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1

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Flow Test Details Activities (38) Areas (33) Regions (1) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Flow tests provide information on permeability, recharge rates, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling. Thermal: Flow tests can measure temperature variations with time to estimate characteristics about the heat source. Dictionary.png Flow Test: Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened and fluids are released, the

2

Evaluation and Application of the Constant Flow Technique in Testing Low-Permeability Geo-Materials  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessment of facilities involved in geological disposal of hazardous waste, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed through mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and/or natural barrier system is mainly controlled by advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Ideally, waste disposal facilities should be constructed in the geological environments where groundwater is not existent, or groundwater is static, or its flow is extremely slow. Potential fluid flow, however, may be induced by thermal convection and/or gas generation, and thus accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties, specifically the permeability and specific storage, along with diffusive transport properties of engineered and natural barrier materials, is of fundamental importance for safety assessment. The engineered and natural barrier materials for isolating hazardous wastes are hydraulically tight, and special techniques are generally required to obtain both rapid and accurate determination of their hydraulic properties. In this paper, the constant flow technique is introduced and evaluated. The capability of this technique in testing low-permeability geo-materials are illustrated through practical applications to a bentonite-sand mixture and rock samples having low permeabilities. (authors)

Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Zhang, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Deep Geological Environments, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

TESTING TECHNIQUE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The cooling bath should ... When testing super-high energy level specimens ... upon the resolution of the scale or readout device at the low end and the ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

A data flow-based structural testing technique for FBD programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increased use of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) in implementing critical systems, quality assurance became an important issue. Regulation requires structural testing be performed for safety-critical systems by identifying coverage criteria ... Keywords: Function block diagram, Programmable logic controller, Software testing, Structural testing, Test coverage criteria

Eunkyoung Jee; Junbeom Yoo; Sungdeok Cha; Doohwan Bae

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

6

RMOTC - Testing - Flow Assurance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow Assurance Flow Assurance RMOTC Flow Loop Facility Layout Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. Over a decade ago, RMOTC began cooperatively building a full-scale facility to test new flow assurance technology, mainly in the areas of hydrates and paraffins. Today, RMOTC's test facility consists of five individual loop

7

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

9

Analyzing Regression Test Selection Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿Regression testing is a necessary but expensive maintenance activity aimed at showing that code has not been adversely affected by changes. Regression test selection techniques reuse tests from an existing test suite to test a modified program. ... Keywords: Software maintenance, regression testing, selective retest, regression test selection.

Gregg Rothermel; Mary Jean Harrold

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

SciTech Connect

Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

12

Definition: Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Flow Test Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened...

13

Evaluation of flow capture techniques for measuring HVAC grilleairflows  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the accuracy of commercially available flow hoods for residential applications. Results of laboratory and field tests indicate these hoods can be inadequate to measure airflows in residential systems, and there can be large measurement discrepancies between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of the hoods to grille airflow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. It is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement. We also evaluated several simple flow capture techniques for measuring grille airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics. These simple techniques can be as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, agencies such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow capture techniques.

Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness...

15

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

16

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

17

Flow Test At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

18

Flow Test At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

19

Flow Test At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

20

Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Flow tests of well CGEH No. 1 were conducted. LBL performed eight temperature surveys after completion of the well to estimate equilibrium reservoir temperatures. Downhole fluid samples were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), and a static pressure profile was obtained. The first test began September 5, 1978 using nitrogen stimulation to initiate flow; this procedure resulted in small flow and subsequent filling of the bottom hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole,

22

Catalyst immobilization techniques for continuous flow synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processes are ubiquitous in both research and industrial settings. As continuous flow processes continue to gain traction in research labs and fine and pharmaceutical chemical processes, new opportunities exist ...

Nagy, Kevin David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

REVIEW OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

9747 9747 Review of Airflow Measurement Techniques Jennifer McWilliams Energy Performance of Buildings Group Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 December 1, 2002 Abstract Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: "Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?" This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and

24

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chamber, passive sampling, passive solar house, measurementhouse, we planed the distribution of fresh air, passivepassive perfluorocarbon tracer technique for determining air infiltration rates into houses

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Continuous flow separation techniques for microchemical synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performing multistep microchemical synthesis requires many techniques from combining micromixers in series to the development of continuous microfluidic separation tools. Safety, high heat and mass transfer rates, and cost ...

Kralj, Jason G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate and air leakage tests under reductive sealing for anfor subsequent sealing, the openings of air infiltrationreductive sealing between the reductions in measured air

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optical techniques for fluid flow and heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is presented of optical measuring techniques employed in momentum heat and mass transfer studies. A classification is given of those techniques that are nowadays widely employed in studies to advance the understanding of transport phenomena in fluids. Techniques that employ effects caused by fluid molecules are briefly treated, and examples of measurements are given to demonstrate the kind of information that can be obtained by these techniques. Optical techniques using tracers to obtain transport information are summarized, and laser-Doppler anemometry and its application to fluid flow studies are emphasized. Applications of this technique in single-phase and two-phase flows are given that demonstrate its potential in experimental fluid mechanics and convective heat transfer studies. 63 refs.

Durst, F. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Universitaet, Erlangen (Germany, F.R.))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To confirm resource using flow tests Notes Both production and injection wells were flow tested. Aslo includes interference testing across the well field. References Glaspey, Douglas J. (30 January 2008) Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(2008)&oldid=473856

29

Future of Hydrogen Fuel Flows Through New NIST Test ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future of Hydrogen Fuel Flows Through New NIST Test Facility. For Immediate Release: February 16, 2010. ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Testing of air-flow windows for evaluation and application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of how the performance of air-flow windows was assessed in comparison to a conventional window of good current design. Tests were performed in the University Building Environment and Energy Laboratory which allowed tests quite representative of actual application conditions in a variety of vertical orientations. The actual application condition requirement necessitated some approximations to the energy measurements which are not found in guarded hot box or calorimeter kinds of approaches to performance evaluations. The testing technique and required approximations are described. A possible type of solar-residential application is also described briefly.

Boehm, R.F.; Brandle, K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Category:Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

following 6 pages are in this category, out of 6 total. E Earth Tidal Analysis F Flow Test I Injectivity Test S Static Temperature Survey Stress Test T Tracer Testing Retrieved...

32

Improvements in sparse matrix/vector technique applications for on-line load flow calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sparsity technique is applied to a wide range of problems in power systems analysis. In this paper the authors propose several analytical and computational improvements in sparsity applications. The new partial matrix refactorization method and ordering algorithm are presented. The proposed method is very efficient when applied to various kinds of programs, such as: on-line load flow, optimal power flow and steady-state security analysis. The proposed methodology is applied in a fast decoupled load flow program which include the treatment of tap violations on under-load tap changing (ULTC) transformers and reactive power generation on PV buses. Effects of proposed improvements are well tested and documented on the three networks: 118 bus IEEE test network and two utility networks with 209 and 519 buses, respectively. Keywords: sparsity technique, load flow analysis, security analysis.

Ristanovic, P.; Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Core holes enabled injection and flow testing up to 70 gpm. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Lake_City_Hot_Springs_Area_(Benoit_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=386872" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

34

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1985 - 1986 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Understand the connectivity of the production and injection wells. Notes A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). The flow test included a well production metering system and a water injection metering system. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

35

Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six Well Flow Test Six Well Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test Abstract A six well flow test was conducted during 1986 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Flow duration lasted from 40 to 74 days with a maximum rate of 5.9 million pounds/hour. During the test, downhole pressures were monitored in eight surrounding wells. Downhole pressure and temperature surveys were run in each of the flowing wells,usually in conjunction with productivity tests. Results from the flow test and earlier interference tests indicate that six wells are capable of providing in excess of the 4.5 million pounds/hour required for a 62 mw (gross) power plant. Author William L. Desormier Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1987

36

Development of a portable grain mass flow sensor test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable grain mass flow sensor test rig was built to measure the accuracy of a mass flow sensor with dual use in the field as well as in the lab. Concurrently, a synchronization method was developed that employs GPS timing data to synchronize the ... Keywords: Mass flow sensor, Test rig, Yield monitor accuracy, Yield monitor error

M. Loghavi; R. Ehsani; R. Reeder

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After the Welaco temperature survey was completed for TG52-7, preparations were completed for a controlled airlift test. This test was completed in the period from 19-20 September 2003 for some 23 hours. The well produced steady state flow of about 320-325 gpm at a wellhead temperature of 126.7degrees C (260degreesF). This production rate is equivalent to about 162,000 pounds per hour, with the production temperature producing usable

38

Experiment DTA report for semiscale transparent vessel countercurrent flow tests  

SciTech Connect

Steady state air-water tests were performed as part of the Semiscale Blowdown and Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Project to investigate downcomer countercurrent flow and downcomer bypass flow phenomena. These tests were performed in a plexiglass representation of the Semiscale pressure vessel which allowed changes to be madein the geometry of the upper annulus and downcomer for the purpose of investigating the sensitivity of downcomer and bypass flow to changes in system geometry. Tests were also performed to investigate the effects of two-phase inlet flows and different initial system pressures on countercurrent and bypass flow. Results for each test are presented in the form of computer printout of the measurements and of a summary of the pertinent calculated flow rates, pressures, and dimensionless volumetric fluxes. Descriptions of the test facility, instrumentation, operating procedures, and test conditions are also presented. An error analysis is presented for selected volumetric flux calculations. 10 references. (auth)

Hanson, D.J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Wister Area Exploration...

40

Flow Test At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area Exploration...

42

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

43

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine field hydraulic conductivity using borehole impeller flowmeter data Notes A quantitative evaluation of borehole-impeller flowmeter data leads to estimated field hydraulic conductivity. Data were obtained during an injection test of a geothermal well at the Raft River geothermal test site in Idaho. Both stationary and trolling calibrations of the flowmeter were made in the well. Methods were developed to adjust for variations in hole

44

Flow Test At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Flow Test At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The pressure data collected during a 50-h-long flow test at LVEW in September 2001 are best matched using solutions for a flow system consisting of a steeply dipping fracture with infinite hydraulic conductivity, surrounded by a finite-conductivity rock matrix. At shallow

45

Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Water samples were collected during nitrogen-stimulated flow tests in 1978, but no information was provided on sampling conditions. The well was flowed again for the last time in 1982, but the flow test lasted only 1 h (Thompson, 1985). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

46

Mutation Sampling Technique for the Generation of Structural Test Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our goal is to produce validation data that can be used as an efficient (pre) test set for structural stuck-at faults. In this paper, we detail an original test-oriented mutation sampling technique used for generating such data and we present a first evaluation on these validation data with regard to a structural test.

Scholive, M; Robach, C; Flottes, M L; Rouzeyre, B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To allow for the lateral and vertical extrapolation of core and test data and bridged the gap between surface geophysical data and core analyses. Notes Temperature and flowmeter logs provide evidence that these fractures and faults are conduits that conduct hot water to the wells. One of the intermediate depth core holes penetrated a hydrothermally altered zone that includes several fractures producing hot water. This altered production

48

Three principal results from recent Fenton Hill flow testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells -- one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region -- would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DuTeaux, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary flow and pressure testing of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, as part of the preparations for the initial 90-day segment of the Long-Term Flow Test, has revealed several significant features concerning the hydraulic behavior of this reservoir as a function of injection and production pressure levels. Of most significance to the future operation of HDR power plants is the influence of elevated production backpressure on the effective reservoir flow impedance (i.e., the difference between injection and production pressures, divided by the production flow rate). It has been found that the effective flow impedance at high backpressure is significantly lower than the corresponding impedance at low backpressure. At an injection pressure of 3700 psi and a back-pressure of 2210 psi, the effective flow impedance for the present reservoir is 20 psi/gpm--less than 40% of the effective flow impedance for similar injection conditions, but at low backpressure (about 170 psi). Recently, a 10-day reservoir flow test was conducted at a somewhat lower backpressure of 1500 psi, and at a slightly higher injection pressure of 3750 psi. At these new conditions, there was an increase in the effective reservoir flow impedance to 23.6 psi/gpm, but also a significant increase in the production flow rate and temperature--from 74 gpm to 95 gpm, and from 154 C to 180 C. The net reservoir water loss rate averaged over the last 5 days of this latest flow test was 7.3 gpm, which corresponds to a net recovery of 93% of the injected water--a very significant result that has been obtained from our preliminary reservoir flow testing. Under both of these high backpressure flow conditions, the reservoir was not extending, as evidenced by a very low rate of water loss and the absence of microseismic activity.

Brown, Donald W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mesoscale Simulations of Particulate Flows with Parallel Distributed Lagrange Multiplier Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid particulate flows are common phenomena in nature and industry. Modeling of such flows at micro and macro levels as well establishing relationships between these approaches are needed to understand properties of the particulate matter. We propose a computational technique based on the direct numerical simulation of the particulate flows. The numerical method is based on the distributed Lagrange multiplier technique following the ideas of Glowinski et al. (1999). Each particle is explicitly resolved on an Eulerian grid as a separate domain, using solid volume fractions. The fluid equations are solved through the entire computational domain, however, Lagrange multiplier constrains are applied inside the particle domain such that the fluid within any volume associated with a solid particle moves as an incompressible rigid body. Mutual forces for the fluid-particle interactions are internal to the system. Particles interact with the fluid via fluid dynamic equations, resulting in implicit fluid-rigid-body coupling relations that produce realistic fluid flow around the particles (i.e., no-slip boundary conditions). The particle-particle interactions are implemented using explicit force-displacement interactions for frictional inelastic particles similar to the DEM method of Cundall et al. (1979) with some modifications using a volume of an overlapping region as an input to the contact forces. The method is flexible enough to handle arbitrary particle shapes and size distributions. A parallel implementation of the method is based on the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) library, which allows handling of large amounts of rigid particles and enables local grid refinement. Accuracy and convergence of the presented method has been tested against known solutions for a falling sphere as well as by examining fluid flows through stationary particle beds (periodic and cubic packing). To evaluate code performance and validate particle contact physics algorithm, we performed simulations of a representative experiment conducted at the University of California at Berkley for pebble flow through a narrow opening.

Kanarska, Y

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Proposal and testing for a fiber-optic-based measurement of flow vorticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by use of a fiber-optic coupler such that the resultant light detected by a photomul- tiplier becomes Tong, and Bruce J. Ackerson A fiber-optic arrangement is devised to measure the velocity difference, v as low as 50 m. The successful test of the fiber-optic technique in the laminar flow with one optical

Tong, Penger

54

Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Flow Test At Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Dick Benoit, Gwen Holdmann, David Blackwell (2007) Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Chena_Area_(Benoit,_Et_Al.,_2007)&oldid=387083" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

56

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)) [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Specification of Surface Roughness for Hydraulic Flow Test Plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to determine the surface roughness of the corrosion layer on aluminum clad booster fuel plates for the proposed Gas Test Loop (GTL) system to be incorporated into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. A layer of boehmite (a crystalline, non-porous gamma-alumina hydrate) is typically pre-formed on the surface of the fuel cladding prior to exposure to reactor operation to prevent the uncontrolled buildup of corrosion product on the surface. A representative sample coupon autoclaved with the ATR driver fuel to produce the boehmite layer was analyzed using optical profilometry to determine the mean surface roughness, a parameter that can have significant impact on the coolant flow past the fuel plates. This information was used to specify the surface finish of mockup fuel plates for a hydraulic flow test model. The purpose of the flow test is to obtain loss coefficients describing the resistance of the coolant flow paths, which are necessary for accurate thermal hydraulic analyses of the water-cooled booster fuel assembly. It is recommended that the surface roughness of the boehmite layer on the fuel cladding be replicated for the flow test. While it is very important to know the order of magnitude of the surface roughness, this value does not need to be matched exactly. Maintaining a reasonable dimensional tolerance for the surface finish on each side of the 12 mockup fuel plates would ensure relative uniformity in the flow among the four coolant channels. Results obtained from thermal hydraulic analyses indicate that ±15% deviation from a surface finish (i.e., Ra) of 0.53 ìm would have a minimal effect on coolant temperature, coolant flow rate, and fuel temperature.

Donna Post Guillen; Timothy S. Yoder

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Benefits of the Multiple Echo Technique for Ultrasonic Thickness Testing  

SciTech Connect

Much effort has been put into determining methods to make accurate thickness measurements, especially at elevated temperatures. An accuracy of +/- 0.001 inches is typically noted for commercial ultrasonic thickness gauges and ultrasonic thickness techniques. Codes and standards put limitations on many inspection factors including equipment, calibration tolerance and temperature variations. These factors are important and should be controlled, but unfortunately do not guarantee accurate and repeatable measurements in the field. Most technicians long for a single technique that is best for every situation, unfortunately, there are no 'silver bullets' when it comes to nondestructive testing. This paper will describe and discuss some of the major contributors to measurement error as well as some advantages and limitations of multiple echo techniques and why multiple echo techniques should be more widely utilized for ultrasonic thickness measurements.

Elder, J.; Vandekamp, R.

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermally Induced Groundwater Flow Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the transient residual thermal signal resulting from an underground nuclear test (buried below the water table) and its potential to affect local groundwater flow and radionuclide migration in a saturated, fractured, volcanic aquifer system. Thermal profiles measured in a drillback hole between 154 days and 6.5 years after the test have been used to calibrate a non-isothermal model of fluid flow. In this process, they have estimated the magnitude and relative changes in permeability, porosity and fracture density between different portions of the disturbed and undisturbed geologic medium surrounding the test location. The relative impacts of buoyancy forces (arising from the thermal residual of the test and the background geothermal gradient) and horizontal pressure gradients on the post-test flow system are better understood. A transient particle/streamline model of contaminant transport is used to visualize streamlines and streaklines of the flow field and to examine the migration of non-reactive radionuclides. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand the effects of local and sub-regional geologic features, and the effects of fractured zones on the movement of groundwater and thermal energy. Conclusions regarding the overall effect of the thermal regime on the residence times and fluxes of radionuclides out of the system are drawn, and implications for more complicated, reactive contaminant transport are discussed.

Maxwell, R.M.; Tompson, A.F.B.; Rambo, J.T.; Carle, S.F.; Pawloski, G.A.

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (DOE GTP) Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Pilgrim Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Pilgrim_Hot_Springs_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402456" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863028959 Varnish cache server

62

Flow Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511312" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

63

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been

64

Flow reference method testing and analysis: Field test plan, Texas Utilities Decordova Steam Electric Station  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the experimental design and test plan for the first of three field tests that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted in 1997 as part of a major study to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The experimental design involved four test teams taking concurrent in-stack measurements with velocity sensing probes. Seven types of probes were included in the study. Three test matrices were used to gather data for inter-probe and inter-team comparisons and to assess the impact of velocity decline near the stack wall on volumetric flow measurements.

Lieberman, E.; Werner, A.S.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fuzzy gain scheduling technique for power flow control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An application of fuzzy logic based control for power systems governing multiple Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices is described here. Sufficiently accurate relations have been derived to determine setpoints of FACTS ... Keywords: AC transmission, FACTS devices, Switzerland, flexible alternating current transmission system, fuzzy control, fuzzy gain scheduling, fuzzy logic, power flow control, power systems, sensitivity analysis

Alexandre Oudalov; Petr Korba; Rachid Cherkaoui; Alain J. Germond

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Pre-test estimates of temperature decline for the LANL Fenton Hill Long-Term Flow Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pre-test predications for the Long-Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill were made using two models. Both models are dependent on estimates of the ``effective`` reservoir volume accessed by the fluid and the mean fracture spacing (MFS) of major joints for fluid flow. The effective reservoir volume was estimated using a variety of techniques, and the range of values for the MFS was set through experience in modeling the thermal cooldown of other experimental HDR reservoirs. The two pre-test predictions for cooldown to 210{degrees}C (a value taken to compare the models) from initial temperature of 240{degrees}C are 6.1 and 10.7 years. Assuming that a minimum of 10{degrees}C is required to provide an unequivocal indication of thermal cooldown, both models predict that the reservoir will not exhibit observable cooldown for at least two years.

Robinson, B.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kruger, P. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Test experience with multiterminal HVDC load flow and stability programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A powerful new set of load flow and stability programs for the study of HVdc systems has recently been completed. During the development of the programs novel applications of multiterminal HVdc systems were investigated, firstly on a large test system and later on actual utility models. This paper describes the test systems used, the HVdc systems studied and some of the interesting system related aspects of the HVdc system performance.

Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); McNichol, J.R. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); Gulachenski, E.M.; Doe, S. (New England Power Service Co., Westboro, MA (US)); Balu, N.J. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Auto-Adaptive Multidomain Spectral Technique for Linear Stability Analysis: Application to Viscous Compressible Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An auto-adaptive multidomain pseudo-spectral technique is considered in order to solve the linear stability problem of viscous compressible flows. Both the locations of the interfaces and the parameters of the mappings in each subdomain are adapted by ... Keywords: Rayleigh–Taylor instability, compressible viscous flows, spectral multidomain method

Eric Serre; Serge Gauthier

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Degassing and two-phase flow pilot hole test report  

SciTech Connect

A pilot hole test was conducted to support the design of the Degassing of Groundwater and Two-Phase Flow experiments planned for the Hard Rock Laboratory, Aespoe, Sweden. The test consisted of a sequence of constant pressure borehole inflow tests (CPTs) and pressure recovery tests (PRTs) in borehole KA2512A. The test sequence was designed to detect degassing effects from the change in transmissivity, or hydraulic conductivity, and storativity when the borehole pressure is lowered below the groundwater bubble pressure. The entire 37.3m of the borehole section was tested without packers. Flow response to pressure changes in CPTs occurred rapidly. Flowrates fluctuated before attaining a steady trend, probably due to effective stress changes when borehole pressure was reduced for the first time. These factors decreased the sensitivity of type-curve fits to values of specific storage. The relationship between borehole pressure and steady-state flowrates was linear over borehole pressures of 1500 kPa (abs) down to 120 kPa (abs) during testing in December 1994, indicating that processes that may change hydraulic conductivity at low borehole pressures, such as degassing, calcite precipitation or turbulence, did not occur to a measurable degree. Test results during January and February of 1995 suggest that degassing may have occurred. The hydraulic conductivity measured at a borehole pressure equal to 120 kPa (abs) was 20% lower than the hydraulic conductivity measured at a borehole pressure of 1500 kPa (abs); the latter value was 10% lower than the hydraulic conductivity measured in December, 1994. The volumetric gas content measured during this time was 1% v/v. Pressures in monitoring well KA2511A responded to the testing in KA2512A. Step-changes in flowrates coincided with blasting at 3300-3400 m tunnel length. The magnitude of these changes was greater at the lower borehole pressures. Step increases in pressures in KA2511A also coincided with the blasts.

