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1

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

2

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

3

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, Bruce P. (Sandoval County, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Bernalillo County, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Bernalillo County, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

6

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993  

SciTech Connect

A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measurement. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Borehole Seismic Monitoring at Otway Using the Naylor-1 Instrument String  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-2337E Borehole Seismic Monitoring at Otway Using thefor performing three distinct seismic measurements, hightime (HRTT), walkaway vertical seismic profiling (WVSP), and

Daley, T.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO2 at the Frio Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , 2001, Orbital vibrator seismic source for simultaneous5: Tomographic image of seismic velocity change due to CO 2Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO 2 at the Frio

Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Hoversten, G.M.; Peterson, John E.; Korneev, Valeri A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Parra, Jorge O. (Helotes, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

Brouns, Thomas M.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

30

THE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seismic reflection cannot (e.g. Liberty et al., 1999; Musil et al., 2002). The images producedTHE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY Geoff J properties is important in many fields. One method that can image the seismic velocity structure

Barrash, Warren

31

Modelling Of Downhole Seismic Sources I: Literature Review, Review Of Fundamentals, Impulsive Point Source In A Borehole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper represents the first of a two paper sequence comprising a multi-faceted introduction to the numerical and analytical modelling of seismic sources in a borehole.

Meredith, J. A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chapter 6 - Seismic Inversion Techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Seismic inversion techniques were developed as a discipline at the same time that seismic technologies were widely applied in oil exploration and development starting in the 1980s. Except for basic theories and principles, seismic inversion techniques are different from traditional seismic exploration methods in geological tasks, involving basic information as well as study approaches. In the early stages of exploration, the geological task of seismic exploration was to find structures and identify traps, and seismic exploration techniques always focused on the ups and downs of reflection interfaces. They mainly relied on the travel time for structural interpretation. The main work of reservoir geophysics is to study the heterogeneity of a reservoir, and the main geological task is to make predictions on the reservoir parameters. Scientists focus on the lateral variation of reservoir characteristics and conduct seismic interpretation based on the information extracted from the results of reservoir seismic inversion. Seismic inversion has developed rapidly in recent years, including recursive inversion, log-constrained inversion, and multiparameter lithological seismic inversion. We choose different methods according to the geological characteristics and specific problems of the study area.

Ming Li; Yimin Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

Reidel, Steve P.

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at Occidental Permian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the distribution of seismic energy within the reservoir.Field Monitoring of ASR Seismic Stimulation Source at LostField Results from Seismic Stimulation, 17th International

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

36

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

37

A Robust MEMS Based Multi-Component Sensor for 3D Borehole Seismic Arrays  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop, prototype and test a robust multi-component sensor that combines both Fiber Optic and MEMS technology for use in a borehole seismic array. The use such FOMEMS based sensors allows a dramatic increase in the number of sensors that can be deployed simultaneously in a borehole seismic array. Therefore, denser sampling of the seismic wave field can be afforded, which in turn allows us to efficiently and adequately sample P-wave as well as S-wave for high-resolution imaging purposes. Design, packaging and integration of the multi-component sensors and deployment system will target maximum operating temperature of 350-400 F and a maximum pressure of 15000-25000 psi, thus allowing operation under conditions encountered in deep gas reservoirs. This project aimed at using existing pieces of deployment technology as well as MEMS and fiber-optic technology. A sensor design and analysis study has been carried out and a laboratory prototype of an interrogator for a robust borehole seismic array system has been assembled and validated.

Paulsson Geophysical Services

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Definition: Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Active Seismic Techniques Active seismic techniques study the behavior of artificially-generated elastic waves in the subsurface. A seismic wave or pulse is generated at the surface by an active seismic source which can be a vibration, mechanical impact, or near-surface explosion.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave fields are recorded by a seismometer,

39

Seismic wave attenuation from borehole and surface records in the top 2.5km beneath the city of Basel, Switzerland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Figure 2 Overview of the borehole profile in the injection...from surface (top of drilling basement). 3 Seismic...separate institutions. Borehole sensors of Geothermal...also seen for other borehole stations. The number...stacking and the generally large number of spectra......

Falko Bethmann; Nicholas Deichmann; P. Martin Mai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

43

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

44

New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management  

SciTech Connect

Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011

46

Fracture detection using crosshole surveys and reverse vertical seismic profiles at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......profiles at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma...RVSPs) at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma...than 50 m, suggest large fracture densities...granite, Scientific Drilling, 1, 21-26. Crampin...system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Kay......

Enru Liu; Stuart Crampin; John H. Queen

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

48

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Exploratory Boreholes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Boreholes Exploratory Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Boreholes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a borehole Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Boreholes: An exploratory borehole is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

50

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of in-line, cross-line, forward, and reversed directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered S-wave records of lower horizontal receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, respectively, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered S-wave signals of lower horizontal receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, respectively, Section 10: Expanded and filtered S-wave signals of lower horizontal receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower horizontal receiver signals, respectively.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rig-installed boreholes have been successful at other sedimentary sites, additional boreholes at the Northeast site should be installed with rotary

Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chapter 7 - Prestack Seismic Inversion and Seismic Attribute Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on seismic, logging, and geological data, the seismic inversion technique can reveal the spatial characteristics (including reservoir thickness, structural characteristics, extending direction, extending range, pinch-out location, and others) of the target layers, such as reservoirs or coal seams. By combining a large area of the continuous distribution of seismic data with high-resolution well logging data, this technique transforms conventional seismic data into a high-resolution well data volume, enabling us to use the acoustic characteristics of rock formations to ascertain lithological interfaces. So we can extrapolate the borehole lithological and physical properties and hydrocarbon features from points to lines and lines to faces, and predict lateral reservoir variations and reservoir properties from known reservoir characteristics. Seismic inversion technology has been one of the core technologies for reservoir characteristics and reservoir prediction. Seismic attribute analysis is the premise of fine reservoir characteristics and fine 3D seismic interpretation, which help us uncover information about lithology and reservoir heterogeneity from seismic data. The work of seismic attribute analysis includes (1) extracting various seismic attributes from poststack seismic data; (2) conducting crossplot analysis of seismic attributes and reservoir properties (including geology, well logging, and petrophysical parameters) to establish relationships between seismic attributes and reservoir parameters; and (3) dynamically interpreting 3D seismic, geological, and logging data, which helps us to study the relationships between seismic reflection characteristics and sedimentary and tectonic information, predict the reservoir spatial distribution, and reveal how fracture systems influence the reservoir distribution. Development of the seismic inversion technique in reservoir characterization can be summarized in four stages: the first stage was in the 1960s. In this stage, the exploration targets were structural reservoirs, and seismic inversion techniques were not used. The second stage was in the 1970s. The exploration targets were structural and lithological reservoirs, and no well-constraint seismic inversion techniques were used. The third stage was in the 1980s, when many new techniques were developed. Seismic inversion techniques, including the prestack amplitude versus offset (AVO) technique and wave impedance inversion technique, developed rapidly and greatly improved our understanding of seismic reservoir characterization. The fourth stage is the stage of reservoir characterization and dynamic monitoring in the 1990s. Seismic inversion techniques are used for reservoir dynamic characterization, such as 3D AVO inversion, well-seismic joint inversion, reservoir characteristics curve reconstruction, multiparameter reservoir inversion, and the elastic wave impedance inversion techniques. Prestack seismic data contain richer information than do poststack data, so prestack seismic inversion and attribute analysis are increasingly important in oil and gas exploration.

Ming Li; Yimin Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Category:Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. M Micro-Earthquake 1 pages T Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring 1 pages Pages in category "Passive Seismic...

56

Observation and scaling of microearthquakes from the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault borehole seismometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Chelungpu-fault borehole seismometers...Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Borehole Seismometers...Despite the large coseismic slip...stress drops of larger events including...Taiwan Chelungpu drilling project (TCDP...seven-level vertical borehole seismic array......

Yen-Yu Lin; Kuo-Fong Ma; Volker Oye

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

58

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

59

Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non?destructive Borehole Logging Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Well integrity is important at all potential CCS locations and may play a crucial role establishing leakage risk in areas where there is a high density of existing wells that could be impacted by the storage operations including depleted petroleum fields where EOR or CCS will occur. To address a need for risk quantification methods that can be directly applied to individual wells using borehole logging tools a study was conducted using data from five wells in Wyoming. The objectives of the study were: Objective 1 Develop methods to establish the baseline flow parameters (porosity and permeability or mobility) from individual measurements of the material properties and defects in a well. Objective 2 Develop a correlation between field flow?property data and cement logs that can be used to establish the flow?properties of well materials and well features using cement mapping tools. Objective 3 Establish a method that uses the flow?property model (Objective 2) to analyze the statistical uncertainties associated with individual well leakage that can provide basis for uncertainty in risk calculations. The project objectives were met through the logging of five wells in Carbon and Natrona County Wyoming to collect data that was used to estimate individual and average well flow properties and model the results using ultrasonic data collected during the logging. Three of the five wells provided data on point and average flow properties for well annuli. Data from the other two wells were used to create models of cement permeability and test whether information collected in one well could be used to characterize another well. The results of the in?situ point measurements were confirmed by the lab measurements sidewall cores collected near the same depths Objective 1 was met using the data collected through logging, testing, and sampling. The methods were developed that can establish baseline flow parameters of wells by both point and average test methods. The methods to estimate the flow properties modeling of point pressure tests, modeling of vertical interference tests, and laboratory measurement of cased?hole sidewall cores The wells were in sufficiently good shape to allow the development of the characterization methods while still having enough defects to study differences in results as they relate to well integrity. Samples and tests analyzed from three of five wells studied in showed the cements were largely intact and had not degraded from exposure native brines. Log results taken in conjunction with the core measurements indicate that interfaces and/or problems with cement placement due to eccentering provide preferential flow paths for fluids, which can increase the effective permeability of the barrier several orders of magnitude above the permeability of intact cement. The results of the maps created using logging tools indicating that the cement condition and bond are generally good identify a need for more research to understand how logs can be used to predict effective well permeabilities such as those measured by the VITs in this study.

Duguid, Andrew; Butsch, Robert; Cary, J.; Celia, Michael; Chugunov, Nikita; Gasda, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Stamp, Vicki; Thingelstad, Rebecca; Wang, James

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Seismic sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of seismic vulnerability using remote sensing and GIS techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a framework to integrate several sources of spatial information to derive a map of seismic vulnerability for the city of Arica, Chile, which has been historically affected by this natural hazard. The proposed method is based on generating a geographical database with different variables that are related to human activity, considering factors of potential reduction and increase of damage caused by a future earthquake. The spatial information was obtained from different sources, mainly remote sensing images, national and local census and field data collection. The map of seismic vulnerability was based on the estimated location of population, as well as the situation of critical installations and a map of construction fragility. Since population activity changes through the day, a dynamic cartography of vulnerability was produced, based on population density levels for different time periods. Construction fragility maps were derived from digital classification of an IRS-1C image, using textural features.

