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Sample records for techniques electromagnetic profiling

  1. Category:Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques page? For...

  2. Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock...

  3. Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical Properties See Electrical Techniques Electromagnetic techniques utilize EM induction processes to measure one or more electric or magnetic field components resulting...

  4. Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information...

  5. Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock...

  6. Category:Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 subcategories, out of 3 total. A Airborne Electromagnetic Survey 1 pages G + Ground Electromagnetic Techniques (2 categories) 3 pages S Self Potential...

  7. Category:Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Ground Electromagnetic Techniques page? For...

  8. Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques...

  9. Category:Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subcategories, out of 3 total. M + Magnetotelluric Techniques (4 categories) 1 pages T Telluric Survey 1 pages Time-Domain Electromagnetics 1 pages Pages in...

  10. Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Electromagnetic Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (KELLER, Et...

  11. Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it was thought that a shallow exploration technique would not be effective. Extensive audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) work by the USGS in KGRA's showed that many geothermal systems...

  12. Sub-Cell Resolution Techniques for Multi-Material Electromagnetics in Two

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Three Dimensions. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Sub-Cell Resolution Techniques for Multi-Material Electromagnetics in Two and Three Dimensions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-Cell Resolution Techniques for Multi-Material Electromagnetics in Two and Three Dimensions. Abstract not provided. Authors: Siefert, Christopher ; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston ; Kramer, Richard Michael Jack ; Voth, Thomas Eugene Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1241710 Report Number(s):

  13. Effect of electron density profile on power absorption of high frequency electromagnetic waves in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi Yanbin; Liu Yue [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Considering different typical electron density profiles, a multi slab approximation model is built up to study the power absorption of broadband (0.75-30 GHz) electromagnetic waves in a partially ionized nonuniform magnetized plasma layer. Based on the model, the power absorption spectra for six cases are numerically calculated and analyzed. It is shown that the absorption strongly depends on the electron density fluctuant profile, the background electron number density, and the collision frequency. A potential optimum profile is also analyzed and studied with some particular parameters.

  14. Surface moisture measurement system electromagnetic induction probe calibration technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-08

    The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) is designed to measure the moisture concentration near the surfaces of the wastes located in the Hanford Site tank farms. This document describes a calibration methodology to demonstrate that the Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) moisture probe meets relevant requirements in the `Design Requirements Document (DRD) for the Surface Moisture Measurement System.` The primary purpose of the experimental tests described in this methodology is to make possible interpretation of EMI in-tank surface probe data to estimate the surface moisture.

  15. A measurement technique to determine the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Gallagher, Ian; Masi, Kathryn J.; Lee, Choonik; Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Ritter, Timothy; Lam, Kwok L.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present and characterize a measurement technique to quantify the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter.Methods: This technique was developed as a quality assurance method for electromagnetic tracking systems used in a multi-institutional clinical hypofractionated prostate study. In this technique, the electromagnetic tracking system is calibrated to isocenter with the manufacturers recommended technique, using laser-based alignment. A test patient is created with a transponder at isocenter whose position is measured electromagnetically. Four portal images of the transponder are taken with collimator rotations of 45° 135°, 225°, and 315°, at each of four gantry angles (0°, 90°, 180°, 270°) using a 3 × 6 cm{sup 2} radiation field. In each image, the center of the copper-wrapped iron core of the transponder is determined. All measurements are made relative to this transponder position to remove gantry and imager sag effects. For each of the 16 images, the 50% collimation edges are identified and used to find a ray representing the rotational axis of each collimation edge. The 16 collimator rotation rays from four gantry angles pass through and bound the radiation isocenter volume. The center of the bounded region, relative to the transponder, is calculated and then transformed to tracking system coordinates using the transponder position, allowing the tracking system's calibration offset from radiation isocenter to be found. All image analysis and calculations are automated with inhouse software for user-independent accuracy. Three different tracking systems at two different sites were evaluated for this study.Results: The magnitude of the calibration offset was always less than the manufacturer's stated accuracy of 0.2 cm using their standard clinical calibration procedure, and ranged from 0.014 to 0.175 cm. On three systems in clinical use, the magnitude of the offset was found to be 0.053 ± 0.036, 0.121 ± 0.023, and 0.093 ± 0.013 cm.Conclusions: The method presented here provides an independent technique to verify the calibration of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter. The calibration accuracy of the system was better than the 0.2 cm accuracy stated by the manufacturer. However, it should not be assumed to be zero, especially for stereotactic radiation therapy treatments where planning target volume margins are very small.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTROMAGNETIC TECHNIQUES FOR HYDROGEN CONTENT ASSESSMENT IN COATED LINEPIPE STEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasseigne-Jackson, A. N.; Anton, J.; Jackson, J. E.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.

    2008-02-28

    With the introduction of new higher strength steels operating at higher pressure, the need for characterization of hydrogen content in high strength steel pipelines is timely for the pipeline industry. The higher-strength steel pipelines have higher susceptibility to hydrogen damage. Through the use of low-frequency induced current impedance measurements, a new non-contact sensor has been developed for real-time determination of diffusible hydrogen content in coated pipeline steel. A measurement scheme to separate variables associated with pipelines is discussed. This electromagnetic technique allows for a rapid, non-destructive assessment of hydrogen accumulation in coated steel line pipe and thus an evaluation of the pipeline integrity.

  17. A Moving Window Technique in Parallel Finite Element Time Domain Electromagnetic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Candel, Arno; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; ,

    2010-06-07

    A moving window technique for the finite element time domain (FETD) method is developed to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic waves induced by the transit of a charged particle beam inside large and long structures. The window moving along with the beam in the computational domain adopts high-order finite-element basis functions through p refinement and/or a high-resolution mesh through h refinement so that a sufficient accuracy is attained with substantially reduced computational costs. Algorithms to transfer discretized fields from one mesh to another, which are the key to implementing a moving window in a finite-element unstructured mesh, are presented. Numerical experiments are carried out using the moving window technique to compute short-range wakefields in long accelerator structures. The results are compared with those obtained from the normal FETD method and the advantages of using the moving window technique are discussed.

  18. Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhdanov; Michael S.

    2008-01-29

    Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

  19. A x-ray radiography-densitometry technique for the quantitative determination of metal deposit profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, F.G.; Iacovangelo, C.D.

    1984-03-01

    The application of x-ray radiography in conjunction with high resolution optical densitometry for the quantitative determination of metal deposit profiles parallel and perpendicular to the substrate surface is described. The principles of the technique and the range of its applicability are discussed. The technique is applied to the study of zinc deposition on highly porous carbon foams from circulating aqueous zinc bromide solutions. The effect of substrate pore size on the zinc distribution is explored. Zinc is found to deposit predominantly on the porous substrate/electrolyte and substrate/current collector interfaces. Smaller pore size favors smoother and more uniform deposits throughout the substrate.

  20. EnCache: A Dynamic Profiling Based Reconfiguration Technique for Improving Cache Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh; Zhang, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    With each CMOS technology generation, leakage energy consumption has been dramatically increasing and hence, managing leakage power consumption of large last-level caches (LLCs) has become a critical issue in modern processor design. In this paper, we present EnCache, a novel software-based technique which uses dynamic profiling-based cache reconfiguration for saving cache leakage energy. EnCache uses a simple hardware component called profiling cache, which dynamically predicts energy efficiency of an application for 32 possible cache configurations. Using these estimates, system software reconfigures the cache to the most energy efficient configuration. EnCache uses dynamic cache reconfiguration and hence, it does not require offline profiling or tuning the parameter for each application. Furthermore, EnCache optimizes directly for the overall memory subsystem (LLC and main memory) energy efficiency instead of the LLC energy efficiency alone. The experiments performed with an x86-64 simulator and workloads from SPEC2006 suite confirm that EnCache provides larger energy saving than a conventional energy saving scheme. For single core and dual-core system configurations, the average savings in memory subsystem energy over a shared baseline configuration are 30.0% and 27.3%, respectively.

  1. An optical technique for measuring divergence, beam profile, and aiming direction, of relativistic negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1988-02-01

    A novel, nonobstructive diagnostic technique for high energy H/sup minus/D/sup minus/ ion beams is described. This scheme employs spectroscopic techniques designed to measure beam profile, perpendicular velocity spread (i.e., divergence), and orientation of multiMeV H/sup minus/ beams. The basic principle of this method is to photoneutralize a small portion of the H/sup minus/ beam in a way such that the photodetachment process results in the formation of excited hydrogen atoms in the n = 2 levels. Observation of fluorescence from spontaneous decay of H(sp) andor induced deacy of H(2s) can be readily used to determine beam profile. Doppler broadening measurements can be used to determine velocity spread from which beam emittance is calculated. With off-the-shelf instruments resolutions of 1 mm for beam profile and 2 x 10/sup minus/2) ..pi.. cm-mrad are possible. For photodetachment, the best commercially available laser is found to be ArF eximer laser. The analysis is performed for the 200 MEV BNL Linac. The laser, which has a pulse duration which has a pulse duration which is of 10/sup minus/5) of the linac can produce sufficient signal at a negligible beam loss. In addition, measurements of minute Doppler shifts of this Lyman-Alpha radiation by a spectrograph could in principle resolve beam direction to within 1.57 ..mu..rad. The process under consideration has a resonance known as the shape resonance. As the following literature review indicates, the total cross section is known and there is a reasonable agreement between theory and experiment. There are no experimental measurements of partical cross sections. nevertheless, there are theoretical estimates which agree within 15%. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-11-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  3. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, Randolph W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  4. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories and now a geophysical consultant ) and Dr. Chester J. Weiss (recently rejoined with Sandia National Laboratories) for many stimulating (and reciprocal!) discussions regar ding the topic at hand.

  5. Technique using axicons for generating flat-top laser-beam profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Woodfin, G.L.; Stahl, D.; Carpenter, J.P.; Kyrala, G.

    1983-01-01

    In certain fusion experiments using CO/sub 2/ lasers, like Helios, it is desired to produce a focal spot several times larger than the nominal focal spot, with a flat beam profile. The typical focal spot in Helios is roughly 70 ..mu..m and just defocussing the beam produces beam breakup, with several hot spots with roughly the original diameter, and a gaussian distribution. A number of schemes were tried to achieve a large spot with desired characteristics. These are described in the article. Axicons were found to produce spots with desired characteristics. Axicons are lenses or mirrors having a cone-shaped surface. The various schemes are described, as well as an experiment in Helios which confirmed that axicons produced the spots with desirable characteristics. Helios is an 8-beam CO/sub 2/ laser which produces 10 kJ at power in excess of 20 TW. It is currently being used for Laser Fusion studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-12-15

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  7. Determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H by hydrogen depth profiling with a tritium imaging plate technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higaki, M.; Otsuka, T.; Hashizume, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Ezato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2015-03-15

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) and an oxide dispersion strengthened F82H (ODS-F82H) have been determined from depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen with a tritium imaging plate technique (TIPT) in the temperature range from 298 K to 523 K. Data on hydrogen diffusion coefficients, D, in F82H, are summarized as D [m{sup 2}*s{sup -1}] =1.1*10{sup -7}exp(-16[kJ mol{sup -1}]/RT). The present data indicate almost no trapping effect on hydrogen diffusion due to an excess entry of energetic hydrogen by the plasma loading, which results in saturation of the trapping sites at the surface and even in the bulk. In the case of ODS-F82H, data of hydrogen diffusion coefficients are summarized as D [m{sup 2}*s{sup -1}] =2.2*10{sup -7}exp(-30[kJ mol{sup -1}]/RT) indicating a remarkable trapping effect on hydrogen diffusion caused by tiny oxide particles (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the bulk of F82H. Such oxide particles introduced in the bulk may play an effective role not only on enhancement of mechanical strength but also on suppression of hydrogen penetration by plasma loading.

  8. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  9. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  10. Waveguide-based ultrasonic and far-field electromagnetic sensors for downhole reservoir characterization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Wang, K.; Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-11-12

    This report summarizes the first year research and development effort leading to development of high-temperature sensors for enhanced geothermal systems. It covers evaluation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic (EM) techniques applied to temperature measurement and flow characterization. On temperature measurement, we have evaluated both microwave radiometry and ultrasonic techniques for temperature gradient and profile measurements. Different antenna designs are evaluated and array loop antenna design is selected for further development. We have also evaluated ultrasonic techniques for total flow characterization, which includes using speed of sound to determine flow temperature, measuring acoustic impedance to estimate fluid density, and using cross-correlation technique to determine the mass flow rate. Method to estimate the flow enthalpy is briefly discussed. At end, the need and proposed techniques to characterize the porosity and permeability of a hot dry rock resource are presented.

  11. Category:Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resistivity Survey E Electrical Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques R Radiometrics S Self Potential T Telluric Survey Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  12. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlueter, Ross D. (Albany, CA); Deis, Gary A. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles.

  13. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlueter, R.D.; Deis, G.A.

    1992-03-24

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles. 14 figs.

  14. Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area 1973 1976 Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Print PDF Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  15. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  16. Electromagnetic Effects in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2010-02-12

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Motivated by this interest we have started to investigate whether significant electro-magnetic effects show up in our small-scale experiments. However, the design of instrumentation for this purpose is far from straightforward, since there are a number of open questions. Thus the main aim of the feasibility tests is to find - if possible - a simple and reliable method that can be used as a diagnostic tool for electro-magnetic effects. SDF charges with a 0.5-g PETN booster and a filling of 1 g aluminum flakes have been investigated in three barometric bomb calorimeters with volumes ranging from 6.3 l to of 6.6 l. Though similar in volume, the barometric bombs differed in the length-to-diameter ratio. The tests were carried out with the bombs filled with either air or nitrogen at ambient pressure. The comparison of the test in air to those in nitrogen shows that the combustion of TNT detonation products or aluminum generates a substantial increase of the quasi-steady overpressure in the bombs. Repeated tests in the same configuration resulted in some scatter of the experimental results. The most likely reason is that the aluminum combustion in most or all cases is incomplete and that the amount of aluminum actually burned varies from test to test. The mass fraction burned apparently decreases with increasing aspect ratio L/D. Thus an L/D-ratio of about 1 is optimal for the performance of shock-dispersed-fuel combustion. However, at an L/D-ratio of about 5 the combustion still yields appreciable overpressure in excess of the detonation. For a multi-burst scenario in a tunnel environment with a number of SDF charges distributed along a tunnel section a spacing of 5 tunnel diameter and a fuel-specific volume of around 7 l/g might provide an acceptable compromise between optimizing the combustion performance and keeping the number of elementary charges low. Further tests in a barometric bomb calorimeter of 21.2 l volume were performed with four types of aluminum. The mass fraction burned in this case appeared to depend on the morphology of the aluminum particles. Flake aluminum exhibited a better performance than granulated aluminum with particle sizes ranging from below 25 {micro}m to 125 {micro}m for the coarsest material. In addition, a feasibility study on electro-magnetic effects from SDF charges detonated in a tunnel has been performed. A method was developed to measure the local, unsteady electro-conductivity in the detonation/combustion products cloud. This method proved to yield reproducible results. A variety of methods were tested with regard to probing electro-magnetic pulses from the detonation of SDF charges. The results showed little reproducibility and were small compared to the effect from pulsed high voltage discharges of comparatively small energy (around 32 J). Thus either no significant electromagnetic pulse is generated in our small-scale tests or the tested techniques have to be discarded as too insensitive or too limited in bandwidth to detect possibly very high frequency electro-magnetic disturbances.

  17. Electromagnetic targeting of guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pogue, E.W.; Boat, R.M.; Holden, D.N.; Lopez, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals produced from explosives being fired have been reported in the literature for fifty years. When a gun is fired it produces an EMP muzzle blast signal. The strength and nature of these signals was first analyzed in the early 1970s, while the results were interesting, no follow-up studies were conducted. With modern detection and signal processing technology, we believe that these signals could be used to instantaneously locate guns of virtually all calibers as they fire. The objective of our one-year project was to establish the basic nature of these signals and their utility in the concept of electromagnetic targeting of guns.

  18. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  19. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  20. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  1. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  2. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Bradly J.; Guenther, David C.

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  3. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Dahl, L.R.

    1996-06-25

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom. 9 figs.

  4. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Electromagnetic Environments Simulator (EMES)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electromagnetic Environments Simulator (EMES) The Electromagnetic Environments Simulator (EMES) is a large transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell that propagates a uniform, planar electromagnetic wave through the cell volume where test items are placed. EMES can be used for continuous wave (CW) Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR) and transient Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) testing. The electric field is vertically polarized between the center conductor and the floor. If it is desired to illuminate test

  6. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  7. Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and Metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with ...

  8. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  9. SOLAR NANTENNA ELECTROMAGNETIC COLLECTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven D. Novack; Dale K. Kotter; Dennis Slafer; Patrick Pinhero

    2008-08-01

    This research explores a new efficient approach for producing electricity from the abundant energy of the sun. A nanoantenna electromagnetic collector (NEC) has been designed, prototyped, and tested. Proof of concept has been validated. The device targets mid-infrared wavelengths where conventional photovoltaic (PV) solar cells do not respond but is abundant in solar energy. The initial concept of designing NEC antennas was based on scaling of radio frequency antenna theory. This approach has proven unsuccessful by many due to not fully understanding and accounting for the optical behavior of materials in the THz region. Also until recent years the nanofabrication methods were not available to fabricate the optical antenna elements. We have addressed and overcome both technology barriers. Several factors were critical in successful implementation of NEC including: 1) frequency-dependent modeling of antenna elements, 2) selection of materials with proper THz properties and 3) novel manufacturing methods that enable economical large-scale manufacturing. The work represents an important step toward the ultimate realization of a low-cost device that will collect as well as convert this radiation into electricity, which will lead to a wide spectrum, high conversion efficiency, and low cost solution to complement conventional PVs.

  10. Electromagnetically driven peristaltic pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Douglas W. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2000-01-01

    An electromagnetic peristaltic pump apparatus may comprise a main body section having an inlet end and an outlet end and a flexible membrane which divides the main body section into a first cavity and a second cavity. The first cavity is in fluid communication with the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section. The second cavity is not in fluid communication with the first cavity and contains an electrically conductive fluid. The second cavity includes a plurality of electrodes which are positioned within the second cavity generally adjacent the flexible membrane. A magnetic field generator produces a magnetic field having a plurality of flux lines at least some of which are contained within the second cavity of the main body section and which are oriented generally parallel to a flow direction in which a material flows between the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section. A control system selectively places a voltage potential across selected ones of the plurality of electrodes to deflect the flexible membrane in a wave-like manner to move material contained in the first cavity between the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section.

