formul\\ae\\ are presented.

  8. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  9. GARDIENNAGE Help Desk technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    --> Relais vers Garde GTPW ASCENSEURS 1ère impulsion Dispatching UCL (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) Dispatching UCL --> SECURITAS LEW ALARMES CDC (Système EBI -Enterprise Building Integrator -Honeywell GTPW téléphonique ) TECHNIQUES CDC (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) GTPW (Heures ouvrables) CDC (En dehors des heures

  10. Heat transfer and pressure drop in tape generated swirl flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopina, Robert F.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water in tape generated swirl flow were investigated. The test sections were electrically heated small diameter nickel tubes with tight fitting full length Inconel ...

  11. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  12. Inertially-induced secondary flow in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Hamed; Di Carlo, Dino

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel technique to passively create strong secondary flows at moderate to high flow rates in microchannels, accurately control them and finally, due to their deterministic nature, program them into microfluidic platforms. Based on the flow conditions and due to the presence of the pillars in the channel, the flow streamlines will lose their fore-aft symmetry. As a result of this broken symmetry the fluid is pushed away from the pillar at the center of the channel (i.e. central z-plane). As the flow needs to maintain conservation of mass, the fluid will laterally travel in the opposite direction near the top and bottom walls. Therefore, a NET secondary flow will be created in the channel cross-section which is depicted in this video. The main platform is a simple straight channel with posts (i.e. cylindrical pillars - although other pillar cross-sections should also function) placed along the channel. Channel measures were 200 \\mum\\times50 \\mum, with pillars of 100 \\mum in diameter. Positioning the...

  13. Make the Grade General Test Taking Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Make the Grade General Test Taking Tips Adapted from: The Academic Skills Center At California Polytechnic State University Tips Before, During, and After the Test Here are some tips you can implement to help you through tests. Try implementing these techniques to make the grade! Before Start to prepare

  14. Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

  15. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  16. Life extension of structural components via an improved nondestructive testing methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohmann, Brian P. (Brian Patrick)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to determine the flaw detection sensitivity of advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques with respect to structural applications. The techniques analyzed exemplify the incorporation ...

  17. Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt ISSE Department, 4A4@cs.hiroshima­cu.ac.jp Abstract Software testing can only be formalized and quantified when a solid basis for test generation can be defined. Tests are commonly generated from the source code, control flow graphs, design representations

  18. Fractured reservoir evaluation using Monte Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, G.F.; Phillips, N.V.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pro forma cash-flow analysis of petroleum ventures usually is considered as a deterministic model. In the last 10 years, Monte Carlo analysis has allowed the introduction of probability distributions of input variables in place of single-valued functions. Reserve determination and rate scheduling in these current Monte Carlo techniques have relied on the volumetric formula, which works well in nonfractured reservoirs. Recent massive drilling in fractured reservoirs has rendered this approach unusable. This paper develops a variation of the Arps rate-cumulative equation as a basic model for the determination of the distribution of original reserves and the decline rates. Continuation of the Monte Carlo technique into net present value analysis and internal rate of return (IRR) is also developed.

  19. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

  20. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  1. Solution Techniques for Single-Phase Subchannel Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansel, Joshua Edmund

    2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    several techniques were tested to minimize the time spent on this task, such as finite difference and the formation of an approximate Jacobian. Simple Jacobian lagging was shown to be very effective at reducing the total time computing the Jacobian...

  2. Study of microfluidic measurement techniques using novel optical imaging diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaesung

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    is applied for a 3-D vector field mapping in a microscopic flow and a Brownian motion tracking of nanoparticles. This technique modifies OSSM system for a micro-fluidic experiment, and the imaging system captures a diffracted particle image having numerous...

  3. Polycarbonate filter technique for collection of sorted cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folstad, L.; Look, M.; Pallavicini, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the application of polycarbonate filters to the collection of cells sorted by flow cytometry. Cells are sorted directly onto polycarbonate filters and transferred to microscope slides which are then processed to dissolve the filter and remove pore outlines. The technique results in cell preparations which retain cellular morphology and have highcell recovery of 82 to 100%.

  4. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  5. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  6. Insights Gained from Testing Alternate Cell Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. K. Housley; M. S. Sohal; D. G. Milobar; Thomas Cable

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, initially developed by the Forschungszentrum Jülich and now manufactured by the French ceramics firm St. Gobain. These cells have an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. They were initially developed as fuel cells, but are being tested as electrolytic cells in the INL test stands. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 µm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 µm thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed another fuel cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. The NASA cell is structurally symmetrical, with both electrodes supporting the thin electrolyte and containing micro-channels for gas diffusion. This configuration is called a bi-electrode supported cell or BSC. The electrodes are made by freeze-casting, a modified tape casting technique which creates the many micro-channels in the YSZ electrode green tape. This report presents results of the INL’s testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  7. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  8. Phase-space representation of digital holographic and light field imaging with application to two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, two computational imaging techniques used for underwater research, in particular, two-phase flows measurements, are presented. The techniques under study, digital holographic imaging and light field imaging, ...

  9. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6974 Rev. e. ' A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTHFig. L r2 r2 Solar test collector flow chart. Type Slope (-2. ai ei ai/ei SOlar test collector in operation, side view.

  10. Multiscale Simulation and Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Richards' Equation in Heterogeneous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Seul Ki

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we develop multiscale finite element methods and uncertainty quantification technique for Richards' equation, a mathematical model to describe fluid flow in unsaturated porous media. Both coarse-level and fine-level numerical...

  11. Quantitative Verification: Models, Techniques and Tools Marta Kwiatkowska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    verification is an analogous technique for establishing quantitative properties of a system modelQuantitative Verification: Models, Techniques and Tools Marta Kwiatkowska Oxford University of the state-transition graph of the model and is therefore more powerful than test- ing. Quantitative

  12. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  13. Innovative Technologies and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samano, R.; Swinford, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2014 Innovative Technologies and Techniques ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 What’s New in Energy Efficient Cooling Systems? ? Director of Energy Management ? Moving Away From... Refrigerants ? LEED ? Reducing the Carbon Footprint ? Improving Indoor Air Quality - IAQ ? High Efficiency Fans and Motors ? Economizers ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Outside Air Management Experts...

  14. UPPAAL TutorialUPPAAL TutorialUPPAAL Tutorial CoVerCoVer TestTest--Case Selection andCase Selection and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    Pettersson RTSS'05 Testing Primary validation technique used in industry Part of system development life-cycle

  15. Power: The New Dimension of Test Patrick GIRARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Power: The New Dimension of Test Patrick GIRARD WRTLT 2008WRTLT 2008 ­­ SapporoSapporo -- Japan;2 1. Relevance of power during test 2. Main test power issues 3. Reducing test power by dedicated techniques 4. Low Power Design and its implications on test 5. One step to the future Outline lirmm-00820640

  16. Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Tim

    1 Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites Shifa-e-Zehra Haidry, Australia. 3 Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases software delivery. Many existing test case prioritisation techniques consider that tests can be run in any

  17. Mechanical analysis of a cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Attaar, M.H.; McNerney, K.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material properties have also been generated at the Argonne National Laboratories which detail the fracture toughness, Weibull modulus, and critical flaw size for a specifically fabricated lot of P-100A alumina/mullite cross flow filters.(Singh, 1990) The critical flaw size within the P-100A matrix was estimated to be {approximately}500 {mu},m which includes both large interconnected pores, as well as potentially debonded areas along the mid-rib or gas channel seams. Critical flaws are generally considered as potential failure initiation sites within the ceramic matrix. In addition maximum filter element stress levels induced by the process system have been estimated at ANL through the use of finite element computer analyses. These efforts project that the highest stresses result within the flange region of the cross flow filter. As a result of these projections, efforts at Coors Ceramics were directed to improving the overall strength of the alumina/mullite material which is used for cross flow filter fabrication. The results of the efforts at Coors Ceramics provide a significant improvement in the hot strength of the P-100A alumina/mullite filter matrix. Westinghouse assessed the existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques in terms of identifying methods for detecting critical flaws within the cross flow filter body. To date viable, cost effective methods for detecting critical flaws within the P-100A alumina/mullite matrix, or along the mid-rib bonds or gas channel seams in the full-scale, porous ceramic cross flow filter element are not readily available. As an alternate approach, Westinghouse focused its attention on developing NDE techniques as inspection methods for evaluating the extent of bonding along the mid-rib bonds and gas channel seams which results during the various fabrication stages of the cross flow filter element.