Patricio Zavala; Emilio Chuvieco

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fast 3D Modeling of Borehole Induction Measurements in Dipping and Anisotropic Formations using a Novel Approximation Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast 3D Modeling of Borehole Induction Measurements in Dipping and Anisotropic Formations using of subsurface geophysical problems have been reported, including 3D EM scattering in the presence of complex introduces a novel efficient 3D EM approx- imation based on a new integral equation formulation. The main

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

63

Seismic sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SH Propagator Matrix and Qs Estimates From Borehole- and Surface-Recorded Earthquake Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......M.,1986. Borehole seismology and...seismic regime of large industrial centres...Long period borehole seismology had...problems such as larger dimensions of...in 1356 by a large destructive earthquake...telephone time borehole seismometer surface...determined during the drilling and are shown......

Jeannot Trampert; Michel Cara; Michel Frogneux

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Detecting Perched Water Bodies Using Surface-seismic Time-lapse Traveltime Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 25 Detecting Perched Water Bodies Using Surface-seismic Time-lapse Traveltime Tomography remediation. Previous near-surface geophysical time-lapse studies have focused on electrical or electromagnetic (EM) techniques (including ground-penetrating radar) or borehole methods. To evaluate the utility

Hubbard, Susan

66

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Multipathing and spectral modulation of the downgoing wavefield in a complex crust: An example from the KTB (Germany) borehole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......depths in spite of large amounts of data...frequently have access to borehole seismic data, which...costs involved in borehole drilling in crystalline crust...fluids exist at even larger depths. Another...1999 in the KTB borehole to a depth of 8......

Jose Pujol; Thomas Bohlen; Thies Beilecke; Wolfgang Rabbel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology August 12, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Technology International Inc. has developed a breakthrough borehole imaging system that stands on the cusp of commercialization. By pushing the limits of seismic-while-drilling technology, the patent-pending SeismicPULSER system provides more accurate geo-steering for the discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves, facilitating new field development and improving well economics. Drill-bit seismic-while-drilling techniques use a downhole acoustic source and receivers at the surface to create real-time images that allow

70

Exploratory Boreholes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Technique Exploratory Boreholes Activity Date 1992 - 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Mammoth Pacific LP drilled several...

71

Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Technique Exploratory Boreholes Activity Date 1984 - 1990 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis This exploration was originally done as part of a...

72

borehole | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

borehole borehole Dataset Summary Description NOAA borehole data with temperatures at different depths. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/borehole/nam.html Source NOAA Date Released April 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords borehole geothermal NOAA Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon NOAA_borehole_data_4-8-10.xlsx (xlsx, 478.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review No Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/open-access-climate-data-policy.pdf Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

73

Submarine Seismic Investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...March 1941 research-article Submarine Seismic Investigations E. C. Bullard T. F. Gaskell The refraction seismic method has been used to investigate the...techniques, and results of a refraction seismic survey of the rock surface underlying...

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt  

SciTech Connect

In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Borehole data transmission apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole data transmission apparatus is described whereby a centrifugal pump impeller(s) is used to provide a turbine stage having substantial pressure characteristics in response to changing rotational speed of a shaft for the pressure pulsing of data from the borehole through the drilling mud to the surface of the earth.

Kotlyar, O.M.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and rock physical properties. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental dam acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. In this quarterly report technical progress is summarized for Task 3, data processing and analysis of: preliminary interpretation of interwell seismic data from wells 5-7 and 7-7 at the Gypsy Test Site; and the response of a thin layer in an anistropic shale.

Parra, J.O.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

A new seismic probe for coal seam hazard detection  

SciTech Connect

An experimental hole-to-hole seismic probe system has been developed for use in coal measure geology as a means of determining the structural conditions of coal seams. The source probe produces a 500-joule electric arc discharge whose seismic wavelet has a spectrum in the 200 to 2,000 Hz frequency range. Low compliance hydrophones contained in the source probe as well as in a separate seismic detector probe are matched to the frequency range of the source. Both probes are constructed with 5.72 cm diameter housings. The transducers in the probes are equipped with fluid-inflatable boots to permit operation in either wet or dry boreholes. Preliminary tests in vertical boreholes drilled 213 m apart in sedimentary rock formations show reliable operation and useful seismic propagation measurements along horizontal and oblique paths up to 232 m in length. Because the seismic wavelet has an accurately repeatable waveshape, multiple shots and signal averaging techniques can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and extend the transmission distances.

Peters, W.R.; Owen, T.E.; Thill, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Estimation of Parigi reservoir characteristics using seismic attributes, AVO analysis and AVO inversion, and seismic inversion  

SciTech Connect

In the carbonate reservoir, the gas was trapped in the cavity of the formation. First of all, to identify the cavity as the distribution of the cavity or porous zone will be done by reflection strength and instantaneous frequency from the seismic attribute analysis. After the zone has been identified, the existing gas and the value of porosity can be estimated using AVO analysis and AVO inversion technique. This idea was applied to the carbonate reservoir within the Parigi Formation in the Northwest Java Basin (Indonesia) by Santoso et al. The result shows a clear zone of high reflection strength and low instantaneous frequency in the carbonate build up. The porosity estimated by AVO inversion gives a value of the porosity about 38% and the Poisson`s ratio around 0.22-0.26. This paper is continuation of Santoso et al. study. It is done by the delineation of the porosity which can be displayed by the acoustic impedance section as a result of seismic inversion process. The delineation of the reservoir characters to the horizontal direction as previous study gives around a similar value as shown by acoustic impedance value. When these results were compared to the borehole data in the location, they are very close. Therefore this idea has given a satisfactory result in estimating porosity from seismic data and delineating the carbonate reservoir away from the borehole.