  11. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  12. Research Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Techniques Research Techniques Print Coming Soon

  13. The effect of initial conditions on the electromagnetic radiation generation in type III solar radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, H.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2013-06-15

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 052903 (2011)]. The numerical simulations were carried out using different density profiles and fast electron distribution functions. It is shown that electromagnetic L and R modes are excited by the transverse current, initially imposed on the system. In the course of the simulations, no further interaction of the electron beam with the background plasma could be observed.

  14. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    quantum wells structures (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well

  15. Strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halbach, Klaus (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles.

  16. Three dimensional electromagnetic wavepackets in a plasma: Spatiotemporal modulational instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borhanian, J.; Hosseini Faradonbe, F.

    2014-04-15

    The nonlinear interaction of an intense electromagnetic beam with relativistic collisionless unmagnetized plasma is investigated by invoking the reductive perturbation technique, resting on the model of three-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with cubic nonlinearity which incorporates the effects of self-focusing, self-phase modulation, and diffraction on wave propagation. Relying on the derived NLS equation, the occurrence of spatiotemporal modulational instability is investigated in detail.

  17. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  18. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  19. electromagnetics, eddy current, computer codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-03-12

    TORO Version 4 is designed for finite element analysis of steady, transient and time-harmonic, multi-dimensional, quasi-static problems in electromagnetics. The code allows simulation of electrostatic fields, steady current flows, magnetostatics and eddy current problems in plane or axisymmetric, two-dimensional geometries. TORO is easily coupled to heat conduction and solid mechanics codes to allow multi-physics simulations to be performed.

  20. Susceptibility study of audio recording devices to electromagnetic stimulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halligan, Matthew S.; Grant, Steven L.; Beetner, Daryl G.

    2014-02-01

    Little research has been performed to study how intentional electromagnetic signals may couple into recording devices. An electromagnetic susceptibility study was performed on an analog tape recorder, a digital video camera, a wired computer microphone, and a wireless microphone system to electromagnetic interference. Devices were subjected to electromagnetic stimulations in the frequency range of 1-990 MHz and field strengths up to 4.9 V/m. Carrier and message frequencies of the stimulation signals were swept, and the impacts of device orientation and antenna polarization were explored. Message signals coupled into all devices only when amplitude modulated signals were used as stimulation signals. Test conditions that produced maximum sensitivity were highly specific to each device. Only narrow carrier frequency ranges could be used for most devices to couple messages into recordings. A basic detection technique using cross-correlation demonstrated the need for messages to be as long as possible to maximize message detection and minimize detection error. Analysis suggests that detectable signals could be coupled to these recording devices under realistic ambient conditions.

  1. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  2. Thin sheet casting with electromagnetic pressurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walk, Steven R. (Winterport, ME); Slepian, R. Michael (Pittsburgh, PA); Nathenson, Richard D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus, method and system for the casting of thin strips or strips of metal upon a moving chill block that includes an electromagnet located so that molten metal poured from a reservoir onto the chill block passes into the magnetic field produced by the electromagnet. The electromagnet produces a force on the molten metal on said chill block in the direction toward said chill block in order to enhance thermal contact between the molten metal and the chill block.

  3. 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (915RWP) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coulter, R

    2005-01-01

    The 915 MHz radar wind profiler/radio acoustic sounding system (RWP/RASS) measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 0.1 km and 5 km and virtual temperature profiles between 0.1 km and 2.5 km. It operates by transmitting electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. Virtual temperatures are recovered by transmitting an acoustic signal vertically and measuring the electromagnetic energy scattered from the acoustic wavefront. Because the propagation speed of the acoustic wave is proportional to the square root of the virtual temperature of the air, the virtual temperature can be recovered by measuring the Doppler shift of the scattered electromagnetic wave.

  4. Crosswell Electromagnetic Resistivity Imaging: Illuminating the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reviiew, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Electromagnetic Resistivity Imaging: Illuminating the Reservior...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Electromagnetics: Main Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORIES Electromagnetics (EM) is the study of the nature and interaction of static and dynamic electric and magnetic fields. Telecommunications, navigational guidance,...

  6. People Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People Profiles Featured Profile Hye-Sook Park Pursuing a challenging-and rewarding-career Read More » Tanza Lewis Tanza Lewis Jamie King Jamie King Lisa Burrows Lisa Burrows Jeremy Huckins Jeremy Huckins Ibo Matthews Ibo Matthews Peter Thelin Peter Thelin Susanna Reyes Susana Reyes Jerry Britten Jerry Britten Reggie Drachenberg Reggie Drachenberg Beth Dzenitis Beth Dzenitis Rebecca Dylla-Spears Rebecca Dylla-Spears John Heebner John Heebner Terry Land Terry Land Zhi Liao Zhi Liao Roark Marsh

  7. Noninvasive valve monitor using alternating electromagnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eissenberg, D.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Casada, D.A.

    1993-03-16

    One or more electrical coils are carefully located on the outside of a valve body. An alternating current passing through the coil(s) results in an alternating electromagnetic field being transmitted into the valve body and valve internals. The electromagnetic field varies in intensity and polarity in the valve. As the position of a valve internal part is changed, the electromagnetic field throughout the valve body and its internals is altered. A passive receiver coil carefully located on the outside of the valve body detects the intensity of the electromagnetic field at that location as an induced electrical voltage in the coil. With the change in position of the valve internal part, there is a corresponding change in the induced voltage as a result of the alteration in the alternating electromagnetic field at that location. Changes in the voltage provide an indication of the position and motion of valve internals.

  8. Noninvasive valve monitor using alternating electromagnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Casada, Donald A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    One or more electrical coils are carefully located on the outside of a valve body. An alternating current passing through the coil(s) results in an alternating electromagnetic field being transmitted into the valve body and valve internals. The electromagnetic field varies in intensity and polarity in the valve. As the position of a valve internal part is changed, the electromagnetic field throughout the valve body and its internals is altered. A passive receiver coil carefully located on the outside of the valve body detects the intensity of the electromagnetic field at that location as an induced electrical voltage in the coil. With the change in position of the valve internal part, there is a corresponding change in the induced voltage as a result of the alteration in the alternating electromagnetic field at that location. Changes in the voltage provide an indication of the position and motion of valve internals.

  9. Efficient transformer for electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, R.B.

    A transformer structure for efficient transfer of electromagnetic energy from a transmission line to an unmatched load provides voltage multiplication and current division by a predetermined constant. Impedance levels are transformed by the square of that constant. The structure includes a wave splitter, connected to an input transmission device and to a plurality of output transmission devices. The output transmission devices are effectively connected in parallel to the input transmission device. The output transmission devices are effectively series connected to provide energy to a load. The transformer structure is particularly effective in increasing efficiency of energy transfer through an inverting convolute structure by capturing and transferring energy losses from the inverter to the load.

  10. Binary power multiplier for electromagnetic energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farkas, Zoltan D. (203 Leland Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025)

    1988-01-01

    A technique for converting electromagnetic pulses to higher power amplitude and shorter duration, in binary multiples, splits an input pulse into two channels, and subjects the pulses in the two channels to a number of binary pulse compression operations. Each pulse compression operation entails combining the pulses in both input channels and selectively steering the combined power to one output channel during the leading half of the pulses and to the other output channel during the trailing half of the pulses, and then delaying the pulse in the first output channel by an amount equal to half the initial pulse duration. Apparatus for carrying out each of the binary multiplication operation preferably includes a four-port coupler (such as a 3 dB hybrid), which operates on power inputs at a pair of input ports by directing the combined power to either of a pair of output ports, depending on the relative phase of the inputs. Therefore, by appropriately phase coding the pulses prior to any of the pulse compression stages, the entire pulse compression (with associated binary power multiplication) can be carried out solely with passive elements.

  11. (Low frequency electromagnetic fields and public health)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, T.E.

    1988-05-23

    The traveler participated in the IARC-sponsored workshop entitled Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) and Public Health'' where he delivered the keynote address. This address set the stage for deliberations among the EMF public health professionals regarding strategies for international collaborative work on this topic. Strong emphasis was placed in explicit exposure monitoring. The traveler also participated in the Tenth Yves Biraud Seminar on rare-event surveillance as a sentinel system for detection potential environmental hazards. He presented an invited paper describing a means for making rapid, preliminary decisions regarding potential health impacts due to contamination of the environment around point sources of toxic substances. He served as the symposium's expert on numerical techniques on the use of spatial and temporal aggregation of rare health events. There is considerable variation among countries in emphasis on application of sentinel systems and application of sentinel systems and data gathering. France has a highly automated, statistically-sophisticated system involving individual physician reporting of specific reportable infectious diseases to a central location. The European Common Market nations are sold on this concept and are supporting the development of an internationally coordinated system.

  12. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum You are accessing a document...

  13. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda...

  14. Category:Time-Domain Electromagnetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Time-Domain Electromagnetics page? For detailed...

  15. Chapter 4: Electrical and Electromagnetic Methods | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4: Electrical and Electromagnetic Methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Chapter 4: Electrical and Electromagnetic Methods Author...

  16. Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Super Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic exploration was performed by using a nature source SLF electromagnetic detector at two geothermal wells in Peking University. The...

  17. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum Authors: Basak, S. ...

  18. Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Interpretation of electromagnetic...

  19. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  20. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bich, George J. (Penn Hills, PA); Gupta, Tapan K. (Monroeville, PA)

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  1. Nanomechanical electric and electromagnetic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datskos, Panagiotis George; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a system for detecting and analyzing at least one of an electric field and an electromagnetic field. The system includes a micro/nanomechanical oscillator which oscillates in the presence of at least one of the electric field and the electromagnetic field. The micro/nanomechanical oscillator includes a dense array of cantilevers mounted to a substrate. A charge localized on a tip of each cantilever interacts with and oscillates in the presence of the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a subsystem for recording the movement of the cantilever to extract information from the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a means of adjusting a stiffness of the cantilever to heterodyne tune an operating frequency of the system over a frequency range.

  2. Computes Generalized Electromagnetic Interactions Between Structures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-02-20

    Object oriented software for computing generalized electromagnetic interactions between structures in the frequency domains. The software is based on integral equations. There is also a static integral equation capability.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Electromagnetic Technology at Sandia National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Electromagnetics Bioscience Computing and Information Science Electromagnetics Facilities Programs & Capabilities Partnership Opportunities EM News & Reports Contact Information Engineering Science Geoscience Materials Science Nanodevices and Microsystems Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Electromagnetic Technology at Sandia National Laboratories Lightning Electromagnetics (EM) is the study of the nature and interaction of static and dynamic

  4. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crow, James T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for generating homogenous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially cancelling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set.

  5. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crow, James Terry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for generating homogenous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set.

  6. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crow, James T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for generating homogenous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set.

  7. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crow, J.T.

    1998-02-10

    An apparatus and method for generating homogeneous electromagnetic fields within a volume is disclosed. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set. 39 figs.

  8. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crow, J.T.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating homogeneous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set. 26 figs.

  9. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crow, J.T.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating homogeneous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set. 55 figs.

  10. Steven Weinberg, Weak Interactions, and Electromagnetic Interactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Steven Weinberg and Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions Resources with Additional Information Steven Weinberg Courtesy Dr. Steven Weinberg Steven "Weinberg is a professor of physics and astronomy at UT [The University of Texas] Austin and is founding director of the Theory Group in the College of Natural Sciences. [He is] well known for his development of a field theory that unifies the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces, and for other major contributions to physics and cosmology ...

  11. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  12. Magnetics + Mechanics + Nanoscale = Electromagnetics Future (Tuesday, March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15) | The Ames Laboratory Magnetics + Mechanics + Nanoscale = Electromagnetics Future (Tuesday, March 15) DATE: Tuesday, March 15, 1:10 pm LOCATION: 3043 Coover Hall Greg P. Carman, Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles. Efficient control of small scale magnetism presents a significant problem for future miniature electromagnetic devices. In most macroscale

  13. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Delettrez, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2013-05-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. Séguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser-irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of ?210 ?m throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and density profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.

  14. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Delettrez, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2013-04-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and density profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.

  15. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2013-04-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and densitymore » profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.« less

  16. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  17. Alabama Profile

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alabama State Energy Profile Alabama Quick Facts In 2013, Alabama ranked 17th in the nation in the number of producing natural gas wells. Mobile, Alabama was the fourth-largest seaport for exporting U.S. coal in 2013. Coking coal used in the steelmaking process accounted for 82% of total exported coal. The three reactors at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in Limestone County, Alabama have a combined generating capacity of 3,310 megawatts, second in capacity only to Arizona's Palo Verde plant.

  18. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Alameda, CA); Gao, Chen (Anhui, CN); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wei, Tao (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  19. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Alameda, CA); Gao, Chen (Alameda, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  20. Device and method for redirecting electromagnetic signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J. (823 Piedra Larga, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1999-01-01

    A device fabricated to redirect electromagnetic signals, the device including a primary driver adapted to provide a predetermined force, a linkage system coupled to the primary driver, a pusher rod rotationally coupled to the linkage system, a flexible rod element attached to the pusher rod and adapted to buckle upon the application of the predetermined force, and a mirror structure attached to the flexible rod element at one end and to the substrate at another end. When the predetermined force buckles the flexible rod element, the mirror structure and the flexible rod element both move to thereby allow a remotely-located electromagnetic signal directed towards the device to be redirected.

  1. Improved Characterization and Monitoring of Electromagnetic Sources -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Characterization and Monitoring of Electromagnetic Sources Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary LLNL's technology is useful in fields such as power systems engineering, security monitoring, and vehicle tracking to identify, locate and monitor a particular source of

  2. Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material Characteristics Alnico and Ferrite Hybrid Excitation Electric Machines Wireless ...

  3. Electromagnetic Isolation Solutions in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Daniel; Peterson, Ken; Euler, Laurie

    2011-10-09

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) is a commercial ceramic-glass multilayer technology with compelling advantages for microelectronics, microsystems and sensors. High frequency applications require good electrical properties such as low dielectric loss and newer applications require extreme isolation from electromagnetic interference (EMI) that is even difficult to measure (-150db). Approaches to providing this isolation, once provided by via fences, have included sidewall coating and full tape thickness features (FTTF) that have been introduced by the filling of slots with via-fill compositions. Several techniques for creating these structures have been modeled for stress and temperature effects in the face of other necessary attachments, such as metallic seal frames. The relative effects of attachment media, FTTF geometry, and alternative measures will be reported. Approaches for thick film and thin film implementations are described.

  4. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  5. A strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halbach, K.

    1987-01-30

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles. 4 figs.

  6. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1994-06-07

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material is disclosed. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation. 1 fig.

  7. Electromagnetic or other directed energy pulse launcher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The physical realization of new solutions of wave propagation equations, such as Maxwell's equations and the scaler wave equation, produces localized pulses of wave energy such as electromagnetic or acoustic energy which propagate over long distances without divergence. The pulses are produced by driving each element of an array of radiating sources with a particular drive function so that the resultant localized packet of energy closely approximates the exact solutions and behaves the same.

  8. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation.

  9. Comparison between electroglottography and electromagnetic glottography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titze, Ingo R.; Story, Brad H.; Burnett, Gregory C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Lea, Wayne A.

    2000-01-01

    Newly developed glottographic sensors, utilizing high-frequency propagating electromagnetic waves, were compared to a well-established electroglottographic device. The comparison was made on four male subjects under different phonation conditions, including three levels of vocal fold adduction (normal, breathy, and pressed), three different registers (falsetto, chest, and fry), and two different pitches. Agreement between the sensors was always found for the glottal closure event, but for the general wave shape the agreement was better for falsetto and breathy voice than for pressed voice and vocal fry. Differences are attributed to the field patterns of the devices. Whereas the electroglottographic device can operate only in a conduction mode, the electromagnetic device can operate in either the forward scattering (diffraction) mode or in the backward scattering (reflection) mode. Results of our tests favor the diffraction mode because a more favorable angle imposed on receiving the scattered (reflected) signal did not improve the signal strength. Several observations are made on the uses of the electromagnetic sensors for operation without skin contact and possibly in an array configuration for improved spatial resolution within the glottis. (c) 2000 Acoustical Society of America.

  10. Electro-Optical Sensing Apparatus and Method for Characterizing Free-Space Electromagnetic Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Libelo, Louis Francis; Wu, Qi

    1999-09-14

    Apparatus and methods for characterizing free-space electromagnetic energy, and in particular, apparatus/method suitable for real-time two-dimensional far-infrared imaging applications are presented. The sensing technique is based on a non-linear coupling between a low-frequency electric field and a laser beam in an electro-optic crystal. In addition to a practical counter-propagating sensing technique, a co-linear approach is described which provides longer radiated field--optical beam interaction length, thereby making imaging applications practical.

  11. Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2012-10-15

    By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

  12. A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wireless sensor systems (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems Vibration energy harvesting is now receiving more interest as a means for powering intelligent wireless sensor systems. In this paper, a resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (VEH) employing

  13. Theoretical study on electromagnetically induced transparency in molecular

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aggregate models using quantum Liouville equation method (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Theoretical study on electromagnetically induced transparency in molecular aggregate models using quantum Liouville equation method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theoretical study on electromagnetically induced transparency in molecular aggregate models using quantum Liouville equation method Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), which is known as an efficient control method of

  14. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  15. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration...

  16. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Skokan, 1974) Exploration...

  17. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Thomas, 1986)...

  18. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration...

  19. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration...

  20. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration...

  1. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  2. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration...

  3. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity...

  4. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase I) Notes Fugro, Inc. performed an airborne geophysical survey using the DIGHEM (Digital Helicopter ElectroMagnetics) aircraft over a 937 km2 survey grid. An coplanar...

  5. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - Reply Authors L. Pellerin and J. M. Johnston Published Journal Geophysics, 1997 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  6. Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accurate Resolution of Multi-Material Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution of Multi-Material Cells. ...

  7. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - Discussion...

  8. Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Alnico and Ferrite Hybrid Excitation Electric Machines Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material Characteristics Novel Flux ...

  9. Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extrusion-based Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion-based Additive Manufacturing To ...

  10. Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent THz...

  11. Electromagnetic form factors and the hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanctis, M. De; Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2007-12-15

    We present new results concerning the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using a relativistic version of the hypercentral constituent quark model and a relativistic current.

  12. Frequency-Domain Electromagnetics Survey At Kilauea East Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Frequency-Domain Electromagnetics Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO,...