  18. Mechanical analysis of a cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Attaar, M.H.; McNerney, K.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material properties have also been generated at the Argonne National Laboratories which detail the fracture toughness, Weibull modulus, and critical flaw size for a specifically fabricated lot of P-100A alumina/mullite cross flow filters.(Singh, 1990) The critical flaw size within the P-100A matrix was estimated to be [approximately]500 [mu],m which includes both large interconnected pores, as well as potentially debonded areas along the mid-rib or gas channel seams. Critical flaws are generally considered as potential failure initiation sites within the ceramic matrix. In addition maximum filter element stress levels induced by the process system have been estimated at ANL through the use of finite element computer analyses. These efforts project that the highest stresses result within the flange region of the cross flow filter. As a result of these projections, efforts at Coors Ceramics were directed to improving the overall strength of the alumina/mullite material which is used for cross flow filter fabrication. The results of the efforts at Coors Ceramics provide a significant improvement in the hot strength of the P-100A alumina/mullite filter matrix. Westinghouse assessed the existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques in terms of identifying methods for detecting critical flaws within the cross flow filter body. To date viable, cost effective methods for detecting critical flaws within the P-100A alumina/mullite matrix, or along the mid-rib bonds or gas channel seams in the full-scale, porous ceramic cross flow filter element are not readily available. As an alternate approach, Westinghouse focused its attention on developing NDE techniques as inspection methods for evaluating the extent of bonding along the mid-rib bonds and gas channel seams which results during the various fabrication stages of the cross flow filter element.

  19. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  20. Jet finding techniques at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet finding techniques at hadron colliders, including pile-up removal tricks, jet deconstruction, etc

  1. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    11 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 1 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2 #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 3July 29, 2013 Data Mining

  2. Microelectromechanical flow control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat (NE Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) flow control apparatus is disclosed which includes a fluid channel formed on a substrate from a first layer of a nonconducting material (e.g. silicon nitride). A first electrode is provided on the first layer of the nonconducting material outside the flow channel; and a second electrode is located on a second layer of the nonconducting material above the first layer. A voltage applied between the first and second electrodes deforms the fluid channel to increase its cross-sectional size and thereby increase a flow of a fluid through the channel. In certain embodiments of the present invention, the fluid flow can be decreased or stopped by applying a voltage between the first electrode and the substrate. A peristaltic pumping of the fluid through the channel is also possible when the voltage is applied in turn between a plurality of first electrodes and the substrate. A MEM flow control assembly can also be formed by providing one or more MEM flow control devices on a common substrate together with a submicron filter. The MEM flow control assembly can optionally include a plurality of pressure sensors for monitoring fluid pressure and determining flow rates through the assembly.

  3. Flow conditions of fresh mortar and concrete in different pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.jacobsen@ntnu.n [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway); Haugan, Lars; Hammer, Tor Arne [SINTEF Byggforsk AS Building and Infrastructure, Trondheim (Norway); Kalogiannidis, Evangelos [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in fresh concrete flow rate over the pipe cross section was investigated on differently coloured and highly flowable concrete mixes flowing through pipes of different materials (rubber, steel, acryl). First, uncoloured (gray) concrete was poured through the pipe and the pipe blocked. Similar but coloured (black) concrete was then poured into the pipe filled with gray concrete, flowing after the gray concrete for a while before being blocked and hardened. The advance of the colouring along the pipe wall (showing boundary flow rate) was observed on the moulded concrete surface appearing after removing the pipe from the hardened concrete. The shapes of the interfaces between uncoloured and coloured concrete (showing variation of flow rate over the pipe cross section) were observed on sawn surfaces of concrete half cylinders cut along the length axes of the concrete-filled pipe. Flow profiles over the pipe cross section were clearly seen with maximum flow rates near the centre of the pipe and low flow rate at the pipe wall (typically rubber pipe with reference concrete without silica fume and/or stabilizers). More plug-shaped profiles, with long slip layers and less variation of flow rate over the cross section, were also seen (typically in smooth acrylic pipes). Flow rate, amount of concrete sticking to the wall after flow and SEM-images of pipe surface roughness were observed, illustrating the problem of testing full scale pumping.

  4. Test Programming by Program Composition and Symbolic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Mark H.

    Classical test generation techniques rely on search through gate-level circuit descriptions, which results in long runtimes. In some instances, classical techniques cannot be used because they would take longer than the ...

  5. Test plan for performance testing of the Eaton AC-3 electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumley, R.L.; Heiselmann, H.W.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternating current (ac) propulsion system for an electric vehicle has been developed and tested by the Eaton Corporation. The test bed vehicle is a modified 1981 Mercury Lynx. The test plan has been prepared specifically for the third modification to this test bed and identified as the Eaton AC-3. The scope of the EG and G testing at INEL to be done on the Eaton AC-3 will include coastdown and dynamometer tests but will not include environmental, on-road, or track testing. Coastdown testing will be performed in accordance with SAE J-1263 (SAE Recommended Practice for Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques).

  6. Negative magnetic eddy diffusivities from test-field method and multiscale stability theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Andrievsky; Axel Brandenburg; Alain Noullez; Vladislav Zheligovsky

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an alpha-effect is investigated by following two different approaches, namely the test-field method and multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenisation technique. We show analytically that the former, applied for the evaluation of magnetic eddy diffusivities, yields results that fully agree with the latter. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor for the specific instances of the parity-invariant flow-IV of G.O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow in a suitable range of parameter values confirm the findings of previous studies, and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between magnetic eddy diffusivity tensors that arise for opposite small-scale flows v(x) and -v(x).

  7. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  8. Flow of suspensions in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Laboratory R& D Center, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slurry pipelines are used in many industrial applications. Several parameters are often needed by the operator, including critical deposit velocity, solids concentration, and particle velocity profiles. This chapter first reviews important formulas used to predict critical deposit velocity both in Newtonian and non-Newtonian (power-law) carrier fluids. Various methods to measure local velocity and solids concentration profiles in slurry pipelines are discussed. Local solids concentration can be measured by sample withdrawal technique. However, the sample should be withdrawn at isokinetic conditions. Sampling downstream of tees and elbows can result in significant errors in measuring solids concentration. Gamma-ray absorption methods can be used; however, two scans are needed to obtain local solids concentration. Bulk velocity of conductive slurries can be obtained using magnetic flow meters mounted on a vertical section of the pipe. Local particle velocity can be obtained using conductivity probes. NMR methods can be used to measure concentration and particle velocity profiles but are limited to small-diameter pipes. Vertical solids concentration of coarse slurries flowing in a horizontal pipeline exhibits a positive gradient near the bottom of the pipe. Traditional models to predict these profiles are given, and new mathematical models and computer software to determine these profiles are introduced. 104 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  10. Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

  11. Hot One-Temperature Accretion Flows Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng Yuan; Ronald E. Taam; Yongquan Xue; Wei Cui

    2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of the thermal coupling of ions and electrons in the context of optically thin, hot accretion flows is investigated. In the limit of complete coupling, we focus on the one-temperature accretion flows. Based on a global analysis, the results are compared with two-temperature accretion flow models and with the observations of black hole sources. Many features are quite similar. That is, hot one-temperature solutions are found to exist for mass flow rates less than a critical value; i.e., $\\dot{M}\\la 10\\alpha^2\\dot{M}_{\\rm Edd}$, where $\\dot{M}_{\\rm Edd}= L_{\\rm Edd}/c^2$ is the Eddington accretion rate. At low mass flow rates, $\\dot{M}\\la 10^{-3}\\alpha^2 \\dot{M}_{\\rm Edd}$, the solution is in the advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) regime. But at higher rates, radiative cooling is effective and is mainly balanced by advective {\\em heating}, placing the solution in the regime of luminous hot accretion flow (LHAF). To test the viability of the one-temperature models, we have fitted the spectra of the two black hole sources, Sgr A* and XTE J1118+480, which have been examined successfully with two-temperature models. It is found that the one-temperature models do not provide acceptable fits to the multi-wavelength spectra of Sgr A* nor to XTE J1118+480 as a result of the higher temperatures characteristic of the one-temperature models. It is concluded that the thermal coupling of ions and electrons cannot be fully effective and that a two-temperature description is required in hot accretion flow solutions.

  12. Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

  13. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cem Sarica; Holden Zhang

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The developments of oil and gas fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) will become more common in the future. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas, oil and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. Recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications, including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is crucial for any multiphase separation technique, either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole, to know inlet conditions such as flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. Therefore, the development of a new generation of multiphase flow predictive tools is needed. The overall objective of the proposed study is to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). In the current multiphase modeling approach, flow pattern and flow behavior (pressure gradient and phase fractions) prediction modeling are separated. Thus, different models based on different physics are employed, causing inaccuracies and discontinuities. Moreover, oil and water are treated as a pseudo single phase, ignoring the distinct characteristics of both oil and water, and often resulting in inaccurate design that leads to operational problems. In this study, a new model is being developed through a theoretical and experimental study employing a revolutionary approach. The basic continuity and momentum equations is established for each phase, and used for both flow pattern and flow behavior predictions. The required closure relationships are being developed, and will be verified with experimental results. Gas-oil-water experimental studies are currently underway for the horizontal pipes. Industry-driven consortia provide a cost-efficient vehicle for developing, transferring, and deploying new technologies into the private sector. The Tulsa University Fluid Flow Projects (TUFFP) is one of the earliest cooperative industry-university research consortia. TUFFP's mission is to conduct basic and applied multiphase flow research addressing the current and future needs of hydrocarbon production and transportation. TUFFP participants and The University of Tulsa are supporting this study through 55% cost sharing.