Santoso, D.; Hendrajaya, L.; Watkins, J.S. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Computer power fathoms the depths: billion-bit data processors illuminate the subsurface. [3-D Seismic techniques  

SciTech Connect

Some of the same space-age signal technology being used to track events 200 miles above the earth is helping petroleum explorationists track down oil and natural gas two miles and more down into the earth. The breakthroughs, which have come in a technique called three-dimensional seismic work, could change the complexion of exploration for oil and natural gas. Thanks to this 3-D seismic approach, explorationists can make dynamic maps of sites miles beneath the surface. Then explorationists can throw these maps on space-age computer systems and manipulate them every which way - homing in sharply on salt domes, faults, sands and traps associated with oil and natural gas. ''The 3-D seismic scene has exploded within the last two years,'' says, Peiter Tackenberg, Marathon technical consultant who deals with both domestic and international exploration. The 3-D technique has been around for more than a decade, he notes, but recent achievements in space-age computer hardware and software have unlocked its full potential.

Ross, J.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

82

Inversion of seismic data using tomographical reconstruction techniques for investigations of laterally inhomogeneous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plitudes caused by energy shifting due to the same...of the subsurface the energy loss occurs. The application...parameters. The operaling costs for the shown computations...and :ipplication in energy cxploration, Kuhl...seismic attenuation within geothermal systems using tele......

Gertrud Neumann-Denzau; Jrn Behrens

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A model for fluid-injection-induced seismicity at the KTB, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......investigated deep-drilling sites in...vicinity of the borehole. The present...whereby a large number of...Germany) drilling hole, where a large number of...near the borehole. In addition...1994. After drilling activities...provides a larger set of seismic...1 km deep borehole at flow rates......

S. Baisch; H.-P. Harjes

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Application of seismic tomographic techniques in the investigation of geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect

The utility of microearthquake data for characterizing the Northwest Geysers geothermal field and the Long Valley Caldera (LVC) was investigated. Three-dimensional (3-D) P- and S-wave seismic velocity models were estimated for the Coldwater Creek Steam Field (CCSF) in the Northwest Geysers region. Hypocenters relocated using these 3-D models appear to be associated with the steam producing zone, with a deeper cluster of hypocenters beneath an active injection well. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit strong correlation with geothermal exploitation. A 3-D differential attenuation model was also developed for the CCSF from spectral ratios corrected for strong site effects. High-velocity anomalies and low attenuation in the near surface correspond to Franciscan metagraywacke and greenstone units. Microearthquakes recorded at seismographic stations located near the metagraywacke unit exhibit high corner frequencies. Low-velocity anomalies and higher attenuation in the near surface are associated with sections of Franciscan melange. Near-surface high attenuation and high Vp/Vs are interpreted to indicate liquid-saturated regions affected by meteoric recharge. High attenuation and low Vp/Vs marks the steam producing zone, suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. The extent of the high attenuation and low Vp/Vs anomalies suggest that the CCSF steam reservoir may extend northwestward beyond the known producing zone. This study concludes that microearthquake monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool. Seismic velocity and attenuation structures as well as the distribution of microearthquake activity can be used to identify and delineate the geothermal reservoir, while temporal variations in these quantities would be useful in tracking changes during exploitation.

Romero, A.E. Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

87

Full Reviews: Seismicity and Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer reviewer comments for Seismicity and Seismic.

88

High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology  

SciTech Connect

Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

Nelson, P.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Ileana Tibuleac, Leiph Preston (2008) Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=425638" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

91

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Estimation of formation temperature from borehole measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......obtained if the borehole rock system...between the drilling muds used...boreholes, the largest being between...properties of drilling muds (see...v) The borehole radius should...this shows large variations...100-1000 times larger than the...the finite drilling rate is more...that the borehole is created......

M. N. Luheshi

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Borehole logging for uranium by measurement of natural ?-radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Ray measurements have been made in boreholes since 1939, for the purpose of detecting the radiation from naturally occuring radioelements in rocks. Logs of the ?-radiation in boreholes have evolved to their present acceptance as a quantitative measurement of uranium concentration for uranium exploration and mining development projects. Many factors influence these ?-ray measurements and consequently new methods of overcoming previous problems have had to be developed. Calibration facilities with model holes have been established in several countries to support quantitative borehole measurements. New high density detector materials have been evaluated and have shown to yield considerable improvements for operation in the restricted environment of the borehole. ?-Ray spectral logging has become available partially as a result of spin-off from parallel developments in surface and airborne ?-ray spectrometric survey equipment. The use of the high resolution solid state detector has proceeded through a series of developments to its present availability as a commercial borehole logging service in spite of the inherent detector cooling problems. Digital measurements are replacing the earlier analog measurements, and minicomputer- or micro processor-based logging systems have enabled new data processing techniques such as inverse filtering, to be implemented in real time at the site of the borehole.