  13. Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Mount St Helens, Washington Abstract A very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic induction survey in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically...

  14. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the electric charge at conductivity boundaries rather than electromagnetic induction. This means that, for detection of the reservoir, methods such as MT, which rely on...

  15. Electromagnetic Soundings At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electromagnetic Soundings At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977)...

  16. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  17. Electromagnetic field of a charge intersecting a cold plasma boundary in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhina, Tatiana Yu.; Tyukhtin, Andrey V.

    2011-06-15

    We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charge crossing a boundary between a vacuum and cold plasma in a waveguide. We obtain exact expressions for the field components and the spectral density of the transition radiation. With the steepest descent technique, we investigate the field components. We show that the electromagnetic field has a different structure in a vacuum than in cold plasma. We also develop an algorithm for the computation of the field based on a certain transformation of the integration path. The behavior of the field depending on distance and time and the spectral density depending on frequency are explored for different charge velocities. Some important physical effects are noted. A considerable increase and concentration of the field near the wave front in the plasma is observed for the case of ultrarelativistic particles. In the plasma, the mode envelopes and spectral density show zero points when the charge velocity is within certain limits.

  18. Profiling Your Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiling Your Application Profiling Your Application Introduction By quantifying the performance of your application on present-day architectures, you will be better able to prioritize, plan, and implement code changes that will enable good performance on Cori. Here, we provide general background on application profiling, as well as links to resources and tools available at NERSC to assist you in this effort. Background Of the platforms available at NERSC, we recommend profiling on Edison and

  19. MODELING OF CHANGING ELECTRODE PROFILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Geoffrey Allen

    1980-12-01

    A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

  20. Discriminating electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John D.

    2015-06-16

    The present invention provides systems, articles, and methods for discriminating electromagnetic radiation based upon the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the materials and systems described herein can be capable of inhibiting reflection of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., the materials and systems can be capable of transmitting and/or absorbing electromagnetic radiation) within a given range of angles of incidence at a first incident surface, while substantially reflecting electromagnetic radiation outside the range of angles of incidence at a second incident surface (which can be the same as or different from the first incident surface). A photonic material comprising a plurality of periodically occurring separate domains can be used, in some cases, to selectively transmit and/or selectively absorb one portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation while reflecting another portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation, based upon the angle of incidence. In some embodiments, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic dielectric function, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic dielectric function. In some instances, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic magnetic permeability, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic magnetic permeability. In some embodiments, non-photonic materials (e.g., materials with relatively large scale features) can be used to selectively absorb incoming electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence.

  1. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  2. Computes Generalized Electromagnetic Interactions Between Structures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-18

    Eiger is primarily in integral equation code for both frequency-domain electromagnetics and electrostatics. There is also some finiate element capability. In the frequency-domain version there are different Green's functions in the code, 2D, 3D free space, symmetry-plane Green's functions, periodic Green's functions, and layered media Green's functions. There are thin slot models for coupling into cavities. There is a thin wire algorithm as well as junction basis functions for attachment of a wire to amore » conducting surface. The code is written in Fortran 90 using object oriented design. The code has the capability to run both in parallel and serial modes. The code is a suite consisting of pre-processor (Jungfrau), the physics code (EIGER), and post processor (Moench).« less

  3. Tissue interaction with nonionizing electromagnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adey, W.R.; Bawin, S.M.; Lawrence, A.F.; Lin-Liu, S.; Luben, R.A.; Lundak, R.L.; Sagan, P.M.; Sheppard, A.R.

    1981-02-01

    Studies of the effects of environmental low frequency electromagnetic fields on isolated cellular systems and tissue preparations derived from brain, bone, blood, and pancreas are reported. Behavioral effects of 60 Hz fields were examined in monkeys. Bioeffects of low level microwave fields modulated at 60 Hz and other ELF frequencies were also examined. Findings in the present studies emphasize a key role for cell membrane surfaces in detecting ELF environmental fields. Two broad groups of exposure techniques have been utilized. In the ELF spectrum, 60 Hz environmental fields were imposed on monkeys during behavioral task performance. Field intensities from 50 to 1000 V/m were tested in different experiments. The monkeys were exposed to a horizontal electric field. In tissue and cell culture preparations, ELF electric fields were generated by passing current between electrodes in the solutions bathing the tissue. Tissue and cell preparations were also tested with low frequency, pulsed magnetic fields by placing the biological preparation inside Helmholtz coils. For ELF dosimetry measurements in tissue preparations, electric gradients were measured directly in relation to specific axes of tissue and cell preparations. Exposures to ELF modulated 450 MHz microwave fields were conducted in two different systems, one uses a large anechoic horn chamber, the other utilizes a Crawford cell, a double-tapered coaxial system.Environmental field levels and tissue components of these fields were studied collaboratively using implantable tissue probes developed by BRH. Concurrent environmental field levels were based on measurements with other BRH probes and a NARDA microwave probe system. (ERB)

  4. Radar operation in a hostile electromagnetic environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-03-01

    Radar ISR does not always involve cooperative or even friendly targets. An adversary has numerous techniques available to him to counter the effectiveness of a radar ISR sensor. These generally fall under the banner of jamming, spoofing, or otherwise interfering with the EM signals required by the radar sensor. Consequently mitigation techniques are prudent to retain efficacy of the radar sensor. We discuss in general terms a number of mitigation techniques.

  5. Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    poor until the last several years when application of numerical techniques using computers permitted forward and inverse solutions to electrical boundary value problems in two...

  6. Fermilab Today | University Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Profiles Archive Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO More than 2,000 scientists worldwide work with Fermilab. In the United States, about 1,300 scientists from institutions in 36 states rely on Fermilab for their research, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. These profiles, published in Fermilab Today, spotlight the critical role of universities in particle physics research. We'd love to profile your

  7. Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro, Roberto E. Muñoz, Víctor; Araneda, Jaime; Moya, Pablo S.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2014-09-15

    Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric...

  15. Bootstrap performance profiles in stochastic algorithms assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Lino; Espírito Santo, Isabel A.C.P.; Oliveira, Pedro

    2015-03-10

    Optimization with stochastic algorithms has become a relevant research field. Due to its stochastic nature, its assessment is not straightforward and involves integrating accuracy and precision. Performance profiles for the mean do not show the trade-off between accuracy and precision, and parametric stochastic profiles require strong distributional assumptions and are limited to the mean performance for a large number of runs. In this work, bootstrap performance profiles are used to compare stochastic algorithms for different statistics. This technique allows the estimation of the sampling distribution of almost any statistic even with small samples. Multiple comparison profiles are presented for more than two algorithms. The advantages and drawbacks of each assessment methodology are discussed.

  16. Electromagnetic anti-jam telemetry tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Harini (Sugar Land, TX); Mayzenberg, Nataliya (Missouri City, TX)

    2008-02-12

    A mud-pulse telemetry tool includes a tool housing, a motor disposed in the tool housing, and a magnetic coupling coupled to the motor and having an inner shaft and an outer shaft. The tool may also include a stator coupled to the tool housing, a restrictor disposed proximate the stator and coupled to the magnetic coupling, so that the restrictor and the stator adapted to generate selected pulses in a drilling fluid when the restrictor is selectively rotated. The tool may also include a first anti-jam magnet coupled to the too housing, and an second anti-jam magnet disposed proximate the first anti-jam magnet and coupled to the inner shaft and/or the outer shaft, wherein at least one of the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet is an electromagnet, and wherein the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet are positioned with adjacent like poles.

  17. Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Oliver K.

    2013-08-20

    Professor Baker was a faculty member at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, and, jointly, a Staff Physicist at Jefferson Lab in nearby Newport News from September 1989 to July 2006. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded the grant DE-FG02-97ER41035 Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei, while Baker was in this joint appointment. Baker sent a closeout report on these activities to Hampton University’s Sponsored Research Office some years ago, shortly after joining Yale University in 2006. In the period around 2001, the research grant with Baker as the Principal Investigator (PI) was put under the supervision of Professor Liguang Tang at Hampton University. Baker continued to pursue the research while in this join appointment, however the administrative responsibilities with the DOE and with Hampton University rested with Professor Tang after 2001, to my recollection. What is written in this document is from Baker’s memory of the research activities, which he has not pursued since joining the Yale University faculty.

  18. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  19. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  20. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  1. Electromagnetic Evidence For An Ancient Avalanche Caldera Rim...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electromagnetic (LOTEM) data and VIBROTEM data from the south flank of Mount Merapi on Java island, Indonesia, are interpreted with one-dimensional (1D) inversions as well as...

  2. Reservoir Characterization: Electromagnetic Imaging of CO2 for EOR Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkendall, B; Roberts, J

    2002-10-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently involved in a long term study using time-lapse multiple frequency electromagnetic (EM) imaging at a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) enhanced oil recovery (EOR) site in the San Joaquin Valley, California. The impetus for this proposed research project is to develop the ability to image subsurface CO{sub 2} during EOR processes while simultaneously discriminating between background heavy petroleum and water deposits. Using field equipment developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in prior imaging studies of EOR water and steam injection, this research uses multiple field deployments to acquire subsurface image snapshots of the CO{sub 2} injection and displacement. Laboratory research, including electrical and transport properties of fluid and CO{sub 2} in saturated materials, uses core samples from drilling, as well as samples of injection and formation fluid provided by industrial partners on-site. Our two-fold approach to combine laboratory and field methods in imaging a pilot CO{sub 2} sequestration EOR site using the cross-borehole EM technique is to (1) improve the inversion process in CO{sub 2} studies by coupling field results with petrophysical laboratory measurements and (2) focus on new gas interpretation techniques of the field data using multiple frequencies and low noise data processing techniques. This approach is beneficial, as field and laboratory data can provide information on subsurface CO{sub 2} detection, CO{sub 2} migration tracking, and the resulting displacement of petroleum and water over time. While the electrical properties of the brine from the prior waterflooding are sharply contrasted from the other components, the electrical signatures of the formation fluid (oil) and CO{sub 2} are quite similar. We attempt to quantify that difference under multiple conditions and as a function of injection time. We find that the electrical conductivity signature difference increases over time and we should thus expect to discriminate CO{sub 2} as a function of time based on the time scales calculated from linear extrapolation of laboratory data.

  3. Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metamaterials (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and Metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and Metamaterials Authors: Grady, Nathaniel [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-08-04 OSTI Identifier: 1148947 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-26158 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type:

  4. Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metamaterials (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and Metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Manipulation of Electromagnetic Fields with Plasmonic Nanostructures and Metamaterials × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to

  5. Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multi-Material Cells. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution of Multi-Material Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution of Multi-Material Cells. Abstract not provided. Authors: Siefert, Christopher ; Voth, Thomas Eugene ; Bochev, Pavel B. Publication Date: 2012-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1117558 Report Number(s): SAND2012-3076C 481119 DOE Contract Number:

  6. Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Guided by the recent experimental confirmation of the validity of the Effective Momentum Approximation (EMA) in quasi-elastic scattering off nuclei, we have re-examined the extraction of the Longitudinal and Transverse Response Functions in medium-weight and heavy

  7. Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy

  8. Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and probe of ultrafast phase transformations (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations We present the first experimental observations of terahertz frequency radiation emitted when a terahertz frequency acoustic

  9. Implicitly-Coupled Electromechanical and Electromagnetic Transient Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using a Frequency Dependent Network Equivalent | Argonne National Laboratory Implicitly-Coupled Electromechanical and Electromagnetic Transient Analysis using a Frequency Dependent Network Equivalent Title Implicitly-Coupled Electromechanical and Electromagnetic Transient Analysis using a Frequency Dependent Network Equivalent Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2015 Authors Zhang, X, Flueck, AJ, Abhyankar, S Journal IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery Volume PP Issue 99

  10. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program-electromagnetic systems compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K A; Grant, W B; Morrison, E L; Juroshek, J R

    1981-01-01

    The EMC analysis addressed only the direct effects of electromagnetic emissions from the SPS on other technological systems. Emissions were defined quite broadly, including not only those from the microwave system, but also thermal blackbody emission and scattered sunlight from the satellite. The analysis is based on the design for an SPS as described in the Reference System Report and some quantitative conclusions, e.g., ranges from rectenna sites at which effects are expected are specific to that design. The methodology and qualitative conclusions, however, apply to an SPS concept using microwave power transmission. Quantitative conclusions have been obtained parametrically and can be adjusted as SPS designs change. The electromagnetic environment that the Reference System would produce, and in which other systems would have to function, is described. As an early part of the EMC Assessment, the problems expected for a hypothetical rectenna site, in the Mojave Desert of southern California, were analyzed in detail. This effort provided an initial quantitative indication of the scope of potential EMC problems and indicated the importance of EMC considerations in rectenna site selection. The results of this analysis are presented. The effects of SPS microwave emissions on important categories of electronic systems and equipment are summarized, with many examples of test results and demonstrated techniques for mitigation of problems encountered. SPS effects on other satellite systems are presented. Astronomical research frequently involves measurement of extremely low levels of electromagnetic radiation and is thus very susceptible to interference. The concerns of both radio astronomy with microwave emissions from SPS and optical astronomy with sunlight scattered from SPS spacecraft are discussed. Summaries of mitigation techniques, cost estimates, and conclusions are presented. (WHK)

  11. Electromagnetic methods for measuring materials properties of cylindrical rods and array probes for rapid flaw inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Haiyan

    2005-05-01

    The case-hardening process modifies the near-surface permeability and conductivity of steel, as can be observed through changes in alternating current potential drop (ACPD) along a rod. In order to evaluate case depth of case hardened steel rods, analytical expressions are derived for the alternating current potential drop on the surface of a homogeneous rod, a two-layered and a three-layered rod. The case-hardened rod is first modeled by a two-layer rod that has a homogeneous substrate with a single, uniformly thick, homogeneous surface layer, in which the conductivity and permeability values differ from those in the substrate. By fitting model results to multi-frequency ACPD experimental data, estimates of conductivity, permeability and case depth are found. Although the estimated case depth by the two-layer model is in reasonable agreement with the effective case depth from the hardness profile, it is consistently higher than the effective case depth. This led to the development of the three-layer model. It is anticipated that the new three-layered model will improve the results and thus makes the ACPD method a novel technique in nondestructive measurement of case depth. Another way to evaluate case depth of a case hardened steel rod is to use induction coils. Integral form solutions for an infinite rod encircled by a coaxial coil are well known, but for a finite length conductor, additional boundary conditions must be satisfied at the ends. In this work, calculations of eddy currents are performed for a two-layer conducting rod of finite length excited by a coaxial circular coil carrying an alternating current. The solution is found using the truncated region eigenfunction expansion (TREE) method. By truncating the solution region to a finite length in the axial direction, the magnetic vector potential can be expressed as a series expansion of orthogonal eigenfunctions instead of as a Fourier integral. Closed-form expressions are derived for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a finite a two-layer rod and a conductive tube. The results are in very good agreement with those obtained by using a 2D finite element code. In the third part, a new probe technology with enhanced flaw detection capability is described. The new probe can reduce inspection time through the use of multiple Hall sensors. A prototype Hall array probe has been built and tested with eight individual Hall sensor ICs and a racetrack coil. Electronic hardware was developed to interface the probes to an oscilloscope or an eddy current instrument. To achieve high spatial resolution and to limit the overall probe size, high-sensitivity Hall sensor arrays were fabricated directly on a wafer using photolithographic techniques and then mounted in their unencapsulated form. The electronic hardware was then updated to interface the new probes to a laptop computer.

  12. Iterative electromagnetic Born inversion applied to earth conductivity imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of a fast imaging technique to deduce the spatial conductivity distribution in the earth from low frequency (< 1 MHz), cross well electromagnetic (EM) measurements. The theory embodied in this work is the extension of previous strategies and is based on the Born series approximation to solve both the forward and inverse problem. Nonlinear integral equations are employed to derive the series expansion which accounts for the scattered magnetic fields that are generated by inhomogeneities embedded in either a homogenous or a layered earth. A sinusoidally oscillating, vertically oriented magnetic dipole is employed as a source, and it is assumed that the scattering bodies are azimuthally symmetric about the source dipole axis. The use of this model geometry reduces the 3-D vector problem to a more manageable 2-D scalar form. The validity of the cross well EM method is tested by applying the imaging scheme to two sets of field data. Images of the data collected at the Devine, Texas test site show excellent correlation with the well logs. Unfortunately there is a drift error present in the data that limits the accuracy of the results. A more complete set of data collected at the Richmond field station in Richmond, California demonstrates that cross well EM can be successfully employed to monitor the position of an injected mass of salt water. Both the data and the resulting images clearly indicate the plume migrates toward the north-northwest. The plausibility of these conclusions is verified by applying the imaging code to synthetic data generated by a 3-D sheet model.

  13. Sub-Cell Resolution Techniques for Multi-Material Electromagnetics in Two and Three Dimensions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    214D Chris Si Computational Multiphysics & 1 putational Math Motivating Application Motivating application: Z-flyer plate * Lorentz force accelerates plate towards target * Goal: Shape current pulse to ensure plate * is as flat and solid as possible on impact. Current concentrates on material surfaces * Material/void interfaces "count" for EM as voids must be meshed. * Lagrangian only works for small deformation. * Eulerian mixture models underdeveloped for EM. * Solution:

  14. Electro-optical and Magneto-optical Sensing Apparatus and Method for Characterizing Free-space Electromagnetic Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Riordan, Jenifer Ann; Sun, Feng-Guo

    2000-08-29

    Apparatus and methods for characterizing free-space electromagnetic energy, and in particular, apparatus/method suitable for real-time two-dimensional far-infrared imaging applications are presented. The sensing technique is based on a non-linear coupling between a low-frequency electric (or magnetic) field and a laser beam in an electro-optic (or magnetic-optic) crystal. In addition to a practical counter-propagating sensing technique, a co-linear approach is described which provides longer radiated field-optical beam interaction length, thereby making imaging applications practical.

  15. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2011-05-31

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric...

  13. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O'Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our results are directly relevant to planned short-pulse ARC (advanced radiographic capability) operation on NIF.