Geller, J.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jarsjoe, J. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Water Resource Engineering

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bull Run Fossil Plant Online Coal Flow Adjustable Riffler Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler optimization at fossil-fired power plants would be enhanced if the flow of coal and air in individual pulverizer fuel delivery lines could be balanced. The static splitter devices currently in service do not adequately maintain coal balance, especially when plant conditions change. This report summarizes the results of a test program to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel riffler to make online adjustments to a stream of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal at a working plant. The demon...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

71

Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filter Testing in Support of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parsons and its team members General Atomics and Energy Solutions conducted a series of tests to assess the constructability and performance of the Cross-Flow Filter (CFF) system specified for the Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The testing determined the optimum flow rates, operating pressures, filtrate-flow control techniques, and cycle timing for filter back pulse and chemical cleaning. Results have verified the design assumptions made and have confirmed the suitability of cross-flow filtration for use in the SWPF. In conclusion: The CFF Test Program demonstrated that the SWPF CFF system could be successfully fabricated, that the SWPF CFF design assumptions were conservative with respect to filter performance and provided useful information on operational parameters and techniques. The filter system demonstrated performance in excess of expectations. (authors)

Stephens, A.B.; Gallego, R.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Singer, S.A.; Swanson, B.L. [Energy Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States); Bartling, K. [Parsons, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Core-support performance test in the component-flow test loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CFTL is a closed-circuit, out-of-pile loop circulating helium at temperatures and pressures anticipated in gas-cooled reactors at flows sufficiently large to perform engineering-scale tests. It has the present capability for fast data acquisition and the control and measurement of gaseous impurities, and it has the potential to perform controlled rapid transients in pressure, flow, and power. The initial HTGR component to be tested in the CFTL is the core support structure for the prismatic bed HTGR. This structure has vertical posts mating with post seats, each with spherical curvatures of different radii. At the point of contact, Hertzian stress concentrations are produced. Under the load of the weight of the core plus the pressure gradient, the graphite will deform until the stress is below its yield limit. The Core Support Performance Test (CSPT) will subject this interface, using actual materials and geometry, to impure helium at HTGR operating temperatures, pressures, and flows under a simulated structural load. The concentration of water, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide will be controlled so that six months of test operation will simulate 40 years of reactor operation. The specification of this concentration is based on existing studies involving small graphite samples exposed to a variety of conditions at a few atmospheres. The extrapolation to concentrations that will duplicate both the amount and the nature of the corrosion is based on the oxidation kinetics of the Gadsby equation as parameterized by Velasquez. Ports are provided in the test vessel for in situ inspection of the graphite during the test period. Post-test examination of the structure will be used to correlate its performance with available computational methods.

Sanders, J.P.; Grindell, A.G.; Eatherly, W.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Technique d'auto test pour les imageurs CMOS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Le test en production des imageurs CMOS est réalisé avec des testeurs qui utilisent des sources de lumière précises, aussi bien au niveau du test… (more)

Lizarraga, L.

74

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Flow Test At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Page Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Flow Test At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

76

Flow Test At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

77

Flow Test At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Flint...

78

Flow Test At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mcgee Mountain...

79

Flow Test At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area...

80

Flow Test At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Pueblo Area...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area...

82

Flow Test At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Crump's Hot...

83

Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

84

Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

85

Flow Test At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location New River Area...

86

Flow Test At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry...

87

Flow Test At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Soda Lake...

88

Flow Test At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot...

89

Film thickness measurement techniques applied to micro-scale two-phase flow systems  

SciTech Connect

Recently semi-empirical models to estimate flow boiling heat transfer coefficient, saturated CHF and pressure drop in micro-scale channels have been proposed. Most of the models were developed based on elongated bubbles and annular flows in the view of the fact that these flow patterns are predominant in smaller channels. In these models, the liquid film thickness plays an important role and such a fact emphasizes that the accurate measurement of the liquid film thickness is a key point to validate them. On the other hand, several techniques have been successfully applied to measure liquid film thicknesses during condensation and evaporation under macro-scale conditions. However, although this subject has been targeted by several leading laboratories around the world, it seems that there is no conclusive result describing a successful technique capable of measuring dynamic liquid film thickness during evaporation inside micro-scale round channels. This work presents a comprehensive literature review of the methods used to measure liquid film thickness in macro- and micro-scale systems. The methods are described and the main difficulties related to their use in micro-scale systems are identified. Based on this discussion, the most promising methods to measure dynamic liquid film thickness in micro-scale channels are identified. (author)

Tibirica, Cristiano Bigonha; do Nascimento, Francisco Julio; Ribatski, Gherhardt [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos (Brazil)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests  

SciTech Connect

The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Synthesis Techniques for Pseudo-Random Built-In Self-Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Built-in self-test (BIST) techniques enable an integrated circuit (IC) to test itself. BIST reduces test and maintenance costs for an IC by eliminating the need for expensive test equipment and by allowing fast location of failed ICs in a system. BIST ...

Nur A. Touba

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Experimental Test of Complementarity by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have tested complementarity for the ensemble-averaged spin states of nuclei $^{13}$C in the molecule of $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ by the use of the spin states of another nuclei $^{1}$H as the path marker. It turns out that the wave-particle duality holds when one merely measures the probability density of quantum states, and that the wave- and particle-like behavior is simultaneously observed with the help of measuring populations and coherence in a single nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) experiment. Effects of path-marking schemes and causes of the appearance and disappearance of the wave behavior are analysed.

Xiwen Zhu; Ximing Fang; Xinhua Peng; Mang Feng; Kelin Gao; Fei Du

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of structural health monitoring techniques using dynamics testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today`s society depends upon many structures (such as aircraft, bridges, wind turbines, offshore platforms, buildings, and nuclear weapons) which are nearing the end of their design lifetime. Since these structures cannot be economically replaced, techniques for structural health monitoring must be developed and implemented. Modal and structural dynamics measurements hold promise for the global non-destructive inspection of a variety of structures since surface measurements of a vibrating structure can provide information about the health of the internal members without costly (or impossible) dismantling of the structure. In order to develop structural health monitoring for application to operational structures, developments in four areas have been undertaken within this project: operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage identification. The developments in each of these four aspects of structural health monitoring have been exercised on a broad range of experimental data. This experimental data has been extracted from structures from several application areas which include aging aircraft, wind energy, aging bridges, offshore structures, structural supports, and mechanical parts. As a result of these advances, Sandia National Laboratories is in a position to perform further advanced development, operational implementation, and technical consulting for a broad class of the nation`s aging infrastructure problems.

James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Szpakiewicz, M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

STATIC SODIUM TEST OF WESTINGHOUSE FLOW CONTROLLER BEARING  

SciTech Connect

Tests were carried out to determine the action of a static sodium environment on a special high-temperature ball bearing while operating at the specified speed and loading. The test bearing was operated at 85 rpm and 870 pounds axial load for 385 hr at 1000 deg F. Visual inspection of the test bearing showed a very marked increase in roughness of both the balls and the ball races. Details of the measurements and a photograph of the bearing parts after test are given. On the basis of this test it did not appear that this bearing will be satisfactory for the service intended. (M.C.G.)

Cygan, R.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Pre-test CFD Calculations for a Bypass Flow Standard Problem  

SciTech Connect

The bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is the flow that occurs between adjacent graphite blocks. Gaps exist between blocks due to variances in their manufacture and installation and because of the expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. Although the temperature of fuel compacts and graphite is sensitive to the presence of bypass flow, there is great uncertainty in the level and effects of the bypass flow. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program at the Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken to produce experimental data of isothermal bypass flow between three adjacent graphite blocks. These data are intended to provide validation for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the bypass flow. Such validation data sets are called Standard Problems in the nuclear safety analysis field. Details of the experimental apparatus as well as several pre-test calculations of the bypass flow are provided. Pre-test calculations are useful in examining the nature of the flow and to see if there are any problems associated with the flow and its measurement. The apparatus is designed to be able to provide three different gap widths in the vertical direction (the direction of the normal coolant flow) and two gap widths in the horizontal direction. It is expected that the vertical bypass flow will range from laminar to transitional to turbulent flow for the different gap widths that will be available.

Rich Johnson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Multivortex micromixing: novel techniques using Dean flows for passive microfluidic mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixing of fluids at the microscale poses a variety of challenges, many of which arise from the fact that molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism in the laminar flow regime. The unfavorable combination of low Reynolds numbers and high P�©clet numbers implies that cumbersomely long microchannels are required to achieve efficient levels of micromixing. Although considerable progress has been made toward overcoming these limitations (e.g., exploiting chaotic effects), many techniques employ intricate 3-D flow networks whose complexity can make them difficult to build and operate. In this research, we show that enhanced micromixing can be achieved using topologically simple and easily fabricated planar 2-D microchannels by simply introducing curvature and changes in width in a prescribed manner. This is accomplished by harnessing a synergistic combination of (i) Dean vortices that arise in the vertical plane of curved channels as a consequence of an interplay between inertial, centrifugal, and viscous effects, and (ii) expansion vortices that arise in the horizontal plane due to an abrupt increase in a conduitâ��s cross-sectional area. We characterize these effects using top-view imaging of aqueous streams labeled with tracer dyes and confocal microscopy of aqueous fluorescent dye streams, and by observing binding interactions between an intercalating dye and double-stranded DNA. These mixing approaches are versatile, scalable, and can be straightforwardly integrated as generic components in a variety of lab-on-a-chip systems.

Sudarsan, Arjun Penubolu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Magnetic Mapping, a way to test and understand current flows in thin and bulk superconductors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well its dependence on the magnetic field or its behaviour in the flux flow regime. However, the directMagnetic Mapping, a way to test and understand current flows in thin and bulk superconductors. X mcarrera@macs.udl.es Keywords: Superconducting ceramics, Inverse problem, critical current

Amoros, Jaume

100

Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The validation of a service life of 20 years for low-cost photovoltaic arrays must be accomplished through accelerated life-prediction tests. A methodology for such tests has been developed in a preceding study. The results discussed consist of the initial identification and assessment of all known measurement techniques and instruments that might be used in these life-prediction tests. Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories--chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and ''other physicals''. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life-prediction tests of arrays are then selected. These recommended techniques and their characteristics are described. Recommendations are made regarding establishment of the adequacy, particularly with respect to precision, of the more fully developed techniques for this application, and regarding the experimental evaluation of promising developmental techniques. Measurement needs not satisfied by presently available techniques/instruments are also identified.

Noel, G.T.; Sliemers, F.A.; Deringer, G.C.; Wood, V.E.; Wilkes, K.E.; Gaines, G.B.; Carmichael, D.C.

1978-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The validation of a service life of 20 years for low-cost photovoltaic arrays must be accomplished through accelerated life-prediction tests. A methodology for such tests has been developed in a preceding study. The results discussed consist of the initial identification and assessment of all known measurement techniques and instruments that might be used in these life-prediction tests. Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories--chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and ''other physicals''. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life-prediction tests of arrays are then selected. These recommended techniques and their characteristics are described. Recommendations are made regarding establishment of the adequacy, particularly with respect to precision, of the more fully developed techniques for this application, and regarding the experimental evaluation of promising developmental techniques. Measurement needs not satisfied by presently available techniques/instruments are also identified.

Noel, G.T.; Sliemers, F.A.; Deringer, G.C.; Wood, V.E.; Wilkes, K.E.; Gaines, G.B.; Carmichael, D.C.

1978-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Flow tests of the Gladys McCall...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search...

103

Test report, air flow control device for 241-SY waste tankventilation  

SciTech Connect

This documents the testing of a passively operated, constant air flow control device for in-duct applications on waste tank ventilation systems in the 50-1000 SCFM range.

Tuck, J.A.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fuel Nozzle Flow Testing Guideline for Gas Turbine Low-NOx Combustion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of dry low-NOx (DLN) gas turbine combustion systems capable of achieving single-digit emission levels requires precise control of the fuel/air ratio within each combustor. The primary means of maintaining the required fuel/air ratio control is through flow testing designed to ensure even distribution of fuel to both individual fuel nozzles and combustion chambers around the gas turbine. This report provides fuel nozzle flow testing guidelines for advanced gas turbine ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long-Term Flow Test  

SciTech Connect

The long term flow test (LTFT) of the worlds largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. This facility should be designed and engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, a wide variety of techniques to advance the state-of-the-art of HDR technology must be pursued to develop this infant technology rapidly to its maximum potential. A number of design and operational techniques have been conceived which may lead to improved economics in HDR systems. After careful technical and economic scrutiny, those showing merit should be vigorously pursued. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

Duchane, David

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed to utilize the High Intensity Infrared lamp located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the measurement of thermal conductivity of bulk refractory materials at elevated temperatures. The applicability of standardized test methods to determine the thermal conductivity of refractory materials at elevated temperatures is limited to small sample sizes (laser flash) or older test methods (hot wire, guarded hot plate), which have their own inherent problems. A new method, based on the principle of the laser flash method, but capable of evaluating test specimens on the order of 200 x 250 x 50 mm has been developed. Tests have been performed to validate the method and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Loveland, Erick R [ORNL; Prigmore, Andre L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

An Accurate Jitter Estimation Technique for Efficient High Speed I/O Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique for estimating total jitter that, along with a loopback-based margining test, can be applied to test high speed serial interfaces. We first present the limitations of the existing estimation method, which is based on ...

Dongwoo Hong; Kwang-Ting (Tim) Cheng

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The application of non-destructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NonDestructive Testing (NDT), also called NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE), is commonly used to monitor structures before, during, and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electron shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Furthermore, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

Sutherland, H.; Beattie, A.; Hansche, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Musial, W.; Allread, J.; Johnson, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Summers, M. [United Technologies, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing Tracer Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Tracer Testing Details Activities (9) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture zones and formation permeability Hydrological: Flow rates, flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity Thermal: Dictionary.png Tracer Testing: A method based on injecting chemical tracers into the reservoir and monitoring how long it takes and where those tracers travel. The purpose is to model subsurface hydrothermal flow characteristics.

110

Superconducting current transformer for testing Nb3Sn cable splicing technique  

SciTech Connect

To provide a quick feedback on different approaches to superconducting cable splicing design and assembly techniques, a superconducting current transformer that can deliver more than 20 kA for testing splice samples has been designed and fabricated. The existing infrastructure of the Short Sample Test Facility at Fermilab, including its cryostat, power supply, and data acquisition system, was used for housing and operating the transformer. This report presents the design features of the transformer and the main results of cable splice tests.

Nicolai Andreev et al.

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Flow-loop endurance tests compare float performance  

SciTech Connect

Endurance tests have identified qualities and characteristics of the three types of cement float valves-flapper, ball, and plunger. Plunger valves last the longest. Flappers have the lowest pressure drop, but less endurance. Uncoated ball valves outlast coated ones, but stability is a problem with each. Float equipment consists of structural elements and a nonreturn or check valve. Three basic nonreturn valve design types are commonly used in float equipment. These are the ball, the flapper and the plunger. This article reviews these basic design types and examines variations in configurations and the operating characteristics. The operating characteristics are compared by impact on drilling.

Stringfellow, B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Standard Test Method for Particle Size Distribution of Alumina or Quartz Powders by Electrical Sensing Zone Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Test Method for Particle Size Distribution of Alumina or Quartz Powders by Electrical Sensing Zone Technique

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Closed-loop flow test Miravalles Geothermal Field well log results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE) conducted a closed-loop flow test in the Miravalles Geothermal Field. The closed-loop test was started in May and ran through August of 1990. The effluent from the production well PG-11 was carried by a pipeline through a monitor station to the injection well PG-2. Before starting the long-term flow test in May, cold-water injection experiments were performed in each well to determine the pressure and temperature response. A series of downhole measurements were made in each well to obtain background information. The downhole measurements were repeated in August just before terminating the flow test to evaluate the results.

Dennis, B.; Eden, G.; Lawton, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Date: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Innovation for Our Energy Future Shyam S. Kocha: NREL Yannick Garsany: EXCET/NRL Deborah Myers: ANL https://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/webinars.html Outline 1) Background 2) Experimental Aspects of RDE Testing 3) Basic Measurement Technique & Analysis 4) Parameters Affecting RDE Activity Measurements 1) Impact of Film Deposition & Drying Techniques 2) Impact of Ink Formulation 3) Impact of Nafion Incorporation 4) Impact of particle size effects 5) Correlation with MEA data 5) Electrocatalyst Durability using RDE Measurements 6) Summary 2 Background PEMFC MEA Thin-film RDE Trends of activity and durability in Rotating Disc Electrode (RDE)

115

Estimation of Critical Flow Velocity for Collapse of Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations performed to determine the critical flow velocity for plate collapse due to static instability for the Gas Test Loop booster fuel assembly. Long, slender plates arranged in a parallel configuration can experience static divergence and collapse at sufficiently high coolant flow rates. Such collapse was exhibited by the Oak Ridge High Flux Reactor in the 1940s and the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 1950s. Theoretical formulas outlined by Miller, based upon wide-beam theory and Bernoulli’s equation, were used for the analysis. Calculations based upon Miller’s theory show that the actual coolant flow velocity is only 6% of the predicted critical flow velocity. Since there is a considerable margin between the theoretically predicted plate collapse velocity and the design velocity, the phenomena of plate collapse due to static instability is unlikely.

Guillen; Mark J. Russell

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analysis and Design Significance of A-11 Flow-Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of the experimental data on seal pressure distributions obtained from the A-11 Flow Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III, with analytical results including porous flow through the unimpregnated inner reflector cylinder for the same operating conditions show generally very good agreement. The principal deviations between analysis and experiment occurs when high pressure ratios exist across the last seal. Additional investigation, both in the relationship used in the analytical model and in the experimental area, are required to determine the cause of the deviation found between analysis and experiment when the pressure ratio across the last seal is near critical. As a result of this comparison, it appears that the analytical methods and assumtions made in predicting unheated seal pressure distributions are resonable, and may be used with confidence in the test prediction of the NRX-A1 cold flow test.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization and radial flow through permeability tests for cementitous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturated permeability is likely a good method for characterizing the susceptibility of portland cement concrete to various forms of degradation; although no widely accepted test exists to measure this property. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization test is a potential solution for measuring concrete permeability. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization (HDP) test is compared with the radial flow through (RFT) test and the solid cylinder dynamic pressurization (SDP) test to assess the accuracy and reliability of the HDP test. The three test methods, mentioned above, were used to measure the permeability of Vycor glass and portland cement paste and the results of the HDP test were compared with the results from the SDP and RFT tests. When the HDP and RFT test results were compared, the measured difference between the mean values of the two tests was 40% for Vycor glass and 47% for cement paste. When the HDP and SDP tests results were compared, the measured difference with Vycor glass was 53%. The cement paste permeability values could not be compared in the same manner since they were tested at various ages to show the time dependency of permeability in cement paste. The results suggest good correlation between the HDP test and both the SDP and RFT tests. Furthermore, good repeatability was shown with low coefficients of variation in all test permutations. Both of these factors suggest that the new HDP test is a valid tool for measuring the permeability of concrete materials.

Jones, Christopher Andrew

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report  

SciTech Connect

One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The application of nondestructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NonDestructive Testing (NDT) is commonly used to monitor structures before, during and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The test used a three-point spanwise load distribution to load a 7.9-m blade to failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electronic shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states with an accuracy of a few microns. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Further, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Musial, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

CFD Simulation and Experimental Testing of Multiphase Flow Inside the MVP Electrical Submersible Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MVP is a special type of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) manufactured by Baker Hughes, model no. G470, and is capable of handling multiphase flow up to 70% Gas Volume Fraction (GVF). Flows at high GVF cause conventional ESPs to surge. However, the special design of the impeller blades of the MVP ESP enables it to handle higher GVF. Dynamic behavior of the multiphase flow is studied experimentally and theoretically for this pump for the first time. In this work, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of an entire pump and detailed experimental analysis are performed. Meshing and CFD simulations are performed using the commercially available software ANSYS Fluent. An experimental facility has been designed and constructed to test the pump at different operating conditions. The pump is modeled and tested at two speeds; 3300 and 3600 rpm, using air-water mixtures with GVFs of 0, 5, 10, 25, 32 and 35%. The flow loop is controlled to produce different suction pressures up to 300psi. Pump pressure head is used to validate the CFD model for both single and two phase flows. Single phase CFD model was validated at 100 psi inlet pressure, while two phase models were validated at 200 psi inlet pressure. CFD simulations can predict the behavior of the pump at different speeds, flow rates, GVFs, and inlet pressures. Different diffuser designs are studied and simulated to improve the multistage pump performance. Enhanced diffuser designs increased the pump pressure head to up to 3.2%.

Rasmy Marsis, Emanuel 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for subsequent modeling studies at Climax. The objectives of the Climax Mine sub-CAU work are to (1) provide simulated heads and groundwater flows for the northern boundaries of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model, while incorporating alternative conceptualizations of the hydrogeologic system with their associated uncertainty, and (2) provide radionuclide fluxes from the three tests in the Climax stock using modeling techniques that account for groundwater flow in fractured granite. Meeting these two objectives required two different model scales. The northern boundary groundwater fluxes were addressed using the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model (Belcher, 2004) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey as a modeling framework, with refined hydrostratigraphy in a zone north of Yucca Flat and including Climax stock. Radionuclide transport was simulated using a separate model confined to the granite stock itself, but linked to regional groundwater flow through boundary conditions and calibration targets.

K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

1995 verification flow testing of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent flow testing of the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir has demonstrated that engineered geothermal systems can be shut-in for extended periods of d= with apparently no adverse effects. However, when this particular reservoir at Venton Hill was shut-in for 2 years in a pressurized condition, natural convection within the open-jointed reservoir region appears to have leveled out the preexisting temperature gradient so that the gradient has now approached a condition more typical of liquid-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs which air invariably almost isothermal due to natural convection. As a result of the sudden flow impedance reduction that led to an almost 50% increase in Production flow new the end of the Second Phase of the LTFR in May 1993, we were uncertain as to the state of the reservoir after being shut-in for 2 years. The flow performance observed during the current testing was found to be intermediate between that at-the end of the Second Phase of the LTFT and that following, the subsequent sudden flow increase, implying that whatever caused the sudden reduction in impedance in the first place is probably somehow associated with the cooldown of the reservoir near the injection interval, since temperature recovery at the surfaces of the surrounding open joints is the most obvious phenomenon expected to occur over time within the reservoir.