  14. Analytical Models for Flowing-Fluid Temperature Distribution in Single-Phase Oil Reservoirs Accounting for Joule-Thomson Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevarunotai, Natasha

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    calculation. Findings from the sensitivity analysis allow us to make a decision whether or not to acquire more data or to perform additional tests for a more reasonable outcome- the flowing-fluid temperature in the reservoir. Bottomhole flowing...

  15. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  16. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  17. Blood flow measurement and slow flow detection in retinal vessels with Joint Spectral and Time domain method in ultrahigh speed OCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorczynska, I.

    We present an application of the Joint Spectral and Time domain OCT (STdOCT) method for detection of wide range of flows in the retinal vessels. We utilized spectral/Fourier domain OCT (SOCT) technique for development of ...

  18. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  19. A Clustering-Based Semi Automated Technique to Build Cultural Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Ramesh; Pepe, Alberto; Rodriguez, Marko A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wong, M. A. (1979). A K-means clustering algorithm. Appliedagglomerative) and K-means clustering (partitioning). Ourclustering techniques. Besides K-means and Ward's, we tested

  20. Field analytical techniques for mercury in soils technology evaluation. Topical report, November 1994--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solc, J.; Harju, J.A.; Grisanti, A.A.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the evaluation of the four field analytical techniques for mercury detection in soils, namely (1) an anodic stripping voltametry technique (ASV) developed and tested by General Electric Corporation; (2) a static headspace analysis (SHSA) technique developed and tested by Dr. Ralph Turner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (3) the BiMelyze{reg_sign} Mercury Immunoassay (Bio) developed and tested by BioNebraska, Inc.; and (4) a transportable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument/technique developed and tested by Spectrace, Inc.

  1. acid amplification tests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colford, John M Jr; Riley, Lee W 2005-01-01 3 Adaptive Flutter Test Vane: Low Net Passive Stiffness (LNPS) Techniques for Deflection Amplification of Piezoelectric...

  2. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1999 - 1999 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A second...

  3. Development of a technique for ex-reactor heating of electrodes and for obtaining voltage-current characteristics of multi-cell thermionic fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalandarishvili, A.G.; Mailov, G.M.; Igumnov, B.N.; Bisko, V.A. [I.N. Vekua Sukhumi Inst. for Physics and Engineering, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of development of a technique for ex-reactor heating with simultaneous recording of voltage-current characteristics of multi-cell thermionic fuel elements (TFE). Heating pulses were applied to electrodes of a thermionic energy converter (TIC), and between these pulses in the antiphase to them there were applied shorter pulses. The TIC emitter was heated by energy of an electric current flowing from the collector (back current heating). Comparison of TIC voltage-current characteristics, obtained for direct (using electric heater) and back current (current from the collector) heating, shows that for the same conditions they differ only slightly. Significant difference may be observed in the case of different profiles along the collector working surface. Results are given of the investigation of multi-cell thermionic fuel assemblies conducted using this technique. The developed technique of the TFE diagnostics can be successfully employed to assess the device quality. Pre-loop testing of multi-cell TFE by the method of back currents allows for cost effective and expeditious thermovacuum treatment of the TFE on thermal stands and for checking of its serviceability prior to its mounting into an irradiation loop or reactor-converter, enables improvements to the TFE design, monitoring of its electric parameters, for example, after vibration testing, and TFE accelerated testing in the most arduous conditions (thermocycling, loss of vacuum, etc.).

  4. Computer-aided analysis of formation pressure integrity tests used in oil well drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, M.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the development of a computer simulation model for leak-off tests has been accomplished. This model is more realistic than the one currently used, but is sufficiently simple that it can be applied with data normally available during leak-off test operations in the field. The model includes the many factors that affect pressure behavior during the test, and can predict with reasonable accuracy what the pressure curve will look like. In addition, test interpretation using the computer model is easily achieved using a curve matching technique. The first step toward the development of the computer model was to subdivide the leak-off test into four phases: (1) pressure increase due to overall compressibility of the system, (2) fracture initiation, (3) fracture expansion, and (4) pressure decline and fracture closure after the pump is shut-in. The second step was the development of mathematical models for each phase separately. The mathematical model that predicts pressure increase before fracture initiation includes the most important variables affecting overall compressibility of the system. The modeling of fracture initiation is based on the classical elasticity theory. The modeling of fracture expansion and closure is based on the solution of the continuity equation for flow into a vertical-elliptical fracture with constant height. A computer program that predicts the pressure behavior during the leak-off test was written. This computer model was then verified using field data furnished by Tenneco Oil Company.

  5. Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberlein, Susan J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Danny L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Tabor, Cynthia L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Holm, Melissa J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the above ground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms.

  6. Proc. IEEE PowerTech, Bucharest, June 2009. 1 Abstract-Power flow studies are typically used to determine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Proc. IEEE PowerTech, Bucharest, June 2009. 1 Abstract-Power flow studies are typically used on the use of optimization techniques and worst-case scenario analysis. The application of these techniques assessment), thus allowing to evaluate the level of confidence of power flow studies. These algorithms should

  7. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  8. SHINE Vacuum Pump Test Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Gregg A; Peters, Brent

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Normetex pumps used world-wide for tritium service are no longer available. DOE and other researchers worldwide have spent significant funds characterizing this pump. Identification of alternate pumps is required for performance and compatibility with tritium gas. Many of the pumps that could be used to meet the functional performance requirements (e.g. pressure and flow conditions) of the Normetex pump have features that include the use of polymers or oils and greases that are not directly compatible with tritium service. This study assembles a test system to determine the flow characteristics for candidate alternate pumps. These tests are critical to the movement of tritium through the SHINE Tritium Purification System (TPS). The purpose of the pump testing is two-fold: (1) obtain baseline vacuum pump characteristics for an alternate (i.e. ''Normetex replacement'') pump intended for use in tritium service; and (2) verify that low pressure hydrogen gas can be transported over distances up to 300 feet by the candidate pumps. Flow rates and nominal system pressures have been identified for the SHINE Mo-99 production process Tritium Purification System (TPS). To minimize the line sizes for the transfer of low pressure tritium from the Neutron Driver Accelerator System (NDAS) to the primary processing systems in the TPS, a ''booster'' pump has been located near the accelerator in the design. A series of pump tests were performed at various configurations using hydrogen gas (no tritium) to ensure that this concept is practical and maintains adequate flow rates and required pressures. This report summarizes the results of the tests that have been performed using various pump configurations. The current design of the Tritium Purification System requires the ''booster'' pump to discharge to or to be backed by another vacuum pump. Since Normetex pumps are no longer manufactured, a commercially available Edwards scroll pump will be used to back the booster pump. In this case the ''booster pump'' is an Adixen Molecular Drag Pump (MDP 5011) and the backing pump is an Edwards (nXDS15iC) scroll pump. Various configurations of the two pumps and associated lengths of 3/4 inch tubing (0 feet to 300 feet) were used in combination with hydrogen and nitrogen flow rates ranging from 25-400 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) to determine whether the proposed pump configuration meets the design criteria for SHINE. The results of this study indicate that even under the most severe conditions (300 feet of tubing and 400 sccm flow rate) the Adixen 5011 MDP can serve as a booster pump to transport gases from the accelerator (NDAS) to the TPS. The Target Gas Receiving System pump (Edwards nXDS15iC) located approximately 300 feet from the accelerator can effectively back the Adixen MDP. The molecular drag pump was able to maintain its full rotational speed even when the flow rate was 400 sccm hydrogen or nitrogen and 300 feet of tubing was installed between the drag pump and the Edwards scroll pump. In addition to maintaining adequate rotation, the pressure in the system was maintained below the target pressure of 30 torr for all flow rates, lengths of tubing, and process gases. This configuration is therefore adequate to meet the SHINE design requirements in terms of flow and pressure.

  9. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  10. Optical flow switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Vincent W. S.

    Present-day networks are being challenged by dramatic increases in bandwidth demand of emerging applications. We will explore a new transport, ldquooptical flow switchingrdquo, that will enable significant growth and ...

  11. Olefin Autoxidation in Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuenschwander, Ulrich

    Handling hazardous multiphase reactions in flow brings not only safety advantages but also significantly improved performance, due to better mass transfer characteristics. In this paper, we present a continuous microreactor ...