  14. Control and monitoring method and system for electromagnetic forming process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunerth, Dennis C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lassahn, Gordon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    A process, system, and improvement for a process for electromagnetic forming of a workpiece in which characteristics of the workpiece such as its geometry, electrical conductivity, quality, and magnetic permeability can be determined by monitoring the current and voltage in the workcoil. In an electromagnet forming process in which a power supply provides current to a workcoil and the electromagnetic field produced by the workcoil acts to form the workpiece, the dynamic interaction of the electromagnetic fields produced by the workcoil with the geometry, electrical conductivity, and magnetic permeability of the workpiece, provides information pertinent to the physical condition of the workpiece that is available for determination of quality and process control. This information can be obtained by deriving in real time the first several time derivatives of the current and voltage in the workcoil. In addition, the process can be extended by injecting test signals into the workcoil during the electromagnetic forming and monitoring the response to the test signals in the workcoil.

  15. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ki H. (Lafayette, CA); Xie, Gan Q. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  16. Transverse electromagnetic horn antenna with resistively-loaded exterior surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aurand, John F. (Edgewood, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An improved transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antenna comprises a resistive loading material on the exterior surfaces of the antenna plates. The resistive loading material attenuates or inhibits currents on the exterior surfaces of the TEM horn antenna. The exterior electromagnetic fields are of opposite polarity in comparison to the primary and desired interior electromagnetic field, thus inherently cause partial cancellation of the interior wave upon radiation or upon reception. Reducing the exterior fields increases the radiation efficiency of the antenna by reducing the cancellation of the primary interior field (supported by the interior surface currents). This increases the transmit gain and receive sensitivity of the TEM horn antenna, as well as improving the transient (time-domain) response.

  17. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, K.H.; Xie, G.Q.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The travel times corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter [alpha] for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography. 13 figures.

  18. Graded pitch electromagnetic pump for thin strip metal casting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, S.B.

    1986-04-01

    A metal strip casing system is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks having a graded pole pitch, polyphase ac winding and being arranged on opposite sides of a movable heat sink. A nozzle is provided for depositing liquid metal on the heat sink such that the resulting metal strip and heat sink combination is subjected to a longitudinal electromagnetic field which increases in wavelength in the direction of travel of the heat sink, thereby subjecting the metal and heat sink to a longitudinal force having a magnitude which increases in the direction of travel. 4 figs.

  19. Graded pitch electromagnetic pump for thin strip metal casting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, Stephen B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A metal strip casing system is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks having a graded pole pitch, polyphase ac winding and being arranged on opposite sides of a movable heat sink. A nozzle is provided for depositing liquid metal on the heat sink such that the resulting metal strip and heat sink combination is subjected to a longitudinal electromagnetic field which increases in wavelength in the direction of travel of the heat sink, thereby subjecting the metal and heat sink to a longitudinal force having a magnitude which increases in the direction of travel.

  20. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  1. Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing Abengoa logo Abengoa Solar, under the Solar Manufacturing Technology (SolarMat) program, will be investigating the use of an automotive-style high-rate fabrication and automated assembly techniques to achieve a substantial reduction in the deployment cost of their new SpaceTube advanced large aperture parabolic trough collector. Approach Abengoa is developing

  2. Electromagnetic analysis of forces and torques on the ITER shield modules due to plasma disruption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2009-06-01

    An electromagnetic analysis is performed on the ITER shield modules under different plasma disruption scenarios using the OPERA-3d software. The modeling procedure is explained, electromagnetic torques are presented, and results of the modeling are discussed.

  3. Low profile thermite igniter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1991-03-05

    A thermite igniter/heat source comprising a housing, high-density thermite, and low-density thermite. The housing has a relatively low profile and can focus energy by means of a torch-like ejection of hot reaction products and is externally ignitable.

  4. Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characteristics | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ape035_miller_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material Characteristics Alnico and Ferrite Hybrid Excitation Electric Machines Wireless Charging

  5. Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characteristics | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ape035_miller_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Alnico and Ferrite Hybrid Excitation Electric Machines Motor Packaging with Consideration of Electromagnetic and Material Characteristics Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets

  6. Electromagnetic Imaging of CO2 Sequestration at an Enhanced Oil Recovery Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkendall, B.; Roberts, J.

    2001-02-28

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently involved in a long term study using time-lapse multiple frequency electromagnetic (EM) characterization at a waterflood enhanced oil recovery (EOR) site in California operated by Chevron Heavy Oil Division in Lost Hills, California (Figure 1). The petroleum industry's interest and the successful imaging results from this project suggest that this technique be extended to monitor CO{sub 2} sequestration at an EOR site also operated by Chevron. The impetus for this study is to develop the ability to image subsurface injected CO{sub 2} during EOR processes while simultaneously discriminating between pre-existing petroleum and water deposits. The goals of this study are to combine laboratory and field methods to image a pilot CO{sub 2} sequestration EOR site using the cross-borehole EM technique, improve the inversion process in CO{sub 2} studies by coupling results with petrophysical laboratory measurements, and focus on new gas interpretation techniques. In this study we primarily focus on how joint field and laboratory results can provide information on subsurface CO{sub 2} detection, CO{sub 2} migration tracking, and displacement of petroleum and water over time. This study directly addresses national energy issues in two ways: (1) the development of field and laboratory techniques to improve in-situ analysis of oil and gas enhanced recovery operations and, (2) this research provides a tool for in-situ analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an international technical issue of growing importance.

  7. Performance of the first prototype of the CALICE scintillator strip electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N. K.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Lima, J. G.R.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J. -Y.; Morin, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Lu, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Sudo, Y.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Wing, M.; Salvatore, F.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. -C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M. -C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch.; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouëné, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J. -C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Musat, G.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Jeans, D.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2014-11-01

    A first prototype of a scintillator strip-based electromagnetic calorimeter was built, consisting of 26 layers of tungsten absorber plates interleaved with planes of 45 × 10 × 3 mm³ plastic scintillator strips. Data were collected using a positron test beam at DESY with momenta between 1 and 6 GeV/c. The prototype's performance is presented in terms of the linearity and resolution of the energy measurement. These results represent an important milestone in the development of highly granular calorimeters using scintillator strip technology. A number of possible design improvements were identified, which should be implemented in a future detector of this type. This technology is being developed for a future linear collider experiment, aiming at the precise measurement of jet energies using particle flow techniques.

  8. High-precision calculation of the strange nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Jeremy; Meinel, Stefan; Engelhardt, Michael G.; Krieg, Stefan; Laeuchli, Jesse; Negele, John W.; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2015-08-01

    We report a direct lattice QCD calculation of the strange nucleon electromagnetic form factors GsE and GsM in the kinematic range 0 lte Q2 \\lessapprox 1.2GeV2. For the first time, both GsE and GsM are shown to be nonzero with high significance. This work uses closer-to-physical lattice parameters than previous calculations, and achieves an unprecented statistical precision by implementing a recently proposed variance reduction technique called hierarchical probing. We perform model-independent fits of the form factor shapes using the z-expansion and determine the strange electric and magnetic radii and magnetic moment. We compare our results to parity-violating electron-proton scattering data and to other theoretical studies.

  9. Performance of the first prototype of the CALICE scintillator strip electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; et al

    2014-11-01

    A first prototype of a scintillator strip-based electromagnetic calorimeter was built, consisting of 26 layers of tungsten absorber plates interleaved with planes of 45 × 10 × 3 mm³ plastic scintillator strips. Data were collected using a positron test beam at DESY with momenta between 1 and 6 GeV/c. The prototype's performance is presented in terms of the linearity and resolution of the energy measurement. These results represent an important milestone in the development of highly granular calorimeters using scintillator strip technology. A number of possible design improvements were identified, which should be implemented in a future detector of thismore » type. This technology is being developed for a future linear collider experiment, aiming at the precise measurement of jet energies using particle flow techniques.« less

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8

  17. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

  18. Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Thermodynamic Responses to Uncertainty in Aerosol Extinction Profiles For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Aerosol radiative effects are of great importance for climate simulations over South Asia. For quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) are often compared with observations. These comparisons have revealed large AOD underestimation and

  19. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as

  20. Temperature-profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  1. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  2. LANL Data Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Profile 2012-2013 Total: 10,407 Quick Facts FY2013 Operating Budget ..... $1.95 billion Operating costs 54% NNSA Weapons Programs 12% Work for other agencies 10% Nonproliferation programs 9% Environmental management 6% Safeguards and security 5% DOE Office of Science 4% Energy and related programs Workforce Demographics Average Age: 46 67% male, 33% female 45% ethnic minorities 67% university degrees -28% undergraduate degrees -17% graduate degrees -22% PhD degrees Capital/Construction

  3. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  4. TRANSVERSE MATCHING OF THE SNS LINAC BASED ON PROFILE MEASUREMENTS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect TRANSVERSE MATCHING OF THE SNS LINAC BASED ON PROFILE MEASUREMENTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TRANSVERSE MATCHING OF THE SNS LINAC BASED ON PROFILE MEASUREMENTS For a high intensity linac such as the SNS linac, it matters to match transversely adequately to minimize the beam mismatch and potential beam loss. The technique of doing the matching using the wire-scanners in series was employed [1]. It was verified that matching was improved through

  5. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Mike; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

    2012-02-14

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the verticalmore » kick of the beam.« less

  6. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  7. Electromagnetic Probes: A Chronometer of Heavy Ion Collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Bikash

    2010-11-23

    I have known Predhiman for quite some time and I consider his friendship a great privilege. He along with some of his colleagues made the almost unique transition time to time from Quantum Electrodynamics of his (almost classical) electromagnetic plasma to Quantum Chromodynamics of quarks and gluons. Some of the papers are unique in the sense they surface up to the centre stage of the field of quarks and gluons giving us a new insight; the particular paper of Bannur and Kaw discussing the stability of quark gluon plasma is a particularly interesting one.I wish Predhiman the very best on this occasion and sincerely hope for a long vital and fruitful life that lies ahead.Interestingly enough this transition from QED (electromagnetic plasma) to QCD plasma (Quark Gluon Plasma) was motivated by consuming a very special kind of Indian soft nuts on Sunday afternoons, the consumers consisted of two persons, P. K. Kaw and Jitendra Parikh - some nuts!

  8. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novack, Steven D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Columbia, MO)

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  9. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  10. Device for conversion of electromagnetic radiation into electrical current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blakeslee, A.E.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1980-03-25

    Electromagnetic energy may be converted directly into electrical energy by a device comprising a sandwich of at least two semiconductor portions, each portion having a p-n junction with a characteristic energy gap, and the portions lattice matched to one another by an intervening superlattice structure. This superlattice acts to block propagation into the next deposited portion of those dislocation defects which can form due to lattice mismatch between adjacent portions.

  11. Nuclear electromagnetic charge and current operators in Chiral EFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girlanda, Luca; Marcucci, Laura Elisa; Pastore, Saori; Piarulli, Maria; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2013-08-01

    We describe our method for deriving the nuclear electromagnetic charge and current operators in chiral perturbation theory, based on time-ordered perturbation theory. We then discuss possible strategies for fixing the relevant low-energy constants, from the magnetic moments of the deuteron and of the trinucleons, and from the radiative np capture cross sections, and identify a scheme which, partly relying on {Delta} resonance saturation, leads to a reasonable pattern of convergence of the chiral expansion.

  12. Experimental studies of electromagnetic properties of few body systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosted, P.E.

    1987-08-01

    An overview is given of some recent and planned experiments which have or will substantially increase our knowledge of the electromagnetic properties of few body systems. Specific examples include the proton and neutron elastic form factors, the deuteron elastic form factors, deuteron threshold electrodisintegration and quasi-elastic scattering, deuteron photodisintegration, and finally measurements of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering from hydrogen, deuterium, and iron. 47 refs., 13 figs. (DWL)

  13. Gradient instabilities of electromagnetic waves in Hall thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomilin, Dmitry

    2013-04-15

    This paper presents a linear analysis of gradient plasma instabilities in Hall thrusters. The study obtains and analyzes the dispersion equation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves based on the two-fluid model of a cold plasma. The regions of parameters corresponding to unstable high frequency modes are determined and the dependence of the increments and intrinsic frequencies on plasma parameters is obtained. The obtained results agree with those of previously published studies.

  14. CRC handbook of biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C.; Postow, E.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the current knowledge about the effects of electromagnetic fields on living matter. The three-part format covers dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of biological materials; effects of direct current and low frequency fields; and effects of radio frequency (including microwave) fields. The parts are designed to be consulted independently or in sequence, depending upon the needs of the reader. Useful appendixes on measurement units and safety standards are also included.

  15. Profile Interface Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allowsmore » semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.« less

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric utilities 2,205 39 IPP & CHP 179 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,496,822 49 Electric utilities 5,851,727 39 IPP & CHP 645,095 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,202 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,043 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,768 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric utilities 20,668 12 IPP & CHP 7,242 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 113,325,986 12 Electric utilities 92,740,582 8 IPP & CHP 20,585,405 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 23,716 31 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 59,416 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 55,342 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 42 Nitrogen

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2 Electric utilities 28,165 4 IPP & CHP 45,607 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 200,077,115 5 Electric utilities 78,407,643 14 IPP & CHP 121,669,472 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,109 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 96,842 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,323 13 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric utilities 10,238 28 IPP & CHP 4,531 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,937,436 28 Electric utilities 42,508,826 25 IPP & CHP 10,428,610 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 40,012 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 49,623 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,387 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 27 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35 Electric utilities 152 46 IPP & CHP 8,617 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,610,789 38 Electric utilities 50,273 45 IPP & CHP 35,560,516 10 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,512 45 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,372 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 8,726 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 47 Nitrogen

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46 Electric utilities 102 47 IPP & CHP 3,144 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,760,861 47 Electric utilities 25,986 47 IPP & CHP 7,734,875 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,241 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,585 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,722 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 40 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,852 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 65,852 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 148 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 49 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric utilities 50,967 1 IPP & CHP 7,813 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 222,398,924 3 Electric utilities 202,527,297 1 IPP & CHP 19,871,627 18 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 117,797 12 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 88,345 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,431 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 34

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric utilities 28,875 2 IPP & CHP 9,335 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 120,953,734 10 Electric utilities 107,082,884 4 IPP & CHP 13,870,850 26 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 123,735 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 55,462 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,812 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 20

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric utilities 1,821 40 IPP & CHP 937 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,267,052 45 Electric utilities 5,748,256 40 IPP & CHP 4,518,796 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 20,710 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 25,416 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,428 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 5 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP 1,530 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,186,128 43 Electric utilities 9,600,216 36 IPP & CHP 5,585,912 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,565 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 7,627 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,942 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 37 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric utilities 5,269 35 IPP & CHP 39,681 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 203,004,919 4 Electric utilities 11,571,734 35 IPP & CHP 191,433,185 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 203,951 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 63,358 11 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 97,812 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 21 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric utilities 23,309 8 IPP & CHP 3,888 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 110,403,477 13 Electric utilities 96,047,678 7 IPP & CHP 14,355,799 23 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 273,718 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 121,681 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 98,895 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 2 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities 12,092 21 IPP & CHP 3,837 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,670,757 27 Electric utilities 41,932,708 26 IPP & CHP 14,738,048 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 106,879 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,657 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,175 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.8 6 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric utilities 11,593 24 IPP & CHP 2,501 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 48,472,581 32 Electric utilities 39,808,763 28 IPP & CHP 8,663,819 32 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,027 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 30,860 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,125 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric utilities 19,599 16 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 89,741,021 18 Electric utilities 89,098,127 11 IPP & CHP 642,894 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 190,782 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 87,201 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,304 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 4 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15 Electric utilities 17,297 17 IPP & CHP 8,931 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 102,010,177 15 Electric utilities 56,226,016 17 IPP & CHP 45,784,161 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 122,578 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 82,286 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 58,274 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 16

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric utilities 14 49 IPP & CHP 4,485 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 14,030,038 44 Electric utilities 597 49 IPP & CHP 14,029,441 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,365 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,607 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,675 45 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 23 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric utilities 85 48 IPP & CHP 12,254 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,850,812 37 Electric utilities 30,205 46 IPP & CHP 35,820,607 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,539 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,995 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 18,950 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 17 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32 Electric utilities 969 42 IPP & CHP 12,709 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,885,021 40 Electric utilities 611,320 44 IPP & CHP 32,273,700 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,339 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,150 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14,735 38 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric utilities 22,148 9 IPP & CHP 7,981 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 105,417,801 14 Electric utilities 83,171,310 13 IPP & CHP 22,246,490 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 237,091 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 86,058 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 67,193 10 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric utilities 11,901 22 IPP & CHP 3,858 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 51,296,988 31 Electric utilities 41,155,904 27 IPP & CHP 10,141,084 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 35,625 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 36,972 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 29,255 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28 Electric utilities 12,842 20 IPP & CHP 2,719 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,810,264 29 Electric utilities 45,413,403 23 IPP & CHP 7,396,861 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 87,718 17 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 24,490 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 22,633 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 9

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric utilities 20,562 15 IPP & CHP 1,239 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 91,626,593 17 Electric utilities 89,217,205 10 IPP & CHP 2,409,387 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 157,488 8 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 78,033 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 78,344 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 8 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities 2,568 38 IPP & CHP 3,761 27 Net generation (megawatthours) 27,687,326 41 Electric utilities 7,361,898 38 IPP & CHP 20,325,428 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 16,865 36 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,789 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,951 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 31 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities 7,911 30 IPP & CHP 538 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,104,628 34 Electric utilities 35,170,167 30 IPP & CHP 1,934,461 48 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 66,884 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 31,505 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,043 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 7 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric utilities 7,915 29 IPP & CHP 2,737 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,443,874 35 Electric utilities 27,888,008 34 IPP & CHP 8,555,866 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 7,436 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 16,438 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,690 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 43 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,452 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 64,750,942 24 Electric utilities -122,674 50 IPP & CHP 64,873,616 6 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,196 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,299 40 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,789 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric utilities 5,912 33 IPP & CHP 2,026 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,870,965 36 Electric utilities 29,833,095 33 IPP & CHP 6,037,870 37 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,735 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 59,055 16 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,535 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric utilities 10,736 26 IPP & CHP 29,182 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 136,116,830 8 Electric utilities 33,860,490 31 IPP & CHP 102,256,340 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,947 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,824 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,456 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 41 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779 11 IPP & CHP 11,703 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,284,189 7 Electric utilities 88,763,825 12 IPP & CHP 48,520,364 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 346,873 2 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 102,526 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 102,466 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.1 1 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric utilities 16,951 18 IPP & CHP 6,349 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 73,673,680 22 Electric utilities 53,348,841 18 IPP & CHP 20,324,839 17 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 80,418 19 Nitrogen oxide 57,024 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 46,268 19 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 19