P.G. Killeen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Stellar acoustic radii, mean densities and ages from seismic inversion techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Determining stellar characteristics such as the radius, the mass or the age is crucial when studying stellar evolution, exoplanetary systems or characterising stellar populations in the Galaxy. Asteroseismology is the golden path to accurately obtain these characteristics. In this context, a key question is how to make these methods less model-dependant. Aims. Building on the work of Reese et al. (2012), we wish to extend the SOLA inversion technique to new stellar global characteristics in addition to the mean density. The goal is to provide a general framework in which to estimate these characteristics as accurately as possible in low mass main sequence stars. Methods. First, we describe our framework and discuss the reliability of the inversion technique and the possible sources of error.We then apply this methodology to the acoustic radius, an age indicator based on the sound speed derivative and the mean density and compare it to estimates based on the average large and small frequency separatio...

Buldgen, Gal; Dupret, Marc-Antoine; Samadi, Rza

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Category:Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Downhole Techniques page? For detailed information on Downhole Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Downhole Techniques Add.png Add a new Downhole Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B [×] Borehole Seismic Techniques‎ 2 pages F [×] Formation Testing Techniques‎ O [×] Open-Hole Techniques‎ W [×] Well Log Techniques‎ 17 pages [×] Well Testing Techniques‎ 8 pages

96

Petrophysical properties and geology of selected intervals in the Frio Formation, Stratton field, South Texas for modeling interwell seismic logging response  

SciTech Connect

Seismic or continuity logging consists of locating a seismic source in one borehole near or in a low-velocity layer and deploying a detector array in a second borehole. Detection of guided waves transmitted between the two wells indicates bed connectivity. The guided wave signatures are either leaky modes or normal modes (or both). The technique has numerous applications in various types of heterogeneous geological environments, including many Gulf Coast gas reservoirs. It can be used to determine the continuity of beds between wells, estimate and locate variations in the thickness of beds, and estimate the average rock physical properties of the beds. Stratton field was selected as the Gulf-Coast-gas-play type field for a project to model interwell seismic logging responses. Stratton is a mature gas field located in the south Texas Gulf Coast, about 30 miles southwest of Corpus Christi. It encompasses over 120,000 acres in portions of Kleberg, Nueces, and Jim Wells counties. Stratton is one of 29 fields in the Frio Formation fluvial-deltaic lay associated with the Vicksburg fault zone along the Texas Gulf Coast Basin. This poster presentation explains the technique of interwell seismic logging, documents the petrophysical properties and geology of intervals in the upper and middle Frio, and presents the results of the forward modeling tests.

Collier, H.A. [Tarleton State Univ., Stephenville, TX (United States); Parra, J.O. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal...

98

Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles  

SciTech Connect

This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

Marvinney, Robert

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

INDUCED SEISMICITY MONITORING OF AN UNDERGROUND SALT CAVITY UNDER A TRANSIENT PRESSURE EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 125 m in cemented boreholes drilled in thé vicinity of thé study area. The underground cavity under and Monitoring, Seismic Introduction A large research project within thé GISOS1 program has been launched

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data  

SciTech Connect

Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

102

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date...

103

Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

105

NOAA Borehole Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NOAA Borehole Data NOAA Borehole Data Dataset Summary Description NOAA borehole data with temperatures at different depths. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/borehole/nam.html Source NOAA Date Released April 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords borehole geothermal NOAA Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon NOAA_borehole_data_4-8-10.xlsx (xlsx, 478.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review No Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/open-access-climate-data-policy.pdf Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

106

Numerical simulation of first-order backscattered P and S waves for time-lapse seismic imaging in heterogeneous reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......borehole seismic data aimed at monitoring oil-water substitution in heterogeneous...heterogeneous media, particularly of oil-water substitution events in producing...time-lapse seismometry. Mark Stephenson of Marathon Oil UK kindly supplied the well-core......

P. C. Leary

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES  

SciTech Connect

Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

Erik C. Westman

2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

The statistical nature of the upper continental crystalline crust derived from in situ seismic measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......crystalline crust. A recent large-scale geoscientific...German continental deep drilling project (KTB). It...in central Europe. A large program of seismic and...undertaken around the drilling location near Windischeschenbach...were measurements in the borehole, namely vertical seismic......

Guido Kneib

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

GaussNewton and full Newton methods in frequencyspace seismic waveform inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reconstructed during the iterative process. However, preconditioning...Hagedoorn J.G. , 1954A process of seismic reflection interpretation...cross-borehole seismic data,57th Mtg. Eur. Assoc. Expl Geophys...estimation in 2D media,58th Mtg. Eur. Assoc. Expl Geophys......

R. Gerhard Pratt; Changsoo Shin; G. J. Hick

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seismic stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the previous chapters, the equipment used for seismic stations has been described. When putting this equipment out in the field, we have a seismic station. Unfortunately it is not as simple as just putting ...

Jens Havskov; Gerardo Alguacil

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A new approach to the borehole temperature relaxation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disturbance in a borehole may be generated...effects. The drilling process itself...conditions of the drilling process, and...available disturbed borehole temperature...to produce a large initial disturbance To in the borehole, to measure......

H. Wilhelm

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

113

NETL: News Release - Microhole "Designer" Seismic Testing Its Potential in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 24, 2007 April 24, 2007 Microhole "Designer" Seismic Testing Its Potential in the Field DOE-Funded Technology Offers Low-Cost Deployment of Vertical Seismic Profiling MORGANTOWN, WV - Using microhole technology developed in partnership with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to inexpensively deploy sensors for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) could dramatically enhance the oil and gas industry's ability to find and produce huge volumes of by-passed oil and natural gas. VSP's advantages over conventional surface seismic have long been known. Placing seismic recording devices in boreholes results in a much improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with surface seismic. VSP gives an especially high-resolution image of the immediate vicinity of the borehole.