  12. Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams, and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portante, E.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how an electric utility system is modeled by using load flow techniques to establish a validated power flow case suitable for simulating and evaluating alternative system scenarios. Details of the load flow model are supported by additional technical and descriptive information intended to correlate modeled electrical system parameters with the corresponding physical equipment that makes up the system. Pictures and technical specifications of system equipment from the utility, public, or vendor are provided to support this association for many system components. The report summarizes the load flow model construction, simulation, and validation and describes the general capabilities of an information query system designed to access load flow parameters and other electrical system information.

  13. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  14. Effective software testing with a string-constraint solver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kie?un, Adam

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents techniques and tools for improving software reliability, by using an expressive string-constraint solver to make implementation-based testing more effective and more applicable. Concolic testing ...

  15. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturi, Daniele, E-mail: daniele-venturi@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)] [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  16. TESTING OF AIR-FLOW WINDOWS FOR EVALUATION AND APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehm, R.F.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRESSURE: TAPS RETURN** REFERENCE** Return-Air ConditioningMakeup-Air Conditioning Energy a.Through Glass Return-Air Conditioning Energy Makeuo-Air

  17. KJRR-FAI Hydraulic Flow Testing Input Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; D.B. Chapman

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL, in cooperation with the KAERI via Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA), undertook an effort in the latter half of calendar year 2013 to produce a conceptual design for the KJRR-FAI campaign. The outcomes of this effort are documented in further detail elsewhere [5]. The KJRR-FAI was designed to be cooled by the ATR’s Primary Coolant System (PCS) with no provision for in-pile measurement or control of the hydraulic conditions in the irradiation assembly. The irradiation assembly was designed to achieve the target hydraulic conditions via engineered hydraulic losses in a throttling orifice at the outlet of the irradiation vehicle.

  18. Flow Test At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro Inc Iosil EnergyFlorin, California:

  19. Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro Inc Iosil EnergyFlorin, California:|

  20. Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro Inc IosilEnergyEnergyOpen Energy

  1. Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information

  2. Underground Flow Measurement and Particle Release Test | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-India Energy Dialogue: CoalBiofuelsUncle Sam

  3. Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area (UGTA) Flow and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y ear R enewable E nergyEnergyNeed fortoStreams

  4. Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,andJumpInformationBlack WarriorColrado

  5. Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProject Project Location InformationSix

  6. NedWind 25 Blade Testing at NREL for the European Standards Measurement and Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larwood, S.; Musial, W.; Freebury, G.; Beattie, A.G.

    2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the mid-90s the European community initiated the Standards, Measurements, and Testing (SMT) program to harmonize testing and measurement procedures in several industries. Within the program, a project was carried out called the European Wind Turbine Testing Procedure Development. The second part of that project, called Blade Test Methods and Techniques, included the United States and was devised to help blade-testing laboratories harmonize their testing methods. This report provides the results of those tests conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  7. Section 13: Flow control 1 Section 13: Flow control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    Geometries for Energyefficient Flow Around Bodies Abstract 14:30 ­ 14:50: Elfriede Friedmann (Universität

  8. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is a pressurized heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor that began operation at 40 MW. The reactor was subsequently upgraded to 60 MW and operated at that level for several years. The reactor undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Questions which were raised about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal transition led to a reactor shutdown and subsequent resumption of operation at a reduced power of 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these questions is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW. Direct use of the experimental results and an understanding of the governing phenomenology supports this conclusion.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Steve

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bauer, Steve

    this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

  11. Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry using energy flow method Azimuthal angle distribution at Q2 >100 GeV2 Energy flow method.Ukleja on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration #12; Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I

  12. Flow Battery System Design for Manufacturability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Tracy Louise; Meacham, Paul Gregory; Perry, David; Broyles, Robin S.; Hickey, Steven; Hernandez, Jacquelynne

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow battery energy storage systems can support renewable energy generation and increase energy efficiency. But, presently, the costs of flow battery energy storage systems can be a significant barrier for large-scale market penetration. For cost- effective systems to be produced, it is critical to optimize the selection of materials and components simultaneously with the adherence to requirements and manufacturing processes to allow these batteries and their manufacturers to succeed in the market by reducing costs to consumers. This report analyzes performance, safety, and testing requirements derived from applicable regulations as well as commercial and military standards that would apply to a flow battery energy storage system. System components of a zinc-bromine flow battery energy storage system, including the batteries, inverters, and control and monitoring system, are discussed relative to manufacturing. The issues addressed include costs and component availability and lead times. A service and support model including setup, maintenance and transportation is outlined, along with a description of the safety-related features of the example flow battery energy storage system to promote regulatory and environmental, safety, and health compliance in anticipation of scale manufacturing.

  13. Assembly flow simulation of a radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherford, W.C.; Biggs, P.M.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete event simulation model has been developed to predict the assembly flow time of a new radar product. The simulation was the key tool employed to identify flow constraints. The radar, production facility, and equipment complement were designed, arranged, and selected to provide the most manufacturable assembly possible. A goal was to reduce the assembly and testing cycle time from twenty-six weeks to six weeks. A computer software simulation package (SLAM II) was utilized as the foundation a for simulating the assembly flow time. FORTRAN subroutines were incorporated into the software to deal with unique flow circumstances that were not accommodated by the software. Detailed information relating to the assembly operations was provided by a team selected from the engineering, manufacturing management, inspection, and production assembly staff. The simulation verified that it would be possible to achieve the cycle time goal of six weeks. Equipment and manpower constraints were identified during the simulation process and adjusted as required to achieve the flow with a given monthly production requirement. The simulation is being maintained as a planning tool to be used to identify constraints in the event that monthly output is increased. ``What-if`` studies have been conducted to identify the cost of reducing constraints caused by increases in output requirement.

  14. Radio frequency (RF) heated supersonic flow laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wantuck, P.; Watanabe, H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique supersonic flow apparatus which employs an inductively-coupled, radio frequency (RF) torch to supply high enthalpy source gas to the nozzle inlet is described. The main features of this system are the plasma tube, a cooled nozzle assembly, and a combustion/expansion chamber with a heat exchanger. A description of these components with current test data is presented. In addition, a discussion of anticipated experiments utilizing this system is included.

  15. Flow control via synthetic jet actuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Adam Cole

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    that downsteam of the flap two counter rotating vortices formed. These vortices are non-stationary and equated to a von Karman vortex street. Fig. 1.3 Typical Gurney Flap Installation. Gurney flap 8 One of the advantages... characteristics was achieved by influencing the amount of the separated flowfield region. The effects of the dynamic stall vortex were investigated with wind tunnel testing during the pitching motion of an airfoil to determine how the flow reacts dynamically...

  16. Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

  17. Hydrogeologic investigations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkins, W L [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Trudeau, D A [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Drellack, S L [Raytheon Services Nevada, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)] [Raytheon Services Nevada, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices and, since 1963, all nuclear detonations there have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts with a small percentage conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks or alluvium. In the testing areas the water table is 450--700 m below the surface. Pre- and post- event geologic investigations are conducted for each test location and long-term studies assess the impact of underground testing on a more regional scale. Studies in progress have not identified any impact on the regional ground water system from testing, but some local effects have been recognized. In some areas where several large tests have been conducted below the water table, water levels hundreds of meters above the regional water table have been measured and radioactivity has been discovered associated with fractures in a few holes. Flow-through and straddle packer testing has revealed unexpectedly high hydraulic pressures at depth. Recently, a multiple completion monitoring well installed to study three zones has confirmed the existence of a significant upward hydraulic gradient. These observations of local pressurization and fracture flow are being further explored to determine the influence of underground nuclear testing on the regional hydrogeologic system.

  18. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  19. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  20. Murphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memon, Atif M.

    --graphical user interface; GUI test automation; model extraction; reverse engineering; industrial test environment is a technique for using models as a basis for automated test generation. The industrial adoption of MBTMurphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing Pekka Aho VTT

  1. Techniques and methods in nuclear materials traceability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonproliferation community is currently addressing concerns that the access to special nuclear materials may increase the illicit trafficking in weapons-usable materials from civil and/or weapons material stores and/or fuel cycles systems. Illicit nuclear traffic usually involves reduced quantities of nuclear materials perhaps as samplings of a potential protracted diversionary flow from sources to users. To counter illicit nuclear transactions requires the development of techniques and methods in nuclear material traceability as an important phase of a broad forensic analysis capability. This report discusses how isotopic signatures and correlation methods were applied to determine the origins of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium samples reported as illicit trafficking in nuclear materials.