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric utilities 10,973 25 IPP & CHP 4,689 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 59,895,515 26 Electric utilities 43,254,167 24 IPP & CHP 16,641,348 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,511 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,803 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 9,500 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 39 Nitrogen

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric utilities 455 44 IPP & CHP 42,584 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 226,785,630 2 Electric utilities 1,105,740 42 IPP & CHP 225,679,890 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 276,851 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 151,148 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,729 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 15 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,802 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,246,807 50 Electric utilities 10,659 48 IPP & CHP 6,236,148 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,271 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,161 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,838 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 44 Nitrogen

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric utilities 21,039 10 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 95,249,894 16 Electric utilities 91,795,732 9 IPP & CHP 3,454,162 44 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 47,671 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,035 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,809 30 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP 629 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,108,887 46 Electric utilities 8,030,545 37 IPP & CHP 2,078,342 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 15,347 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 11,430 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,228 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.0 12

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric utilities 20,635 13 IPP & CHP 690 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,651,619 19 Electric utilities 75,988,871 15 IPP & CHP 3,662,748 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 86,204 18 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,189 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,118 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 19 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric utilities 28,705 3 IPP & CHP 80,879 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 433,380,166 1 Electric utilities 96,131,888 6 IPP & CHP 337,248,278 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 383,728 1 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 228,695 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 257,465 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 25 Nitrogen Oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669 32 IPP & CHP 1,029 44 Net generation (megawatthours) 42,516,751 33 Electric utilities 39,526,881 29 IPP & CHP 2,989,870 45 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 23,670 32 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 62,296 13 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 35,699 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric utilities 329 45 IPP & CHP 925 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,884,910 48 Electric utilities 872,238 43 IPP & CHP 6,012,672 38 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 792 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric utilities 20,601 14 IPP & CHP 4,227 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 76,896,565 20 Electric utilities 63,724,860 16 IPP & CHP 13,171,706 28 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,077 21 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,706 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 34,686 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 26 Nitrogen

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP 3,586 28 Net generation (megawatthours) 114,172,916 11 Electric utilities 100,013,661 5 IPP & CHP 14,159,255 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,259 39 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 17,975 38 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,543 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 46

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24 Electric utilities 10,625 27 IPP & CHP 5,657 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 75,863,067 21 Electric utilities 46,351,104 22 IPP & CHP 29,511,963 13 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 93,888 15 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 60,229 14 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 68,862 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric utilities 13,358 19 IPP & CHP 3,984 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,962,792 23 Electric utilities 47,027,455 20 IPP & CHP 18,935,337 19 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 108,306 13 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 44,114 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,686 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 10 Nitrogen

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,381 37 Electric utilities 7,279 31 IPP & CHP 1,102 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,483,065 30 Electric utilities 48,089,178 19 IPP & CHP 4,393,887 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 49,587 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 55,615 19 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 50,687 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 24 Nitrogen Oxide

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the

  6. Compare Gene Profiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linuxmore » environment in serial or parallel mode.« less

  7. Environmental profile of Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    The social, cultural, physical, and economic dimensions of Paraguay's environment are analyzed to identify main environmental features and problems and to recommend specific actions. The environmental profile presents an overview of Paraguay's ethno-historic and anthropological background, present-day society, and the impact of pollution. Descriptions are presented of: the legal and institutional aspects of environmental policy; the structure and performance of the economy, with focus on the primary and energy sectors; physical resources (climate, geological, mineral, soil, and water resources); and biological resources (vegetation, wild animal life, protected areas, and fish resources).

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP 1,530 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,186,128 43 Electric utilities 9,600,216 36 IPP & CHP 5,585,912 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,565 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 7,627 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,942 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 37 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric utilities 10,973 25 IPP & CHP 4,689 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 59,895,515 26 Electric utilities 43,254,167 24 IPP & CHP 16,641,348 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,511 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,803 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 9,500 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 39 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP 629 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,108,887 46 Electric utilities 8,030,545 37 IPP & CHP 2,078,342 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 15,347 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 11,430 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,228 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.0 12

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    United States Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,060,064 Electric utilities 616,799 IPP & CHP 443,264 Net generation (megawatthours) 4,065,964,067 Electric utilities 2,388,058,409 IPP & CHP 1,677,905,658 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 3,978,753 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,411,564 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,172,355 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 Nitrogen Oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP 3,586 28 Net generation (megawatthours) 114,172,916 11 Electric utilities 100,013,661 5 IPP & CHP 14,159,255 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,259 39 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 17,975 38 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,543 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 46

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,381 37 Electric utilities 7,279 31 IPP & CHP 1,102 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,483,065 30 Electric utilities 48,089,178 19 IPP & CHP 4,393,887 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 49,587 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 55,615 19 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 50,687 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 24 Nitrogen Oxide

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,786 29 Electric utilities 11,559 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 60,322,492 25 Electric utilities 46,547,772 21 IPP & CHP 13,774,720 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 88,811 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 45,896 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,346 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 13 Nitrogen

  16. Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet File Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template ...

  17. Final report on passive and active low-frequency electromagnetic spectroscopy for airborne detection of underground facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SanFilipo, Bill

    2000-04-01

    The objective of this program is to perform research to advance the science in the application of both passive and active electromagnetic measurement techniques for the detection and spatial delineation of underground facilities. Passive techniques exploit the electromagnetic fields generated by electrical apparatus within the structure, including generators, motors, power distribution circuitry, as well as communications hardware and similar electronics equipment. Frequencies monitored are generally in the audio range (60-20,000 Hz), anticipating strong sources associated with normal AC power (i.e., 50 or 60 Hz and associated harmonics), and low frequency power from broad-band sources such as switching circuits. Measurements are made using receiver induction coils wired to electronics that digitize and record the voltage induced by the time varying magnetic fields. Active techniques employ electromagnetic field transmitters in the form of AC current carrying loops also in the audio frequency range, and receiving coils that measure the resultant time varying magnetic fields. These fields are perturbed from those expected in free space by any conductive material in the vicinity of the coils, including the ground, so that the total measured field is comprised of the primary free-space component and the secondary scattered component. The latter can be further delineated into an average background field (uniform conductive half-space earth) and anomalous field associated with heterogeneous zones in the earth, including both highly conductive objects such as metallic structures as well as highly resistive structures such as empty voids corresponding to rooms or tunnels. Work performed during Phase I included the development of the prototype GEM-2H instrumentation, collection of data at several test sites in the passive mode and a single site in the active mode, development of processing and interpretation software. The technical objectives of Phase II were to: (1) continue to develop and improve EM instruments; (2) develop new software for analysis and inversion of electromagnetic induction measurements for both passive and active surveys; and (3) Perform experiments to test EM induction methodology.

  18. Evaluation of Non-Nuclear Techniques for Well Logging: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Harris, R. V.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Moran, Traci L.

    2011-08-01

    The focus of this study is the understanding of the technical obstacles that hinder the replacement of and the disadvantages from the loss of extensive interpretation experience based on data accumulated with AmBe. Enhanced acoustic and electromagnetic sensing methods in combination with non-isotope-based well logging techniques have the potential to complement and/or replace existing isotope-based techniques, providing the opportunity to reduce oil industry dependence on isotopic sources such as AmBe.

  19. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  20. Theory and Manufacturing Processes of Solar NanoAntenna Electromagnetic Collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale K. Kotter; Steven D. Novack

    2010-02-01

    DRAFT For Submittal to Journal of Solar Energy - Rev 10.1 ---SOL-08-1091 SOLAR Nantenna Electromagnetic Collectors Dale K. Kotter Idaho National Laboratory Steven D. Novack Idaho National Laboratory W. Dennis Slafer MicroContinuum, Inc. Patrick Pinhero University of Missouri ABSTRACT The research described in this paper explores a new and efficient approach for producing electricity from the abundant energy of the sun, using nanoantenna (nantenna) electromagnetic collectors (NECs). NEC devices target mid-infrared wavelengths, where conventional photovoltaic (PV) solar cells are inefficient and where there is an abundance of solar energy. The initial concept of designing NECs was based on scaling of radio frequency antenna theory to the infrared and visible regions. This approach initially proved unsuccessful because the optical behavior of materials in the terahertz (THz) region was overlooked and, in addition, economical nanofabrication methods were not previously available to produce the optical antenna elements. This paper demonstrates progress in addressing significant technological barriers, including: 1) development of frequency-dependent modeling of double-feedpoint square spiral nantenna elements; 2) selection of materials with proper THz properties; and 3) development of novel manufacturing methods that could potentially enable economical large-scale manufacturing. We have shown that nantennas can collect infrared energy and induce THz currents, and we have also developed cost-effective proof-of-concept fabrication techniques for the large-scale manufacture of simple square loop nantenna arrays. Future work is planned to embed rectifiers into the double-feedpoint antenna structures. This work represents an important first step toward the ultimate realization of a low-cost device that will collect as well as convert this radiation into electricity. This could lead to a broadband, high conversion efficiency low-cost solution to complement conventional PV devices.

  1. Radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure and non-specific symptoms of ill health: A systematic review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeoesli, Martin

    2008-06-15

    This article is a systematic review of whether everyday exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) causes symptoms, and whether some individuals are able to detect low-level RF-EMF (below the ICNIRP [International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection] guidelines). Peer-reviewed articles published before August 2007 were identified by means of a systematic literature search. Meta-analytic techniques were used to pool the results from studies investigating the ability to discriminate active from sham RF-EMF exposure. RF-EMF discrimination was investigated in seven studies including a total of 182 self-declared electromagnetic hypersensitive (EHS) individuals and 332 non-EHS individuals. The pooled correct field detection rate was 4.2% better than expected by chance (95% CI: -2.1 to 10.5). There was no evidence that EHS individuals could detect presence or absence of RF-EMF better than other persons. There was little evidence that short-term exposure to a mobile phone or base station causes symptoms based on the results of eight randomized trials investigating 194 EHS and 346 non-EHS individuals in a laboratory. Some of the trials provided evidence for the occurrence of nocebo effects. In population based studies an association between symptoms and exposure to RF-EMF in the everyday environment was repeatedly observed. This review showed that the large majority of individuals who claims to be able to detect low level RF-EMF are not able to do so under double-blind conditions. If such individuals exist, they represent a small minority and have not been identified yet. The available observational studies do not allow differentiating between biophysical from EMF and nocebo effects.

  2. Standing electromagnetic solitons in hot ultra-relativistic electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidari, E.; Aslaninejad, M.; Eshraghi, H.; Rajaee, L.

    2014-03-15

    Using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model, we investigate standing relativistic bright solitons in hot electron-positron plasmas. The positron dynamics is taken into account. A set of nonlinear coupled differential equations describing the evolution of electromagnetic waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasma is derived analytically and solved numerically. As a necessary condition for the existence of standing solitons the system should be relativistic. For the case of ultra-relativistic plasma, we investigate non-drifting bright solitary waves. Detailed discussions of the acceptable solutions are presented. New single hump non-trivial symmetric solutions for the scalar potential were found, and single and multi-nodal symmetric and anti-symmetric solutions for the vector potential are presented. It is shown that for a fixed value of the fluid velocity excited modes with more zeros in the profile of the vector potential show a higher magnitude for the scalar potential. An increase in the plasma fluid velocity also increases the magnitude of the scalar potential. Furthermore, the Hamiltonian and the first integral of the system are given.

  3. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314

  16. PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing Photovoltaic Efficiency PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing Photovoltaic ...

  17. Search Women@Energy Profiles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Search the Women@Energy profiles to learn more about how to get into STEM, inspired by STEM, or find a STEM career.

  18. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    generator (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator To scavenge energy from ambient vibrations with arbitrary in-plane motion directions and over a wide frequency range, a novel electromagnetic vibration energy harvester is designed and optimized. In the harvester, a circular cross-section

  19. Electromagnetic structure of the proton within the CP-violation hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krutov, A. F. Kudinov, M. Yu.

    2013-11-15

    The so-called non-Rosenbluth behavior of the proton electromagnetic form factors can be explained within the hypothesis of CP violation in electromagnetic processes involving composite systems of strongly interacting particles. It is shown that this hypothesis leads to the appearance of an additional, anapole, form factor of the proton. The proton electromagnetic form factors, including the anapole form factor, are estimated on the basis of experimental data on elastic electron-proton scattering.

  20. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  1. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appelquist, T.; Berkowitz, E.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; et al

    2015-10-23

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar “stealth baryon” dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory—“stealth dark matter.” In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest “baryon” states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using themore » background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be possibly detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200–700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1/m6B, suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter.« less

  2. Electromagnetic fluctuations and normal modes of a drifting relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruyer, C.; Gremillet, L.; Bénisti, D.; Bonnaud, G.

    2013-11-15

    We present an exact calculation of the power spectrum of the electromagnetic fluctuations in a relativistic equilibrium plasma described by Maxwell-Jüttner distribution functions. We consider the cases of wave vectors parallel or normal to the plasma mean velocity. The relative contributions of the subluminal and supraluminal fluctuations are evaluated. Analytical expressions of the spatial fluctuation spectra are derived in each case. These theoretical results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, showing a good reproduction of the subluminal fluctuation spectra.

  3. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  4. Computational Science Research in Support of Petascale Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, L.-Q.; Akcelik, V; Ge, L; Chen, S; Schussman, G; Candel, A; Li, Z; Xiao, L; Kabel, A; Uplenchwar, R; Ng, C; Ko, K; /SLAC

    2008-06-20

    Computational science research components were vital parts of the SciDAC-1 accelerator project and are continuing to play a critical role in newly-funded SciDAC-2 accelerator project, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS). Recent advances and achievements in the area of computational science research in support of petascale electromagnetic modeling for accelerator design analysis are presented, which include shape determination of superconducting RF cavities, mesh-based multilevel preconditioner in solving highly-indefinite linear systems, moving window using h- or p- refinement for time-domain short-range wakefield calculations, and improved scalable application I/O.

  5. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  6. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  7. Continuous profiling of magnetotelluric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdin, C.T.

    1991-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method of mapping ground electrical conductivity is traditionally based on measurement of the surface impedance at widely spaced stations to infer models of the subsurface through a suitable pseudo 1-D inverse or with linearized least-squares inversion for 2- or 3-D geoelectric media. It is well known that small near-surface inhomogeneities can produce spatial discontinuities in the measured electric fields over a wide frequency range and may consequently bias the impedance on a very local scale. Inadequate station spacing effectively aliases the electric field measurements and results in distortions that cannot be removed in subsequent processing or modelling. In order to fully exploit the benefits of magnetotellurics in complex geological environments, closely spaced measurements must be used routinely. This thesis entertains an analysis of MT data taken along continuous profiles and is a first step that will allow more encompassing 2-D sampling techniques to become viable in the years to come. The developments presented here are to a large extent motivated by the physical insight gained from low-contrast solutions to the forward MT problem. These solutions describe the relationship between a perturbation in the electrical conductivity of the subsurface and the ensuing perturbation of the MT response as the output of a linear system. Albeit strictly accurate in a limited subset of practical exploration problems, the linearized solutions allow one to pursue a model independent study of the response characteristics of MT data. In fact, these solutions yield simple expressions for 1-,2-, and 3-D resistivity models which are here examined in progressive sequence.

  8. Steel Energy and Environmental Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2000-08-01

    Major steelmaking processes (from ironmaking through fabrication and forming) and their associated energy requirements have been profiled in this 2001 report (PDF 582 KB). This profile by Energetics, Inc. also describes the waste streams generated by each process and estimates annual emissions of CO2 and criteria pollutants.

  9. Renewable Energy, Photovoltaic Systems Near Airfields. Electromagnetic Interference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, Chris; Dann, Geoff

    2015-04-01

    Recent increases in photovoltaic (PV) systems on Department of the Navy (DON) land and potential siting near airfields prompted Commander, Naval Installations Command to fund the Naval Facilities Engineering Command to evaluate the impact of electromagnetic interference (EMI) from PV systems on airfield electronic equipment. Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center tasked Department of Energy National Renewable Energy laboratory (NREL) to conduct the assessment. PV systems often include high-speed switching semiconductor circuits to convert the voltage produced by the PV arrays to the voltage needed by the end user. Switching circuits inherently produce electromagnetic radiation at harmonics of the switching frequency. In this report, existing literature is summarized and tests to measure emissions and mitigation methods are discussed. The literature shows that the emissions from typical PV systems are low strength and unlikely to cause interference to most airfield electronic systems. With diligent procurement and siting of PV systems, including specifications for FCC Part 15 Class A compliant equipment and a 250-foot setback from communication equipment, NREL anticipates little to no EMI impact on nearby communications or telemetry equipment.

  10. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  11. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  12. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1980-06-16

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a beam of coherent light of two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency constantly greater than the other by a fixed amount to produce a difference frequency with a constant phase to be used as a reference, and splitting the beam into its two components. The separate components are directed onto spaced apart points on the face of the object to be tested for smoothness while the face of the object is rotated on an axis normal to one point, thereby passing the other component over a circular track on the face of the object. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a reflected frequency difference of a phase proportional to the difference in path length of one component reflected from one point to the other component reflected from the other point. The phase of the reflected frequency difference is compared with the reference phase to produce a signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track with respect to the fixed point at the center, thereby to produce a signal that is plotted as a profile of the surface along the circular track. The phase detector includes a quarter-wave plate to convert the components of the reference beam into circularly polarized components, a half-wave plate to shift the phase of the circularly polarized components, and a polarizer to produce a signal of a shifted phase for comparison with the phase of the frequency difference of the reflected components detected through a second polarizer. Rotation of the half-wave plate can be used for phase adjustment over a full 360/sup 0/ range.