114

Basic data report: borehole WIPP-12 deepening. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Borehole WIPP-12 was originally drilled in 1978 as an exploratory borehole to characterize the geology of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Eddy County, New Mexico. WIPP-12 was reentered and deepened in late 1981. WIPP-12 is located in Section 17, T22S, R31E, just outside the limit of Zone II, approximately one mile north of the exploratory shaft site. The deepening of WIPP-12 was undertaken for several reasons: to investigate the presence of an anticlinal or domal structure and thickening of halite indicated by surface seismic reflection surveys conducted in the area; to determine the nature and extent of deformation in the Castile Formation, in a location adjacent to the zone of anomalous seismic reflections found north of the well location (''Disturbed Zone''); and to characterize any fluid-bearing zones encountered in the Castile Formation while drilling. Field operations related to deepening of the borehole began November 16, 1981 and were completed January 1, 1982. The borehole was deepened through the Castile Formation to a total depth of 3927.5 ft by coring. Pressurized brine was encountered on November 22, 1981 at a depth of about 3016 ft. The brine reservoir is apparently related to a system of near-vertical fractures of unknown extent observed in Anhydrite III. The Halite I member is about 200 ft thicker than observed in undisturbed areas in the vicinity of WIPP (for example, Borehole DOE-1). Small-scale lithologic features such as folding of anhydrite stringers in halite and halite lineation appear to confirm the presence of a structural disturbance at this location. This Basic Data Report includes geologic information gathered during WIPP-12 deepening.

Black, S.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

116

Kimberly Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

Kimama Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper part of the borehole with bentonite and concrete seals. A reference design of the

119

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

120

Geophysical Prospecting, 2007, 55, 891899 doi:10.1111/j.1365-2478.2007.00654.x Importance of borehole deviation surveys for monitoring of hydraulic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of borehole deviation surveys for monitoring of hydraulic fracturing treatments Petr Bulant1 , Leo Eisner2 accepted April 2007 ABSTRACT During seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing treatment, it is very common-system geometry derived from microseismic event locations. For common hydraulic fracturing geometries, a 2

Cerveny, Vlastislav

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the direction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies EGS Program is installing, operating, and/or interfacing seismic arrays at multiple Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites. The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality

122

Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution. Annual report, March 1, 1996--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect

In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. They also may connect the borehole to remote zones of better reservoir characteristics. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based on the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. The project is a study directed toward the evaluation of acoustic logging and 3D-seismic measurement techniques as well as fluid flow and transport methods for mapping permeability anisotropy and other petrophysical parameters for the understanding of the reservoir fracture systems and associated fluid dynamics. The principal application of these measurement techniques and methods is to identify and investigate the propagation characteristics of acoustic and seismic waves in the Twin Creek hydrocarbon reservoir owned by Union Pacific Resources (UPR) and to characterize the fracture permeability distribution using production data. This site is located in the overthrust area of Utah and Wyoming. UPR drilled six horizontal wells, and presently UPR has two rigs running with many established drill hole locations. In addition, there are numerous vertical wells that exist in the area as well as 3D seismic surveys. Each horizontal well contains full FMS logs and MWD logs, gamma logs, etc.

Parra, J.O.; Collier, H.A.; Owen, T.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Seismic amplitude and coherency response of channel sand, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hazard delineation. This paper describes a new technique for drilling hazard identification using a conventional 3 D seismic amplitude dataset. An event coherence calculation program is applied to a 3 D seismic dataset to derive seismic attributes...

Fischer, Elena Mikhaylovna

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer  

SciTech Connect

Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Model accurately predicts directional borehole trajectory  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical investigations and field data analyses helped develop a new method of predicting the rate of inclination change in a deviated well bore to help reduce the frequency and magnitude of doglegs. Predicting borehole dogleg severity is one of the main problems in directional drilling. Predicting the tendency and magnitude of borehole deviation and comparing them to the planned well path makes it possible to improve bottom hole assembly (BHA) design and to reduce the number of correction runs. The application of adaptation models for predicting the rate of inclination change if measurement-while-drilling systems are used results in improved accuracy of prediction, and therefore a reduction in correction runs.

Mamedbekov, O.K. (Azerbaijan State Petroleum Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan))

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

High resolution reverse VSP and interwell seismic experiments at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling VSP and interwell seismic experiments were conducted at the Western Kentucky Petroleum Buckhorn test site near Quincy, Illinois. The RVSP data were acquired using a 3-component pneumatic probe and the interwell seismic data were acquired using a 24-element hydrophone array. The experiments were conducted to analyze high resolution seismic waveforms and to perform travel time velocity inversion for mapping the Silurian Kankakee formation which is the more prolific oil producer in the Mt. Sterling area. Reverse VSP and interwell seismic measurements together with log data have yielded information on the anisotropic characteristic of the shale formation and in the compressional wave velocity distribution of the limestone formation. These results inferred that reverse VSP (using several 3-component detectors in shallow boreholes) and interwell seismic measurements integrated with log data and seismic modeling can delineate the hydrocarbon reservoir and geological structures at the Buckhorn test site.