  2. Accelerated boundary integral method for multiphase flow in non-periodic geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Kumar; Michael D. Graham

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerated boundary integral method for Stokes flow of a suspension of deformable particles is presented for an arbitrary domain and implemented for the important case of a planar slit geometry. The computational complexity of the algorithm scales as O(N) or $O(N\\log N$), where $N$ is proportional to the product of number of particles and the number of elements employed to discretize the particle. This technique is enabled by the use of an alternative boundary integral formulation in which the velocity field is expressed in terms of a single layer integral alone, even in problems with non-matched viscosities. The density of the single layer integral is obtained from a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind involving the double layer integral. Acceleration in this implementation is provided by the use of General Geometry Ewald-like method (GGEM) for computing the velocity and stress fields driven by a set of point forces in the geometry of interest. For the particular case of the slit geometry, a Fourier-Chebyshev spectral discretization of GGEM is developed. Efficient implementations employing the GGEM methodology are presented for the resulting single and the double layer integrals. The implementation is validated with test problems on the velocity of rigid particles and drops between parallel walls in pressure driven flow, the Taylor deformation parameter of capsules in simple shear flow and the particle trajectory in pair collisions of capsules in shear flow. The computational complexity of the algorithm is verified with results from several large scale multiparticle simulations.

  3. Influence of the Fin on Two-Dimensional Characteristics of Dispersed Flow With Wall Liquid Film in the Vicinity of Obstacle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Serizawa, Akimi [Kyoto University, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacers have positive effects on the heat transfer enhancement and critical heat flux (CHF) increase downstream of their location in the boiling channel. These effects are further increased by the inclusion of the fin on the spacer rear edge. Numerical simulation of a separation in a high void gas phase and dispersed droplets flow around a spacer, with a liquid film flowing on the wall, is performed. Mechanisms leading to the CHF increase due to the two-phase flow separation and liquid film thickening downstream the spacer are demonstrated. Numerical simulations of gas phase, entrained droplets and wall liquid film flows were performed with the three-fluid model and with the application of the high order numerical scheme for the liquid film surface interface tracking. Predicted is a separation of gas and entrained droplets streams around the spacer without and with a fin inclined 30 and 60 degrees to the wall, as well as a change of wall liquid film thickness in the vicinity of spacer. Results of liquid film dynamic behaviour are compared with the recently obtained experimental results. Multi-dimensional characteristics of surface waves on the liquid film were measured with newly developed ultrasonic transmission technique in a 3 3 rod bundle test section with air-water flow under atmospheric conditions. Obtained numerical results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The presented investigation gives insight into the complex mechanisms of separated two-phase flow with wall liquid film around the spacer and support thermal-hydraulic design and optimisation of flow obstacles in various thermal equipment. (authors)

  4. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  5. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  6. Test Strategy for the European HCPB Test Blanket Module in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boccaccini, L.V.; Meyder, R.; Fischer, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the European Blanket Programme two blanket concepts, the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and a Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) will be tested in ITER. During 2004 the test blanket modules (TBM) of both concepts were redesigned with the goal to use as much as possible similar design options and fabrication techniques for both types in order to reduce the European effort for TBM development. The result is a robust TBM box being able to withstand 8 MPa internal pressure in case of in-box LOCA; the TBM box consists of First wall (FW), caps, stiffening grid and manifolds. The box is filled with typically 18 and 24 breeding units (BU), for HCPB and HCLL respectively. A breeding unit has about 200 mm in poloidal and toroidal direction and about 400 mm in radial direction; the design is adapted to contain and cooling ceramic breeder/beryllium pebble beds for the HCPB and eutectic Lithium-Lead for the HCLL.The use of a new material, EUROFER, and the innovative design of these Helium Cooled components call for a large qualification programme before the installation in ITER; availability and safety of ITER should not be jeopardised by a failure of these components. Fabrication technologies especially in the welding processes (diffusion welding, EB, TIG, LASER) need to be tested in the manufacturing of large mock-ups; an extensive out-of-pile programme in Helium facility should be foreseen for the verification of the concept from basic helium cooling functions (uniformity of flow in parallel channels, heat transfer coefficient in FW, etc.) up to the verification of large portions of the TBM design under relevant ITER loading.In ITER the TBM will have the main objective to collect information that will contribute to the final design of DEMO blankets. A strategy has been proposed in 2001 that leads to the tests in ITER 4 different Test Blanket Modules (TBM's) type during the first 10 years of ITER operation. For the new HCPB design this strategy is confirmed with some additional possibilities taking into account the modular design of the breeding zone.

  7. Study of Laminar Flow Forced Convection Heat Transfer Behavior of a Phase Change Material Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, Gurunarayana

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    with constant peripheral temperature and uniform axial and peripheral temperature, were considered in the case of circular tubes. An effective specific heat technique was used to model the phase change process assuming a hydrodynamically fully-developed flow...

  8. Modeling fluid flow through single fracture using experimental, stochastic, and simulation approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfred, Dicman

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents an approach to accurately simulate flow experiments through a fractured core using experimental, stochastic, and simulation techniques. Very often, a fracture is assumed as a set of smooth parallel plates separated by a...

  9. Wavelet analysis study of microbubble drag reduction in a boundary channel flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen, Ling

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and pressure measurement techniques were performed to investigate the drag reduction due to microbubble injection in the boundary layer of a fully developed turbulent channel flow. ...

  10. Identification and characterization of Hydraulic Flow Units in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deghirmandjian, Odilia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into "units" of similar fluid flow characteristics. The HFU method does not presume a relationship between variables. The non-parametric regression/transform technique is based on using variable transformations to generate relationship between dependent...

  11. Unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow and the vibration of nuclear reactor components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yih, Tien Sieh

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a twophase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe. Measured momentum flux data has been machine processed by standard random vibration techniques ...

  12. Modeling and Detection of Content and Packet Flow Anomalies at Enterprise Network Gateway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Sheng-Ya

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates modeling techniques and computing algorithms for detection of anomalous contents and traffic flows of ingress Internet traffic at an enterprise network gateway. Anomalous contents refer to a large volume of ingress...

  13. Constant pressure high throughput membrane permeation testing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albenze, Erik J.; Hopkinson, David P.; Luebke, David R.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a membrane testing system for individual evaluation of a plurality of planar membranes subjected to a feed gas on one side and a sweep gas on a second side. The membrane testing system provides a pressurized flow of a feed and sweep gas to each membrane testing cell in a plurality of membrane testing cells while a stream of retentate gas from each membrane testing cell is ported by a retentate multiport valve for sampling or venting, and a stream of permeate gas from each membrane testing cell is ported by a permeate multiport valve for sampling or venting. Back pressure regulators and mass flow controllers act to maintain substantially equivalent gas pressures and flow rates on each side of the planar membrane throughout a sampling cycle. A digital controller may be utilized to position the retentate and permeate multiport valves cyclically, allowing for gas sampling of different membrane cells over an extended period of time.

  14. Taylor-Couette flow of unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Flanagan, K.; Khalzov, I. V.; Nornberg, M. D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Clark, M.; Seidlitz, B.; Wallace, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Differentially rotating flows of unmagnetized, highly conducting plasmas have been created in the Plasma Couette Experiment. Previously, hot-cathodes have been used to control plasma rotation by a stirring technique [C. Collins et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 115001 (2012)] on the outer cylindrical boundary—these plasmas were nearly rigid rotors, modified only by the presence of a neutral particle drag. Experiments have now been extended to include stirring from an inner boundary, allowing for generalized circular Couette flow and opening a path for both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic experiments, as well as fundamental studies of plasma viscosity. Plasma is confined in a cylindrical, axisymmetric, multicusp magnetic field, with T{sub e}?flows (up to 12?km/s, M?=?V?c{sub s}???0.7) are driven by edge J?×?B torques in helium, neon, argon, and xenon plasmas, and the experiment has already achieved Rm???65 and Pm?0.2?12. We present measurements of a self-consistent, rotation-induced, species-dependent radial electric field, which acts together with pressure gradient to provide the centripetal acceleration for the ions. The maximum flow speeds scale with the Alfvén critical ionization velocity, which occurs in partially ionized plasma. A hydrodynamic stability analysis in the context of the experimental geometry and achievable parameters is also explored.

  15. Loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture and steam line break thermohydraulic experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendler, O J; Takeuchi, K; Young, M Y

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, was reinstrumented and modified for performing a series of tests simulating steam generator accident transients. The transients simulated were: loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break events. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the tests performed, and (3) the analyses of the test results.

  16. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  18. Gaseous Flows in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2007-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas component plays a major role in the dynamics of spiral galaxies, because of its dissipative character, and its ability to exchange angular momentum with stars in the disk. Due to its small velocity dispersion, it triggers gravitational instabilities, and the corresponding non-axisymmetric patterns produce gravity torques, which mediate these angular momentum exchanges. When a srong bar pattern develops with the same pattern speed all over the disk, only gas inside corotation can flow towards the center. But strong bars are not long lived in presence of gas, and multiple-speed spiral patterns can develop between bar phases, and help the galaxy to accrete external gas flowing from cosmic filaments. The gas is then intermittently driven to the galaxy center, to form nuclear starbursts and fuel an active nucleus. The various time-scales of these gaseous flows are described.