  13. Conceptual Ideas for New Nondestructive UF6 Cylinder Assay Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A.

    2012-05-02

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of uranium cylinders play an important role in helping the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard uranium enrichment plants. Traditionally, these measurements have consisted of a scale or load cell to determine the mass of UF{sub 6} in the cylinder combined with a gamma-ray measurement of the 186 keV peak from {sup 235}U to determine enrichment. More recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed systems that exploit the passive neutron signal from UF{sub 6} to determine uranium mass and/or enrichment. These include the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM), and the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The purpose of this report is to provide the IAEA with new ideas on technologies that may or may not be under active development but could be useful for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay. To begin, we have included two feasibility studies of active interrogation techniques. There is a long history of active interrogation in the field of nuclear safeguards, especially for uranium assay. Both of the active techniques provide a direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The first is an active neutron method based on the existing PNEM design that uses a correlated {sup 252}Cf interrogation source. This technique shows great promise for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay and is based on advanced technology that could be implemented in the field in the near term. The second active technique is nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). In the NRF technique, a bremsstrahlung photon beam could be used to illuminate the cylinder, and high-resolution gamma-ray detectors would detect the characteristic de-excitation photons. The results of the feasibility study show that under certain measurement geometries, NRF is impractical for UF6 cylinder assay, but the 'grazing transmission' and 'secant transmission' geometries have more potential for this application and should be assessed quantitatively. The next set of techniques leverage scintillator detectors that are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The first is the BC-523A capture-gated organic liquid scintillator. The detector response from several different neutron energies has been characterized and is included in the study. The BC-523A has not yet been tested with UF{sub 6} cylinders, but the application appears to be well suited for this technology. The second detector type is a relatively new inorganic scintillator called CLYC. CLYC provides a complementary detection approach to the HEVA and PNEM systems that could be used to determine uranium enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders. In this section, the conceptual idea for an integrated CLYC-HEVA/PNEM system is explored that could yield more precision and robustness against systemic uncertainties than any one of the systems by itself. This is followed by a feasibility study on using alpha-particle-induced reaction gamma-rays as a way to estimate {sup 234}U abundance in UF{sub 6}. Until now, there has been no readily available estimate of the strength of these reaction gamma-rays. Thick target yields of the chief reaction gammas are computed and show that they are too weak for practical safeguards applications. In special circumstances where long count times are permissible, the 1,275 keV F({alpha},x{gamma}) is observable. Its strength could help verify an operator declaration provided other knowledge is available (especially the age). The other F({alpha},x{gamma}) lines are concealed by the dominant uranium line spectrum and associated continuum. Finally, the last section provides several ideas for electromagnetic and acoustic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. These can be used to measure cylinder wall thickness, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for gamma-ray-based NDA techniques; characterize the UF{sub 6} filling profile inside the cylinder, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for neutron-based NDA techniques; locate hidden objects inside the cylinder; a

  14. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  15. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency in paraffin-coated vapor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.; Hohensee, M.; Walsworth, R. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Phillips, D. F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Antirelaxation coatings in atomic vapor cells allow ground-state coherent spin states to survive many collisions with the cell walls. This reduction in the ground-state decoherence rate gives rise to ultranarrow-bandwidth features in electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra, which can form the basis of, for example, long-time scale slow and stored light, sensitive magnetometers, and precise frequency standards. Here we study, both experimentally and theoretically, how Zeeman EIT contrast and width in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells are determined by cell and laser-beam geometry, laser intensity, and atomic density. Using a picture of Ramsey pulse sequences, where atoms alternately spend ''bright'' and ''dark'' time intervals inside and outside the laser beam, we explain the behavior of EIT features in coated cells, highlighting their unique characteristics and potential applications.

  17. Cosmological Ohm's law and dynamics of non-minimal electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R. E-mail: jain@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2013-01-01

    The origin of large-scale magnetic fields in cosmic structures and the intergalactic medium is still poorly understood. We explore the effects of non-minimal couplings of electromagnetism on the cosmological evolution of currents and magnetic fields. In this context, we revisit the mildly non-linear plasma dynamics around recombination that are known to generate weak magnetic fields. We use the covariant approach to obtain a fully general and non-linear evolution equation for the plasma currents and derive a generalised Ohm law valid on large scales as well as in the presence of non-minimal couplings to cosmological (pseudo-)scalar fields. Due to the sizeable conductivity of the plasma and the stringent observational bounds on such couplings, we conclude that modifications of the standard (adiabatic) evolution of magnetic fields are severely limited in these scenarios. Even at scales well beyond a Mpc, any departure from flux freezing behaviour is inhibited.

  18. Electromagnetic field triggered drug and chemical delivery via liposomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liburdy, Robert P. (1820 Mountain View Rd., Tiburon, CA 94920)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system and to a method of delivering a drug to a preselected target body site of a patient, comprising the steps of encapsulating the chemical agent within liposomes, essentially temperature insensitive, i.e. not having a specific predetermined phase transition temperature within the specific temperature range of drug administration; administering the liposomes to the target body site; and subjecting the target body site to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in an area of the preselected target body in order to release said chemical agent from the liposomes at a temperature of between about +10 and 65.degree. C. The invention further relates to the use of said liposomes to bind to the surface of or to enter target tissue or an organ in a living system, and, when subjected to a nonionizing field, to release a drug from the liposomes into the target site.

  19. Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the Σ+(1385)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keller, D.; Hicks, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the Σ*+(1385) from the reaction γp → K0 Σ*+(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and Σ* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 ± 56.9(stat)-41.2+34.3(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representationmore » yields predictions for the Σ*+(1385) → Σ+γ and Σ*0(1385) → Λγ partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.« less

  20. Electromagnetic field limits set by the V-Curve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hudson, Howard Gerald

    2014-07-01

    When emitters of electromagnetic energy are operated in the vicinity of sensitive components, the electric field at the component location must be kept below a certain level in order to prevent the component from being damaged, or in the case of electro-explosive devices, initiating. The V-Curve is a convenient way to set the electric field limit because it requires minimal information about the problem configuration. In this report we will discuss the basis for the V-Curve. We also consider deviations from the original V-Curve resulting from inductive versus capacitive antennas, increases in directivity gain for long antennas, decreases in input impedance when operating in a bounded region, and mismatches dictated by transmission line losses. In addition, we consider mitigating effects resulting from limited antenna sizes.

  1. Low-frequency computational electromagnetics for antenna analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, E.K. ); Burke, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    An overview of low-frequency, computational methods for modeling the electromagnetic characteristics of antennas is presented here. The article presents a brief analytical background, and summarizes the essential ingredients of the method of moments, for numerically solving low-frequency antenna problems. Some extensions to the basic models of perfectly conducting objects in free space are also summarized, followed by a consideration of some of the same computational issues that affect model accuracy, efficiency and utility. A variety of representative computations are then presented to illustrate various modeling aspects and capabilities that are currently available. A fairly extensive bibliography is included to suggest further reference material to the reader. 90 refs., 27 figs.

  2. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  3. Electromagnetic field triggered drug and chemical delivery via liposomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liburdy, R.P.

    1993-03-02

    The present invention relates to a system and to a method of delivering a drug to a preselected target body site of a patient, comprising the steps of encapsulating the chemical agent within liposomes, essentially temperature insensitive, i.e. not having a specific predetermined phase transition temperature within the specific temperature range of drug administration; administering the liposomes to the target body site; and subjecting the target body site to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in an area of the preselected target body in order to release the chemical agent from the liposomes at a temperature of between about +10 and 65 C. The invention further relates to the use of the liposomes to bind to the surface of or to enter target tissue or an organ in a living system, and, when subjected to a nonionizing field, to release a drug from the liposomes into the target site.

  4. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  5. Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R.; Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2014-04-15

    The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrödinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

  6. Electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richter, Tomas (State College, PA)

    1998-01-01

    An electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material is provided, which comprises an induction coil for generating a magnetic field in response to an applied alternating electrical current, a housing, and a refractory composite nozzle. The nozzle is comprised of an inner sleeve composed of an erosion resistant refractory material (e.g., a zirconia ceramic) through which molten, magnetic metal flows, a refractory outer shell, and an intermediate compressible refractory material, e.g., unset, high alumina, thermosetting mortar. The compressible refractory material is sandwiched between the inner sleeve and outer shell, and absorbs differential expansion stresses that develop within the nozzle due to extreme thermal gradients. The sandwiched layer of compressible refractory material prevents destructive cracks from developing in the refractory outer shell.

  7. Electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richter, T.

    1998-06-16

    An electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material is provided, which comprises an induction coil for generating a magnetic field in response to an applied alternating electrical current, a housing, and a refractory composite nozzle. The nozzle is comprised of an inner sleeve composed of an erosion resistant refractory material (e.g., a zirconia ceramic) through which molten, magnetic metal flows, a refractory outer shell, and an intermediate compressible refractory material, e.g., unset, high alumina, thermosetting mortar. The compressible refractory material is sandwiched between the inner sleeve and outer shell, and absorbs differential expansion stresses that develop within the nozzle due to extreme thermal gradients. The sandwiched layer of compressible refractory material prevents destructive cracks from developing in the refractory outer shell. 5 figs.

  8. Chaotic advection at large Péclet number: Electromagnetically driven experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Aldo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62209 (Mexico)] [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62209 (Mexico); Meunier, Patrice; Villermaux, Emmanuel [Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE, Marseille F-13384 (France)] [Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE, Marseille F-13384 (France); Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)] [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2014-01-15

    We present a combination of experiment, theory, and modelling on laminar mixing at large Péclet number. The flow is produced by oscillating electromagnetic forces in a thin electrolytic fluid layer, leading to oscillating dipoles, quadrupoles, octopoles, and disordered flows. The numerical simulations are based on the Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) which was recently introduced (P. Meunier and E. Villermaux, “The diffusive strip method for scalar mixing in two-dimensions,” J. Fluid Mech. 662, 134–172 (2010)) to solve the advection-diffusion problem by combining Lagrangian techniques and theoretical modelling of the diffusion. Numerical simulations obtained with the DSM are in reasonable agreement with quantitative dye visualization experiments of the scalar fields. A theoretical model based on log-normal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of stretching factors, characteristic of homogeneous turbulence in the Batchelor regime, allows to predict the PDFs of scalar in agreement with numerical and experimental results. This model also indicates that the PDFs of scalar are asymptotically close to log-normal at late stages, except for the large concentration levels which correspond to low stretching factors.

  9. 3D electromagnetic inversion for environmental site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D non-linear electromagnetic inversion scheme has been developed to produce images of subsurface conductivity structure from electromagnetic geophysical data. The solution is obtained by successive linearized model updates where full forward modeling is employed at each iteration to compute model sensitivities and predicted data. Regularization is applied to the problem to provide stability. Because the inverse part of the problem requires the solution of 10`s to 100`s of thousands of unknowns, and because each inverse iteration requires many forward models to be computed, the code has been implemented on massively parallel computer platforms. The use of the inversion code to image environmental sites is demonstrated on a data set collected with the Apex Parametrics {open_quote}MaxMin I-8S{close_quote} over a section of stacked barrels and metal filled boxes at the Idaho National Laboratory`s {open_quote}Cold Test Pit{close_quote}. The MaxMin is a loop-loop frequency domain system which operates from 440 Hz up to 56 kHz using various coil separations; for this survey coil separations of 15, 30 and 60 feet were employed. The out-of phase data are shown to be of very good quality while the in-phase are rather noisy due to slight mispositioning errors, which cause improper cancellation of the primary free space field in the receiver. Weighting the data appropriately by the estimated noise and applying the inversion scheme is demonstrated to better define the structure of the pit. In addition, comparisons are given for single coil separations and multiple separations to show the benefits of using multiple offset data.

  10. LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    background News Multimedia Events Profiles Highlights Activity Reports The Pulse User Program Headlines News & Media dotline LANSCE Profiles Kurt Schoenberg: Steering LANSCE for the Future Kurt Schoenberg Kurt Schoenberg, LANSCE User Facility Director and Los Alamos National Laboratory Deputy Associate Director retired from Los Alamos National Laboratory on October 1, 2015. Over the past decade, Kurt has been integral in creating opportunities for LANSCE and the neutron community through the

  11. JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

  12. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous

  13. PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs While Increasing Durability PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module ...

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module Quality Assurance ...

  15. SU-E-T-512: Electromagnetic Simulations of the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uselmann, A; Mackie, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and parametrically study the key components of a dielectric wall accelerator through electromagnetic modeling and particle tracking. Methods: Electromagnetic and particle tracking simulations were performed using a commercial code (CST Microwave Studio, CST Inc.) utilizing the finite integration technique. A dielectric wall accelerator consists of a series of stacked transmission lines sequentially fired in synchrony with an ion pulse. Numerous properties of the stacked transmission lines, including geometric, material, and electronic properties, were analyzed and varied in order to assess their impact on the transverse and axial electric fields. Additionally, stacks of transmission lines were simulated in order to quantify the parasitic effect observed in closely packed lines. Particle tracking simulations using the particle-in-cell method were performed on the various stacks to determine the impact of the above properties on the resultant phase space of the ions. Results: Examination of the simulation results show that novel geometries can shape the accelerating pulse in order to reduce the energy spread and increase the average energy of accelerated ions. Parasitic effects were quantified for various geometries and found to vary with distance from the end of the transmission line and along the beam axis. An optimal arrival time of an ion pulse relative to the triggering of the transmission lines for a given geometry was determined through parametric study. Benchmark simulations of single transmission lines agree well with published experimental results. Conclusion: This work characterized the behavior of the transmission lines used in a dielectric wall accelerator and used this information to improve them in novel ways. Utilizing novel geometries, we were able to improve the accelerating gradient and phase space of the accelerated particle bunch. Through simulation, we were able to discover and optimize design issues with the device at low cost. Funding: Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison WI; Conflict of Interest: Dr. Mackie is an investor and board member at CPAC, a company developing compact accelerator designs similar to those discussed in this work, but designs discussed are not directed by CPAC. Funding: Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison WI; Conflict of Interest: Dr. Mackie is an investor and board member at CPAC, a company developing compact accelerator designs similar to those discussed in this work, but designs discussed are not directed by CPAC.

  16. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain...

  17. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sanchez; Perez, Javier; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Lopez, M. A. Jimenez; Espindola, M. E. Sanchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernandez, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez

    2008-08-11

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-{beta}) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor.

  18. Electromagnetic Analysis For The Design Of ITER Diagnostic Port Plugs During Plasma Disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Y

    2014-03-03

    ITER diagnostic port plugs perform many functions including structural support of diagnostic systems under high electromagnetic loads while allowing for diagnostic access to plasma. The design of diagnotic equatorial port plugs (EPP) are largely driven by electromagnetic loads and associate response of EPP structure during plasma disruptions and VDEs. This paper summarizes results of transient electromagnetic analysis using Opera 3d in support of the design activities for ITER diagnostic EPP. A complete distribution of disruption loads on the Diagnostic First Walls (DFWs). Diagnostic Shield Modules (DSMs) and the EPP structure, as well as impact on the system design integration due to electrical contact among various EPP structural components are discussed.

  19. Emergent spin electromagnetism induced by magnetization textures in the presence of spin-orbit interaction (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatara, Gen; Nakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2014-05-07

    Emergent electromagnetic field which couples to electron's spin in ferromagnetic metals is theoretically studied. Rashba spin-orbit interaction induces spin electromagnetic field which is in the linear order in gradient of magnetization texture. The Rashba-induced effective electric and magnetic fields satisfy in the absence of spin relaxation the Maxwell's equations as in the charge-based electromagnetism. When spin relaxation is taken into account besides spin dynamics, a monopole current emerges generating spin motive force via the Faraday's induction law. The monopole is expected to play an important role in spin-charge conversion and in the integration of spintronics into electronics.

  20. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-15

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of {+-}3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s ({+-}18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r{sup 2} is equal to 0.997; for the bi-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r{sup 2} is equal to 0.990 for positive flows (inspiration) and 0.988 for negative flows (expiration). Measurement uncertainty {delta}Q of air flow rate has been evaluated by means of the propagation of distributions and the percentage error in the arrangement of bi-directional sensor ranges from a minimum of about 0.5% at -18.0 l/min to a maximum of about 9% at -12.0 l/min.

  1. A bipolar integrator for secondary emission profile monitors at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datte, P.; Beechy, D.; Webber, R.

    1994-01-01

    Many invasive techniques for monitoring beam profile and intensity require secondary emission signals in order to make the measurement. Signal acquisition and processing can take many forms. This paper describes a bipolar integration technique which uses the Burr-Brown ACF2101 Dual Switched Integrator chip and applications for accelerator beam instrumentation.

  2. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing

  3. Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluids | Department of Energy High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Logos for The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University, and Four graphics in a grid that represent the sputtering technique being used in this project. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with partners at the University of California, Berkeley, and

  4. Project Profile: Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacture of Reflectors Project Profile: Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors University of Arizona logo The University of Arizona and its partners, under the 2012 Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) SunShot R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), are developing technology to improve the optical accuracy and reflectivity of the self-supporting glass mirrors used in CSP collector systems. Approach The research team is working to optimize and validate a novel glass-molding technique that

  5. Electromagnetic structure of few-nucleon ground states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marcucci, Laura E.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; Gross, Franz L.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility; Peña, M. T.; Piarulli, M.; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Schiavilla, Rocco; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Sick, Ingo; et al

    2016-01-08

    Experimental form factors of the hydrogen and helium isotopes, extracted from an up-to-date global analysis of cross sections and polarization observables measured in elastic electron scattering from these systems, are compared to predictions obtained in three different theoretical approaches: the first is based on realistic interactions and currents, including relativistic corrections (labeled as the conventional approach); the second relies on a chiral effective field theory description of the strong and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei (labeled ChiEFT); the third utilizes a fully relativistic treatment of nuclear dynamics as implemented in the covariant spectator theory (labeled CST). Furthermore, for momentum transfers belowmore » Q < 5 fm-1 there is satisfactory agreement between experimental data and theoretical results in all three approaches. Conversely, at Q > 5 fm-1, particularly in the case of the deuteron, a relativistic treatment of the dynamics, as is done in the CST, is necessary. The experimental data on the deuteron A structure function extend to Q ~ 12 fm-1, and the close agreement between these data and the CST results suggests that, even in this extreme kinematical regime, there is no evidence for new effects coming from quark and gluon degrees of freedom at short distances.« less

  6. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  7. Effects of thermal motion on electromagnetically induced absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilchin, E.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Firstenberg, O. [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan IL-52900 (Israel); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa IL-32000 (Israel)

    2011-05-15

    We describe the effect of thermal motion and buffer-gas collisions on a four-level closed N system interacting with strong pump(s) and a weak probe. This is the simplest system that experiences electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) due to transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited state to the ground state. We investigate the influence of Doppler broadening, velocity-changing collisions (VCC), and phase-changing collisions (PCC) with a buffer gas on the EIA spectrum of optically active atoms. In addition to exact expressions, we present an approximate solution for the probe absorption spectrum, which provides physical insight into the behavior of the EIA peak due to VCC, PCC, and the wave-vector difference between the pump and probe beams. VCC are shown to produce a wide pedestal at the base of the EIA peak, which is scarcely affected by the pump-probe angular deviation, whereas the sharp central EIA peak becomes weaker and broader due to the residual Doppler-Dicke effect. Using diffusionlike equations for the atomic coherences and populations, we construct a spatial-frequency filter for a spatially structured probe beam and show that Ramsey narrowing of the EIA peak is obtained for beams of finite width.