Parra, J.O.; Bangs, J.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High resolution reverse VSP and interwell seismic experiments at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling VSP and interwell seismic experiments were conducted at the Western Kentucky Petroleum Buckhorn test site near Quincy, Illinois. The RVSP data were acquired using a 3-component pneumatic probe and the interwell seismic data were acquired using a 24-element hydrophone array. The experiments were conducted to analyze high resolution seismic waveforms and to perform travel time velocity inversion for mapping the Silurian Kankakee formation which is the more prolific oil producer in the Mt. Sterling area. Reverse VSP and interwell seismic measurements together with log data have yielded information on the anisotropic characteristic of the shale formation and in the compressional wave velocity distribution of the limestone formation. These results inferred that reverse VSP (using several 3-component detectors in shallow boreholes) and interwell seismic measurements integrated with log data and seismic modeling can delineate the hydrocarbon reservoir and geological structures at the Buckhorn test site.

Parra, J.O.; Bangs, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Stochastic Bayesian inversion of borehole self-potential measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occurs if the drilling fluid infiltrates...flows into the borehole (Hearst Nelson...resistivity of the drilling mud (or borehole fluid) and rho...invasion of the drilling mud in the formation...minimal. Areas of large separation in......

W. F. Woodruff; A. Revil; A. Jardani; D. Nummedal; S. Cumella

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Seismic Monitoring - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curation Services Ecological Monitoring Environmental Surveillance Meteorology and Climatology Services Seismic Monitoring Seismic Monitoring Email Email Page | Print Print Page...

130

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be...

131

Formation temperatures determined from stochastic inversion of borehole observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......relatively large a priori...following the borehole model and...represents the borehole with drilling fluid while...R. R is large enough that...returning drilling fluid, exists...be given large a priori...basins. A borehole thermal conductivity......

S. B. Nielsen; N. Balling; H. S. Christiansen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Inversion of borehole weak motion records observed in Istanbul (Turkey)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......sets, might be large. This indicates...the inversion of borehole weak and strong...2005 December, a drilling program consisting...the 140-m-deep borehole, based on the encountered...applicable also to borehole sites where other...velocities (with a large change of impedance......

S. Parolai; R. Wang; D. Bindi

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RESEARCH PAPER Compaction bands induced by borehole drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: boreholes are often drilled deep into weak porous sandstone formations for the purpose of extracting oil Introduction Boreholes drilled into the Earth's crust for facilitating the extraction of water, oil, naturalRESEARCH PAPER Compaction bands induced by borehole drilling R. Katsman ? E. Aharonov ? B. C

Einat, Aharonov

134

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

135

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect

A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.

Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Seismicity Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...density, highly porous airborne vol- canic ejecta near...explosions for such stress-release experiments cannot be...a)+e2 /7 f is the fraction of stress drop and a...Steinbrugge Pacific Fire Rating Bureau San Francisco...fault belt without the release of seismic energy. Hence...

137

Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to understand earthquake dynamics. Subduction zones generate about 90% of the Earth's seismicity, resulting in coastal water impacts the entire ecosystem--what fish live there, when fish spawn, phytoplankton blooms

Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

138

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

139

Seismic Array Software System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic Array Software System Sam Irvine, Martin Lukac,of a Portable Broadband Seismic Array Long - Part of theStudy the propagation of seismic waves in Mexico City Line

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal This roadmap is intended to advance deep borehole disposal (DBD) from its current conceptual status to potential future deployment as a disposal system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The objectives of the DBD RD&D roadmap include providing the technical basis for fielding a DBD demonstration project, defining the scientific research activities associated with site characterization and postclosure safety, as well as defining the engineering demonstration activities associated with deep borehole drilling, completion, and surrogate waste canister emplacement. Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal

142

Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

Redpath, Bruce B.

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Application of seismic tomographic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Application of seismic tomographic techniques in the investigation of geothermal systems Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

144

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories (more)

Hoag, Christopher Ian.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Modeling and visualizing borehole information on virtual globes using KML  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advances in virtual globes and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) are providing the Earth scientists with the universal platforms to manage, visualize, integrate and disseminate geospatial information. In order to use KML to represent and disseminate subsurface geological information on virtual globes, we present an automatic method for modeling and visualizing a large volume of borehole information. Based on a standard form of borehole database, the method first creates a variety of borehole models with different levels of detail (LODs), including point placemarks representing drilling locations, scatter dots representing contacts and tube models representing strata. Subsequently, the level-of-detail based (LOD-based) multi-scale representation is constructed to enhance the efficiency of visualizing large numbers of boreholes. Finally, the modeling result can be loaded into a virtual globe application for 3D visualization. An implementation program, termed Borehole2KML, is developed to automatically convert borehole data into KML documents. A case study of using Borehole2KML to create borehole models in Shanghai shows that the modeling method is applicable to visualize, integrate and disseminate borehole information on the Internet. The method we have developed has potential use in societal service of geological information.

Liang-feng Zhu; Xi-feng Wang; Bing Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data from packer testing and monitoring. Authors John H. Williams and Carole D. Johnson Conference Seventh International Symposium on Borehole Geophysics for Minerals,...