  19. Aerosol-measurement techniques developed for nuclear-reactor-accident simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novick, V.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop techniques for sampling aerosols from a high temperature, high pressure environment. As such, much of this research can be applied to any high temperature, high pressure sampling problem. There are four parts that must be considered in any reactor sampling system: First, the sampling tip is important from the standpoint of (1) representatively sampling the ambient particles, (2) withstanding the high temperatures in the near core region, (3) rapidly reducing the temperature of the sampled gas without causing severe thermophoretic losses or condensing gases onto existing aerosols. The second part of the system is the aerosol transport. The dynamics that must be considered include diffusion, thermophoresis, setting and impaction. The third part involves the collection or analysis of the aerosols. Finally, the ability to control the flow rate through the sampling system affects the first three parts. All four areas are analyzed theoretically for general applications. Experiments were performed on various aspects of the problem that were not dealt with by other researchers or were specific to the experiments performed in the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor and the Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor. Specifically this work includes (1) sampling tip analysis, (2) experimental and theoretical aerosol transport analysis, (3) the development and testing of a new multistage virtual impactor, (4) the analysis and development of a new method of measuring particle concentration using series light extinction cells, and (5) analysis and experimentally determined capabilities and usefulness of a flow control system for experimentally decreasing pressures and changing argon-steam-hydrogen gas compositions.

  20. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  1. SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.W. REIMUS

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvial Testing Complex (ATC) located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and colloid transport parameters. (4) Comparisons of sorption parameter estimates for a reactive solute tracer (lithium ion) derived from the C-wells field tracer tests and laboratory tests using C-wells core samples. (5) Sorption parameter estimates for lithium ion derived from laboratory tests using alluvium samples from ATC well NC-EWDP-19D. These estimates will allow a comparison of laboratory- and field-derived sorption parameters to be made in saturated alluvium if cross-hole tracer tests are conducted at the ATC.

  2. The Momentum flux in two-phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andeen, Gerry B.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average momentum flux at a section of a pipe with twophase upflow has been measured by the impulse technique. Steamwater and air-water mixtures were tested in one-inch and onehalf inch nominal pipes. Homogeneous ...

  3. The linear and nonlinear stability of thread-annular flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Andrew G

    .walton@ic.ac.uk) The surgical technique of thread injection of medical implants is modelled by the axial pressure surgical trauma. The thread is stored on a spool and injected within a fluid by applying an axial pressure Navier­Stokes solution for sliding flow through an annulus (equation (1.1) below), they discovered

  4. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; Xi Hong; John P. Hurley

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF has been completed. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Screening tests are in currently in progress. Detailed analysis of corrosion rates from the first tests is in progress.

  5. Cache Energy Optimization Techniques For Modern Processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern multicore processors are employing large last-level caches, for example Intel's E7-8800 processor uses 24MB L3 cache. Further, with each CMOS technology generation, leakage energy has been dramatically increasing and hence, leakage energy is expected to become a major source of energy dissipation, especially in last-level caches (LLCs). The conventional schemes of cache energy saving either aim at saving dynamic energy or are based on properties specific to first-level caches, and thus these schemes have limited utility for last-level caches. Further, several other techniques require offline profiling or per-application tuning and hence are not suitable for product systems. In this book, we present novel cache leakage energy saving schemes for single-core and multicore systems; desktop, QoS, real-time and server systems. Also, we present cache energy saving techniques for caches designed with both conventional SRAM devices and emerging non-volatile devices such as STT-RAM (spin-torque transfer RAM). We present software-controlled, hardware-assisted techniques which use dynamic cache reconfiguration to configure the cache to the most energy efficient configuration while keeping the performance loss bounded. To profile and test a large number of potential configurations, we utilize low-overhead, micro-architecture components, which can be easily integrated into modern processor chips. We adopt a system-wide approach to save energy to ensure that cache reconfiguration does not increase energy consumption of other components of the processor. We have compared our techniques with state-of-the-art techniques and have found that our techniques outperform them in terms of energy efficiency and other relevant metrics. The techniques presented in this book have important applications in improving energy-efficiency of higher-end embedded, desktop, QoS, real-time, server processors and multitasking systems. This book is intended to be a valuable guide for both newcomers and veterans in the field of cache power management. It will help graduate students, CAD tool developers and designers in understanding the need of energy efficiency in modern computing systems. Further, it will be useful for researchers in gaining insights into algorithms and techniques for micro-architectural and system-level energy optimization using dynamic cache reconfiguration. We sincerely believe that the ``food for thought'' presented in this book will inspire the readers to develop even better ideas for designing ``green'' processors of tomorrow.

  6. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

  7. Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

  8. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  9. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  10. OPTIMUM SHAPE DESIGN FOR UNSTEADY THREE-DIMENSIONAL VISCOUS FLOWS USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    in forward flight, turbomachinery blades and cooling fans operate in unsteady flow and are constantly subjected to unsteady loads. Optimization techniques for unsteady flows are clearly needed to improve estimates for the computational cost of a multistage compressor and turbine calculation based

  11. Numerical Study of Hypersonic Rarefied-Gas Flows About a Toroidal Ballute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    , pressure distribution, and drag have been found. Keywords: Torus, Balloon Parachute, Transition Rarefied-GasNumerical Study of Hypersonic Rarefied-Gas Flows About a Toroidal Ballute Vladimir V. Riabov investigated numerically using the Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo technique under transition rarefied-gas flow

  12. INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES Hypersonic flows of argon, nitrogen, oxygen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    the Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique under transition rarefied-gas flow conditions (Knudsen structure (the shape of shock waves and the stagnation point location), skin friction, pressure distribution and gas mixtures were used in simulations of planetary atmospheres. The flow pattern near a torus in argon

  13. SMOKE AND CFD VISUALIZATION OF THE FLOW AFTER AN EMC SCREEN IN A SUBRACK MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SMOKE AND CFD VISUALIZATION OF THE FLOW AFTER AN EMC SCREEN IN A SUBRACK MODEL Raúl Antón1, 2, 3 analysed are the velocity, the EMC screen porosity and the subrack geometry. The technique used pattern after the screen. KEYWORDS: RNG k-, perforated plate, porosity, EMC screen, subrack, flow pattern

  14. Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power or fixed palenstrophy flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, Alexei

    Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power or fixed palenstrophy flows-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using techniques, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (Dated: 31 March 2012) We consider passive scalar mixing

  15. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  16. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  17. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  18. Development of Spatio-Temporal Wavelet Post Processing Techniques for Application to Thermal Hydraulic Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salpeter, Nathaniel

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -intrusive particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) techniques. The second experiment is of a simulated double ended guillotine break in the prismatic block gas cooled reactor. Numerical simulations of jet flow mixing in the lower plenum of a prismatic block high...

  19. Single phase flow visualization using Digital Pulsed Laser Velocimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hild, Robert David

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Single Phase Flow: Experiment z511m-z511r. . . . X. 4 Velocity Vectors for Two Phase Flow: Experiment z726a-z726f (Sigma Cutoff=10. 0) . X. 5 Velocity Vecttus for Two Phase Flow: Experiment z726a-z726f (Sigma Cutoff=0. 020) . 83 . . . 84 96 97... captured. This code was originally intended for six frames of video to be analyzed, however, it was written to accept a variable number of frames greater than four. It has been tested on six, nine, and ten frames of video and performs correctly; 9...

  20. Effects of external pressure on the terminal lymphatic flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seale, James Lewis

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure applied to the skin of the canine cause the terminal lymphat- ic flow rate to increase until the external pressure reaches 60mm Hg. At an external pressure of 60mm Hg reduced lymphatic flow is observed in some of the test animals. At 75mm Hg... resulting from the external pressure begins to col- lapse the lymph vessels. External pressure between 60 and 75mm Hg restricts or completely occludes the terminal lymphatic flow rate. ACKNOWLEDGENENTS I would like to express my appreciation...

  1. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the construction directs flat cells near to the area of one dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates.

  2. AGN and Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. A small number of enthusiasts have argued for a radically different interpretation of the data, but had little impact on prevailing opinion because the unsteady heating picture that they advocate is extremely hard to work out in detail. Here I explain why it is difficult to extract robust observational predictions from the heating picture. Major problems include the variability of the sources, the different ways in which a bi-polar flow can impact on X-ray emission, the weakness of synchrotron emission from sub-relativistic flows, and the sensitivity of synchrotron emission to a magnetic field that is probably highly localized.

  3. Use of laser extensometer for mechanical test on irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brillaud, C.; Meylogan, T.; Salathe, P. [Electricite de France, Avoine (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques have been developed by EDF`s hot laboratory in Chinon for performing mechanical tests on irradiated materials. Some of these techniques aim to facilitate strain measurements, which are particularly difficult to perform on irradiated specimens at high temperatures or on subsize specimens. Recent progress has been driven by laser technology combined with software development. The use of this technique, which allows strain measurements without contact on the specimen, is described for tensile (especially on subsize specimens), fatigue and creep tests.