  8. The Effect of Ionospheric Models on Electromagnetic Pulse Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Triplett, Laurie A.

    2014-07-01

    Locations of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) determined by time-of-arrival (TOA) often have outliers with significantly larger errors than expected. In the past, these errors were thought to arise from high order terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation. We simulated 1000 events randomly spread around the Earth into a constellation of 22 GPS satellites. We used four different ionospheres: “simple” where the time delay goes as the inverse of the frequency-squared, “full Appleton-Hartree”, the “BobRD integrals” and a full raytracing code. The simple and full Appleton-Hartree ionospheres do not show outliers whereas the BobRD and raytracing do. This strongly suggests that the cause of the outliers is not additional terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation, but rather is due to the additional path length due to refraction. A method to fix the outliers is suggested based on fitting a time to the delays calculated at the 5 GPS frequencies with BobRD and simple ionospheres. The difference in time is used as a correction to the TOAs.

  9. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Compressible Electromagnetic Turbulence in High-? Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhihong

    2014-03-13

    Supported by this award, the PI and his research group at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have carried out computational and theoretical studies of instability, turbulence, and transport in laboratory and space plasmas. Several massively parallel, gyrokinetic particle simulation codes have been developed to study electromagnetic turbulence in space and laboratory plasmas. In space plasma projects, the simulation codes have been successfully applied to study the spectral cascade and plasma heating in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence, the linear and nonlinear properties of compressible modes including mirror instability and drift compressional mode, and the stability of the current sheet instabilities with finite guide field in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. The research results have been published in 25 journal papers and presented at many national and international conferences. Reprints of publications, source codes, and other research-related information are also available to general public on the PI’s webpage (http://phoenix.ps.uci.edu/zlin/). Two PhD theses in space plasma physics are highlighted in this report.

  10. Frequency-domain multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics simulation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Lingyi; Yin, Zhenyu; Yam, ChiYung E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Koo, SiuKong; Chen, GuanHua E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai

    2013-12-28

    A frequency-domain quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method is developed. Compared with the time-domain QM/EM method [Meng et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 1190–1199 (2012)], the newly developed frequency-domain QM/EM method could effectively capture the dynamic properties of electronic devices over a broader range of operating frequencies. The system is divided into QM and EM regions and solved in a self-consistent manner via updating the boundary conditions at the QM and EM interface. The calculated potential distributions and current densities at the interface are taken as the boundary conditions for the QM and EM calculations, respectively, which facilitate the information exchange between the QM and EM calculations and ensure that the potential, charge, and current distributions are continuous across the QM/EM interface. Via Fourier transformation, the dynamic admittance calculated from the time-domain and frequency-domain QM/EM methods is compared for a carbon nanotube based molecular device.

  11. Design of the electromagnetic fluctuations diagnostic for MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, P.A.; Goerz, D.A.; Martin, R.

    1983-11-28

    The Electromagnetic Fluctuations (EMF) diagnostic will be used to monitor ion fluctuations which could be unstable in MFTF-B. Each probe assembly includes a high impedance electrostatic probe to measure potential fluctuations, and a group of nested, single turn loops to measure magnetic fluctuations in three directions. Eventually, more probes and loops will be added to each probe assembly for making more detailed measurements. The sensors must lie physically close to the plasma edge and are radially positionable. Also, probes at separate axial locations can be positioned to connect along the same magnetic field line. These probes are similar in concept to the rf probes used on TMX, but the high thermal load for 30-second shots on MFTF-B requires a water-cooled design along with temperature monitors. Each signal channel has a bandwidth of .001 to 150 MHz and is monitored by up to four different data channels which obtain amplitude and frequency information. This paper describes the EMF diagnostic and presents the detailed mechanical and electrical designs.

  12. Electromagnetic wave propagation through an overdense magnetized collisional plasma layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Hughes, T. P. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The results of investigations into the feasibility of using a magnetic window to propagate electromagnetic waves through a finite-sized overdense plasma slab are described. We theoretically calculate the transmission coefficients for right- and left-handed circularly polarized plane waves through a uniform magnetized plasma slab. Using reasonable estimates for the plasma properties expected to be found in the ionized shock layer surrounding a hypersonic aircraft traveling in the earth's upper atmosphere (radio blackout conditions), and assuming a 1 GHz carrier frequency for the radio communications channel, we find that the required magnetic field for propagation of right-handed circularly polarized, or whistler, waves is on the order of a few hundred gauss. Transmission coefficients are calculated as a function of sheath thickness and are shown to be quite sensitive to the electron collision frequency. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are shown to be in good agreement with the theory. These simulations also demonstrate that Ohmic heating of the electrons can be considerable. Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using a simplified waveguide and antenna model illustrate the same general transmission behavior as the theory and one-dimensional simulations. In addition, a net focusing effect due to the plasma is also observed in two and three dimensions. These simulations can be extended to design and analyze more realistic waveguide and antenna models.

  13. Waveguide-based Ultrasonic and Far-field Electromagnetic Sensors for Downhole Reservoir Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: To develop waveguide-based ultrasonic and farfield electromagnetic sensors to measure key Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoir parameters, including directional temperature, pressure, fluidflow, fracture imaging, and flow/rock interaction.

  14. Electromagnetic calorimeter for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Emma

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search Experiment (HPS) seeks to detect a hypothesised hidden sector boson, the A', predicted to be produced in dark matter decay or annihilation. Theories suggest that the A' couples weakly to electric charge through kinetic mixing, allowing it, as a result, to decay to Standard Matter (SM) lepton pair, which may explain the electron and positron excess recently observed in cosmic rays. Measuring the lepton pair decay of the A' could lead to indirect detection of dark matter. The HPS experiment is a fixed target experiment that will utilize the electron beam produced at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The detector set-up includes a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) and an Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal). The ECal will provide the trigger and detect e+e- pairs and its construction and testing forms the focus of this thesis. The ECal consists of 442 PbWO4} tapered crystals with a length 16cm and a 1.6x1.6cm^2 cross-section, stacked into a rectangular array and are coupled to Large Area APDs and corresponding pre-amplifiers. Supplementary to the ECal is a Light Monitoring System (LMS) consisting of bi-coloured LEDs that will monitor changes in APD gain and crystal transparency due to radiation damage. Before construction of the ECal each of the components were required to be individually tested to determine a number of different characteristics. Irradiation tests were performed on PbWO4 ECal crystals and, as a comparison, one grown by a different manufacturer to determine their radiation hardness. A technique for annealing the radiation damage by optical bleaching, which involves injecting light of various wavelengths into the crystal, was tested using the blue LED from the LMS as a potential candidate. The light yield dependence on temperature was also measured for one of the PbWO4 crystal types. Each APD was individually tested to determine if they functioned correctly and within the requirements of the experiment, then arranged into groups of similar gain at chosen applied voltages, for connection to High Voltage (HV) supplies. Each bi-coloured LED was also tested to determine if they functioned within the specifications of the experiment; including their signal quality at high frequency and their radiation hardness. The HPS crystals were recycled from a previous Jefferson Lab detector, the Inner Calorimeter from CLAS, which needed to be dismantled and reconditioned using various removal and cleaning techniques. The HPS ECal was then constructed in a new formation using a combination of different gluing and construction techniques, and initial functionality tests were performed.

  15. New results from BLAST on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect New results from BLAST on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New results from BLAST on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors Recently, a new experiment was carried out in the South Hall Ring at the MIT-Bates Accelerator Laboratory. This experiment utilized a polarized electron beam, a pure hydrogen (deuterium) internal polarized gas target, and the symmetric Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST)

  16. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  17. DRAFT Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook Evaluation of a New Multi-Frequency Microwave Radiometer for Measuring the Vertical Distribution of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Cloud Liquid Water Prepared by James C. Liljegren Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory December 4, 2002 For the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program 2 Table of Contents Abstract

  18. Fermilab Today | Purdue University Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    world and offer a range of training opportunities, including very-large-scale integration design, advanced mechanical engineering and micro- and nano-manufacturing techniques...

  19. The Study of Electromagnetic Wave Propogation in Photonic Crystals Via Planewave Based Transfer (Scattering) Matrix Method with Active Gain Material Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ming LI

    2007-12-01

    In this dissertation, a set of numerical simulation tools are developed under previous work to efficiently and accurately study one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional(2D), 2D slab and three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal structures and their defects effects by means of spectrum (transmission, reflection, absorption), band structure (dispersion relation), and electric and/or magnetic fields distribution (mode profiles). Furthermore, the lasing property and spontaneous emission behaviors are studied when active gain materials are presented in the photonic crystal structures. Various physical properties such as resonant cavity quality factor, waveguide loss, propagation group velocity of electromagnetic wave and light-current curve (for lasing devices) can be obtained from the developed software package.

  20. Gauge invariance of phenomenological models of the interaction of quantum dissipative systems with electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokman, M. D. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    We discuss specific features of the electrodynamic characteristics of quantum systems within the framework of models that include a phenomenological description of the relaxation processes. As is shown by W. E. Lamb, Jr., R. R. Schlicher, and M. O. Scully [Phys. Rev. A 36, 2763 (1987)], the use of phenomenological relaxation operators, which adequately describe the attenuation of eigenvibrations of a quantum system, may lead to incorrect solutions in the presence of external electromagnetic fields determined by the vector potential for different resonance processes. This incorrectness can be eliminated by giving a gauge-invariant form to the relaxation operator. Lamb, Jr., et al. proposed the corresponding gauge-invariant modification for the Weisskopf-Wigner relaxation operator, which is introduced directly into the Schroedinger equation within the framework of the two-level approximation. In the present paper, this problem is studied for the von Neumann equation supplemented by a relaxation operator. First, we show that the solution of the equation for the density matrix with the relaxation operator correctly obtained ''from the first principles'' has properties that ensure gauge invariance for the observables. Second, we propose a common recipe for transformation of the phenomenological relaxation operator into the correct (gauge-invariant) form in the density-matrix equations for a multilevel system. Also, we discuss the methods of elimination of other inaccuracies (not related to the gauge-invariance problem) which arise if the electrodynamic response of a dissipative quantum system is calculated within the framework of simplified relaxation models (first of all, the model corresponding to constant relaxation rates of coherences in quantum transitions). Examples illustrating the correctness of the results obtained within the framework of the proposed methods in contrast to inaccuracy of the results of the standard calculation techniques are given.

  1. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  2. Weld braze technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanne, Jr., William R. (Aiken, SC); Kelker, Jr., John W. (North Augusta, SC); Alexander, Robert J. (Aiken, SC)

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  3. Profiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p rogram e xecu?on * Useful to first calibrate with a well---understood code on t he s ame p laorm ( e.g. STREAM) * Can h elp d etermine w hether y our c ode i s a t l east...

  4. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  5. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  6. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  7. Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the...

  8. LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Neutron Science Center lansce.lanl.gov lansce-user-office@lanl.gov phone: 505.665.1010 mesa header Beam Status Accelerator Ops (Internal) Operating Schedule Long Range Operating Schedule User Resources User Agreements Proposals Visit Registration Schedules Experiment Reports User Satisfaction Survey Reviews Users User Office User Program LANSCE User Group Rosen Scholar Rosen Prize News & Multimedia News Multimedia Events Profiles Highlights Seminars Activity Reports The Pulse User

  9. State coal profiles, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

  10. State Electricity Profiles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Profiles Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: State Electricity Profiles Abstract On this website, the U.S. Energy Information...

  11. Manipulating electromagnetic responses of metal wires at the deep subwavelength scale via both near- and far-field couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wei; Sun, Yong; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhi-Guo

    2014-03-03

    A hybrid coupling model containing both near- and far-field couplings is developed for radiating two-resonator structures. We demonstrate that the near- and far-field couplings make distinguished contributions to electromagnetic responses. Compared to the classical electromagnetically induced transparency configurations, the presence of far-field coupling provides more flexibility in tuning lineshapes. Planar metamaterials composed of metal wires are designed based on this model, and various electromagnetic responses are experimentally observed.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Microwave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Microwave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation 2000.09.01 - 2001.03.31 Lead Scientist : James Liljegren For data sets, see below. Abstract The microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) is a new 12-channel radiometer developed by Radiometrics Corporation for measuring vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and

  13. IT Project Management Profile | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Management Profile IT Project Management Profile This is a form that must be completed to initiate the assessment of a Project Manager to determine the level of qualification PDF icon IT Project Management Profile More Documents & Publications IT Project Management Profile FEDERAL ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM) Systems and Professional Development - David Brown, Director, Systems & Professional Development, OAPM

  14. IT Project Management Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Management Profile IT Project Management Profile This form lists positions/experience and training relating to project management; include other positions/experience or training if relevant PDF icon IT Project Management Profile More Documents & Publications IT Project Management Profile FEDERAL ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM) Systems and Professional Development - David Brown, Director, Systems & Professional Development, OAPM

  15. Mentee Profile Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services » Learning and Workforce Development » Workforce Development » Leadership Development » DOE Mentoring Program » Mentee Profile Form Mentee Profile Form The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentors from which to choose the most appropriate match. PDF icon Mentee Profile Form More Documents & Publications Mentor Profile Form Tools for the Mentor Tools for the Mentee Benefits Executive Resources Learning and Workforce

  16. Stable Spheromaks with Profile Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T K; Jayakumar, R

    2008-01-29

    A spheromak equilibrium with zero edge current is shown to be stable to both ideal MHD and tearing modes that normally produce Taylor relaxation in gun-injected spheromaks. This stable equilibrium differs from the stable Taylor state in that the current density j falls to zero at the wall. Estimates indicate that this current profile could be sustained by non-inductive current drive at acceptable power levels. Stability is determined using the NIMROD code for linear stability analysis. Non-linear NIMROD calculations with non-inductive current drive could point the way to improved fusion reactors.

  17. ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great

  18. WE-A-17A-09: Exploiting Electromagnetic Technologies for Real-Time Seed Drop Position Validation in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racine, E; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Beaulieu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on preliminary results validating the performance of a specially designed LDR brachytherapy needle prototype possessing both electromagnetic (EM) tracking and seed drop detection abilities. Methods: An EM hollow needle prototype has been designed and constructed in collaboration with research partner Philips Healthcare. The needle possesses conventional 3D tracking capabilities, along with a novel seed drop detection mechanism exploiting local changes of electromagnetic properties generated by the passage of seeds in the needle's embedded sensor coils. These two capabilities are exploited by proprietary engineering and signal processing techniques to generate seed drop position estimates in real-time treatment delivery. The electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) used for the experiment is the NDI Aurora Planar Field Generator. The experiment consisted of dropping a total of 35 seeds in a prismatic agarose phantom, and comparing the 3D seed drop positions of the EMTS to those obtained by an image analysis of subsequent micro-CT scans. Drop position error computations and statistical analysis were performed after a 3D registration of the two seed distributions. Results: Of the 35 seeds dropped in the phantom, 32 were properly detected by the needle prototype. Absolute drop position errors among the detected seeds ranged from 0.5 to 4.8 mm with mean and standard deviation values of 1.6 and 0.9 mm, respectively. Error measurements also include undesirable and uncontrollable effects such as seed motion upon deposition. The true accuracy performance of the needle prototype is therefore underestimated. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrates the potential benefits of EM technologies in detecting the passage of seeds in a hollow needle as a means of generating drop position estimates in real-time treatment delivery. Such tools could therefore represent a potentially interesting addition to existing brachytherapy protocols for rapid dosimetry validation. Equipments and fundings for this project were provided by Philips Medical.

  19. Transition from thermal to turbulent equilibrium with a resulting electromagnetic spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 ; Gaelzer, R.; Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS ; Pavan, J.

    2014-01-15

    A recent paper [Ziebell et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010701 (2014)] discusses a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of quasi-equilibrium between the particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. Such a system may be an example of the so-called “turbulent quasi-equilibrium.” In the present paper, it is shown on the basis of electromagnetic weak turbulence theory that an initial thermal equilibrium state (i.e., only electrostatic fluctuations and Maxwellian particle distributions) transitions toward the turbulent quasi-equilibrium state with enhanced electromagnetic radiation spectrum, thus demonstrating that the turbulent quasi-equilibrium discussed in the above paper correctly describes the weakly turbulent plasma dynamically interacting with electromagnetic fluctuations, while maintaining a dynamical steady-state in the average sense.

  20. Continuum resonance induced electromagnetic torque by a rotating plasma response to static resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yueqiang; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.

    2012-10-15

    A numerical study is carried out, based on a simple toroidal tokamak equilibrium, to demonstrate the radial re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque density, as a result of a rotating resistive plasma (linear) response to a static resonant magnetic perturbation field. The computed electromagnetic torque peaks at several radial locations even in the presence of a single rational surface, due to resonances between the rotating response, in the plasma frame, and both Alfven and sound continuum waves. These peaks tend to merge together to form a rather global torque distribution, when the plasma resistivity is large. The continuum resonance induced net electromagnetic torque remains finite even in the limit of an ideal plasma.

  1. Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. StratigraphicStructural: Structural geology-...

  2. Kinetic theory of the electron bounce instability in two dimensional current sheets—Full electromagnetic treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tur, A.; Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.

    2014-03-15

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of a current sheet with applications to magnetospheric substorms or solar flares, a kinetic model is proposed for studying the resonant interaction between electromagnetic fluctuations and trapped bouncing electrons in a 2D current sheet. Tur et al. [A. Tur et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102905 (2010)] and Fruit et al. [G. Fruit et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 022113 (2013)] already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Here, the model is completed for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. It is found that for mildly strechted current, undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet half thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in ??=?B{sub z}/B{sub lobes}, the mode becomes explosive with typical growth rate of a few tens of seconds. The free energy contained in the bouncing motion of the electrons may trigger an electromagnetic instability able to disrupt the cross-tail current in a few seconds. This new instability–electromagnetic electron-bounce instability–may explain fast and global scale destabilization of current sheets as required to describe substorm phenomena.

  3. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  4. Poynting-vector based method for determining the bearing and location of electromagnetic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simons, David J.; Carrigan, Charles R.; Harben, Philip E.; Kirkendall, Barry A.; Schultz, Craig A.