Brown, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comprehensive functional testing and dynamic compensation techniques for Cellular Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular Neural Networks (CNN's) are analog, non-linear, dynamic systems which are especially well suited for solving problems in the areas of image processing and pattern recognition. State of the art implementations of two-dimensional CNN's arrays are fabricated in sub-micron Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technologies. The increase in circuit integration has driven the need to develop robust testing methods to establish baseline functionality of CNN'S. Present techniques for testing CNN hardware provide only limited capabilities, often require additional hardware, and are limited to specific topologies. The goal of this thesis is to provide a deterministic method to conduct functional testing and dynamic compensation of CNN arrays independent of the size or topology of the array. The methods provide comprehensive, non-invasive techniques for verifying the integrity of each of the functional paths as well as procedures to measure and minimize parametric faults in real CNN hardware. The functional tests consist of a sequence of inputs to the array that insure each node in the system level representation of the CNN is toggled and propagated to the output where it is compared to a known good output vector set. The dynamic compensation strategies characterize and attempt to minimize or eliminate the effect of undesirable parametric faults such as time-constant mismatches, non-linearity in the multipliers and state nodes, and system offsets. Whenever possible, the compensation techniques are carried out locally on each cell independently, otherwise a global compensation approach is used. Numerous CNN architectures had to be modeled to provide insight into different problems faced when testing a VLSI implementations of CNN arrays. For this reason, a set of software tools was developed to select CNN macromodels of different complexities, combine input stimulus files in a logical manner, and generate the necessary files for simulation. The simulation results were used to design, refine, and measure the effectiveness of the proposed testing strategies.

Grimaila, Michael Russell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analysis and testing the performance of a centrifugal two phase flow separator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis and testing the performance of an 8 in., 1.72 ft high centrifugal cyclone separator for flows up to 4.0 lbs/s and pressures ranging from 10 to 60 psig. Conclusions drawn are based on inlet steam qualities of 23 to 27 percent (x% = m/sub s//m /sub t/) .99% and better steam quality is achieved up to 3 lbs/s under 50 and 60 psig. Breakdown flow rate is found to be a linear function of separator pressure.

Mirza-Moghadam, A.V.

127

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Validation Analysis of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Central Nevada Test Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site undergoing environmental restoration. The CNTA is located about 95 km northeast of Tonopah, Nevada, and 175 km southwest of Ely, Nevada (Figure 1.1). It was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (DOE's predecessor agency) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site [NTS]) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless underground nuclear test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 2000). A three-dimensional flow and transport model was created for the CNTA site (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and determined acceptable by DOE and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for predicting contaminant boundaries for the site.

A. Hassan; J. Chapman; H. Bekhit; B. Lyles; K. Pohlmann

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Comparison of calculated results from two analytical models with measured data from a heat-exchanger flow test  

SciTech Connect

Predicted results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model were compared with measured results from an air flow test on a half-scale model of the auxiliary heat exchanger for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Measurements of both velocity and pressure were made within the heat exchanger shell side flow field. These measurements were compared with calculated results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model. Both analytical models predicted early identical results which, except for some minor anomalies, compared favorably with the measured data.

Carosella, D.P.; Pavlics, P.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sakarya, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modified simulated annealing technique based optimal power flow with FACTS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated annealing is a probabilistic method for finding the global minimum of a cost function that may possess several local minima. In this paper, a Modified Simulated Annealing (MSA) technique is proposed to minimise the generation cost in Optimal ...

Subrata Majumdar; Ajoy Kumar Chakraborty; P. K. Chattopadhyay; Tulika Bhattacharjee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coupled hydrodynamic-structural analysis of an integral flowing sodium test loop in the TREAT reactor  

SciTech Connect

A hydrodynamic-structural response analysis of the Mark-IICB loop was performed for the TREAT (Transient Reactor Test Facility) test AX-1. Test AX-1 is intended to provide information concerning the potential for a vapor explosion in an advanced-fueled LMFBR. The test will be conducted in TREAT with unirradiated uranium-carbide fuel pins in the Mark-IICB integral flowing sodium loop. Our analysis addressed the ability of the experimental hardware to maintain its containment integrity during the reference accident postulated for the test. Based on a thermal-hydraulics analysis and assumptions for fuel-coolant interaction in the test section, a pressure pulse of 144 MPa maximum pressure and pulse width of 1.32 ms has been calculated as the reference accident. The response of the test loop to the pressure transient was obtained with the ICEPEL and STRAW codes. Modelling of the test section was completed with STRAW and the remainder of the loop was modelled by ICEPEL.

Zeuch, W.R.; A-Moneim, M.T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Status of Proof-Of-Concept testing at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-concept (POC) testing, and collection and evaluation of data continued at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility during the past year. Following four preliminary tests firing Rosebud coal in 1991 to establish base conditions for the Rosebud coal POC tests, three POC tests were run in 1992, and a fourth test early in 1993. Major equipment additions or modifications included installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which replaced a badly deteriorated venturi. This component also provides improved capability to meet Tennessee pollution regulations while operating the dry ESP and/or baghouse off design, or if one of these two control devices does not function properly. Improvements were also made to the dry ESP prior to the 1993 test, which appear to have improved the performance of this equipment. This paper will present an overview of the major results obtained during the Rosebud coal POC tests, including the performance of the dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Differences between the Rosebud and Illinois coals will be described, but it is emphasized that these observations are based on incomplete results for the Rosebud coal.

Attig, R.C.; Chapman, J.N.; Johanson, N.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Techniques Employed to Conduct Postshot Drilling at the former Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Postshot drilling provided essential data on the results of the underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), now identified as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). It was the means by which samples from the zone of interest were obtained for radiochemical analysis. This handbook describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted postshot drilling operations at the NTS, and it provides a general understanding of the process. Postshot drilling is a specialized application of rotary drilling. Accordingly, this handbook gives a brief description of rotary drilling in Section 2 to acquaint the reader with the general subject before proceeding to the specialized techniques used in postshot drilling. In Section 3, the handbook describes the typical postshot drilling situation at the former NTS and the drilling methods used. Section 4 describes the typical sequence of operations in postshot drilling at the former NTS. Detailed information on special equipment and techniques is given in a series of appendices (A through F) at the end of the handbook.

Dekin, W D

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey, in situ measurements with high-purity germanium (HPGe) and hand-held LaBr3 systems, soil sampling with a variety of tools, and laboratory gamma spectrometric analysis of those samples. A further benefit of the measurement campaign was to gain familiarity with the many logistical aspects of performing radiological field work at NNSS ahead of the PRex. Many practical lessons concerning the proper methodologies and logistics of using the surveying and sampling equipment were noted. These Lessons Learned are compiled together in Appendix A. The vehicle-based survey was successful in that it found a previously unknown hotspot (determined to be 232Th) while it demonstrated that a better method for keeping a serpentine track without staking was needed. Some of the soil sampling equipment was found to be impractical for the application, though core sampling would not be the correct way to take soil samples for a fresh vent deposit (as opposed to an old site like DILUTED WATERS). Due to the site’s age, 137Cs was the only fission radioisotope identified, though others were searched for. While not enough samples were taken and analyzed to definitively link the 137Cs to DILUTED WATERS as opposed to other NNSS activities, results were consistent with the historical DILUTED WATERS plume. MDAs were compared for soil sampling and in situ measurements.

Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford Site in Washington state. Previous studies of these flow systems used chloride as a tracer to determine the transverse dispersivities of several of the Hanford flow systems. This study analyzes three reactive solute distributions, two of which are coincident, to determine aquifer and solute reactions parameters. In addition to modeling the transport of two solutes, a chemical speciation model, MINTEQA2, was used to determine saturation indices for the sample waters in an effort to verify observed secondary mineralization. Boron and potassium were the two solute distributions modeled in this study. The analytical model results accurately reproduce the observed field conditions, comply with the assumptions of the conceptual model, and match the results of the previous chloride study. The parameters determined by the analytical model include the source size and dimension, transverse dispersivity, and reaction rate/solute velocity ratio. The reaction rate term is used to describe the first order reactions experienced by boron and potassium. This term is believed to represent the affect of both precipitation and non-equilibrium sorption reactions. Due to the nature of the problem, this ratio cannot be separated for its individual terms. However, the relative rates of reaction for the solutes are determined.

Adamski, Mark Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Stress Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress Test Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Stress Test Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: Fluid flow direction Thermal: Dictionary.png Stress Test: A geologic stress analysis based on images of a borehole wall and hydraulic fracturing tests to characterize fracture orientations and stress magnitudes in order to identify stress planes and zones of potential permeability. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

139

Standard Test Method for Resin Flow of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the amount of resin flow that will take place from prepreg tape or sheet under given conditions of temperature and pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Environmental Assessment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Well Flow Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project, a coordinated research effort of the University of Hawaii, funded by the County and State of Hawaii, and ERDA, was initiated in 1973 in an effort to identify, generate, and use geothermal energy on the Big Island of Hawaii. A number of stages are involved in developing geothermal power resources: exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development, power plant and powerline construction, and full-scale production. Phase I of the Project, which began in the summer of 1973, involved conducting exploratory surveys, developing analytical models for interpretation of geophysical results, conducting studies on energy recovery from hot brine, and examining the legal and economic implications of developing geothermal resources in the state. Phase II of the Project, initiated in the summer of 1975, centers on drilling an exploratory research well on the Island of Hawaii, but also continues operational support for the geophysical, engineering, and socioeconomic activities delineated above. The project to date is between the test drilling and production testing phase. The purpose of this assessment is to describe the activities and potential impacts associated with extensive well flow testing to be completed during Phase II.

None

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tests of a two-stage, axial-flow, two-phase turbine  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase-flow turbine with two stages of axial-flow impulse rotors was tested with three different working-fluid mixtures at a shaft power of 30 kW. The turbine efficiency was 0.55 with nitrogen-and-water of 0.02 quality and 94 m/s velocity, 0.57 with Refrigerant 22 of 0.27 quality and 123 m/s velocity, and 0.30 with steam-and-water of 0.27 quality and 457 m/s velocity. The efficiencies with nitrogen-and-water and Refrigerant 22 were 86% of theoretical. At that fraction of theoretical, the efficiencies of optimized two-phase turbines would be in the low 60% range with organic working fluids and in the mid 50% range with steam-and-water. The recommended turbine design is a two-stage axial-flow impulse turbine followed by a rotary separator for discharge of separate liquid and gas streams and recovery of liquid pressure.

Elliott, D.G.

1982-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Finite-element analyses of blade and slot coating flows using an implicit pseudo-solid domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured grids  

SciTech Connect

In coating processes (e.g. in blade coating) the flow domain inherently contains free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and characteristic length scales of flow features in the dimension transverse to the web-movement vary by an order of magnitude or more from a fraction of a millimeter or more to tens of microns or less). The presence of free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and the sudden changes of flow geometry and directions create difficulties in theoretical analyses of such flows. Though simulations of coating flows via finite-element methods using structured grids have been reportedly demonstrated in the literature, achieving high efficiency of such numerical experiments remains a grand challenge -- mainly due to difficulties in local mesh-refinement and in avoiding unacceptably distorted grids. High efficiency of computing steady flow fields under various process conditions is crucial in shortening turn-around time in design and optimization of coating-flow processes. In this paper we employ a fully-implicit, pseudo-solid, domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured meshes to analyze blade and slot coating flows using Galerkin`s method with finite element basis functions. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our unique technique in circumventing shortcomings of mesh-motion schemes currently being used in the coating-flow research community. Our goal is to develop an efficient numerical tool, together with a suitable optimization toolkit, that can be used routinely in design and optimization of coating-flow processes.

Chen, K.S.; Schunk, P.R.; Sackinger, P.A.

1994-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Standard practice for measurement of the glass dissolution rate using the single-pass flow-through test method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice describes a single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method that can be used to measure the dissolution rate of a homogeneous silicate glass, including nuclear waste glasses, in various test solutions at temperatures less than 100°C. Tests may be conducted under conditions in which the effects from dissolved species on the dissolution rate are minimized to measure the forward dissolution rate at specific values of temperature and pH, or to measure the dependence of the dissolution rate on the concentrations of various solute species. 1.2 Tests are conducted by pumping solutions in either a continuous or pulsed flow mode through a reaction cell that contains the test specimen. Tests must be conducted at several solution flow rates to evaluate the effect of the flow rate on the glass dissolution rate. 1.3 This practice excludes static test methods in which flow is simulated by manually removing solution from the reaction cell and replacing it with fresh solution. 1.4 Tests may be conducted wit...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

146

Flow control techniques for real-time media applications in best-effort networks using fluid models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality of Service (QoS) in real-time media applications is an area of current interest because of the increasing demand for audio/video, and generally multimedia applications, over best effort networks, such as the Internet. Media applications are transported using the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and tend to use a disproportionate amount of network bandwidth as they do not perform congestion or flow control. Methods for application QoS control are desirable to enable users to perceive a consistent media quality. This can be accomplished by either modifying current protocols at the transport layer or by implementing new control algorithms at the application layer irrespective of the protocol used at the transport layer. The objective of this research is to improve the QoS delivered to end-users in real-time applications transported over best-effort packet-switched networks. This is accomplished using UDP at the transport layer, along with adaptive predictive and reactive control at the application layer. An end-to-end fluid model is used, including the source buffer, the network and the destination buffer. Traditional control techniques, along with more advanced adaptive predictive control methods, are considered in order to provide the desirable QoS and make a best-effort network an attractive channel for interactive multimedia applications. The effectiveness of the control methods, is examined using a Simulink-based fluid-level simulator in combination with trace files extracted from the well-known network simulator ns-2. The results show that improvement in real-time applications transported over best-effort networks using unreliable transport protocols, such as UDP, is feasible. The improvement in QoS is reflected in the reduction of flow loss at the expense of flow dead-time increase or playback disruptions or both.

Konstantinou, Apostolos

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Three-dimensional Fast Flux Test Facility plenum model turbulent flow prediction and data comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a scaled Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) upper plenum model were performed using the TEMPEST hydrothermal code. A standard k-element of model was used to describe turbulence through an effective viscosity. Comparisons with previously reported mean velocity and turbulence field data measured in the plenum model and two-dimensional numerical simulations using the TEACH code were made. Predicted horizontal and vertical mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energy are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data when inlet conditions of the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy are appropriately prescribed. The three-dimensional quarter-symmetry simulation predicts the turbulent kinetic energy field significantly better than the two-dimensional centerplane simulations. These results lead to conclusions concerning deficiencies in the experimental data and the turbulence model.

Eyler, L.L.; Sawdye, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Solderability test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

Yost, Fred (Cedar Crest, NM); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Short, Bruce (Beverly, MA); Giversen, Terri (Beverly, MA); Reed, Jimmy R. (Austin, TX)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solderability test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

HDR opportunities and challenges beyond the long-term flow test  

SciTech Connect

The long term flow test (LTFT) of the world's largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

HDR opportunities and challenges beyond the long-term flow test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long term flow test (LTFT) of the world's largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Application of the key curve and multi-specimen techniques to dynamic J-R Curve testing of alloy steel  

SciTech Connect

J-integral R-Curve tests were performed on three point bend specimens of a 3-Ni steel at three loading rates - quasi-static, intermediate (25mm/s) and a drop tower rate (2.54m/s). The key curve and multi-specimen procedures were employed for the higher rate tests and this investigation is focused primarily on details of the test method development. The multi-specimen and key curve techniques were found to yield upper shelf J-R Curves which were in substantial agreement at the elevated loading rates. Numerical smoothing techniques required to apply a key curve method appear to separate the oscillatory high frequency component from the load-displacement record. For the 3-Ni steel tested for this investigation both J/sub Ic/ and T were found to be elevated with increasing loading rate.

Joyce, J.A.; Hackett, E.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

PETERSEN SW

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of the optics of the Final Focus Test Beam using Lie algebra based techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the analysis of the beam optics of the final focus test beam at the Stanford Linear Collider using Lie algebra. (LSP).

Roy, G.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design and development of a test facility to study two-phase steam/water flow in porous media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach taken at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to obtain relative permeability curves and their dependence on fluid and matrix properties is summarized. Thermodynamic studies are carried out to develop the equations governing two-phase steam/water flow in porous media and to analyze the relationship between mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy. These relationships will be verified against experimental results and subsequently will be used to develop a field analysis technique to obtain in-situ relative permeability parameters. Currently our effort is concentrated on thermodynamic analysis and development of an experimental facility. Some of the findings of the theoretical work are presented and also the design and development effort for the experimental facility is described.

Verma, A.K.; Pruess, K.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A New Look Ahead Technique for Customized Testing in Digital Microfluidic Biochips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Micro fluidic biochips have been developed as a promising platform for Lab-on-chip systems that manipulate individual droplet of chemicals on a 2D planar array of electrodes. Due to the significance of the correctness of the results -- fault ... Keywords: Look ahead testing, Digital microfluidic biochips, structural test, completion time, routing algorithms, resource utilization

Pranab Roy; Hafizur Rahaman; Parthasarthi Dasgupta; Bhargab B. B. Bhattacharya

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.  

SciTech Connect

The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

Beattie, Alan G.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale oil agglomeration technology capable of increasing the recovery and improving the quality of fine coal strearrts. Two distinct agglomeration devices will be tested, namely, a conventional high shear mixer and a jet processor. To meet the overall objective an eleven task work plan has been designed. The work ranges from batch and continuous bench-scale testing through the design, commissioning and field testing of POC-scale agglomeration equipment.

None

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

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161

TESTS ON HALF-SCALE FLOW MODEL OF 40-MW(E) PROTOTYPE HTGR (PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION)  

SciTech Connect

A half-scale clear plastic nonnuclear flow model of the 40-Mw(e) Peach Bottom High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) vessel and internals was operated during the period from January 1981, through October 1981. The model was operated as an induced system using ambient air as the working fluid. The maximum Reynolds number achieved in the model was approximately one-half of the Reynolds number corresponding to the full-load design conditions in the prototype. The prototype reactor pressure-drop values extrapolated from the flow-model data indicated a pressure drop of 2.0 psi for a helium flow rate of 468,000 lb/hr and pressure of 350 psia, and a constant inlet and Outlet temperature of 650 deg F. The corresponding conservatively calculated pressure-drop value was approximately 2.9 psi. No areas of serious flow starvation were observed within the model during tests with flow through only one nozzle or through both nozzles. The inlet flow divided almost equally into the upward and downward directions. Regions where low velocities were indicated appeared to be turbulent and free from stagnation. Completely closing the four off-center openings in the top head reduced the flow of air from the outer flow jacket to the inner flow jackets by only about 20%. This result supported the design approach of providing only one nozzle in the center of the top head for flow from the outer to the inner flow jackets. The heat-transfer coefficients measured at the inner surface of the pressure vessel varied over a range from 50 to 200 Btu/(hr)(ft2)( deg F), at the design flow rate, and in general were about twice the caiculated values for corresponding points. The tilting reflector was found to be a workable concept. No vibration or movement could be induced in the core by manual manipulation of various reflector blocks. There was no detectable vibration of the core during any mode of flowmodel operation. (auth)

Ross, S.; Dav, E.A.; Skeehan, R.A.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

TransDPOR: a novel dynamic partial-order reduction technique for testing actor programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To detect hard-to-find concurrency bugs, testing tools try to systematically explore all possible interleavings of the transitions in a concurrent program. Unfortunately, because of the nondeterminism in concurrent programs, exhaustively exploring all ...

Samira Tasharofi; Rajesh K. Karmani; Steven Lauterburg; Axel Legay; Darko Marinov; Gul Agha

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Inferences about Shear Zone Flow Pathways between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel from Tracer Tests 10-01 to 12-02  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an analysis of several tracer tests conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, between 2010 and early 2012, with the objective of testing a conceptual model of flow through the shear zone in which the tracer tests were conducted. The analysis includes predictions of tracer residence times in each of two flow pathways in the shear zone as a function of injection and extraction flow rates in the tracer tests. Conclusions are: (1) Separation of shear zone flow between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel into two predominant flow pathways seems reasonable; (2) Conceptual model is that travel time in pathway 1 is dependent on injection flow rate, and travel time in pathway 2 is dependent on extraction flow rate; (3) Predict residence time (in hours) in Pathway 1 equal to {approx}9.9/(Injection Flow Rate, ml/min), provided injection interval flow is greater than about 0.15 ml/min (which is not reliably achieved under natural flow/dilution conditions after installation of CFM 11.00X holes); and (4) Predict residence time of {approx}8 hrs in Pathway 2 with extraction flow rate of 25 ml/min.

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Advancing weatherization performance: Measured results from the North Carolina field test of an advanced measure selection technique  

SciTech Connect

The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced residential energy conservation measure selection technique was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and energy savings achieved. One-hundred twenty low-income, single-family households served by three different weatherization agencies participated in the field test which was conducted between June 1989 and August 1991. Average heating energy savings were 33% for weatherizations based on the new technique and 23% for Retro-Tech-based weatherizations. Weatherizations based on the new technique achieved 43% more heating energy savings, cost around 10% less at two weatherization agencies and considerably more at the third, and were near equivalent in labor requirements. Major findings from the study include: (1) the advanced audit will install some measures in near identical quantities as Retro-Tech-based weatherizations and others in dramatically different quantities, (2) the advanced audit can significantly increase heating energy savings, (3) blower-door-directed air sealing can more than double the air leakage reductions achieved from standard air sealing techniques, (4) North Carolina low-income houses have much higher average leakage rates than similar New York houses but can be sealed as well or better, and (5) using the advanced audit will not increase weatherization costs and may actually lower costs for most weatherization agencies.

Sharp, T.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Built-in data-flow integration testing in large-scale component-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern large-scale component-based applications and service ecosystems are built following a number of different component models and architectural styles, such as the data-flow architectural style. In this style, each building block receives data from ...

Éric Piel; Alberto Gonzalez-Sanchez; Hans-Gerhard Gross

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluation of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir. Part I. Heat extraction performance and modeling. Part II. Flow characteristics and geochemistry. Part III. Reservoir characterization using acoustic techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On May 28, 1977, as the production well GT-2 at Fenton Hill was being redrilled along a planned trajectory, it intersected a low-impedance hydraulic fracture in direct communication with the injection well, EE-1. Thus, a necessary prerequisite for a full-scale test of the LASL Hot Dry Rock Concept, that of establishing a high flow rate between wells at low wellhead differential pressures, was satisified. Full-scale operation of the loop occurred for 75 days from January 27 to April 12, 1978. This test is referred to as Phase 1, Segment 2 and was designed to examine the thermal drawdown, flow characteristics, water losses, and fluid geochemistry of the system in detail. Results of these studies are the major topic of this paper which is divided into three separate parts covering first the heat extraction performance, second the flow characteristics and geochemistry and third the use of acoustic techniques to describe the geometry of the fracture system. In the third section, dual-well acoustic measurements used to detect fractures are described. These measurements were made using modified Dresser Atlas logging tools. Signals intersecting hydraulic fractures in the reservoir under both hydrostatic and pressurized conditions were simultaneously detected in both wells. Signal attenuation and characteristic waveforms can be used to describe the extent of fractured rock in the reservoir.

Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Superheater/intermediate temperature air heater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility (Montana Rosebud POC tests)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nineteen alloys have been exposed for approximately 1000 test hours as candidate superheater and intermediate temperature air heater tubes in a U.S. DOE facility dedicated to demonstrating Proof of Concept for the bottoming or heat and seed recovery portion of coal fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generating plants. Corrosion data have been obtained from a test series utilizing a western United States sub-bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud. The test alloys included a broad range of compositions ranging from carbon steel to austenitic stainless steels to high chromium nickel-base alloys. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO-containing deposits, developed principally, oxide scales by an oxidation/sulfidation mechanism. In addition to being generally porous, these scales were frequently spalled and/or non-compact due to a dispersed form of outward growth by oxide precipitation in the adjacent deposit. Austenitic alloys generally had internal penetration as trans Tranular and/or intergranular oxides and sulfides. While only two of the alloys had damage visible without magnification as a result of the relatively short exposure, there was some concern about Iona-term corrosion performance owing to the relatively poor quality scales formed. Comparison of data from these tests to those from a prior series of tests with Illinois No. 6, a high sulfur bituminous coal, showed less corrosion in the present test series with the lower sulfur coal. Although K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}was the principal corrosive agent as the supplier of sulfur, which acted to degrade alloy surface scales, tying up sulfur as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prevented the occurrence of complex alkali iron trisulfates responsible for severe or catastrophic corrosion in conventional power plants with certain coals and metal temperatures.

White, M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; Guy Roemer

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.  

SciTech Connect

When the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) was designed in the 1960s the potential for fuel element burnout by a phenomenon referred to at that time as 'autocatalytic vapor binding' was of serious concern. This type of burnout was observed to occur at power levels considerably lower than those that were known to cause critical heat flux. The conversion of the MURR from HEU fuel to LEU fuel will probably require significant design changes, such as changes in coolant channel thicknesses, that could affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor core. Therefore, the redesign of the MURR to accommodate an LEU core must address the same issues of fuel element burnout that were of concern in the 1960s. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was designed at about the same time as the MURR and had similar concerns with regard to fuel element burnout. These concerns were addressed in the ATR by two groups of thermal-hydraulic tests that employed electrically heated simulated fuel channels. The Croft (1964), Reference 1, tests were performed at ANL. The Waters (1966), Reference 2, tests were performed at Hanford Laboratories in Richland Washington. Since fuel element surface temperatures rise rapidly as burnout conditions are approached, channel surface temperatures were carefully monitored in these experiments. For self-protection, the experimental facilities were designed to cut off the electric power when rapidly increasing surface temperatures were detected. In both the ATR reactor and in the tests with electrically heated channels, the heated length of the fuel plate was 48 inches, which is about twice that of the MURR. Whittle and Forgan (1967) independently conducted tests with electrically heated rectangular channels that were similar to the tests by Croft and by Walters. In the Whittle and Forgan tests the heated length of the channel varied among the tests and was between 16 and 24 inches. Both Waters and Whittle and Forgan show that the cause of the fuel element burnout is due to a form of flow instability. Whittle and Forgan provide a formula that predicts when this flow instability will occur. This formula is included in the PLTEMP/ANL code.Error! Reference source not found. Olson has shown that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the powers at which flow instability occurs in the Whittle and Forgan experiments. He also considered the electrically heated tests performed in the ANS Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop at ORNL and report by M. Siman-Tov et al. The purpose of this memorandum is to demonstrate that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the Croft and the Waters tests. This demonstration should provide sufficient confidence that the PLTEMP/ANL code can adequately predict the onset of flow instability for the converted MURR. The MURR core uses light water as a coolant, has a 24-inch active fuel length, downward flow in the core, and an average core velocity of about 7 m/s. The inlet temperature is about 50 C and the peak outlet is about 20 C higher than the inlet for reactor operation at 10 MW. The core pressures range from about 4 to about 5 bar. The peak heat flux is about 110 W/cm{sup 2}. Section 2 describes the mechanism that causes flow instability. Section 3 describes the Whittle and Forgan formula for flow instability. Section 4 briefly describes both the Croft and the Waters experiments. Section 5 describes the PLTEMP/ANL models. Section 6 compares the PLTEMP/ANL predictions based on the Whittle and Forgan formula with the Croft measurements. Section 7 does the same for the Waters measurements. Section 8 provides the range of parameters for the Whittle and Forgan tests. Section 9 discusses the results and provides conclusions. In conclusion, although there is no single test that by itself closely matches the limiting conditions in the MURR, the preponderance of measured data and the ability of the Whittle and Forgan correlation, as implemented in PLTEMP/ANL, to predict the onset of flow instability for these tests leads one to the conclusion that the same method should be able to predict the

Feldman, E. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

Numerical calculations of wind flow in a full-scale wind test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies on wind flow around the Texas Tech University (TTU) Wind Engineering Research Field Laboratory (WERFL) building were conducted. The main focus of this paper is wind loads on the TTU building in the INEEL proposed Windstorm Simulation Center. The results are presented in the form of distributions of static pressure, dynamic pressure, pressure coefficients, and velocity vectors on the surface and the vicinity of the TTU building.

C.H. Oh; J.M. Lacey

1999-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

Application of heat-flow techniques to geothermal energy exploration, Leach Hot Springs area, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of 82 holes ranging in depth from 18 to 400 meters were drilled for thermal and hydrologic studies in a 200 km/sup 2/ area of Grass Valley, Nevada, near Leach Hot Springs. Outside the immediate area of Leach Hot Springs, heat flow ranges from 1 to 6.5 hfu with a mean of 2.4 hfu (1 hfu = 10/sup -6/ cal cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ = 41.8 mWm/sup -2/). Within 2 km of the springs, conductive heat flow ranges between 1.6 and more than 70 hfu averaging 13.6 hfu. Besides the conspicuous thermal anomaly associated with the hot springs, two additional anomalies were identified. One is associated with faults bounding the western margin of the Tobin Range near Panther Canyon, and the other is near the middle of Grass Valley about 5 km SSW of Leach Hot Springs. The mid-valley anomaly appears to be caused by hydrothermal circulation in a bedrock horst beneath about 375 meters of impermeable valley sediments. If the convective and conductive heat discharge within 2 km of the Leach Hot Springs is averaged over the entire hydrologic system (including areas of recharge), the combined heat flux from this part of Grass Valley is about 3 hfu, consistent with the average regional conductive heat flow in the Battle Mountain High. The hydrothermal system can be interpreted as being in a stationary stable phase sustained by high regional heat flow, and no localized crustal heat sources (other than hydrothermal convection to depths of a few kilometers) need be invoked to explain the existence of Leach Hot Springs.

Sass, J.H.; Ziagos, J.P.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Munroe, R.J.; di Somma, D.E.; Lachenbruch, A.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Capillary test specimen, system, and methods for in-situ visualization of capillary flow and fillet formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A capillary test specimen, method, and system for visualizing and quantifying capillary flow of liquids under realistic conditions, including polymer underfilling, injection molding, soldering, brazing, and casting. The capillary test specimen simulates complex joint geometries and has an open cross-section to permit easy visual access from the side. A high-speed, high-magnification camera system records the location and shape of the moving liquid front in real-time, in-situ as it flows out of a source cavity, through an open capillary channel between two surfaces having a controlled capillary gap, and into an open fillet cavity, where it subsequently forms a fillet on free surfaces that have been configured to simulate realistic joint geometries. Electric resistance heating rapidly heats the test specimen, without using a furnace. Image-processing software analyzes the recorded images and calculates the velocity of the moving liquid front, fillet contact angles, and shape of the fillet's meniscus, among other parameters.

Hall, Aaron C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hosking, F. Michael (Albuquerque, NM),; Reece, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants is an important step.

Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

Ketcham, Jerod W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A laboratory scale supersonic combustive flow system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A laboratory scale supersonic flow system [Combustive Flow System (CFS)] which utilizes the gaseous products of methane-air and/or liquid fuel-air combustion has been assembled to provide a propulsion type exhaust flow field for various applications. Such applications include providing a testbed for the study of planar two-dimensional nozzle flow fields with chemistry, three-dimensional flow field mixing near the exit of rectangular nozzles, benchmarking the predictive capability of various computational fluid dynamic codes, and the development and testing of advanced diagnostic techniques. This paper will provide a detailed description of the flow system and data related to its operation.

Sams, E.C.; Zerkle, D.K.; Fry, H.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A Novel Two-Step Laser Ranging Technique for a Precision Test of the Theory of Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All powered spacecraft experience residual systematic acceleration due to anisotropy of the thermal radiation pressure and fuel leakage. The residual acceleration limits the accuracy of any test of gravity that relies on the precise determination of the spacecraft trajectory. We describe a novel two-step laser ranging technique, which largely eliminates the effects of non-gravity acceleration sources and enables celestial mechanics checks with unprecedented precision. A passive proof mass is released from the mother spacecraft on a solar system exploration mission. Retro-reflectors attached to the proof mass allow its relative position to the spacecraft to be determined using optical ranging techniques. Meanwhile, the position of the spacecraft relative to the Earth is determined by ranging with a laser transponder. The vector sum of the two is the position, relative to the Earth, of the proof mass, the measurement of which is not affected by the residual accelerations of the mother spacecraft. We also describe the mission concept of the Dark Matter Explorers (DMX), which will demonstrate this technology and will use it to test the hypothesis that dark matter congregates around the sun. This hypothesis implies a small apparent deviation from the inverse square law of gravity, which can be detected by a sensitive experiment. We expect to achieve an acceleration resolution of $\\sim 10^{-14} m/s^2$. DMX will also be sensitive to acceleration towards the galactic center, which has a value of $\\sim 10^{-10} m/s^2$. Since dark matter dominates the galactic acceleration, DMX can also test whether dark matter obeys the equivalence principle to a level of 100 ppm by ranging to several proof masses of different composition from the mother spacecraft.

Konstantin Penanen; Talso Chui

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Lateral steam flow revealed by a pressure build-up test at the Matsukawa vapor-dominated geothermal field, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results and discussion of a pressure build-up test at the Matsukawa vapor-dominated geothermal field in north-east Japan are reported. Pressure build-up behavior of three dry steam wells was monitored at the wellhead in October 1986. The observed pressure gradient clearly shows the existence of a lateral steam flow from south-west to north-east in the reservoir. This result suggests that the vapor-dominated reservoir extends further south-west than it is currently being developed. These conclusions are supported by production records and chemical data.

Hanano, M. Sakagawa, Y. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., 24-Ukai, Takizawa-mura, Iwate 020-01 (JP))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Development of Correlations for Pressure Loss/Drop Coefficients Obtained From Flow Testing of Fuel Assemblies in Framatome ANP's PHTF  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-hydraulic analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies are generally performed for either assembly thermal-hydraulic design, thermal-hydraulic compatibility evaluation, or cycle licensing thermal-hydraulic characterization. A key issue in all cases is the hydraulic resistance characterization of the assembly in which the assembly, its components and support plates, etc., are represented by their respective pressure loss and pressure drop coefficients. These hydraulic coefficients can be determined by single-phase flow testing in an experimental facility such as the Framatome ANP Portable Hydraulic Test Facility (PHTF) located at Richland Test Facilities (RTF) in Richland, WA. The goal of this paper is to present a uniform and consistent methodology for the development of coefficient correlations from data obtained from single phase pressure drop testing of PWR and BWR fuel assemblies and their components performed in the PHTF. This methodology reflects the years of accumulated experience from an existing facility with an ongoing test program. (authors)

Madni, Imtiaz K.; Stephens, Lance G.; Turner, Dave M. [Framatome ANP Inc. (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced Testing Technique II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010... Vikas Tomar, Purdue University; Jianyu Huang, Sandia National Laboratories; Frederic Sansoz, The University of Vermont; Christoph Eberl, ...

184

End-to-end register data-flow continuous self-test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While Moore's Law predicts the ability of semi-conductor industry to engineer smaller and more efficient transistors and circuits, there are serious issues not contemplated in that law. One concern is the verification effort of modern computing systems, ... Keywords: control logic, degradation, design errors, end-to-end protection, online testing

Javier Carretero; Pedro Chaparro; Xavier Vera; Jaume Abella; Antonio González

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

Tatro, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

FINAL STATUS OF GENERAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY AIR FLOW AND DUST TEST PROGRAM. PART I. PART II  

SciTech Connect

A full scale 15 deg sector of the P122 reactor configuration was constructed. The model was complete with respect to all internal cooling air passages, and reflectors, thermal shielding, and island reflector. The contract was terminated before any test data could be obtained. Investigation of the effect of atmospheric dust on performance of reactor systems using wire screen matrix fuel elements is reported. The interim conclusion is that dust would not limit aircraft performance or life. Work proposed but not completed is outlined. Appendices contain previously unpublished reports. (auth)

Venneman, W.F.; Lawrence, R.L.; Ryan, P.T.

1961-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

In-Situ Thermal Conductivity Testing Using a Portable Heat Flow Meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method has been developed for measuring heat losses from insulated systems in the field. While the measurements are not as precise as those made under laboratory conditions, they are more indicative of actual in service conditions. Extensive field tests have been carried out in petrochemical plants and power plants throughout the country. Some insulating materials have been found to lose up to 60% of their insulating value after a few years in service. Calcium silicate insulations were found to be the most durable.

Harr, K. S.; Hutto, F. B., Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well. Appendix A, Gladys McCall Site (Cameron Parish, LA): Final report, October 1985--October 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor ``pills`` directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Comparison of NDA and DA measurement techniques for excess plutonium powders at the Hanford Site: Statistical design and heterogeneity testing  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative physical measurements are a n component of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear material m&guards verification regime. In December 1994, LA.FA safeguards were initiated on an inventory of excess plutonium powder items at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Vault 3, on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The material originl from the US nuclear weapons complex. The diversity of the chemical form and the heterogenous physical form of this inventory were anticipated to challenge the precision and accuracy of quantitative destructive analytical techniques. A sampling design was used to estimate the degree of heterogeneity of the plutonium content of a variety of inventory items. Plutonium concentration, the item net weight, and the {sup 240}Pu content were among the variables considered in the design. Samples were obtained from randomly selected location within each item. Each sample was divided into aliquots and analyzed chemically. Operator measurements by calorimetry and IAEA measurements by coincident neutron nondestructive analysis also were performed for the initial physical inventory verification materials and similar items not yet under IAEA safeguards. The heterogeneity testing has confirmed that part of the material is indeed significantly heterogeneous; this means that precautionary measures must be taken to obtain representative samples for destructive analysis. In addition, the sampling variability due to material heterogeneity was found to be comparable with, or greater than, the variability of the operator`s calorimetric measurements.

Welsh, T.L.; McRae, L.P.; Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Liebetrau, A.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, W.C. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Theis, W.; Lemaire, R.J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Xiao, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Agents  

SciTech Connect

An integrated lateral flow test strip with electrochemical sensor (LFTSES) device with rapid, selective and sensitive response for quantification of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents has been developed. The principle of this approach is based on parallel measurements of post-exposure and baseline acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity, where reactivation of the phosphorylated AChE is exploited to enable measurement of total amount of AChE (including inhibited and active) which is used as a baseline for calculation of AChE inhibition. Quantitative measurement of phosphorylated adduct (OP-AChE) was realized by subtracting the active AChE from the total amount of AChE. The proposed LFTSES device integrates immunochromatographic test strip technology with electrochemical measurement using a disposable screen printed electrode which is located under the test zone. It shows linear response between AChE enzyme activity and enzyme concentration from 0.05 to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM. Based on this reactivation approach, the LFTSES device has been successfully applied for in vitro red blood cells inhibition studies using chlorpyrifos oxon as a model OP agent. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure because of individual variation of normal AChE values, but also avoids the problem in overlapping substrate specificity with cholinesterases and avoids potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It is baseline free and thus provides a rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive tool for in-field and point-of-care assessment of exposures to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Yuehe

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Protein Biomarker Using a Portable Fluorescence Biosensor based on Quantum Dots and a Lateral Flow Test Strip  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable fluorescence biosensor with rapid and ultrasensitive response for trace protein has been built up with quantum dots and lateral flow test strip. The superior signal brightness and high photostability of quantum dots are combined with the promising advantages of lateral flow test strip and resulted in high sensitivity, selectivity and speedy for protein detection. Nitrated ceruloplasmin, a significant biomarker for cardiovascular disease, lung cancer and stress response to smoking, was used as model protein to demonstrate the good performances of this proposed Qdot-based lateral flow test strip. Quantitative detection of nitrated ceruloplasmin was realized by recording the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots captured on the test line. Under optimal conditions, this portable fluorescence biosensor displays rapid responses for nitrated ceruloplasmin in wide dynamic range with a detection limit of 0.1ng/mL (S/N=3). Furthermore, the biosensor was successfully utilized for spiked human plasma sample detection with the concentration as low as 1ng/mL. The results demonstrate that the quantum dot-based lateral flow test strip is capable for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of nitrated ceruloplasmin and hold a great promise for point-of-care and in field analysis of other protein biomarkers.

Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Tang, Zhiwen; Pounds, Joel G.; Lin, Yuehe

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Techniques Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Modeling Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

194

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Detecting Ice Nuclei with a Continuous—Flow Diffusion Chamber-Some Exploratory Tests of Instrument Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few basic experiments were performed with artificial cloud condensation nuclei and ice-nucleating aerosols in a continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber to investigate the instrument's response. Brief pulses of ice nuclei were input ...

David C. Rogers

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model  

SciTech Connect

Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Technique for preparation of prototypic fast test reactor mixed-oxide fuel pins for ceramography and metallography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiated liquid metal fast breeder reactor prototypic mixed-oxide fuel and cladding have been sectioned and examined in remote hot cell facilities for ceramographic and metallographic examinations. Metallography, shielded electron microprobe examinations, electron microscopy from replicas and autoradiography are routinely employed to obtain postirradiation data for statistical evaluation. Selection of preparatory techniques are based on fuel type, burnup, customer requirements and fuel pin condition.

Chastain, S.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

199

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy's implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Design and Development of a Test Facility to Study Two-Phase Steam/Water Flow in Porous Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of relative permeability is the key concept in extending Darcy's law for single phase flow through porous media to the two-phase flow regime. Relative permeability functions are needed for simulation studies of two-phase geothermal reservoirs. These are poorly known inspite of considerable theoretical and experimental investigations during the last decade. Since no conclusive results exist, many investigators use ad hoc parametrization, or adopt results obtined from flow of oil and gas (Corey, 1954). It has been shown by Reda and Eaton (1980) that this can lead to serious deficiencies. Sensitivity of the relative permeability curves for prediction of mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy into geothermal wells has been studied by many investigators (e.g. Eaton and Reda (1980), Bodvarsson et al (1980), Sun and Ershagi (1979) etc.). It can be concluded from these studies that the beehavior of a two-phase steam/water reservoir depends greatly on the relative permeability curves used. Hence, there exists a need for obtaining reliable relative permeability functions.

Verma, Ashok K.; Pruess, Karsten; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Experimental study of a R-407C drop-in test on an off-the-shelf air conditioner with a counter-cross-flow evaporator  

SciTech Connect

An off-the-shelf 2-ton window air conditioner having an energy efficiency ratio of 10 was used to perform a drop-in test with R-407C. Laboratory tests were performed using a parallel-cross-flow (PCF) evaporator and a counter-cross-flow (CCF) evaporator. The CCF configuration is designed to take advantage of the temperature glide of R-407C so that the warm evaporator inlet air will be in contact with the higher temperature part of the evaporator coils first. The test results indicated that, at the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute-rated indoor and outdoor conditions, the cooling capacity was 8% higher and system coefficient of performance about 3.8% higher for the CCF evaporator than for the PCF evaporator. The test results also showed that the latent load for CCF was 30.6% higher than for PCF. The far better dehumidification effect provided by the CCF evaporator design is desirable for areas where the latent load is high. The experimental findings should be useful for future efforts to design a dehumidifier that uses a zeotropic refrigerant that provides a significant temperature glide. R-22 test data from a previous project are included as a reference.

Mei, V.C.; Domitrovic, R.; Chen, F.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Wafer-scale charge isolation technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are described which improve the performance of charge-coupled devices (CCD) in the presence of ionizing radiation. The invention is a wafer scale charge isolation technique which inhibits or reduces the flow of electrons created by the passage of ionizing radiation in the bulk regions of a silicon CCD. The technique has been tested in a device designed for operating in the infra-red wavelength band. The technique prevents charge from reaching the active charge collection volume of a pixel in a CCD.

Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Inhomogeneity of fluid flow in Stirling engine regenerators  

SciTech Connect

The literature relating to inhomogeneity of flow regenerators is briefly reviewed. It is noted that, in contrast to other applications of regenerators, relatively little attention has been paid to the consequences of flow inhomogeneity for thermal regeneration in Stirling cycle machines. The construction of regenerator capsules for a large stationary Stirling engine is described. A test rig is developed to measure the gas velocity profile across the face of the packed regenerator capsules under steady flow conditions. Measured flow profiles for a number of different matrix materials and construction techniques are presented, and it is noted that stacked-mesh regenerator matrices tend to display marked inhomogeneities of flow. The consequences of flow inhomogeneity for flow friction and regenerator effectiveness are analyzed theoretically, and approximate formulae deduced. One method for reducing flow inhomogeneity in stacked-screen matrice

Jones, J.D. (School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser Univ. Burnaby, British Columbia (CA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

From MC/DC to RC/DC: formalization and analysis of control-flow testing criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter describes an approach to the formalization of existing criteria used in computer systems software testing and proposes a Reinforced Condition/Decision Coverage (RC/DC) criterion. This criterion has been developed from the well-known Modified ...

Sergiy A. Vilkomir; Jonathan P. Bowen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0  

SciTech Connect

Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

Abramowitz, Howard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Cecil, Richard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; D'Angelo, Nicholas [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Callow, Richard A. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Joseph, Innocent

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

A PRECISION, CONTINUOUS FLOW ENVIRONMENTAL APPARATUS DESIGNED FOR THE TESTING AND CALIBRATION OF HUMIDITY-MEASURING ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is designed for testing and calibrating relative humidity elements. A brief history of other apparatus of this type and similar types is given along with the primary areas of differences. Factors affecting the design of the various parts, accuracy of the system, and its capabilities are discussed. (D.J.C.)