  4. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standards for ~sting Solar Collectors and Thermal StorageLBL-6974 Rev. e. ' A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF+ 0.66 Fig. L r2 r2 Solar test collector flow chart. Type

  5. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  6. Negative magnetic eddy diffusivities from test-field method and multiscale stability theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrievsky, Alexander; Noullez, Alain; Zheligovsky, Vladislav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an alpha-effect is investigated by following two different approaches, namely the test-field method and multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenisation technique. We show analytically that the former, applied for the evaluation of magnetic eddy diffusivities, yields results that fully agree with the latter. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor for the specific instances of the parity-invariant flow-IV of G.O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow in a suitable range of parameter values confirm the findings of previous studies, and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between magnetic eddy dif...

  7. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  8. Mapping Diffuse Seismicity Using Empirical Matched Field Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C; Harris, D B

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate more microearthquakes using the empirical matched field processing (MFP) method than can be detected using only conventional earthquake detection techniques. We propose that empirical MFP can complement existing catalogs and techniques. We test our method on continuous seismic data collected at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field during November 2009 and January 2010. In the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) earthquake catalog, 619 events were identified in our study area during this time frame and our MFP technique identified 1094 events. Therefore, we believe that the empirical MFP method combined with conventional methods significantly improves the network detection ability in an efficient matter.

  9. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

  10. Plasma flow at a high Mach-number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Bing; Hameiri, Eliezer [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike the case of static magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, where an expansion in large aspect ratio of toroidal devices is common, cases of MHD equilibria with flow are rarely treated this way, and when this is done the expansion tends to be only partial. The main reason for the difference seems to be the difficulty of expanding the larger system of equilibrium equations with flow. Here, we use a recent expansion technique which employs a variational principle to simplify the process [E. Hameiri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 024504 (2013)]. We treat four cases of MHD equilibria with flow, developing their asymptotic expansions in full, and for an application consider the effect of the flow on the Shafranov shift.

  11. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  12. CESR Test Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, David L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured in 2008 as a test accelerator to investigate the physics of ultra-low emittance damping rings. During the approximately 40 days/year available for dedicated operation as a test accelerator, specialized instrumentation is used to measure growth and mitigation of the electron cloud, emittance growth due to electron cloud, intra-beam scattering, and ions, and single and multi-bunch instabilities generated by collective effects. The flexibility of the CESR guide field optics and the integration of accelerator modeling codes with the control system have made possible an extraordinary range of experiments. Findings at CesrTA with respect to electron cloud effects, emittance tuning techniques, and beam instrumentation for measuring electron cloud, beam sizes, and beam positions are the basis for much of the design of the ILC damping rings as documented in the ILC-Technical Design Report. The program has allowed the Cornell group to cultivate the kind of talen...

  13. Coupling free flow / porous-medium flow General idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    equation t (v) + div (vv ) - div(v) + p - g - qv = 0 Darcy flow equation t (S) - div K (p - g) - qpmT transport equation t (X) + div (vX - DsteamX) = qsteam 16/14 #12;Backup additional Darcy flow equations-Stokes 1 phase, 2 components, temperature sharp interface porous-medium / Darcy flow 2 phases, 2 component

  14. Fundamentals and Techniques of Nonimaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Gallagher, J. J.; Winston, R.

    2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report describing a long term basic research program in nonimaging optics that has led to major advances in important areas, including solar energy, fiber optics, illumination techniques, light detectors, and a great many other applications. The term ''nonimaging optics'' refers to the optics of extended sources in systems for which image forming is not important, but effective and efficient collection, concentration, transport, and distribution of light energy is. Although some of the most widely known developments of the early concepts have been in the field of solar energy, a broad variety of other uses have emerged. Most important, under the auspices of this program in fundamental research in nonimaging optics established at the University of Chicago with support from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences at the Department of Energy, the field has become very dynamic, with new ideas and concepts continuing to develop, while applications of the early concepts continue to be pursued. While the subject began as part of classical geometrical optics, it has been extended subsequently to the wave optics domain. Particularly relevant to potential new research directions are recent developments in the formalism of statistical and wave optics, which may be important in understanding energy transport on the nanoscale. Nonimaging optics permits the design of optical systems that achieve the maximum possible concentration allowed by physical conservation laws. The earliest designs were constructed by optimizing the collection of the extreme rays from a source to the desired target: the so-called ''edge-ray'' principle. Later, new concentrator types were generated by placing reflectors along the flow lines of the ''vector flux'' emanating from lambertian emitters in various geometries. A few years ago, a new development occurred with the discovery that making the design edge-ray a functional of some other system parameter permits the construction of whole new classes of devices with greatly expanded capabilities compared to conventional approaches. These ''tailored edge-ray'' designs have dramatically broadened the range of geometries in which nonimaging optics can provide a significant performance improvement. Considerable progress continues to be made in furthering the incorporation of nonimaging secondaries into practical high concentration and ultra-high concentration solar collector systems. In parallel with the continuing development of nonimaging geometrical optics, our group has been working to develop an understanding of certain fundamental physical optics concepts in the same context. In particular, our study of the behavior of classical radiance in nonimaging systems, has revealed some fundamentally important new understandings that we have pursued both theoretically and experimentally. The field is still relatively new and is rapidly gaining widespread recognition because it fuels many industrial applications. Because of this, during the final years of the project, our group at Chicago has been working more closely with a team of industrial scientists from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) at first informally, and later more formally, beginning in 1998, under a formal program initiated by the Department of Energy and incrementally funded through this existing grant. This collaboration has been very fruitful and has led to new conceptual breakthroughs which have provided the foundation for further exciting growth. Many of these concepts are described in some detail in the report.

  15. Basic research model of gas combustion in turbulent flow. Annual report, 1 June 1988-30 June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahm, W.J.A.; Tryggvason, G.; Krasny, R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the development currently underway of a basic research model for gas combustion in turbulent flow. The model being developed is fundamentally different from the conventional types of turbulence models currently in use for flame calculations, both in terms of the underlying physical approximations made and in the numerical techniques used to implement them. The present approach is based on the idea that many of the precise and detailed fine scale processes at work in turbulent combustion have a simple self-similar structure, and as a result do not need to be continually recomputed in full detail. These can be modeled using results from recent experimental research into the fine scales of turbulent flows. Results obtained to date from this model have been carefully compared with finite difference simulations of the full governing equations for several simple test cases, and show that even complex and highly nonlinear phenomena such as local extinction of reactions in the flow field are correctly reproduced by the model. The model directly incorporates the strong coupling between the fluid dynamics and combustion chemistry in the flame. Work presently underway is incorporating volume source effects into the model.

  16. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is gaining importance for power conversion in the Generation IV fast reactor system because of its high conversion efficiencies. When used in conjunction with a sodium fast reactor, the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle offers additional safety advantages by eliminating potential sodium-water interactions that may occur in a steam cycle. In power conversion systems for Generation IV fast reactors, supercritical CO{sub 2} temperatures could be in the range of 30°C to 650°C, depending on the specific component in the system. Materials corrosion primarily at high temperatures will be an important issue. Therefore, the corrosion performance limits for materials at various temperatures must be established. The proposed research will have four objectives centered on addressing corrosion issues in a high-temperature supercritical CO{sub 2} environment: Task 1: Evaluation of corrosion performance of candidate alloys in high-purity supercritical CO{sub 2}: The following alloys will be tested: Ferritic-martensitic Steels NF616 and HCM12A, austenitic alloys Incoloy 800H and 347 stainless steel, and two advanced concept alloys, AFA (alumina forming austenitic) steel and MA754. Supercritical CO{sub 2} testing will be performed at 450°C, 550°C, and 650°C at a pressure of 20 MPa, in a test facility that is already in place at the proposing university. High purity CO{sub 2} (99.9998%) will be used for these tests. Task 2: Investigation of the effects of CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} impurities in supercritical CO{sub 2} on corrosion: Impurities that will inevitably present in the CO{sub 2} will play a critical role in dictating the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms. These effects must be understood to identify the level of CO{sub 2} chemistry control needed to maintain sufficient levels of purity to manage corrosion. The individual effects of important impurities CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} will be investigated by adding them separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650°C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

  17. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  18. Flow (2008) Director: Irena Salina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow (2008) Director: Irena Salina Run Time: 93 min. Summary: ,Irena Salina's documentary film://documentaryfilms.suite101.com/article.cfm/desperate_for_water_irena_salinas_movie_flow No Dumb Questions (2001) Director

  19. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; John P. Hurley

    2003-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF is in progress. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Testing is expected to begin in October.