    2008-10-21

    A method and apparatus is utilized to determine the bearing and/or location of sources, such as, alternating current (A.C.) generators and loads, power lines, transformers and/or radio-frequency (RF) transmitters, emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. When both a source and field sensors (electric and magnetic) are static, a bearing to the electromagnetic source can be obtained. If a single set of electric (E) and magnetic (B) sensors are in motion, multiple measurements permit location of the source. The method can be extended to networks of sensors allowing determination of the location of both stationary and moving sources.

  5. Self-generation and management of spin-electromagnetic wave solitons and chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustinov, Alexey B.; Kondrashov, Alexandr V.; Nikitin, Andrey A.; Kalinikos, Boris A.

    2014-06-09

    Self-generation of microwave spin-electromagnetic wave envelope solitons and chaos has been observed and studied. For the investigation, we used a feedback active ring oscillator based on artificial multiferroic, which served as a nonlinear waveguide. We show that by increasing the wave amplification in the feedback ring circuit, a transition from monochromatic auto-generation to soliton train waveform and then to dynamical chaos occurs in accordance with the Ruelle-Takens scenario. Management of spin-electromagnetic-wave solitons and chaos parameters by both dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the multiferroic waveguiding structure is demonstrated.

  6. Communications system using a mirror kept in outer space by electromagnetic radiation pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Csonka, Paul L. (Eugene, OR)

    1981-01-01

    A method and system are described for transmitting electromagnetic radiation by using a communications mirror located between about 100 kilometers and about 200 kilometers above ground. The communications mirror is kept aloft above the atmosphere by the pressure of the electromagnetic radiation which it reflects, and which is beamed at the communications mirror by a suitably constructed transmitting antenna on the ground. The communications mirror will reflect communications, such as radio, radar, or television waves up to about 1,100 kilometers away when the communications mirror is located at a height of about 100 kilometers.

  7. Electromagnetic wave propagation in a random distribution of C{sub 60} molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2014-10-15

    Propagation of electromagnetic waves in a random distribution of C{sub 60} molecules are investigated, within the framework of the classical electrodynamics. Electronic excitations over the each C{sub 60} molecule surface are modeled by a spherical layer of electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the ? and ? electrons. It is found that the present medium supports four modes of electromagnetic waves, where they can be divided into two groups: one group with shorter wavelength than the light waves of the same frequency and the other with longer wavelength than the free-space radiation.

  8. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity ?DDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (?0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (?f) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ?0 to ?0 + ?f. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ?0 < ?DDS < ?0 + ?f. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  9. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  10. An estimate of the error caused by the elongation of the wavelength in a focused beam in free-space electromagnetic parameters measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, En Guo, Gaofeng; Xu, Jiadi; Wang, Chao

    2014-09-15

    A pair of spot-focusing horn lens antenna is the key component in a free-space measurement system. The electromagnetic constitutive parameters of a planar sample are determined using transmitted and reflected electromagnetic beams. These parameters are obtained from the measured scattering parameters by the microwave network analyzer, thickness of the sample, and wavelength of a focused beam on the sample. Free-space techniques introduced by most papers consider the focused wavelength as the free-space wavelength. But in fact, the incident wave projected by a lens into the sample approximates a Gaussian beam, thus, there has an elongation of the wavelength in the focused beam and this elongation should be taken into consideration in dielectric and magnetic measurement. In this paper, elongation of the wavelength has been analyzed and measured. Measurement results show that the focused wavelength in the vicinity of the focus has an elongation of 1%–5% relative to the free-space wavelength. Elongation's influence on the measurement result of the permittivity and permeability has been investigated. Numerical analyses show that the elongation of the focused wavelength can cause the increase of the measured value of the permeability relative to traditionally measured value, but for the permittivity, it is affected by several parameters and may increase or decrease relative to traditionally measured value.

  11. Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities StratigraphicStructural: Structural geology-...

  12. Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. StratigraphicStructural: Structural geology-...

  13. Symposium on Lower Tropospheric Profiling: Needs and Technologies, 1st, Boulder, CO, May 31-June 3, 1988, Papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabberdt, W.F.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1989-10-01

    Papers on lower tropospheric profiling are presented, covering topics such as horizontal resolution needs for adequate lower tropospheric profiling with atmospheric systems forced by horizontal gradients in surface heating, meteorological data requirements for modeling air quality uncertainties, and kinematic quantities derived from a triangle of VHF Doppler wind profilers. Other topics include the intercomparison of wind measurements from two acoustic Doppler sodars, a laser Doppler radar, and in situ sensors, studying precipitation processes in the troposphere with an FM-CW radar, Doppler lidar measurements of profiles of turbulence and momentum flux, and airborne Doppler lidar measurements of the extended California sea breeze. Additional subjects include DIAL tropospheric ozone measurement using a Nd:YAG laser and the Raman shifting technique, design considerations for a network of thermodynamic profilers, nonredundant frequencies for ground-based microwave radiometric temperature profiling, and the sounding range of a 1-m wavelength radio acoustic sounder.

  14. US nuclear warhead facility profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, T.B.; Arkin, W.A.; Norris, R.S.; Hoenig, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    US Nuclear Warhead Facility Profiles is the third volume of the Nuclear Weapons Databook, a series published by the Natural Resources Defense Council. This volume reviews the different facilities in the US nuclear warhead complex. Because of the linkage between nuclear energy and nuclear weapons, the authors cover not only those facilities associated mainly with nuclear power research, but also those well known for weapons development. They are: the Argonne National Laboratory; the Hanford Reservation; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the Pantex plant; the Los Alamos Test Site; the Rocky Flats plant; the Sandia National Laboratories; and a host of others. Information on each facility is organized into a standard format that makes the book easy to use. The reader will find precise information ranging from a facility's address to its mission, management, establishment, budget, and staff. An additional, more in-depth presentation covers the activities and technical process of each facility. Maps, pictures, and figures complement the text.

  15. Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in ... Title: Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in ...

  16. Formation of electron bunches with tailored current profiles using multi-frequency linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.

    2012-12-21

    Tailoring an electron bunch with specific current profile can provide substantial enhancement of the transformer ratio in beam-driven acceleration methods. We present a method relying on the use of a linac with accelerating sections operating at different frequencies followed by a magnetic bunch compressor. The experimental verfification of the technique in a two-frequency linac is presented. The compatibility of the proposed technique with the formation and acceleration of a drive and witness bunches is numerically demonstrated.

  17. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Politte, David G.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ?6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (?$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners.

  18. gprof Profiling Tools | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Automatic Performance Collection (AutoPerf) Software & Libraries IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] gprof Profiling Tools Contents Introduction Profiling on the

  19. Using Helicopter Electromagnetic Surveys to Identify Potential Hazards at Mine Waste Impoundments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammack, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    In July 2003, helicopter electromagnetic surveys were conducted at 14 coal waste impoundments in southern West Virginia. The purpose of the surveys was to detect conditions that could lead to impoundment failure either by structural failure of the embankment or by the flooding of adjacent or underlying mine works. Specifically, the surveys attempted to: 1) identify saturated zones within the mine waste, 2) delineate filtrate flow paths through the embankment or into adjacent strata and receiving streams, and 3) identify flooded mine workings underlying or adjacent to the waste impoundment. Data from the helicopter surveys were processed to generate conductivity/depth images. Conductivity/depth images were then spatially linked to georeferenced air photos or topographic maps for interpretation. Conductivity/depth images were found to provide a snapshot of the hydrologic conditions that exist within the impoundment. This information can be used to predict potential areas of failure within the embankment because of its ability to image the phreatic zone. Also, the electromagnetic survey can identify areas of unconsolidated slurry in the decant basin and beneath the embankment. Although shallow, flooded mineworks beneath the impoundment were identified by this survey, it cannot be assumed that electromagnetic surveys can detect all underlying mines. A preliminary evaluation of the data implies that helicopter electromagnetic surveys can provide a better understanding of the phreatic zone than the piezometer arrays that are typically used.

  20. Podolsky electromagnetism at finite temperature: Implications on the Stefan-Boltzmann law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonin, C. A.; Bufalo, R.; Pimentel, B. M.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2010-01-15

    In this work we study Podolsky electromagnetism in thermodynamic equilibrium. We show that a Podolsky mass-dependent modification to the Stefan-Boltzmann law is induced and we use experimental data to limit the possible values for this free parameter.

  1. FULL ELECTROMAGNETIC FEL SIMULATION VIA THE LORENTZ-BOOSTED FRAME TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawley, William; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-08-16

    Numerical electromagnetic simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz-boosted frame. A particularly good application for calculation in a boosted frame isthat of short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) where a high energy electron beam with small fractional energy spread interacts with a static magnetic undulator. In the optimal boost frame (i.e., the ponderomotive rest frame), the red-shifted FEL radiation and blue-shifted undulator field have identical wavelengths and the number of required longitudinal grid cells and time-steps for fully electromagnetic simulation (relative to the laboratory frame) decrease by factors of gamma^2 each. In theory, boosted frame EM codes permit direct study of FEL problems for which the eikonal approximation for propagation of the radiation field and wiggler-period-averaging for the particle-field interaction may be suspect. We have adapted the WARP code to apply this method to several electromagnetic FEL problems including spontaneous emission, strong exponential gain in a seeded, single pass amplifier configuration, and emission from e-beams in undulators with multiple harmonic components. WARP has a standard relativistic macroparticle mover and a fully 3-D electromagnetic field solver. We discuss our boosted frame results and compare with those obtained using the ?standard? eikonal FEL simulation approach.

  2. PROJECT PROFILE: Enabling High Concentration Photovoltaics with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enabling High Concentration Photovoltaics with 50% Efficient Solar Cells PROJECT PROFILE: Enabling High Concentration Photovoltaics with 50% Efficient Solar Cells Funding ...

  3. Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Project Profile: Forecasting and ... energy technologies based on estimates of future rates of progress and adoption. ...

  4. TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende Department of CIS, University of Oregon, Advanced Computing Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory sameer@cs.uoregon.edu...

  5. Plant Energy Profiler | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance » Plant Energy Profiler Plant Energy Profiler April 17, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis The Plant Energy Profiler, or PEP, is an online software tool provided by the U.S. Department of Energy to help industrial plant managers in the United States identify how energy is being purchased and consumed at their plant and identify potential energy and cost savings. PEP is designed so that the users can complete a plant profile in about an hour. PEP provides users with a customized,

  6. Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatti, Sami; Kleiner, Matthias

    2007-04-07

    The paper shows some investigation results about the production of straight and curved lightweight profiles for lightweight structures and presents their benefits as well as their manufacturing potential for present and future lightweight construction. A strong emphasis is placed on the manufacturing of straight and bent profiles by means of sheet metal bending of innovative products, such as tailor rolled blanks and tailored tubes, and the manufacturing of straight and curved profiles by the innovative procedures curved profile extrusion and composite extrusion, developed at the Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL) of the University of Dortmund.

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot ...

  8. The first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au; O’Brien, Ricky; Ng, Jin Aun [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Colvill, Emma [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)] [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000, Denmark and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark)] [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000, Denmark and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Eade, Thomas; Kneebone, Andrew; Booth, Jeremy T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)] [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: We report on the clinical process, quality assurance, and geometric and dosimetric results of the first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking which occurred on 28 November 2013 at the Northern Sydney Cancer Centre. Methods: An electromagnetic transponder-based positioning system (Calypso) was modified to send the target position output to in-house-developed MLC tracking code, which adjusts the leaf positions to optimally align the treatment beam with the real-time target position. Clinical process and quality assurance procedures were developed and performed. The first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking was for a prostate cancer patient being treated with dual-arc VMAT (RapidArc). For the first fraction of the first patient treatment of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking we recorded the in-room time and transponder positions, and performed dose reconstruction to estimate the delivered dose and also the dose received had MLC tracking not been used. Results: The total in-room time was 21 min with 2 min of beam delivery. No additional time was needed for MLC tracking and there were no beam holds. The average prostate position from the initial setup was 1.2 mm, mostly an anterior shift. Dose reconstruction analysis of the delivered dose with MLC tracking showed similar isodose and target dose volume histograms to the planned treatment and a 4.6% increase in the fractional rectal V{sub 60}. Dose reconstruction without motion compensation showed a 30% increase in the fractional rectal V{sub 60} from that planned, even for the small motion. Conclusions: The real-time beam-target correction method, electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking, has been translated to the clinic. This achievement represents a milestone in improving geometric and dosimetric accuracy, and by inference treatment outcomes, in cancer radiotherapy.

  9. Profiles in garbage glass containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1997-09-01

    Glass containers are made from sand, limestone, soda ash, cullet (crushed bottles), and various additives, including those used to color brown, green, or blue bottles. Sixty percent of the glass used in the US is clear (flint) and one-fourth is brown (amber). Almost half of the green bottles are imported wind and beer bottles. Other glass products include flat glass such as windows; fiberglass insulation; and glassware. These products use different manufacturing processes and different additives than container glass. This profile covers only container glass. Glass bottles are commonly collected in curb-side programs. Losses due to breakage and the abrasiveness of glass during collection and processing offset their low collection and processing costs. Breakage solutions include installation of interior baffles or nets in the collection trucks, special glass-only truck compartments, and limiting the number of times glass is transferred after collection before final processing. Ten states require deposits on glass bottles for beer and soft drinks and related items.

  10. Diagnostic techniques used in AVLIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    This is the second part of a general overview talk on the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. In this presentation the authors will discuss the diagnostic techniques used to measure key parameters in their atomic vapor including densities, temperature, velocities charge exchange rates and background ionization levels. Although these techniques have been extensively applied to their uranium program they do have applicability to other systems. Relevant data demonstrating these techniques will be shown.

  11. techniques | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and discussion of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques. The Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program is authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act of...

  12. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  13. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  14. Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in density, such as at fault contacts. 2 Gravity techniques are also applied towards reservoir monitoring for subsidence and mass gain or loss within a geothermal reservoir...

  15. Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in-situ within the well, downhole techniques are capable of accurately constraining these reservoir parameters relative to depth.2 Gaining an understanding of these reservoir...

  16. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavroula Foteinopoulou

    2003-12-12

    In this dissertation, they have undertaken the challenge to understand the unusual propagation properties of the photonic crystal (PC). The photonic crystal is a medium where the dielectric function is periodically modulated. These types of structures are characterized by bands and gaps. In other words, they are characterized by frequency regions where propagation is prohibited (gaps) and regions where propagation is allowed (bands). In this study they focus on two-dimensional photonic crystals, i.e., structures with periodic dielectric patterns on a plane and translational symmetry in the perpendicular direction. They start by studying a two-dimensional photonic crystal system for frequencies inside the band gap. The inclusion of a line defect introduces allowed states in the otherwise prohibited frequency spectrum. The dependence of the defect resonance state on different parameters such as size of the structure, profile of incoming source, etc., is investigated in detail. For this study, they used two popular computational methods in photonic crystal research, the Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The results for the one-dimensional defect system are analyzed, and the two methods, FDTD and TMM, are compared. Then, they shift their attention only to periodic two-dimensional crystals, concentrate on their band properties, and study their unusual refractive behavior. Anomalous refractive phenomena in photonic crystals included cases where the beam refracts on the ''wrong'' side of the surface normal. The latter phenomenon, is known as negative refraction and was previously observed in materials where the wave vector, the electric field, and the magnetic field form a left-handed set of vectors. These materials are generally called left-handed materials (LHM) or negative index materials (NIM). They investigated the possibility that the photonic crystal behaves as a LHM, and how this behavior relates with the observed negatively refractive phenomena. They found that in the PC system, negative refraction is neither a prerequisite nor guarantees left-handed behavior. They examined carefully the condition to obtain left-handed behavior in the PC. They proposed a wedge type of experiment, in accordance with the experiment performed on the traditional LHM, to test these conditions. They found that for certain frequencies the PC shows left-handed behavior and acts in some respects like a homogeneous medium with a negative refractive index. they used the realistic PC system for this case to show how negative refraction occurs at the interface between a material with a positive and a material with a negative refractive index. Their findings indicate that the formation of the negatively refracted beam is not instantaneous and involves a transient time. With this time-dependent analysis, they were able to address previous controversial issues about negative refraction concerning causality and the speed of light limit. Finally, they attempt a systematic study of anomalous refractive phenomena that can occur at the air-PC interface. They observe cases where only a single refracted beam (in the positive or negative direction) is present, as well as cases with birefringence. they classify these different effects according to their origin and type of propagation (left-handed or not). For a complete study of the system, they also obtain expressions for the energy and group velocities, and show their equality. For cases with very low index contrast, band folding becomes an artificiality. They discuss the validity of their findings when they move to the limit of photonic crystals with a low index modulation.

  17. All-thin-film multilayered multiferroic structures with a slot-line for spin-electromagnetic wave devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikitin, Andrey A.; Ustinov, Alexey B.; Semenov, Alexander A.; Kalinikos, Boris A.; Lähderanta, E.

    2014-03-03

    Spin-electromagnetic waves propagating in thin-film multilayered multiferroic structures containing a slot transmission line have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The thin-film structure was composed of a ferrite film, a ferroelectric film, and a slot-line. It was shown that the spectrum of the spin-electromagnetic wave was formed as a result of hybridization of the spin wave in the ferrite film with the electromagnetic wave in the slot-line and was electrically and magnetically tunable. For the experimental investigations, a microwave phase shifter based on the multiferroic structure has been fabricated. Performance characteristics are presented.

  18. Terahertz electromagnetic wave generation and amplification by an electron beam in the elliptical plasma waveguides with dielectric rod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahmani, Z. Jazi, B.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in an elliptical plasma waveguide including strongly magnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is investigated. The dispersion relation of guided hybrid electromagnetic waves is obtained. Excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam will be studied. The time growth rate of electromagnetic waves is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, radius of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of the annular elliptical beam on the growth rate and the frequency spectra are numerically presented.

  19. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  20. Human body impedance for electromagnetic hazard analysis in the VLF to MF band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, H.; Chatterjee, I.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1984-08-01

    A knowledge of the average electrical impedance of the human body is essential for the analysis of electromagnetic hazards in the VLF to MF band. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the average body impedance of several human subjects as a function of frequency. Measurements were carried out with the subjects standing barefoot on a ground plane and touching various metal electrodes with the hand or index finger. The measured impedance includes the electrode polarization and skin impedances, spread impedance near the electrode, body impedance, stray capacitance between the body surface and ground, and inductance due to the body and grounding strap. These components are separated and simplified equivalent circuits are presented for body impedance of humans exposed to free-space electromagnetic waves as well as in contact with large ungrounded metallic objects therein.