Wade, J.B.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well. Appendix C, Willis Hulin Site: Final report, October 1985--October 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop  

SciTech Connect

The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Visualization and Diagnostics of Thermal Plasma Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow visualization is a key tool for the study of thermal plasma flows. Because of their high temperature and associated self emission, standard and high speed photography is commonly used for flow and temperature field visualization. Tracer techniques ... Keywords: d.c. plasma jet, enthalpy probe techniques, induction plasma, laser strobe, photographic techniques, schlieren, thermal plasma flows

M. I. Boulos

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Comprehensive Review of the Tests Completed on the Flow Loop at the Energy Systems Laboratory (Draft)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1988 the Governor's Energy Office (GEO) of Texas received approval from the U.S. Department of Energy to establish a $98.6 million state-wide retrofit demonstration program, the LoanSTAR (Loan to Save Taxes and Resources) Program. The LoanSTAR Program was designed to demonstrate commercially available, energy efficient, retrofit technologies and techniques. Part of the approved DOE program includes monitoring buildings to determine the effectiveness of the retrofits. The monitoring for this program is composed of thermal metering (chilled and hot water Btu measurements), electrical load metering, psychrometric data (cooling and heating coil temperatures and humidities), and weather monitoring. All of the sensors and monitoring equipment must be calibrated prior to installation and recalibrated periodically while in service. For this purpose, a calibration facility was developed in which National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)- traceable instrumentation is maintained (Turner et al. 1992).

Robinson, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Unsteady flow volumes  

SciTech Connect

Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evaluation of commercially available techniques and development of simplified methods for measuring grille airflows in HVAC systems  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we discuss the accuracy of flow hoods for residential applications, based on laboratory tests and field studies. The results indicate that commercially available hoods are often inadequate to measure flows in residential systems, and that there can be a wide range of performance between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of existing hoods to grille flow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. We also evaluated several simple techniques for measuring register airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics that are often as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, organizations such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow hoods.

Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.; Guillot, Cyril; Masson, S.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design  

SciTech Connect

An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL{sup -1}. At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 {mu} L of 200 ng mL{sup -1} mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury.

Shekhar, R.; Karunasagar, D.; Ranjit, M.; Arunachalam, J. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Hyderabad (India)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Application of Advanced Data Processing, Mathematical Techniques and Computing Technologies in Control Centers: Enhancing Speed and Robustness of Power Flow Computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To combat added complexity, a system operator’s job can be facilitated by deploying advanced computing technologies, with new software and hardware, that can potentially accelerate and improve data analysis and computer simulation tasks. The overall goal of this project is apply new technologies and techniques, within a few years, to address the current limitations of tools that we identified in the 2011 project. The goal of the 2012 research effort focuses on improving two aspects of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Data and Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Modeling Techniques and Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, and fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

219

Superheater/intermediate temperature airheater tube corrosion tests in the MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility (Eastern Coal Phase)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion data have been obtained for tub is exposed for 1500--2000 hours in a proof-of-concept magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation test facility to conditions representative of superheater and intermediate temperature air heater (ITAH) components. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-rich deposits, were corroded more than in most pulverized coal fired superheater service, but much less than the highly aggressive liquid phase attack encountered in conventional plants with certain coals and temperatures. Results indicated that, with parabolic corrosion kinetics, type 310 and 253MA stainless steels should be usable to 1400F at hot end of ITAH. At final superheater temperatures, 2.25 and 5 Cr steels were indicated to have parabolic corrosion rates generally below a 0.5 mm/yr criterion, based on corrosion scale thickness. However, unknown amounts of scale loss from spallation made this determination uncertain. Stainless steels 304H, 316H, and 321H had parabolic rates variably above the criterion, but may be servicable under less cyclic conditions. Corrosion rates derived from scale thickness and intergranular corrosion depth measurements are reported, along with scale morphologies and compositions. Implications of results on commercial MHD utilization of the alloys are discussed, as well as the indicated need for more corrosion resistant alloys or coatings under the most severe exposure conditions.

White, M.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modons in Shear Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modons in shear flow are computed as equilibrium solutions of the equivalent barotropic vorticity equation using a numerical Newton–Kantorovich iterative technique with double Fourier spectral expansion. The model is given a first guess of an ...

Sue Ellen Haupt; James C. McWilliams; Joseph J. Tribbia

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

222

A Hydrostratigraphic System for Modeling Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration at the Corrective Action Unit Scale, Nevada Test Site and Surrounding Areas, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Underground Test Area (UGTA) corrective action unit (CAU) groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity are built upon hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) that utilize the hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) as the fundamental modeling component. The delineation and three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of HSUs within the highly complex geologic terrain that is the NTS requires a hydrostratigraphic system that is internally consistent, yet flexible enough to account for overlapping model areas, varied geologic terrain, and the development of multiple alternative HFMs. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system builds on more than 50 years of geologic and hydrologic work in the NTS region. It includes 76 HSUs developed from nearly 300 stratigraphic units that span more than 570 million years of geologic time, and includes rock units as diverse as marine carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, granitic intrusives, rhyolitic lavas and ash-flow tuffs, and alluvial valley-fill deposits. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system uses a geology-based approach and two-level classification scheme. The first, or lowest, level of the hydrostratigraphic system is the hydrogeologic unit (HGU). Rocks in a model area are first classified as one of ten HGUs based on the rock’s ability to transmit groundwater (i.e., nature of their porosity and permeability), which at the NTS is mainly a function of the rock’s primary lithology, type and degree of postdepositional alteration, and propensity to fracture. The second, or highest, level within the UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system is the HSU, which is the fundamental mapping/modeling unit within UGTA CAU-scale HFMs. HSUs are 3-D bodies that are represented in the finite element mesh for the UGTA groundwater modeling process. HSUs are defined systematically by stratigraphically organizing HGUs of similar character into larger HSUs designations. The careful integration of stratigraphic information in the development of HSUs is important to assure individual HSUs are internally consistent, correlatable, and mappable throughout all the model areas.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack Jr., Jennifer Mercadante

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

CPC thermal collector test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of test procedures has evolved at Argonne National Laboratory for establishing the performance of compound parabolic and related concentrating thermal collectors with large angular fields of view. The procedures range from separate thermal and optical tests, to overall performance tests. A calorimetric ratio technique has been developed to determine the heat output of a collector without knowledge of the heat transfer fluid's mass flow rate and heat capacity. Sepcial attention is paid to the problem of defining and measuring the incident solar flux with respect to which the collector efficiency is to be calculated.

Reed, K A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Test Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel method for measuring the degree to which a set of test cases executes a given program in diverse ways with respect to the two fundamental programming concepts: control and data. Test Diversity is a method for measuring the variety of software control flow and data flow, comprising of four new measures: conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation of diversity, and test orthogonality. These closely-related measures could be used to evaluate the test effectiveness and the test-effort distribution of a test suite. The Diversity Analyzer is a novel industrial-strength testing tool that can currently perform diversity analysis on software written in C/C++/C#/VB in Windows and.NET environments. The Diversity Analyzer is used to evaluate the fault-detection effectiveness of Test Diversity on various types of industrial projects. Key Words: testing tools, verification, theory, experimentation, conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation,

Borislav Nikolik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A comparative study of the aerodynamics of several wind turbines using flow visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports flow visualization techniques used to study the flows over the Enertech 21-5, Carter 25, and Enertech 44-50. Despite centrifugal effects superimposed on the aerodynamics, tufting (gross aerodynamic behavior) and oil flow (average boundary layer behavior), tests reveal the nature and many of the details of the flows involved. Results were compared to expected flow patterns based on angles of attack calculated from the PROPPC code. Chord Reynolds numbers ranged between 75,000 (Enertech 21-5) to 1,340,000 (Enertech 44-50). The typical low Reynolds number flow characteristics of these airfoils, including laminar separation bubbles, turbulent reattachment, and complete separation were observed. full or partial reattachment due to tower shadow was observed on each machine. Spanwise flow was observed near the leading edge of the Enertech 21-5. Cyclic radial flow from tower dam effect was also noted.

Eggleston, D.M. (Control Engineering, Univ. of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa, TX (US)); Starcher, K. (Alternative Energy Inst., West Texas State Univ., Canyon, TX (US))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) NA-241, Office of Dismantlement and Transparency.

Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Test Advising Framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test cases are represented in various formats depending on the process, the technique or the tool used to generate the tests. While different test case… (more)

Wang, Yurong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Directed Test Suite Augmentation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test suite augmentation techniques are used in regression testing to identify code elements affected by changes and to generate test cases to cover those elements.… (more)

Xu, Zhihong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared to k- factors in CIBSE and ASHRAE data as well asto those given in the CIBSE guide, and these were lower thanwith data published in the CIBSE Guide and ASHRAE Handbook.

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geologic Flow Characterization Using Tracer Techniques Robert...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be used in liquids, including methanol and ethyl alcohols, acetone, MEK, formic acid, acetic acid, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, sugar, sodium, 11 12 potassium, lithium, phenols,...

232

Designing Axial Flow Fan for Flow and Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive finite element methodology is developed to predict the compressible flow performance of a non-symmetric 7-blade axial flow fan, and to quantify the source strength and sound pressure levels at any location in the system. The acoustic and flow performances of the fan are predicted simultaneously using a computational aero-acoustic technique combining transient flow analysis and noise propagation. The calculated sound power levels compare favorably with the measured sound power data per AMCA 300-96 code.

Subrata Roy; Phillip Cho; Fred Périé; International Off-highway

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Phase 3A, Low NO{sub x} burner tests  

SciTech Connect

This Phase 3A test report summarizes the testing activities and results for the third testing phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. Described in this report are the test plans, data measurements, and data analyses performed during the Phase 3A effort. The present report also contains sufficient background material to provide an understanding of the overall program scope, the relationship of Phase 3A to the overall program, the testing methodologies, testing procedures, and unit configuration. Results from 66 short-term tests indicate increasing NO{sub x} emissions over the load range ranging from 0.5 lb/MBtu at 300 NM to around 0.65 lb/MBtu at 480 MW. Fly ash loss-on-ignition (LOI) for these loads ranged from 5.4 to 8.6 percent. Long-term test results indicated high load (480 MW) NO{sub x} emissions of approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. At the 300 MW mid load point, the emissions dropped to 0.47 lb/MBtu which is slightly lower than the 0.50 lb/MBtu shown for the short-term data. The annual and 30-day average achievable NO{sub x} emissions were determined to be 0.55 and 0.64 lb/MBtu, respectively, for the load scenario experienced during the Phase 3A, long-term test period. Based on the long-term test results for Phase 3A, at full-load the low NO{sub x} burners (LNB) retrofit resulted in a NO{sub x} reduction of 48 percent from baseline, while at 300 MW the reduction was approximately 50 percent. A series of tests was also conducted to evaluate the effects of various burner equipment settings and mill coal flow biasing on both NO{sub x} and LOI emissions.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

On the adoption of MC/DC and control-flow adequacy for a tight integration of program testing and statistical fault localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: Testing and debugging consume a significant portion of software development effort. Both processes are usually conducted independently despite their close relationship with each other. Test adequacy is vital for developers to assure that sufficient ... Keywords: Adequacy criterion, Fault localization, MC/DC, Test case prioritization, Testing-debugging integration

Bo Jiang; Ke Zhai; W. K. Chan; T. H. Tse; Zhenyu Zhang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic ...

Burner A. W.; Liu Tianshu

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Flow Batteries: A Historical Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marvin Warshay *1976 Shunt Current Model, Paul Prokopius *1976 Interfaced an RFB with solar cells *1977 Electrode-Membrane-Flow Battery Testing *Largest polarization @ negative...

237

Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow prediction of the percentage 43 of fish passing would be particularly useful near flow speed thresholds where binary 44 passage models are clearly limited.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

240

flow_loop.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOW ASSURANCE TEST LOOP FLOW ASSURANCE TEST LOOP Objective O ver a decade ago, RMOTC began cooperatively building a full-scale facility to test new fl ow assurance technology, mainly in the areas of hydrates and paraffi ns. Today, RMOTC's test facility consists of fi ve individual loop sections, including chilling and heated pipe-in-pipe water sections, bare lines, and a mixing section. The facility was designed to represent typical deepwater production systems in order to simulate full-scale tests and apply the results to fl ow assurance fi eld applications and technology. The current facility design consists of a 6" x 3,600 maximum allowable operating pressure test pipeline in fi ve separate loops. The test loops begin and ter- minate at a central location just north

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241

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

242

Two-phase flow studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-phase flow program is directed at understanding the hydrodynamics of two-phase flows. The two-phase flow regime is characterized by a series of flow patterns that are designated as bubble, slug, churn, and annular flow. Churn flow has received very little scientific attention. This lack of attention cannot be justified because calculations predict that the churn flow pattern will exist over a substantial portion of the two-phase flow zone in producing geothermal wells. The University of Houston is experimentally investigating the dynamics of churn flow and is measuring the holdup over the full range of flow space for which churn flow exists. These experiments are being conducted in an air/water vertical two-phase flow loop. Brown University has constructed and is operating a unique two-phase flow research facility specifically designed to address flow problems of relevance to the geothermal industry. An important feature of the facility is that it is dedicated to two-phase flow of a single substance (including evaporation and condensation) as opposed to the case of a two-component two-phase flow. This facility can be operated with horizontal or vertical test sections of constant diameter or with step changes in diameter to simulate a geothermal well profile.

Hanold, R.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ceramic Cross Flow Recuperator Design Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTE Products Corporation has developed a compact ceramic cross flow recuperator for high temperature industrial heat recovery applications. They recently completed a jointly funded project with the DOE, (Contract #EX-76-C-0 1-2162) to demonstrate the performance of the ceramic recuperator in various industrial furnaces. The ceramic cross flow recuperator core has multiple rectangular flow passages (perpendicular to each other) for the air and gas. Various flow passages are available contingent upon requirements of the particular application. In selecting and sizing a matrix for a given application, one may design a recuperator on the basis of a minimum for one or more of the following parameters; frontal area, length, volume, weight, pressure drop and cost. This paper discusses how the designer can select an optimum design from the various heat exchanger surfaces available and then predict the performance of a recuperator in any given application. The results of wind tunnel tests utilizing a single blow technique, determining a heat transfer parameter, the Colburn factor (j), and a flow friction parameter, Fanning Friction factor (f) are presented and discussed. Methods that illustrate how the (j) and (f) data can be used to compare the relative merits of two or more heat exchanger surface are presented. A typical furnace recuperation example is presented and calculations are detailed to illustrate the design procedures.

Gonzalez, J. M.; Rebello, W. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Test of the Flow Velocity Enhancement System (FVES) for Deflecting Aquatic Vegetation from the Intake of Genoa Power Station #3, Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the results of an evaluation of the Flow Velocity Enhancement System (FVES), a new technology for generating motive water in the water column to deflect downstream drifting aquatic weeds from cooling water intakes. The research was conducted at Dairyland Power’s Genoa Generating Station on the upper Mississippi River in Wisconsin.BackgroundBlockage of cooling water intake structures (CWIS) by waterborne debris occurs frequently at ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Odorization techniques  

SciTech Connect

Reynolds Equipment Co. briefly describes some of the odorizers employed in natural-gas systems. Odorizers operate on absorption, injection, or titration mechanisms that vary widely in complexity and accuracy from a simple wick type to completed automated systems that accurately proportion the odorant to the gas flow.

Reynolds, L.E.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.  

SciTech Connect

To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

248

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geologic flow characterization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

249

Turbulent Flow Analysis and Coherent Structure Identification in Experimental Models with Complex Geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulent flows and coherent structures emerging within turbulent flow fields have been extensively studied for the past few decades and a wide variety of experimental and numerical techniques have been developed for measurement and analysis of turbulent flows. The complex nature of turbulence requires methods that can accurately estimate its highly chaotic spatial and temporal behavior. Some of the classical cases of turbulent flows with simpler geometries have been well characterized by means of the existing experimental techniques and numerical models. Nevertheless, since most turbulent fields are of complex geometries; there is an increasing interest in the study of turbulent flows through models with more complicated geometries. In this dissertation, characteristics of turbulent flows through two different facilities with complex geometries are studied applying two different experimental methods. The first study involves the investigation of turbulent impinging jets through a staggered array of rods with or without crossflow. Such flows are crucial in various engineering disciplines. This experiment aimed at modeling the coolant flow behavior and mixing phenomena within the lower plenum of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Matched Index of Refraction (MIR) techniques were applied to acquire the turbulent velocity fields within the model. Some key flow features that may significantly enhance the flow mixing within the test section or actively affect some of the structural components were identified in the velocity fields. The evolution of coherent structures within the flow field is further investigated using a Snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique. Furthermore, a comparative POD method is proposed and successfully implemented for identification of the smaller but highly influential coherent structures which may not be captured in the full-field POD analysis. The second experimental study portrays the coolant flow through the core of an annular pebble bed VHTR. The complex geometry of the core and the highly turbulent nature of the coolant flow passing through the gaps of fuel pebbles make this case quite challenging. In this experiment, a high frequency Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA) system is applied for velocity measurements and investigation of the bypass flow phenomena within the near wall gaps of the core. The velocity profiles within the gaps verify the presence of an area of increased velocity close to the outer reflector wall; however, the characteristics of the coolant flow profile is highly dependent on the gap geometry and to a less extent on the Reynolds number of the flow. The time histories of the velocity are further analyzed using a Power Spectra Density (PSD) technique to acquire information about the energy content and energy transfer between eddies of different sizes at each point within the gaps.

Amini, Noushin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Multiphase Flow Modeling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Chris Guenther, Director Computational Science Division RUA Spring Meeting, Morgantown, WV March 2013 2 NETL's Multiphase Flow Science Team * The Multiphase Flow Science Team develops physics-based simulation models to conduct applied scientific research. - Development of new theory - Extensive on-site and collaborative V&V efforts and testing - Engages in technology transfer - Applies the models to industrial scale problems. 3 Why is Multiphase Flow Science Needed? * Industry is increasingly relying on multiphase technologies to produce clean and affordable energy with carbon capture. * Unfortunately, the presence of a solid phase reduces the operating capacity of a typical energy device from its original design on average by 40% [1].

251

Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.

John McCord

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

APS 7-BM Beamline: Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motivation Motivation The major thrust of the 7-BM beamline is the application of synchrotron radiation tools to examine complex fluid flowfields. Two major techniques are applied: radiography and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. While optical techniques are often ideally suited to the study of fluid flowfields, there are certain flowfields for which optical diagnostics have significant challenges. These include: Multiphase flows: Visible light interacts strongly with phase boundaries. This leads to strong refraction, scattering, and attenuation of light. These effects hinder quantitative measurements of dense multiphase flowfields. Opaque media. Flows with strong refractive effects. Luminous flames: The strong light emission from sooting flames can hinder certain optical diagnostics.

254

Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Accuracy of flow hoods in residential applications  

SciTech Connect

To assess whether houses can meet performance expectations, the new practice of residential commissioning will likely use flow hoods to measure supply and return grille airflows in HVAC systems. Depending on hood accuracy, these measurements can be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow for heating and cooling, to determine flow imbalances between different building spaces, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. This paper discusses these flow hood applications and the accuracy requirements in each case. Laboratory tests of several residential flow hoods showed that these hoods can be inadequate to measure flows in residential systems. Potential errors are about 20% to 30% of measured flow, due to poor calibrations, sensitivity to grille flow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. Active flow hoods equipped with measurement devices that are insensitive to grille airflow patterns have an order of magnitude less error, and are more reliable and consistent in most cases. Our tests also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, a new standard for flow hood calibration needs to be developed, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow hoods. Lastly, field evaluation of a selection of flow hoods showed that it is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement.

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Analysis of pressure tests through the use of instantaneous source response concepts  

SciTech Connect

A general method of analysis for pressure transient tests is presented. This technique is based on the pressure response of an instantaneous source and it provides a mean to compute the first and second derivatives of the influence function (unit flow rate response) of the well-reservoir system. This information is basic in identifying the flow regimes occurring during the test. This method eliminates the effect of producing time on pressure buildup data. An explicit and stable procedure is discussed to compute both the derivatives of the influence function and the initial reservoir pressure. This technique is suitable for DST and Repeat Formation Tests as well as for pressure buildup and fall off tests with long shut in period; variable flow rate before shut in can be taken into account. Examples of application are presented.

Cinco-Ley, H.; Kuchuk, F.; Ayoub, J.; Ayestaran, L.; Samaniego, V.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Residential Fuel Cell Performance Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently, the test facility is setup to deliver natural gas as the fuel, but ... A turbine and magnetic flow meter measure the flow of water for the domestic ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Aluminum Flouride Purity Test by Different Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimensional Analysis in Cold Water Model Experiments of New Cathode Structure ... Effective Insulation Control Monitoring System: The CANDI™ Solution for a ...

259

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

260

Instrumentation for Increased Power Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second Technical Update of the Instrumentation for Managing Increased Power Flow project, part of EPRI's Increased Power Flow (IPF) program. The project, initiated in 2006 and expected to continue for several years, studies the feasibility of new instrumentation to support increased power flow strategies. In 2007 the work focused on two primary developments: the Backscatter Sensor for the real-time measurement of transmission line temperature and current and the Emissivity Test Instrum...

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

Aydelotte, S.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Flow visualization around cylinders in a channel flow using Particle Image Velocimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the undertaken study was to apply state-of the-art Particle Image Velocimetry to measure full field turbulent flow around cylinders, starting with one cylinder and eventually to a quad cylinder arrangement. Particle Image Velocimetry as used herein is identical to the techniques in use in Texas A&M University's Pulsed Laser Velocimetry Laboratory where the test facilities include a flow bench, a ND-YAG pulsed laser, and data acquistion equipment, consisting of a CCD camera and attendant PC's programmed to control the laser and camera, and to acquire and store the digitized data. The data can then be retrieved for analysis. The data was analyzed using an existing algorithm, the Cross Correlation Code. Full-field, fluid two-dimensional velocity around, about, and past the test specimens was obtained with the digital camera which captured the images of light reflected from seeds flowing within the fluid within a given time exposure time of 53.8 ms. The viewing field area (approximately 5 cm by 5 cm) was illuminated by two light sheets impinging on the test specimens from opposing sides at angles less than 90' from the horizontal. The impinging angles were selected to create the least amount of shading by the test specimen and the incident target on the test specimen was common to both light sheets so that they would superimpose on the target, thus reinforcing the illumination intensity. The two light sheets were created by splitting the pulsing beam into two beams, and then each beam directed with, and to, mirrors which were part of an optical train consisting of three cylindrical lenses which converted the beam into a light sheet 0.5 to 1.0mm thick and 5 cm wide. The test conditions had a range of from 0.043 to 0.0579 m/s for the average velocity of the fluid and a range of Reynolds number of 7142 to 8140. Given these test conditions, vector plots representing the flow fieldwere generated for one test run on each of the these specimens. The velocity component of the plotted vectors was derived from a scale within the plots. Thus, two-dimensional velocities could be read anywhere within the plots. A mix of quantitative and qualitative data was obtained for the one, two, three, and quad cylinder arrangement test specimens.