  20. Relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, G.W.; Title, A.M.; Topka, K.P.; Tarbell, T.D.; Shine, R.A.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles (corks) in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed. 31 references.

  1. Money versus Time: Evaluation of Flow Control in Terms of Energy Consumption and Convenience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frohnapfel, Bettina; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow control with the goal of reducing the skin friction drag on the fluid-solid interface is an active fundamental research area, motivated by its potential for significant energy savings and reduced emissions in the transport sector. Customarily, the performance of drag reduction techniques in internal flows is evaluated under two alternative flow conditions, i.e. at constant mass flow rate or constant pressure gradient. Successful control leads to reduction of drag and pumping power within the former approach, whereas the latter leads to an increase of the mass flow rate and pumping power. In practical applications, however, money and time define the flow control challenge: a compromise between the energy expenditure (money) and the corresponding convenience (flow rate) achieved with that amount of energy has to be reached so as to accomplish a goal which in general depends on the specific application. Based on this idea, we derive two dimensionless parameters which quantify the total energy consumption an...

  2. Past Test One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MA 366: Introduction to Di?'erential Equations. Fall 2001, Test One. Instructor: Yip o This test booklet has FIVE QUESTIONS, totaling 50 points for the whole test.

  3. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Test Battery Electric Vehicle Fast Charge Test Battery Energy Storage Performance Test For DC Fast Charge Demand Reduction...

  4. Ricci flow and quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show some relations between Ricci flow and quantum theory via Fisher information and the quantum potential.

  5. Progress in Grid Scale Flow Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011Year #12;Flow Battery Research at PNNL and Sandia #12 with industries and universities New Generation Redox Flow Batteries, PNNL Developed new generation redox flow

  6. Microfluidic velocimetry reveals spatial cooperativity in soft glassy flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Goyon; A. Colin; G. Ovarlez; A. Ajdari; L. Bocquet

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous glassy materials of diverse nature -- concentrated emulsions, granular materials, pastes, molecular glasses -- display complex flow properties, intermediate between solid and liquid, which are at the root of their use in many applications. A classical feature, well documented yet not really understood, is the very non-linear nature of the flow rule relating stresses and strain rates. Using a microfluidic velocimetry technique, we characterize the flow of thin layers of concentrated emulsions, confined in gaps of different thicknesses by surfaces of different roughness. Beyond the classical non-linearities of the rheological behaviour, we evidence finite size effects in the flow behaviour and the absence of an intrinsic local flow rule. In contrast, a rather simple non-local flow rule is shown to account for all the velocity profiles. This non-locality of the dynamics is quantified by a length, characteristic of the cooperativity of the flow at these scales, that is unobservable in the liquid state (lower concentrations) and that increases with concentration in the jammed state. Beyond its practical importance for applications involving thin layers, e.g. coatings, our assessment of non-locality and cooperativity echoes observations on other glassy, jammed and granular systems, suggesting a possible fundamental universality.

  7. Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. W. Reimus; M. J. Umari

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that have been conducted to test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters that are used in the development of parameter distributions for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in the revisions to the SZ flow model report (BSC 2003 [ 162649]), the SZ transport model report (BSC 2003 [ 162419]), the SZ colloid transport report (BSC 2003 [162729]), and the SZ transport model abstraction report (BSC 2003 [1648701]). Specifically, this scientific analysis report provides the following information that contributes to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as a barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvium Testing Complex (ATC), which is located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and colloid transport parameters. (4) Comparisons of sorption parameter estimates for a reactive solute tracer (lithium ion) derived from both the C-wells field tracer tests and laboratory tests using C-wells core samples. (5) Sorption parameter estimates for lithium ion derived from laboratory tests using alluvium samples from NC-EWDP-19D1 (one of the wells at the ATC) so that a comparison of laboratory- and field-derived sorption parameters can be made in saturated alluvium if cross-hole tracer tests are conducted at the ATC.

  8. Fast reactor safety testing in Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Dutt, D.S. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Harrison, L.J. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several series of fast reactor safety tests were performed in TREAT during the 1980s. These focused on the transient behavior of full-length oxide fuels (US reference, UK reference, and US advanced design) and on modern metallic fuels. Most of the tests addressed fuel behavior under transient overpower or loss-of-flow conditions. The test series were the PFR/TREAT tests; the RFT, TS, CDT, and RX series on oxide fuels; and the M series on metallic fuels. These are described in terms of their principal results and relevance to analyses and safety evaluation. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Field scale evaluation of the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor and assessment of river-aquifer interaction at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site / by Andrew Scott Alden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alden, Andrew Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors (ISPFS), recently developed by Dr. Sanford Ballard at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas. The Flow Sensors use a thermal...

  10. Field scale evaluation of the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor and assessment of river-aquifer interaction at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site / by Andrew Scott Alden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alden, Andrew Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors (ISPFS), recently developed by Dr. Sanford Ballard at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas. The Flow Sensors use a thermal...

  11. Numerical Polynomial Homotopy Continuation Method to Locate All The Power Flow Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhagash Mehta; Hung Nguyen; Konstantin Turitsyn

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The manuscript addresses the problem of finding all solutions of power flow equations or other similar nonlinear system of algebraic equations. This problem arises naturally in a number of power systems contexts, most importantly in the context of direct methods for transient stability analysis and voltage stability assessment. We introduce a novel form of homotopy continuation method called the numerical polynomial homotopy continuation (NPHC) method that is mathematically guaranteed to find all the solutions without ever encountering a bifurcation. The method is based on embedding the real form of power flow equation in complex space, and tracking the generally unphysical solutions with complex values of real and imaginary parts of the voltage. The solutions converge to physical real form in the end of the homotopy. The so-called $\\gamma$-trick mathematically rigorously ensures that all the paths are well-behaved along the paths, so unlike other continuation approaches, no special handling of bifurcations is necessary. The method is \\textit{embarrassingly parallelizable} and can be applied to reasonably large sized systems. We demonstrate the technique by analysis of several standard test cases up to the 14-bus system size. Finally, we discuss possible strategies for scaling the method to large size systems, and propose several applications for transient stability analysis and voltage stability assessment.

  12. Review : integration of EMI technique with global vibration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Suteng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, the development of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been skyrocketing because of the serious consequences that come with structural failure. Traditional damage detection techniques, also known as ...

  13. TEST STATION SALE OF PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    in the test had to meet minimum performance requirements. Those were: CREEP NON-CREEP Adj 205 day wt. 560 520AS-B428 U T BULL TEST STATION SALE OF PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012 12:00 NOON IN GREENEVILLE AND KNOXVILLE LIVESTOCK CENTER http://animalscience.ag.utk.edu/ (For video) #12;UT BULL TEST

  14. Dual-Axis Resonance Testing of Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbine blades must undergo strength and fatigue testing in order to be rated and marketed appropriately. Presently, wind turbine blades are fatigue-tested in the flapwise direction and in the edgewise direction independently. This testing involves placing the blades through 1 to 10 million or more load or fatigue cycles, which may take 3 to 12 months or more to complete for each tested direction. There is a need for blade testing techniques that are less expensive to use and require...

  15. The Big Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sikivie

    2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy, such as our own, produces streams and caustics in its halo. The outer caustics are topological spheres whereas the inner caustics are rings. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii $a_n$ follow the approximate law $a_n \\sim 1/n$. In a study of 32 extended and well-measured external galactic rotation curves evidence was found for this law. In the case of the Milky Way, the locations of eight sharp rises in the rotation curve fit the prediction of the self-similar model at the 3% level. Moreover, a triangular feature in the IRAS map of the galactic plane is consistent with the imprint of a ring caustic upon the baryonic matter. These observations imply that the dark matter in our neighborhood is dominated by a single flow. Estimates of that flow's density and velocity vector are given.

  16. Energy Flow: Flow Charts Illustrating United States Energy Resources and Usage, from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Decision makers have long recognized the importance of visualizing energy and material flows in a way that distinguishes between resources, transformations and services. Research priorities can be defined in terms of changes to the flows, and the consequences of policy or technology shifts can be traced both upstream and downstream. The usefulness of this top-down view is limited by the level of detail that can be conveyed in a single image. We use two techniques to balance information content with readability. First we employe visualization techniques, such as those embodied in the energy Sankey diagram below (Figure 1), to display both qualitative (relative line weight) and quantitative (listed values) information in a reader-friendly package. The second method is to augment static images with dynamic, scalable digital content containing multiple layers (e.g. energy, carbon and economic data). This transitions the audience from that of a passive reader to an active user of the information. When used in conjunction these approaches enable relatively large, interconnected processes to be described and analyzed efficiently. [copied from the description at http://en.openei.org/wiki/LLNL_Energy_Flow_Charts#cite_note-1

  17. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  18. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  19. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  20. Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2.5 V Thermal Mgmt.: Passive, Vacuum-Sealed Unit Pack Weight: 294 kg BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 6,696 mi Date of...