Martinez, Ramiro Serna

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

Folta, J.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

VALIDATING UNCERTAINTY ANALYSES FOR GAS FLOW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tank volume to obtain the initial and final mass of gas in the tank ... during a crossover test, but laminar flow elements (LFE) and turbine flowmeters are ...

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Numerical simulation of single-phase and multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous and fractured reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well tests, multiphase flow, porous and fracturedin modeling multiphase flow in porous and fractured media,”description of multiphase flow through porous media: S w + S

Wu, Yu-Shu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Active flow control in an advanced serpentine jet engine inlet duct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was performed to understand the development and suppression of the secondary flow structures within a compact, serpentine jet engine inlet duct. By employing a variety of flow diagnostic techniques, the formation of a pair of counter-rotating vortices was revealed. A modular fluidic actuator system that would apply several different methods of flow control was then designed and manufactured to improve duct performance. At the two bends of the inlet, conformal flow control devices were installed to deliver varying degrees of boundary layer suction, suction and steady fluid injection, and suction and oscillatory injection. Testing showed that suction alone could delay flow separation and improve the pressure recovery of the duct by as much as 70%. However, this technique was not able to rid the duct completely of the nonuniformities that exist at the engine face plane. Suction with steady blowing, however, increased pressure recovery by 37% and reduced distortion by 41% at the engine face. Suction with pulsed injection had the least degree of success in suppressing the secondary flow structures, with improvements in pressure recovery of only 16.5% and a detrimental impact on distortion. The potential for gains in the aerodynamic efficiency of serpentine inlets by active flow control was demonstrated in this study.

Kirk, Aaron Michael

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

UZ Flow Models and Submodels  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

Y. Wu

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

FLOW GATING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>This invention is a fast gating system for eiectronic flipflop circuits. Diodes connect the output of one circuit to the input of another, and the voltage supply for the receiving flip-flop has two alternate levels. When the supply is at its upper level, no current can flow through the diodes, but when the supply is at its lower level, current can flow to set the receiving flip- flop to the same state as that of the circuit to which it is connected. (AEC)

Poppelbaum, W.J.

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Faraday cage enclosing the flow chamber of a cytometer and ground planes associated with each field deflection plate in concert therewith inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates and increases forces applied to a charged event passing therethrough for accurate focus thereof while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard.

van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Faraday cage is described which encloses the flow chamber of a cytometer. Ground planes associated with each field deflection plate inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates. They also increase forces applied to a passing charged event for accurate focus while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard. 4 figs.

Van den Engh, G.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

HEV Fleet Testing Operating Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

calculated for this figure using mass air flow over dynamic vehicle operation. 2006 Toyota Highlander Hybrid Final Fleet Testing Results Operating Performance Cumulative MPG 1 :...

273

HEV Fleet Testing Operating Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

calculated for this figure using mass air flow over dynamic vehicle operation. 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid Final Fleet Testing Results Operating Performance Cumulative MPG 1 : 33.6...

274

Superhydrophobic Materials Technology-PVC Bonding Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the technology maturation project was to develop an enhanced application technique for applying diatomaceous earth with pinned polysiloxane oil to PVC pipes and materials. The oil infiltration technique is applied as a spray of diluted oil in a solvent onto the superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth substrate. This makes the surface take on the following characteristics: • wet?cleanable • anti?biofouling • waterproof • anti?corrosion. The project involved obtaining input and supplies from VeloxFlow and the development of successful techniques that would quickly result in a commercial license agreement with VeloxFlow and other companies that use PVC materials in a variety of other fields of use.

Hunter, Scott R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Efird, Marty [VeloxFlow, LLC

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Testing technology  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin from Sandia National Laboratories presents current research highlights in testing technology. Ion microscopy offers new nondestructive testing technique that detects high resolution invisible defects. An inexpensive thin-film gauge checks detonators on centrifuge. Laser trackers ride the range and track helicopters at low-level flights that could not be detected by radar. Radiation transport software predicts electron/photon effects via cascade simulation. Acoustic research in noise abatement will lead to quieter travelling for Bay Area Rapid Transport (BART) commuters.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Flow meters tested on dairy lagoon water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for suspended particles. quire 110-volt power. However, theyof electromag- both also have 12-volt battery-powered neticmagmeter con- models, and a 12-volt tube magmeter is sists

Schwankl, Larry; Eagle, Alison; Frate, Carol; Nydam, Ben

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Experimental Investigation of Laser-sustained Plasma in Supersonic Argon Flow  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced energy deposition is widely discussed as a flow control technique in supersonic transportation. In case of thermal laser-plasma upstream of a blunt body, a substantial adaptation of shock wave geometry and magnitude of wave drag is predicted. Related to the research on laser supported detonation, the paper describes the implementation of laser-sustained plasma in a supersonic Argon jet. The stable plasma state is generated by the intersection of a Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser and a continuous wave CO{sub 2}-laser beams, for ignition and maintenance of the plasma respectively. A miniature supersonic Ludwieg tube test facility generates a supersonic jet at velocities of Mach 2.1. Modifications of the flow and plasma conditions are investigated and characterized by Schlieren flow visualisation, laser energy transmission and plasma radiation measurements. The results include the discussions of the flow field as well as the required laser and gas parameters.

Sperber, David; Eckel, Hans-Albert [DLR - German Aerospace Center, Institute of Technical Physics, Stuttgart (Germany); Moessinger, Peter [University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Esslingen (Germany); Fasoulas, Stefanos [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Space Systems, Stuttgart (Germany)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

Enhancement of two-phase flow images obtained using dynamic neutron radiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though both film and video radiographic image techniques are available in neutron radiography, radiographic video cameras are commonly used to capture the dynamic flow patterns in a rapid sequence of images. These images may be useful to verify two-phase flow models in small diameter flow channels. An initial series of real-time neutron radiography experiments were performed at the Texas A&M University System, Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) to evaluate the effectiveness of various image enhancement algorithms and procedures, beneficial for visualization of two-phase water and air flow regimes through small diameter metal flow channels. After evaluating these initial images, research was conducted to improve the images coming from the camera and to evaluate the particular forms of enhancement. Contrast enhancement and smoothing filters were applied to improve the ability to visualize the flow regimes. Tracking algorithms were applied to gather flow information in the form of vector flow plots. Finally, Monte Carlo analysis was performed to test the possibility of gathering three dimensional data from two dimensional images.

Johns, Russell Craig

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Test results of heat-exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These tests evaluated flow-driven brushes, recirculating sponge rubber balls, chlorination, and mechanical system/chlorination combinations for in-situ cleaning of two potential heat exchanger materials: titanium and aluminum alloy 5052. Tests were successful when fouling resistance was <3.0 x 10/sup -4/ ft/sup 2/ hr-/sup 0/F/Btu. Results indicated systems and cleaning techniques using brushes, soft sponge balls, and various concentrations of chlorine had some potential for maintaining heat transfer efficiency.

Lott, D F

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Continuous Flow Multi-Step Organic Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using continuous flow techniques for multi-step synthesis enables multiple reaction steps to be combined into a single continuous operation. In this mini-review we discuss the current state of the art in this field and ...

Webb, Damien

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

Shadday, M

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

The 8th International Symposium on Flow Visualization: Conference report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 8th International Symposium on Flow Visualization (8ISFV) was held in Sorrento, Italy, from the 1st to the 4th of September 1998. The Symposium has attracted, by far, the largest number of participants in the history of the meeting. The 313 presented ... Keywords: acoustics, advanced techniques, aircrafts, airfoils, applications, bluff bodies, cavity flows, channel flows, combustion, delta wings, droplets break-up, electrodynamics, engines, flow around cylinders, flow visualization, fluidics, holography, industrial processes, infrared thermography, instability, interferometry, jets, jets in cross flow, liquid crystals, low reynolds number flows, machines, medical applications, multiphase flows, natural convection, numerical visualizations, particle image velocimetry, porous media, rotating fluids, schlieren, shock waves, supersonic flows, three dimensional flows, turbomachines, turbulence, two phase flows, unsteady flow, vortices

G. M. Carlomagno

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cavitation descaling techniques for geothermal applications  

SciTech Connect

A simple and more efficient technique for descaling hard silica scales is urgently needed in order to exploit geothermal energy resources economically. With this objective in mind, DAEDALEAN ASSOCIATES, Incorporated is engaged in a research and development program utilizing the phenomenon of cavitation for cleaning and descaling under the sponsorship of ERDA, Division of Geothermal Research. The highlights of the research carried out so far under this program is reviewed in this presentation. Various effects of the phenomenon of cavitation erosion are presented. The intensity of cavitation erosion and its use in descaling applications are explained. The parameters governing the intensity of erosion are discussed. The overall objectives of the program are to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing cavitation and to generate engineering design data for its application in geothermal technology. The test facility used for this research consists of flow equipment, test chamber, and associated instrumentation. The performance of cavitating nozzles have been evaluated over a range of sizes. The intensity of erosion for one specific nozzle has been measured. The cleaning rates, the quality of cleaned surface and the intensity margin available so as not to damage the pipe wall have been determined for this specific design. Further work is under progress.

Thiruvengadam, Alagu P.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Condition monitoring of biodegradable oil-filled transformers using DGA, PD and PDC measurement techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The three most common condition monitoring techniques were applied to laboratory test configurations that simulate biodegradable oil-filled transformer insulation system. The tested techniques were Dissolved… (more)

Muhamad, Nor Asiah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A three phase load flow algorithm for Shipboard Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load Flow (Power Flow) is the determination of the steady state operating conditions for the system. This is a very important tool utilized by many real time applications in power systems. Traditional load flow methods, which incorporate Gauss-Seidel and/or Newton Raphson techniques, were primarily developed for transmission system analysis. Distribution load flow analysis must incorporate its unique characteristics such as unbalanced loads, distributed loads, radial network structure, and one, two, or three phase lines. Also, there are a variety of components included in distribution systems such as switches, transformers, voltage regulators, and distributed generators. Therefore, the traditional methods cannot be directly applied to distribution systems since the assumptions made for transmission systems are not valid for the unique characteristics of distribution systems. A Shipboard Power System (SPS) is a finite inertia electric power system. The generation, transmission, and distribution systems in SPSs are tightly coupled. In reality, the transmission system consists of the lines that interconnect the generator buses in a ring configuration. The distribution system consists of lines, transformers, and loads connected in a radial configuration. When analyzing a SPS, its distinct characteristics must be taken into consideration. Therefore, just as transmission and distribution systems have unique methods of analysis, SPSs also need a unique method of analysis. A load flow algorithm for a SPS must consider its distribution system characteristics as well as the unique characteristics of SPSs. The work presented in this thesis discussed a load flow algorithm developed for Shipboard Power Systems and terrestrial wye and delta connected radial distribution systems. The issues in developing a load flow algorithm for a SPS are addressed and the solution is presented. This solution combines three methods that addressed the issues of multiple sources, ring configuration, and radial load flow. This algorithm was tested on the IEEE 37 Bus Radial Distribution Test Feeder and a simplified Shipboard Power Test System developed by researchers in the Power System Automation Laboratory. The results produced minimal percent error when compared to the actual output results.

Medina-Calder?on, M?onica M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An Examination of Failure Modes and Investigation Techniques in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accident Investigation and Materials Failure Analysis at the Transportation Safety ... Experimental Technique to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories ...

287

Drilling techniques presently in use by the Geothermal Studies Project, US Geological Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat-flow studies program has evolved from one in which holes drilled for other purposes (mining and oil exploration, nuclear tests, hydrologic studies, etc.) provided the bulk of the data to a program in which the free holes, while still providing cost-effective and useful data, are being supplemented increasingly by holes drilled specifically for heat-flow determinations at locations where thermal data of high quality are needed, and where nobody else is interested in drilling. Ideally, heat-flow holes should be located in areas with moderate local relief and should be completed so that vertical water movement is inhibited. The most satisfactory test media for heat-flow determinations are crystalline rocks (particularly granites) and unconsolidated sediments; carbonate rocks and volcanic terranes can provide useful heat-flow data, but they present greater challenges both in drilling and interpretation. Drilling techniques have evolved from that of the continuously cored diamond-drilled hole (adapted from mining exploration) to adaptations of the shot-hole and blast-hole techniques used in petroleum exploration, water-well construction, and quarry operations. Spot cores are obtained where necessary to provide specific petrologic, geochemical, and physical data, but primary reliance is placed on ditch samples from rotary or percussion drilling for routine measurements of thermal conductivity and heat production. In shallow (50 to 100 m) holes in low temperature environments, plastic casing is used to maintain access for later temperature measurements. For deeper holes, steel casing is preferred. The annulus between casing and borehole wall in the lowermost 50 to 80 meters of heat-flow holes is routinely grouted off with a specially designed mixture of cement, bentonite, salt, and water to prevent vertical water movement.

Moses, T.H. Jr.; Sass, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cold flow modeling of pulverized coal combustors for magnetohydrodynamic channel applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an experimental program and techniques for studying the internal aerodynamics of pulverized coal combustors of the type used in magnetohydrodynamic test trains at The University of Tennessee Space Institute. The combustors are modeled with small scale, cold flow models that permit both flow visualization and velocity field surveys to be performed. Water was selected as the working fluid so that the model flow fields had the same Reynolds number as the actual reactive combustors, and also to facilitate flow visualization. The systems used for flow visualization and velocity field surveying are described in detail. The velocity field survey equipment is based on a vector-velocity, laser doppler velocimeter coupled to a controllable field scanning device and a microprocessor for on-line data reduction. Results are presented that were obtained from a laser velocimeter study of recirculating flows in a combustor model. The results show that, even for exceedingly simple geometrical arrangements of oxidant injector configurations, complex three dimensional highly turbulent flow fields exist in the combustor. A brief discussion of the impact of the results on fuel injector positioning is presented.

Schulz, R.J.; Giel, T.V.; Ghosh, A.; Morris, R.D.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Improved Fluid Flow Measurements: Feedwater Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the combined results of a utility survey and site visits concerning feedwater flow measurement in fossil-fueled power plants. In addition, a summary is provided of the technologies available to measure the volumetric feedwater flow rate in plants. This volumetric flow rate can be converted to a mass flow rate by knowing the pressure and temperature of the flow media. Velocity meters, differential pressure meters, and other closed-conduit flowmeters are discussed along with ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Assessment of Partial Discharge and Electromagnetic Interference On-Line Testing of Turbine-Driven Generator Stator Winding Insulati on Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial discharge (PD) and electromagnetic interference (EMI) on-line testing have been promoted as means to assess the condition of turbine-driven generator stator winding insulation systems. Such test approaches offer clear advantages in avoiding prolonged generator shutdown for off-line tests and inspections. Although PD is a time-domain measurement and EMI measures activity with a frequency scan, both techniques still evaluate the same phenomenon -- high-frequency currents that flow as a result of el...

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

291

ParFlow User's Manual Reed M. Maxwell1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5.1 Introduction to the ParFlow TCL commands (PFTCL) . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.5.2 PFTCL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.5.3 Common examples using ParFlow TCL commands (PFTCL) . . . . . . . . 21 3.6 Directory of Test

292

Category:Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Downhole Techniques page? For detailed information on Downhole Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Downhole Techniques Add.png Add a new Downhole Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B [×] Borehole Seismic Techniques‎ 2 pages F [×] Formation Testing Techniques‎ O [×] Open-Hole Techniques‎ W [×] Well Log Techniques‎ 17 pages [×] Well Testing Techniques‎ 8 pages

293

Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Flowmeter Test Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Define permeable zones within a well Thermal: Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test: A well testing technique done upon completion of a well to identify locations of permeable zones within the well and to quantify the relative permeability of each zone. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A vertical flowmeter test is also known as a spinner test and is preformed

294

Liquid hydrogen flow problems in Kiwi reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kiwi series of reactors were the first ones tested in the US Rover Program in the development of nuclear rocket engines for space propulsion. The early experiments with liquid hydrogen showed that parallel flow systems were prone to uneven flow distributions and violent fluctuations in pressure and flow that were capable of destroying a reactor core. Kiwi flow distribution problems were solved by using multiple feed lines into the nozzle cooling system and carefully balancing impedance among them. The violent pressure and flow fluctuations were eliminated after their cause was identified as resonance phenomena driven by the response to flow disturbances of heat transfer through a superheated hydrogen layer. Smooth flow operations were assured by rapidly bringing operating pressures beyond several times the critical pressure of hydrogen. After this initial rough start, solid core nuclear rocket engines successfully passed milestones of achievements during the remainder of the Rover program.

Thurston, R.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

LLNL Energy Flow Charts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Energy Flow Charts LLNL Energy Flow Charts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: LLNL Energy Flow Charts Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Lab Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Pathways analysis References: LLNL Energy Flow Charts [1] Decision makers have long recognized the importance of visualizing energy and material flows in a way that distinguishes between resources, transformations and services. Research priorities can be defined in terms of changes to the flows, and the consequences of policy or technology shifts can be traced both upstream and downstream. The usefulness of this top-down view is limited by the level of detail that can be conveyed in a single image. We use two techniques to balance information content with readability. First we employe visualization

296

Kingsnorth PF Flow Meter Demonstration Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-month demonstration project at PowerGen's Kingsnorth Power Station tested several new pulverized fuel (PF) flow measurement technologies in the harsh environment of an operational power station. Although further development may be warranted, current on-line PF flow measurement technologies already meet the basic requirements of coal fired boiler operators.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Flow and Plate Motion in Compressor Valves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry,... Mission: #12;15 Group Engineering Fluid Dynamics Rotating-flow machines ­ Centrifugal pumps Machines · pumps · wind turbines · compressors · propellers EFD-FLOW #12;17 Engineering Fluid Dynamics (HWA, visualisation) · ball-on-disc test rig · Starling Resistor ( lung tubes) · CFD-lab servers, PC

Twente, Universiteit

298

The Turbulence Structure of Nocturnal Slope Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the turbulence structure of nocturnal slope flow are used to test the hypothesis that slope flow turbulence in the region above the low-level wind maximum is decoupled from the surface and has a local structure similar to that ...

T. W. Horst; J. C. Doran

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Pseudospectral Technique for Calculation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pseudospectral method and its numerical solution algorithm for application to boundary layer problems in the atmosphere are presented. The method introduces the evaluation of a polynomial function when the solution is expressed as the sum of a ...

H. N. Lee; J. K. Shi

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Active load control techniques for wind turbines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Flow assurance and multiphase pumping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A robust understanding and planning of production enhancement and flow assurance is required as petroleum E&P activities are targeting deepwaters and long distances. Different flow assurance issues and their solutions are put together in this work. The use of multiphase pumps as a flow assurance solution is emphasized. Multiphase pumping aids flow assurance in different ways. However, the problem causing most concern is sand erosion. This work involved a detection-based sand monitoring method. Our objectives are to investigate the reliability of an acoustic sand detector and analyze the feasibility of gel injection as a method to mitigate sand erosion. Use of a sand detector coupled with twin-screw pumps is studied under varying flow conditions. The feasibility of gel injection to reduce slip and transport produced solids through twin-screw pump is investigated. A unique full-scale laboratory with multiphase pumps was utilized to carry out the experimental tests. The test results indicate that acoustic sand detection works in a narrow window around the calibration signature. An empirical correlation for predicting the twin-screw pump performance with viscous fluids was developed. It shows good agreement in the practical operational limits – 50% to 100% speed. The results indicate that viscous gel injection should be an effective erosion mitigation approach as it reduces slip, the principle cause of erosive wear. To correlate the performance of viscous fluid injection to hydroabrasive wear, further experimental investigation is needed.

Nikhar, Hemant G.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

flow_measurements_cryogenic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A dynamic weighing system is used to measure ... using liquid nitrogen at flow rates of 1 ... For volumetric flow rate measurement, the uncertainty in fluid ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Multiphase Flow Modeling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Chris Guenther, Director Computational Science Division RUA Spring Meeting, Morgantown, WV March 2013 2 NETL's Multiphase Flow Science Team * The Multiphase Flow Science...

304

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Application of Neutron Imaging to InvestigateFlow Through Fractures for EGS  

SciTech Connect

This paper will describe ongoing efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a unique experimental capability for investigating flow through porous and fractured geological media using neutron imaging techniques. This capability is expected to support numerous areas of investigation associated with flow processes relevant to EGS including, but not limited to: experimental visualization and measurement of velocity profiles and other flow characteristics to better inform reduced-order modeling of flow through fractures; laboratory scale validation of flow models and simulators; and a 'real-time' tool for studying geochemical rock/fluid interactions by noninvasively measuring material effects such as precipitation and dissolution in EGS representative conditions. Neutron scattering and attenuation based techniques have many distinctive advantages over other radiographic imaging methods for studying certain types of physical processes because cold and thermal neutrons are more highly attenuated by materials with large Hydrogen compositions while they more easily penetrate higher Z materials, such as those used in structural applications. Experiments exploiting this behavior may therefore be devised to study flow behaviors in samples even when thick pressure vessel walls and large sample masses are present. The objective of this project is to develop an experimental setup and methodology for taking EGS representative core samples with engineered fractures and fracture features, subjecting them to a triaxial stress state at EGS representative temperatures (up to 300 degrees C), and pumping high pressure fluid through the sample while imaging and measuring fluid flow characteristics using high flux neutron beams. This effort will take advantage of signature Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities, including the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor, as well as its core expertise in Neutron Science. Towards this end, a geothermal pressure test cell and flow system has been developed that can accommodate 1.5 diameter, 6 long core samples and apply a radial confining pressure up to 10,000 psi with fluid flow pressures up to 5,000 psi. This cell has been specially designed to optimize the transmission of neutrons and permit improved imaging of the interior of the sample of interest. Proof of principle measurements of the system have been performed and will be discussed in this paper. Techniques for injecting fluid contrast agents to permit visualization and quantification of flow profiles are also being developed and will be described along with future development plans.

Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Injectivity Test At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes On March 22, 2007 a brief injectivity test was preformed after the slotted liner had been installed. Water was injected at flow rates of 6.3 l/s, 13 l/s and 19 l/s and the pressure and temperature was recorded down hole at a depth of 926 m. At the higher flow rate, the test was interrupted several times to repair leaks at the surface. From the recorded pressure an approximate injectivity index of 10 l/s/MPa was calculated. References William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne (2008) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Retrieved from

307

IMUnit: improved multithreaded unit testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This position paper argues for an approach to bring several techniques successful for (regression) testing of sequential code over to multithreaded code. Multithreaded code is getting increasingly important but remains extremely hard to develop and test. ...

Vilas Jagannath; Milos Gligoric; Dongyun Jin; Grigore Rosu; Darko Marinov

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1993 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the steam and water mass flow rate Notes The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of

309

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. Notes A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the simultaneous use of liquid-phase and two-phase tracers in fluid-depleted geothermal

310

A Unified Analysis-Initialization Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified analysis-initialization technique is introduced and tested in the framework of the shallow water equations. It consists of iterating multivariate optimal interpolation and nonlinear normal mode initialization. For extratropical regions, ...

David L. Williamson; Roger Daley

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

312

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technique: Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Use salt flow to deliver precursors Increase growth rate through flux of reactants (increase spin rate) Precursors can be...

314

A Gas Dynamics Method Based on The Spectral Deferred Corrections (SDC) Time Integration Technique and The Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM)  

SciTech Connect

We present a computational gas dynamics method based on the Spectral Deferred Corrections (SDC) time integration technique and the Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM) finite volume method. The PPM framework is used to define edge averaged quantities which are then used to evaluate numerical flux functions. The SDC technique is used to integrate solution in time. This kind of approach was first taken by Anita et al in [17]. However, [17] is problematic when it is implemented to certain shock problems. Here we propose significant improvements to [17]. The method is fourth order (both in space and time) for smooth flows, and provides highly resolved discontinuous solutions. We tested the method by solving variety of problems. Results indicate that the fourth order of accuracy in both space and time has been achieved when the flow is smooth. Results also demonstrate the shock capturing ability of the method.

Samet Y. Kadioglu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Structural testing of the North Wind 250 composite rotor joint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The North Wind 250 wind turbine is under development at Northern Power Systems (NPS) in Moretown, VT. The turbine uses a unique, flow-through, teetered-rotor design. This design eliminates structural discontinuities at the blade/hub interface by fabricating the rotor as one continuous structural element. To accomplish this, the two blade spars are joined at the center of the rotor using a proprietary bonding technique. Fatigue tests were conducted on the full-scale rotor joint at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Subsequent tests are now underway to test the full-scale rotor and hub assembly to verify the design assumptions. The test articles were mounted in dedicated test fixtures. For the joint test, a constant moment was generated across the joint and parent material. Hydraulic actuators applied sinusoidal loading to the test article at levels equivalent to 90% of the extreme wind load for over one million cycles. When the loading was increased to 112% of the extreme wind load, the joint failed by buckling. Strain levels were monitored at 14 locations inside and outside of the blade joint during the test. The tests were used to qualify this critical element of the rotor for field testing and to provide information needed to improve the structural design of the joint.

Musial, W; Link, H [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Coleman, C [Northern Power Systems, Moretown, VT (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Eddy Current Testing of Service Water Heat Exchangers for Engineers Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service water (SW) heat exchangers experience tube failures due primarily to Inside Diameter (ID) pitting and flow-induced fretting wear at tube-to-tube support plate intersections. Eddy current is a fast volumetric tube wall examination technique performed from inside a tube to test and maintain structural integrity of the installed tubing. Because the service water heat exchanger tubing examination is not mandated under the ASME Code or the Regulatory Guide requirements, eddy current examination practi...

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Electron Based Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Characterization of Materials through High Resolution Coherent Imaging: Electron Based Techniques Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Milling Techniques - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

February 4-8 · 1996 TMS ANNUAL MEETING · Anaheim, California. SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING OF NANOCRYSTALLINE POWDER III: Milling Techniques ...

322

Conceptual plan: Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to address concerns regarding two-phase flow properties and to provide WIPP-specific, geologically consistent experimental data to develop more appropriate correlations for Salado rock to replace those currently used in Performance Assessment models. Researchers in Sandia`s Fluid Flow and Transport Department originally identified and emphasized the need for laboratory measurements of Salado threshold pressure and relative permeability. The program expanded to include the measurement of capillary pressure, rock compressibility, porosity, and intrinsic permeability and the assessment of core damage. Sensitivity analyses identified the anhydrite interbed layers as the most likely path for the dissipation of waste-generated gas from waste-storage rooms because of their relatively high permeability. Due to this the program will initially focus on the anhydrite interbed material. The program may expand to include similar rock and flow measurements on other WIPP materials including impure halite, pure halite, and backfill and seal materials. This conceptual plan presents the scope, objectives, and historical documentation of the development of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Program through January 1993. Potential laboratory techniques for assessing core damage and measuring porosity, rock compressibility, capillary and threshold pressure, permeability as a function of stress, and relative permeability are discussed. Details of actual test designs, test procedures, and data analysis are not included in this report, but will be included in the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program Test Plan pending the results of experimental and other scoping activities in FY93.

Howarth, S.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Holographic Flow Visualization as a Tool for Studying Three-dimensional Coherent Structures and Instabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Holography is capable of three-dimensional (3D) representation of spatial objects such as fluid interfaces and particle ensembles. Based on this, we adapt it into a 3D flow visualization tool called Holographic Flow Visualization (HFV). This technique ... Keywords: drop instability, flame-vortex interaction, holographic PIV, holographic flow visualization, jet diffusion flame, particle-laden flows, vortex cascade, vortex ring instability

H. Meng; J. Estevadeordal; S. Gogineni; L. Goss; W. M. Roquemore

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

On test suite composition and cost-effective regression testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost-effectiveness of these methodologies has been shown to vary with characteristics of regression test suites. One such characteristic involves the way in which test inputs are composed into test cases within a test suite. This article reports the results of controlled experiments examining the effects of two factors in test suite composition — test suite granularity and test input grouping — on the costs and benefits of several regression-testing-related methodologies: retest-all, regression test selection, test suite reduction, and test case prioritization. These experiments consider the application of several specific techniques, from each of these methodologies, across ten releases each of two substantial software systems, using seven levels of test suite granularity and two types of test input grouping. The effects of granularity, technique, and grouping on the cost and fault-detection effectiveness of regression testing under the given methodologies are analyzed. This analysis shows that test suite granularity significantly affects several cost-benefit factors for the methodologies considered, while test input grouping has limited effects. Further, the results expose essential tradeoffs affecting the relationship between test suite design and regression testing cost-effectiveness, with several implications for practice. 1

Gregg Rothermel; Sebastian Elbaum; Alexey Malishevsky; Praveen Kallakuri

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Characterizing flows with an instrumented particle measuring Lagrangian accelerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present in this article a novel Lagrangian measurement technique: an instrumented particle which continuously transmits the force/acceleration acting on it as it is advected in a flow. We develop signal processing methods to extract information on the flow from the acceleration signal transmitted by the particle. Notably, we are able to characterize the force acting on the particle and to identify the presence of a permanent large-scale vortex structure. Our technique provides a fast, robust and efficient tool to characterize flows, and it is particularly suited to obtain Lagrangian statistics along long trajectories or in cases where optical measurement techniques are not or hardly applicable.

Zimmermann, Robert; Gasteuil, Yoann; Volk, Romain; Pinton, Jean-François

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions  

SciTech Connect

Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Vertical Flow Wetland Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim report to present the preliminary results of a study conducted by Duke Energy to test the potential effectiveness of vertical flow wetlands (VFWs) for the removal of selenium, mercury, and other related compounds from a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) discharge. These compounds commonly are found in and regulated for coal-fired utility water discharges. There is a widespread need for a cost-effective alternative to physiochemical treatment to maintain compliance for these parameters, on...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Vortex flow visualization using tetrahedral cell subdivision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposes an effective technique for searching for critical points, which are points at which the velocity vector is zero. The previous method, using tetrahedral-cell subdivision, often generates multiple critical points in a hexahedral cell, and this ... Keywords: Newton's method, critical point searching technique, hexahedral cell, linear interpolation function, multiple critical points, numerical integration scheme, precise position calculation, tetrahedral cell subdivision, trilinear interpolation function, velocity vector, vortex flow visualization, vortices

A. Doi; S. Suzuki; K. Koyamada; S. Sannakanishi

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Flow simulation in industrial cyclone separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of ash settling on super-heater tube bank, due to improper velocity distribution, in the cyclone separator used at Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC) has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamic techniques. With ... Keywords: CAD model, CFD - finite volume technique, Circulating fluidized bed combustion, Flow recirculation - geometry modification, Particle Trajectories, Partition plates, Pressure based algorithms, Pressure drop, Recycle cyclone collector, Structured multi-block grids

C. Bhasker

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Baked Slug -- New Method to Test Fireproofing Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They have relied on “hot wire” techniques, which use wire probes to measure heat flow through a wire surrounded by the material of interest. ...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Smokeless Gasoline Fire Test  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the recent concern by environmentalists, the hypothetical accident thermal test can no longer be performed by simply burning gasoline in an open pit. The uncontrolled open pit technique creates thick, dense, black clouds of smoke which are not permitted by local authorities. This paper deals with the design of the fire test facility and the techniques used to eliminate the smoke plume. The techniques include the addition of excess air to the fire in combination with a spray of water mist near the fuel surface. The excess air technique has been used successfully in an experimental setup; it was found that the temperature could be controlled in the neighborhood of the required 1475 degrees F environment and the smoke could be reduced to very low levels. The water spray technique has been successfully used by others in similar applications and, on completion of a permanent fire test facility at Mound Laboratory (anticipated July, 1974), test results will be available. The water is believed to interact with the combustion reaction to provide more complete combustion. The permanent facility will be a 10 x 10 ft cement block enclosure lined with firebrick. It will be 8 ft high on three sides and 4 ft high on one side to provide for observation of the test. A 5000 gal underground tank provides storage for the aviation gasoline which is gravity fed to the fire.

Williams, H.; Griffin, J. F.

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A constitutive law for dense granular flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

Pierre Jop; Yoël Forterre; Olivier Pouliquen

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of energy system analysis techniques for identifying underground facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study to determine the feasibility and potential usefulness of applying energy system analysis techniques to help detect and characterize underground facilities that could be used for clandestine activities. Four off-the-shelf energy system modeling tools were considered: (1) ENPEP (Energy and Power Evaluation Program) - a total energy system supply/demand model, (2) ICARUS (Investigation of Costs and Reliability in Utility Systems) - an electric utility system dispatching (or production cost and reliability) model, (3) SMN (Spot Market Network) - an aggregate electric power transmission network model, and (4) PECO/LF (Philadelphia Electric Company/Load Flow) - a detailed electricity load flow model. For the purposes of most of this work, underground facilities were assumed to consume about 500 kW to 3 MW of electricity. For some of the work, facilities as large as 10-20 MW were considered. The analysis of each model was conducted in three stages: data evaluation, base-case analysis, and comparative case analysis. For ENPEP and ICARUS, open source data from Pakistan were used for the evaluations. For SMN and PECO/LF, the country data were not readily available, so data for the state of Arizona were used to test the general concept.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; Portante, E.C. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Tracer test analysis of the Klamath Falls geothermal resource: a comparison of models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two tracer tests on doublet systems in a fractured geothermal system were carried out in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The purpose of the tests were to obtain data which would lead to information about the reservoir and to test the applicability of current tracer flow models. The results show rapid breakthrough times and indicate fracture flow with vigorous mixing of injector fluid before production of same. This leads to the idea that thermal breakthrough is not directly related to tracer breakthrough in the Klamath Union doublet system. There has been no long-term enthalpy loss from exploiting the resource for 40 years. In order to reduce the data, models were developed to analyze the results. Along with a porous media flow model two mathematical models developed to analyze fractured geothermal systems are used to help decipher the various tracer return curves. The flow of tracers in doublet systems was investigated. A mathematical description is used for tracer flow through fractures as a function of time and various nonlinear parameters which can be found using a curve fitting technique. This allows the reservoir to be qualitatively defined. These models fit the data well, but point to the fact that future improvement needs to be considered for a clearer and more quantitative understanding of fractured geothermal systems. 22 refs., 32 figs., 11 tabs.

Johnson, S.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Precision Flow Table | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Table Table Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Flow Table Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flow Table Length(m) 2.4 Beam(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes Past Pertinent Test Experience Users are District Engineers, Planners, and Engineering Consultants

338

Mutation testing strategies using mutant classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutation testing has a widespread reputation of being a rather powerful testing technique. However, its practical application requires the detection of equivalent mutants. Detecting equivalent mutants is cumbersome since it requires manual analysis, ... Keywords: mutant classification, mutants' impact, mutation testing

Mike Papadakis; Yves Le Traon

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Combinatorial Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... using an OS bridge such as the Virtual PC, we ... XML; Numeric; CSV; Excel. Separate tool to generate .NET configuration files ... connect air flow meter. b. ...

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Production test IP-412-AI: B and C reactors export system test  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this test was to determine the adequacy of the export system for supplying flow to a dual reactor area under simulated emergency conditions.

Benson, J.L.; Jones, S.S.

1961-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multicolor Underwater Imaging Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies were conducted on multispectral polarimetric subtraction imaging techniques for underwater imaging that use a broadband light source. The main objective of this study was… (more)

Waggoner, Douglas Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Structure of Offshore Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal and vertical structure of the mean flow and turbulent fluxes are examined using aircraft observations taken near a barrier island on the east coast of the United States during offshore flow periods. The spatial structure is ...

Dean Vickers; L. Mahrt; Jielun Sun; Tim Crawford

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Increased Power Flow Guidebook - Underground Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities must consider a number of factors when evaluating uprating and upgrading options for underground transmission cables. This comprehensive guidebook documents the state-of-science for increasing power flow capacities of underground transmission cables. It provides an overview of underground transmission cable ratings and uprating techniques so that the maximum utilization can be obtained from the existing underground transmission infrastructure.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ultrasonic flow metering system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Data Techniques: The collection, processing, and interpretation of data from various methods so accurate interpretations can be made about the subject matter. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Data techniques are any technique where data is collected and organized in a manner so that the information is useful for geothermal purposes. The

346

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

347

Elbow mass flow meter  

SciTech Connect

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A NEW TEST METRIC AND A NEW SCAN ARCHITECTURE FOR EFFICIENT VLSI TESTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEW TEST METRIC AND A NEW SCAN ARCHITECTURE FOR EFFICIENT VLSI TESTING A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED. To overcome the difficulty and cost of VLSI testing, we need to search for better testing techniques. Chip testing can be classified into two categories: production testing and characterization testing

Stanford University

349

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

350

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hot Hydrogen Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

W. David Swank

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nuclear Feedwater Flow Measurement Applications Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the technologies available to measure the feedwater mass flow rate in nuclear power plants. Differential pressure meters, three types of ultrasonic flow meters (UFMs) (external transit time, chordal transit time, and cross-correlation), and tracer tests are discussed. For each technology, the report describes operating principles, installation, maintenance requirements, measurement errors, uncertainties, and the results of an industry survey.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Redox Flow Batteries: a Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1137-1164 Date Published 102011 ISSN 1572-8838 Keywords Flow battery, Flow cell, Redox, Regenerative fuel cell, Vanadium Abstract Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a...

354

Lateral flow strip assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Francesca S. (Livermore, CA); Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L. (Livermore, CA)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Flow dynamics in a double-skin façade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamical study of the flow in an asymmetrically heated vertical plane channel was carried out experimentally and numerically. The experiments are carried out in water for modified Rayleigh numbers (Ra*) in a range corresponding to the boundary layer ... Keywords: double skin, laminar flow, natural convection, numerical simulation, recirculation zone, vertical channel, visualization technique, wall flux

Dan Ospir; Cristian Chereches; Catalin Popa; Stéphane Fohanno; Catalin Popovici

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co’s well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. 1 tab., 9 figs.

Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Aqueous carrier waveguide in a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The liquid of a flow cytometer itself acts as an optical waveguide, thus transmitting the light to an optical filter/detector combination. This alternative apparatus and method for detecting scattered light in a flow cytometer is provided by a device which views and detects the light trapped within the optical waveguide formed by the flow stream. A fiber optic or other light collecting device is positioned within the flow stream. This provides enormous advantages over the standard light collection technique which uses a microscope objective. The signal-to-noise ratio is greatly increased over that for right-angle-scattered light collected by a microscope objective, and the alignment requirements are simplified.

Mariella, Jr., Raymond P. (Danville, CA); van den Engh, Gerrit (Seattle, WA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

359

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

360

Numerical Study of Rarefied Hypersonic Flow Interacting With a Continuum Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An uncoupled CFD-DSMC technique is developed and applied to provide solutions for continuum jets interacting with rarefied external flows. The technique is based on a correlation of the appropriate Bird breakdown parameter for a transitional-rarefied ...

Glass Christopher E.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Using Structured Interviewing Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GAO assists congressional decisionmakers in their deliberative process by furnishing analytical information on issues and options under consideration. Many diverse methodologies are needed to develop sound and timely answers to the questions that are posed by the Congress. To provide GAO evaluators with basic information about the more commonly used methodologies, GAO’s policy guidance includes documents such as methodology transfer papers and technical guidelines, This methodology transfer paper on using structured interviewing techniques discusses how GAO evaluators should incorporate structured interview techniques when appropriate to performing our work. It explains when these techniques should be

Gao/pemd-. Preface; Werner Grosshans

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. Author(s): Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.;

363

PORFLOW TESTING AND VERIFICATION DOCUMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORFLOW software package is a comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of multi-phase fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. PORFLOW can simulate transient or steady-state problems in Cartesian or cylindrical geometry. The porous medium may be anisotropic and heterogeneous and may contain discrete fractures or boreholes with the porous matrix. The theoretical models within the code provide a unified treatment of concepts relevant to fluid flow and transport. The main features of PORFLOW that are relevant to Performance Assessment modeling at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) include variably saturated flow and transport of parent and progeny radionuclides. This document involves testing a relevant sample of problems in PORFLOW and comparing the outcome of the simulations to analytical solutions or other commercial codes. The testing consists of the following four groups. Group 1: Groundwater Flow; Group 2: Contaminant Transport; Group 3: Numerical Dispersion; and Group 4: Keyword Commands.

Aleman, S

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

364

Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Determination of lithology, grain size Stratigraphic/Structural: Thickness and geometry of rock strata, fracture identification Hydrological: Porosity, permeability, water saturation Thermal: Formation temperature with depth Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques: Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids

365

Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Techniques Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: may be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: may be inferred Hydrological: may be inferred Thermal: may be inferred Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques: Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Geophysical techniques measure physical phenomena of the earth such as gravity, magnetism, elastic waves, electrical and electromagnetic waves.

366

Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques:

367

Chesapeake Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Send E-Mail to NVLAP at: NVLAP@nist.gov. Personal Body Armor Testing. ... 7 Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor, Section 7, Ballistic Test Methods. ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

Structural Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers many benefits to wind turbine companies. NWTC includes a new high bay large enough to test any blade expected during the next 5 years. (There are four test bays.) In 1995, NWTC developed a saphisticated data acquisition system, known as the Blade Structural Testing Real-time Acquisition Interface Network (BSTRAIN), to monitor structural testing through 24-hour continuous video surveillance. NWTC recommends ultimate static-strength and fatigue testing, with nondestructive testing in some cases (vibrational testing is covered in a separate information sheet).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

High differential pressure, radial flow characteristics of gun perforations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tubing conveyed completion techniques are being utilized more frequently than in the past, because of the apparent advantages derived from underbalanced perforating. These advantages include cleaner perforations, reductions of additional stimulation treatments and reduced completion times. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study of gun perforations made under high differential pressure, radial flow conditions. In this study, Berea sandstone cores, modified to permit radial flow, are used to determine the relationship between perforation characteristics and the time-dependent pressure differential between pore pressure (i.e. formation pressure) and ''well bore'' pressure during the completion process. The primary perforation characteristic investigated (Radial Flow Ratio) is defined as the ratio of the perforated flow rate to the flow rate of the unperforated core under identical conditions. The perforated flow rate is measured in radial flow after the perforation has been made under various time-dependent pressure differentials.

Regalbuto, J.A.; Riggs, R.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Impact of Flow and Brand Equity in 3D Virtual Worlds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research is a partial test of Park et al.'s 2008 model to assess the impact of flow and brand equity in 3D virtual worlds. It draws on flow theory as its main theoretical foundation to understand and empirically assess the impact of flow on brand ... Keywords: 3D Virtual Worlds, Brand Equity, Challenges, Flow, Intention, Skills

David DeWester; Brenda Eschenbrenner; So Ra Park; Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed  

SciTech Connect

A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi-phase flow systems in high temperature and high pressure conditions, typical in many industrial applications.

Qussai Marashdeh

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sequential Circuit Testing: From DFT to SFT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequential circuit testing is an active research area due to its applicability, its practicality, and its complexity. This paper gives an overview of the sequential automatic test pattern generation approaches and the classical and more recent design-for-testability ... Keywords: logic testing, sequential circuit testing, DFT techniques, automatic test pattern generation, design-for-testability methods, synthesis-for-testability, SFT techniques, large sequential circuits, ATPG

R. M. Chou; K. K. Saluja

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

JAERI instrumented spool piece performance in two-phase flow  

SciTech Connect

Instrumented spool pieces to be installed in horizontal piping on the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at the Japanese Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI) have been designed and tested. The instrumented spool pieces will provide measurements from which mass flow rates can be computed. The primary instruments included in the spool pieces are a full-flow turbine, a full-flow perforated drag plate, and a low energy three-beam photon densitometer. Secondary instruments are provided to measured absolute pressure, fluid temperature, and differential pressure across the full-flow perforated drag plate.

Colson, J.B.; Gilbert, J.V.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Turbulent flow in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

375

Solids mass flow determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Multiple sort flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA); Esposito, Richard J. (Seattle, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Droplet Laden Flow Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Flow Past a Heated Cylinder, Atomization and Sprays, 2006, 16(6 ... Numerical Modeling and Experimental Measurements of Water Spray Impact and ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Black String Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an exact description of the steady flow of a black string into a planar horizon. The event horizon is out of equilibrium and provides a simple, exact instance of a `flowing black funnel' in any dimension D>=5. It is also an approximation to a smooth intersection between a black string and a black hole, in the limit in which the black hole is much larger than the black string thickness. The construction extends easily to more general flows, in particular charged flows.

Emparan, Roberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Visualization of Fluid Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Goujon and J. Devaney, Large Scale Simulations of Single and Multi- Component Flow in Porous Media in Proceedings of SPIE: The International ...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt chloride was developed for nondestructive determination of surface moisture content. Fundamental new understanding of drying characteristics in wood and fiber has been provided that can be used by researchers to improve drying of wood and fiber. The three techniques for measuring moisture content and gradients provided in this study are efficient, practical, and economical - easy to apply by industry and researchers. An energy consumption worksheet is provided as a first step toward reducing energy consumed during drying of lumber and strandboard flakes. However, it will need additional verification and testing.

Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fault-based test suite prioritization for specification-based testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: Existing test suite prioritization techniques usually rely on code coverage information or historical execution data that serve as indicators for estimating the fault-detecting ability of test cases. Such indicators are primarily empirical in ... Keywords: Fault class hierarchy, Fault-based prioritization, Fault-based testing, Software testing, Specification-based testing, Test suite prioritization

Yuen Tak Yu; Man Fai Lau

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

383

Fladmark. Parallel simulation of multiphase/multicomponent flow models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary. The simulation of flow in porous media is a computationally demanding task. Thermodynamical equilibrium calculations and complex, heterogeneous geological structures normally gives a multiphysics/multidomain problem to solve. Thus, efficient solution methods are needed. The research simulator Athena is a 3D, multiphase, multicomponent, porous media flow simulator. A parallel version of the simulator was developed based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition strategy, where the domains are defined a-priori from e.g. geological data. Selected domains are refined with locally matching grids, giving a globally non-matching, unstructured grid. In addition to the space domain, novel algorithms for parallel processing in time based on a predictor-corrector strategy has been successfully implemented. We discuss how the domain decomposition framework can be used to include different physical and numerical models in selected sub-domains. Also we comment on how the two-level solver relates to multiphase upscaling techniques. Adding communication functionality enables the original serial version to run on each sub-domain in parallel. Motivated by the need for larger time steps, an implicit formulation of the mass transport equations has been formulated and implemented in the existing parallel framework. Further, as the Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used for communication, the simulator is highly portable. Through benchmark experiments, we test the new formulation on platforms ranging from commercial super-computers to heterogeneous networks of workstations. 1

Erlend Øian; Magne S. Espedal; I. Garrido; G. E. Fladmark

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solar cycle variations of large scale flows in the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we study the large-scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique. We use observations from four different times to study possible temporal variations in flow velocity. We find definite changes in both the zonal and meridional components of the flows. The amplitude of the zonal flow appears to increase with solar activity and the flow pattern also shifts towards lower latitude with time.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Design, construction and evaluation of a simulated geothermal flow system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system was designed and built to simulate the flow from a geothermal well. The simulated flow will be used to power a Lysholm engine, the performance of which will then be evaluated for different simulated geothermal flows. Two main subjects are covered: 1) the design, construction and evaluation of the behavior of the system that simulates the geothermal flow; included in that topic is a discussion of the probable behavior of the Lysholm engine when it is put into operation, and 2) the investigation of the use of dynamic modeling techniques to determine whether they can provide a suitable means for predicting the behavior of the system.

Mackanic, J.C.

1980-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

INPUT VALIDATION TESTING: A SYSTEM LEVEL, EARLY LIFECYCLE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnston '12, chelsea Karpenko '12, Lauriane rougeau '13 and catherine White '12. Johnston was a member, a maintenance mechanic and material handler at Cornell for 30 years who served in many roles, including presi

Offutt, Jeff

387

Developing an acoustic discharge measurement technique for hydroelectric performance testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The efficient operation of hydroelectric generating plants requires an accurate definition of the performance relationships of each turbine/generator unit. Of the information obtained by performance… (more)

Gawne, Kevin D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Tests of Bayesian Model Selection Techniques for Gravitational Wave Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of gravitational wave data involves many model selection problems. The most important example is the detection problem of selecting between the data being consistent with instrument noise alone, or instrument noise and a gravitational wave signal. The analysis of data from ground based gravitational wave detectors is mostly conducted using classical statistics, and methods such as the Neyman-Pearson criteria are used for model selection. Future space based detectors, such as the \\emph{Laser Interferometer Space Antenna} (LISA), are expected to produced rich data streams containing the signals from many millions of sources. Determining the number of sources that are resolvable, and the most appropriate description of each source poses a challenging model selection problem that may best be addressed in a Bayesian framework. An important class of LISA sources are the millions of low-mass binary systems within our own galaxy, tens of thousands of which will be detectable. Not only are the number of sources unknown, but so are the number of parameters required to model the waveforms. For example, a significant subset of the resolvable galactic binaries will exhibit orbital frequency evolution, while a smaller number will have measurable eccentricity. In the Bayesian approach to model selection one needs to compute the Bayes factor between competing models. Here we explore various methods for computing Bayes factors in the context of determining which galactic binaries have measurable frequency evolution. The methods explored include a Reverse Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm, Savage-Dickie density ratios, the Schwarz-Bayes Information Criterion (BIC), and the Laplace approximation to the model evidence. We find good agreement between all of the approaches.

Neil J. Cornish; Tyson B. Littenberg

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Experimental Technique to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure Analysis Case Studies from Refinery and Petrochemical Pilot Plants ... Failure of Electrical Submersible Pump of Oil Reservoir · Fan Blade Fracture in a  ...

390

Physical Model Development and Benchmarking for MHD Flows in Blanket Design  

SciTech Connect

An advanced simulation environment to model incompressible MHD flows relevant to blanket conditions in fusion reactors has been developed at HyPerComp in research collaboration with TEXCEL. The goals of this phase-II project are two-fold: The first is the incorporation of crucial physical phenomena such as induced magnetic field modeling, and extending the capabilities beyond fluid flow prediction to model heat transfer with natural convection and mass transfer including tritium transport and permeation. The second is the design of a sequence of benchmark tests to establish code competence for several classes of physical phenomena in isolation as well as in select (termed here as “canonical”,) combinations. No previous attempts to develop such a comprehensive MHD modeling capability exist in the literature, and this study represents essentially uncharted territory. During the course of this Phase-II project, a significant breakthrough was achieved in modeling liquid metal flows at high Hartmann numbers. We developed a unique mathematical technique to accurately compute the fluid flow in complex geometries at extremely high Hartmann numbers (10,000 and greater), thus extending the state of the art of liquid metal MHD modeling relevant to fusion reactors at the present time. These developments have been published in noted international journals. A sequence of theoretical and experimental results was used to verify and validate the results obtained. The code was applied to a complete DCLL module simulation study with promising results.

Ramakanth Munipalli; P.-Y.Huang; C.Chandler; C.Rowell; M.-J.Ni; N.Morley; S.Smolentsev; M.Abdou

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

Capabilities for information flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a capability-based mechanism for permissive yet secure enforcement of information-flow policies. Language capabilities have been studied widely, and several popular implementations, such as Caja and Joe-E, are available. By making ... Keywords: capabilities, information flow control

Arnar Birgisson; Alejandro Russo; Andrei Sabelfeld

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interplay between elastic instabilities and shear-banding: three categories of Taylor–Couette flows and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past twenty years, shear-banding flows have been probed by various techniques, such as rheometry, velocimetry and flow birefringence. In micellar solutions, many of the data collected exhibit unexplained spatiotemporal ...

Fardin, M. A.

394

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Eclat: Automatic Generation and Classification of Test Inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique that helps a test engineerselect, from a large set of randomly generated testinputs, a small subset likely to reveal faults in the softwareunder test. The technique takes a program or ...

Pacheo, Carlos

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Eclat : automatic generation and classification of test inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a technique that selects, from a large set of test inputs, a small subset likely to reveal faults in the software under test. The technique takes a program or software component, plus a set of correct ...

Pacheco, Carlos, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

High-Temperature Interlaminar Tension Test Method Development ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, standard test methods only address the characterization of interlaminar tensile ... This work addresses the development of a new test technique for the ...

398

Laboratory–Numerical Model Comparisons of Flow over a Coastal Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different modeling approaches are applied to the same geophysical flow in order to assess the ability of laboratory models to provide useful benchmarks in the development of oceanic numerical models. The test case considered here—that of the flow ...

Nicolas Pérenne; Dale B. Haidvogel; Don L. Boyer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evaluation of a slotted orifice plate flow meter using horizontal two phase flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several years, the slotted orifice plate has been evaluated for its performance as a single phase flow meter using air and as a two-phase flow meter using water and air. These previous studies have both shown superior performance to that of the standard orifice plate flow meter. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the slotted orifice plate two-phase flow meter with water and steam as the working fluids and compare this data with previous data taken from other test facilities to further develop the calibration of this new two-phase flow meter. Tests for repeatability will be shown for beta ratios of 0.430, 0.467, and 0.500. Reproducibility will also be evaluated between a water and steam facility and three water and air facilities. This includes comparing data obtained using a set of brass slotted orifice plates and a set of stainless steel slotted orifice plates. The brass plates were tested in one water and air facility in a previous study and the stainless steel plates were tested using two phase data from air and water and also from steam and water. Differential pressure effects using water and steam as a mixture will be considered since there is a change in fluid quality as the fluid drops in pressure across an orifice plate. Reproducibility from six different data sets found using different facilities, different slotted orifice plates, and different working fluids were shown to converge to the same relationship. This relationship contained non-dimensional variables which included the calibration coefficient (KY= flow coefficient (K) multiplied by the expansion factor (Y)), the Euler number, and the beta ratio. These results were analyzed to develop a calibration for the slotted orifice plate two-phase flow meter which can ultimately be used to determine the flow rate of a two-phase mixture.

Flores, Anita Elena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dismantling techniques for reactor steel piping  

SciTech Connect

Two cutting techniques have been developed for dismantling the pipes connected to the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) pressure vessel. They are the rotary disk knife cutting system for dismantling relatively large pipes, such as the primary cooling system, and the shaped explosive cutting systems for cutting relatively small pipes in air or water. Basic cutting tests were performed to determine the optimum characteristics of the cutting systems and to conduct a safety evaluation by studying the effects of blasting on surrounding areas. Mock-up tests confirmed the applicability of the newly developed dismantling systems for JPDR dismantlement by successfully cutting test pipes with these systems.

Yanagihara, S.; Hiraga, F.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dual flow--temperature--humidity control system operating manual  

SciTech Connect

The manual contains operating, maintenance, and troubleshooting procedures for a dual flow--temperature--humidity control system used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to prepare test atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies. The system consists of two basic components: a commercially available temperature/humidity indicator unit and a specially built dual flow--temperature--humidity control module that provides two air sources controlled at the same conditions of flow, temperature, and relative humidity.

Nelson, G.O.; Taylor, R.D.

1978-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hardware Fault Insertion Techniques and Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of dependability validation becomes more and more important regarding big public telecom systems. This is why fault insertion has been widely accepted as a means of testing the fault handling mechanisms of the systems. This master thesis classifies and compares fault insertion techniques used within the industry. It also looks into internal fault insertion techniques used by the people at Ericsson Telecom working with the AXD301 ATM switch. Hardware Fault Insertion Techniques and Tools 2 Acknowledgements The following people at Ericsson has contributed to this thesis in one way or another: Roger Nordmark Mattias Rimbark Bengt Kvist Anders strm Kenny Ohlsson Johan Jeppson Johan Eklv Also a thank you to my supervisor at KTH: Axel Jantsch A special thanks also to my good friend and colleague: Robert Thorhuus Hardware Fault Insertion Techniques and Tools 3 Abbreviations ASIC - Application Specific Integrated Circuit ATM - Asynchronous Transfer Mode BSDL - Boundary Scan De...

Emil Savqvist; Roger Nordmark; Mattias Rimbark; Bengt Kvist; Anders Åström; Kenny Ohlsson; Johan Eklöv; Axel Jantsch; Robert Thorhuus; Hw Hard Ware

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nondestructive Performance Characterization Techniques for Module Reliability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes nondestructive characterization techniques for module reliability. These techniques include light and dark current versus voltage and related analysis such as resistance, diode quality factor, and dark current. The use of the NREL laser scanner at zero volts and forward bias is also described as a technique to uncover cracks, shunts, and open-circuit regions in a module. Quantum-efficiency measurements of isolated cells or regions in a module are also possible. The interpretation of laser-scanning data is enhanced by hot-spot testing with an infrared camera or thermographic paper. Specialized nondestructive techniques have also been developed to determine the shunt resistance of individual cells in a module by selective shading of cells under sunlight. Ultraviolet fluorescence and reflectivity measurements at NREL have proven useful in evaluating encapsulant stability.

Emery, K.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

Brackbill, J.U.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Continuum modeling of two-phase flows  

SciTech Connect

Continuum modeling of two-phase flows can essentially be achieved in two ways. The first approach, the so-called continuum theory of mixtures, ignores the details of the flow occurring on the microscopic level, while the second one is the result of some averaging procedure. Although they both lead, as expected, to the same set of basic equations, they differ strongly in their spirit when closure equations have to be found. In the present report, we have attempted to give a brief critical review of both approaches, to compare them and to discuss some of the major difficulties which arise. It is shown that the application of the continuum theory of mixtures is, in most cases, questionable and that the only appropriate way of finding closure equations, besides correlating experimental results, consists in a useful investigation of the microscopic flow pattern associated with an adequate averaging technique.

Bataille, J.; Kestin, J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd Place Yoqneam, Israel Zip 20692 Sector Solar Product Israel-based manufacturer of non-contact substrate processing, handling, and testing equipments for Flat Panel Display (FPD), semiconductor, and solar industries. References CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd is a company located in Yoqneam, Israel . References ↑ "CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoreFlow_Scientific_Solutions_Ltd&oldid=343913" Categories:

408

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

409

Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

Jang, J.H.; Faghri, A. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Chang, W.S. [Wright Research and Development Center, Wright-Patterson, OH (United States)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Heat flow of Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive new heat flow and geothermal gradient data set for the State of Oregon is presented on a contour map of heat flow at a scale of 1:1,000,000 and is summarized in several figures and tables. The 1:1,000,000 scale heat flow map is contoured at 20 mW/m/sup 2/ (0.5 HFU) intervals. Also presented are maps of heat flow and temperature at a depth of 1 km averaged for 1/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ intervals. Histograms and averages of geothermal gradient and heat flow for the State of Oregon and for the various physiographic provinces within Oregon are also included. The unweighted mean flow for Oregon is 81.3 +- 2.7 mW/m/sup 2/ (1.94 +- 0.06 HFU). The average unweighted geothermal gradient is 65.3 +- 2.5/sup 0/C/km. The average heat flow value weighted on the basis of geographic area is 68 +- 5 mW/m/sup 2/ (1.63 +- 0.12 HFU) and the average weighted geothermal gradient is 55.0 +- 5/sup 0/C/km.

Blackwell, D.D.; Hull, D.A.; Bowen, R.G.; Steele, J.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Statistical Modeling of Photovoltaic Reliability Using Accelerated Degradation Techniques (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We introduce a cutting-edge life-testing technique, accelerated degradation testing (ADT), for PV reliability testing. The ADT technique is a cost-effective and flexible reliability testing method with multiple (MADT) and Step-Stress (SSADT) variants. In an environment with limited resources, including equipment (chambers), test units, and testing time, these techniques can provide statistically rigorous prediction of lifetime and other interesting parameters, such as failure rate, warranty time, mean time to failure, degradation rate, activation energy, acceleration factor, and upper limit level of stress. J-V characterization can be used for degradation data and the generalized Eyring model can be used for the thermal-humidity stress condition. The SSADT model can be constructed based on the cumulative damage model (CEM), which assumes that the remaining test united are failed according to cumulative density function of current stress level regardless of the history on previous stress levels.

Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Jones, W.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Shroud leakage flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Resin infiltration transfer technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies  

SciTech Connect

Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

Planning, drilling, logging, and testing of energy extraction hole EE-1, Phases I and II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy Extraction Hole No. 1 (EE-1) is the second deep hole drilled into the Precambrian-age granitic rocks of the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico. EE-1 was drilled to intersect a hydraulic fracture extending outward from near the bottom of previously drilled hole GT-2, thus completing the underground circulation loop required for the hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction experiment. Directional drilling techniques were used to intersect the fracture zone. In addition, high-temperature instrumentation and equipment development, hydraulic fracturing experiments, pressure-flow testing of the fracture systems, and fracture mapping and borehole-ranging technique activities were conducted. The drilling, logging, and testing operations in EE-1 are described.

Pettitt, R.A.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Technique Subgroupings Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and NSLS-II beamlines according to DOE Technique Scheme and NSLS-II beamlines according to DOE Technique Scheme Technique Subgroupings Spectroscopy 01 - Low Energy Spectroscopy Infrared Photoemission U12IR, U4IR / MET* U5UA, U13 / ESM 02 - Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Tender XAS U4B, U7A, X24A / SST, SSS* X15B, X19A / TES* 03 - Hard X-ray Spectroscopy EXAFS X3A, X3B, X11A, X11B, X18A, X18B, X23A2 / ISS, BMM, QAS*, XAS* 04 - Optics/Calibration/Metrology U3C,X8A/ OFT,MID Scattering 05 X-ray Diffraction X-Ray Powder Diffraction Extreme Conditions Energy Dispersive Micro-Beam Diffraction X7B,X10B,X14A,X16C,X17A / XPD,IXD* X17B2,X17B3,X17C / XPD, TEC*, 4DE* X17B1, X17B2 / NA X13B / MXD* 06 MX, footprinting Protein Crystallography X-ray footprinting X4A, X4C, X6A, X12B, X12C, X25, X29 / FMX, AMX, NYX;

417

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress-relaxation techniques using electric

418

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress relaxation techniques using electric

419

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN VALVE AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN VALVE CAMBRIA VALVE CORPORATION OCTOBER 17, 1995 FC9536/95ET1 RMOTC TEST REPORT Automatic Shutdown Valve Cambria Valve Corporation Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR RMOTC Project Manager October 17, 1995 551103/9536:jb TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Figure 1 2 Test Details 3 Table 1 4 Conclusions 5 Acknowledgments 5 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of an Automatic Shutdown Valve (ASDV) for hydraulic systems at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3). The Cambria Valve Corporation (CVC) manufactures the 3-Port ASDV that is designed to automatically shut down the flow of fluid through a hydraulic system in the event of a ruptured line and safely redirect flow to a bypass system. The CVC ASDV effectively demonstrated its

420

Neutron formation temperature gauge and neutron activation analysis brine flow meter. Final report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Feasibility studies of nuclear techniques applicable to the determination of geothermal formation temperature and two-phase brine flow downhole have been performed. The formation temperature gauging technique involves injection of fast neutrons into the formation and analysis of the moderated slow neutron energy distribution by appropriately filtered neutron detectors. The scientific feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by analytical computational and experimental evaluation of the system response. A data analysis method has been developed to determine unambiguously the temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power of an arbitrary medium. The initial phase of a program to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of the technique has been performed. A sonde mockup was fabricated and measurements have been performed in a test stand designed to simulate a geothermal well. The results indicate that the formation temperature determined by this method is independent of differences between the temperature in the borehole fluid and the formation, borehole fluid density, and borehole fluid salinity. Estimates of performance specifications for a formation temperature sonde have been made on the basis of information obtained in this study and a conceptual design of a logging system has been developed. The technique for the determination of fluid flow in a well is based on neutron activation analysis of elements present in the brine. An analytical evaluation of the method has been performed. The results warrant further, experimental evaluation.

Vagelatos, N.; Steinman, D.K.; John, J.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Category:Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques page? For detailed information on Gravity Techniques, click here. Category:Gravity Techniques Add.png Add a new Gravity Techniques Technique Pages in category "Gravity...

422

Diurnal Cycle of Supercritical Along-Coast Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a three-dimensional hydrostatic mesoscale model is used to address the transient behavior of supercritical along-coast flow. A control experiment and several sensitivity tests are performed in order to investigate the diurnal cycle ...

Stefan Söderberg; Michael Tjernström

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Heat transfer and pressure drop in tape generated swirl flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water in tape generated swirl flow were investigated. The test sections were electrically heated small diameter nickel tubes with tight fitting full length Inconel ...

Lopina, Robert F.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A New Horizontal Gradient, Continuous Flow, Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow, horizontal gradient, ice thermal diffusion chamber has been developed and tested for heterogeneous ice nucleation of aerosol particles under accurately controlled supersaturations and supercooling in the absence of a substrate. ...

E. M. Tomlinson; N. Fukuta

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Dynamic Response of Single Electrode Conductivity Probes in Slow Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four designs of single electrode conductivity probes, three of them new, were tested for response characteristics in conditions simulating laboratory internal wave flows. Two of the new designs were shown to be significantly superior in sensing ...

William F. Simmons; Barry R. Ruddick

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Type B Cyclogenesis in a Zonally Varying Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that surface cyclogenesis in the Northern Hemisphere storm-track regions can be described by the structural modification of baroclinic wave packets traversing a zonally varying flow field. We test this hypothesis using a ...

Jeffrey S. Whitaker; Albert Barcilon

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Casting Flow Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 1 Simplified flow diagram of the basic operations for producing a steel casting. Similar diagrams can be applied to other ferrous and nonferrous alloys produced by sand

428

Stochastically scalable flow control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the mathematical analysis of flow control have prompted the creation of the Scalable TCP (STCP) and Exponential RED (E-RED) algorithms. These are designed to be scalable under the popular deterministic delay ...

Thomas Voice

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Maple Sap Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I know a little about this topic even though I am from Illinois which is far from the heart of maple syrup country. Sap flows from a maple tree by internal pressure caused by the...

430

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Islands in Zonal Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a meridional gradient in sea surface temperature (warm toward the equator, cold toward the pole) on the circulation around an island is investigated. The upper-ocean eastward geostrophic flow that balances such a meridional gradient ...

Michael A. Spall

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

RG flows and instantons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these two lectures I discuss RG flow solutions in (1,0) six dimensional supergravity involving SU(2) Yang-Mills instantons. in the conformally flat part of the 6D metric. The solutions interpolate between two (4,0) supersymmetric AdS{sub 3} Multiplication-Sign S{sup 3} backgrounds with different values of AdS{sub 3} and S{sup 3} radii and describe RG flows in the dual 2D SCFT. The flows described are of v.e.v. type, driven by a vacuum expectation value of a (not exactly) marginal operator of dimension 2 in the UV. We give an interpretation of the supergravity solution in terms of the D1/D5 system in type I string theory on K3, whose effective field theory is expected to flow to a (4,0) SCFT in the infrared.

Gava, Edi [INFN, Trieste (Italy)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

Increased Power Flow Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best practices guidebook on increasing power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates alternatives with case studies, and analyzes costs and benefits of differe...

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Three dimensional flow processor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The 3D-flow processor is a general purpose programmable data stream pipelined device that allows fast data movement in six directions for digital signal processing applications such as identifying objects in a matrix in a programmable form. The 3D-flow processor can be used in one dimensional, two dimensional, and three dimensional topologies capable of sustaining an input data rate of up to 100 million data (or frames) per