147

3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The "fluid-flow tomography", an advanced technique for geoelectrical survey based on the conventional mise-a-la-masse measurement, has been developed by Exploration Geophysics Laboratory at the Kyushu University. This technique is proposed to monitor fluid-flow behavior

148

Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

Shervais, John

149

Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

SP Reidel

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

Numerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp-adaptive finite elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp elasticity Coupled problems hp-adaptive finite elements a b s t r a c t Accurate numerical simulation physical modeling combined with accurate and efficient numerical dis- cretization and solution techniques

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

152

Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

Babayev, Gulam R. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Recording and interpretation/analysis of tilt signals with five ASKANIA borehole tiltmeters at the KTB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In June 2003 a large scale injection experiment started at the Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB) in Germany. A tiltmeter array was installed which consisted of five high resolution borehole tiltmeters of the ASKANIA type also equipped with three dimensional seismometers. For the next 11 months 86 000 m 3 were injected into the KTB pilot borehole 4000 m deep. The average injection rate was approximately 200 l ? min . The research objective was to observe and to analyzedeformation caused by the injection into the upper crust at the kilometer range. A new data acquisition system was developed by Geo-Research Center Potsdam (GFZ) to master the expected huge amount of seismic and tilt data. Furthermore it was necessary to develop a new preprocessing software called PREANALYSE for long-period time series. This software includes different useful functions such as step and spike correction interpolation filtering and spectral analysis. This worldwide unique installation offers the excellent opportunity of the separation of signals due to injection and due to environment by correlation of the data of the five stations with the ground water table and meteorological data.

Andr Gebauer; Thomas Jahr; Gerhard Jentzsch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully coupled processes consisting of: thermoporoelastic deformation, hydraulic conduction, thermal osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has

155

Analysing sand-dominated channel systems for potential gas-hydrate-reservoirs using an AVO seismic inversion technique on the Southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrates have recently been recognised as a class of unconventional petroleum resource and the economic viability of gas production from hydrates is now being viewed as a realistic possibility within the next decade. Therefore, potential offshore hydrate accumulations in the world-class endowed gas hydrate province, the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, represent a significant medium- to long-term opportunity to meet the country's future energy requirements. In this paper we delineate a potential gas hydrate reservoir in the East Coast Basin, New Zealand and quantitatively estimate its gas hydrate concentrations from 2D seismic data with no well information available. The target is interesting for exploration since it shows evidence for gas-hydrate bearing sands, in particular, buried channel systems. We use a combined analysis of high-resolution velocity analysis, amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute and AVO inversion to investigate whether we can identify regions that are likely to contain highly concentrated gas hydrates and whether they are likely to be sand-dominated. To estimate hydrate concentrations we apply a rock physics model. Our results indicate the presence of several up to 200m thick zones that are likely to host gas hydrates, with one location predicted to consist of high-permeable channel sands and an inferred gas hydrate saturation of ?25%. These findings suggest significant amounts of gas hydrates may be present in high-quality reservoirs on this part of the margin.

M. Fohrmann; I.A. Pecher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

High-resolution velocity field imaging around a borehole: Excavation Damaged Zone characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the laboratory offers a large number of boreholes. These boreholes form linear excavations with a perfectly round to deploy significant resources with a large number of sensors and boreholes (Balland et al, 2009). Instead induced around a borehole drilled for survey purposes. This would involve the installation of several

Boyer, Edmond

157

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

158

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

159

Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Determination of lithology, grain size Stratigraphic/Structural: Thickness and geometry of rock strata, fracture identification Hydrological: Porosity, permeability, water saturation Thermal: Formation temperature with depth Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques: Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids

160

Fundamental solution method for reconstructing past climate change from borehole temperature gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Deep borehole temperature profiles have successfully been used to reconstruct past ground surface temperature history and the results are dependent on the inversion methods. These methods are tedious and sometimes unstable in iterative computation. In this paper, we propose a new fundamental solution method to reconstruct the past ground surface temperature variation, which depends on the assumption that ground temperature field in a homogeneous region is governed by a one-dimensional heat conductive equation. To regularize the resultant ill-conditioned linear system of equations, we apply successfully both the Tikhonov regularization technique and the generalized cross validation parameter choice rule to obtain a stable approximation solution of the ill-posed inverse problem. Our new method is stable and meshless, and it does not require iteration. We conducted idealized simulations with good results. We also used in-situ borehole data of RU-Yakutia329 from Yakutia, Siberia and CN-XZ-naqu903 from Naqu, QinghaiXizang (Tibetan) Plateau to validate our new approach. Results from these borehole studies show a warming of 0.1 and 2.3C, respectively, in the past 450years. When comparing to the results from previous studies, the RU-Yakutia329 study has the same magnitude of warming, while the magnitude of warming at Naqu is slightly smaller.

Jia Liu; Tingjun Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic ray method available. This method plays an important role in seismology, seismic exploration, and the interpretation of seismic measurements. The book presents a consistent treatment of the seismic ray method, based

Cerveny, Vlastislav

162

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Abstract Temperature data obtained in boreholes serve as critical input to many fields of engineering, exploration, and research: (1) in well completions, (2) gas and fluid production engineering, (3) in the exploration for hydrocarbons and ore minerals, and (4) for testing hypotheses concerning the evolution of the Earth's crust and tectonic processes. Wireline-conveyed maximum-recording thermometers and continuous-reading thermistors are used to measure absolute temperatures, differential

163

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

Bates, Ethan Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

166

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

167

Seismic velocity estimation from time migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Algorithms producing the seismic velocities from thethe Dix velocities and the true seismic velocities in 2D . .

Cameron, Maria Kourkina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Seismic Performance Assessment in Dense Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinematic interaction . . 4.4.2 Seismic footing response 6Deterministic seismic hazard analysis . . . . . . . . . .Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis . . . . . . . . .

Mason, Henry Benjamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

170

Data Qualification Report: Borehole Straigraphic Contacts  

SciTech Connect

The data set considered here is the borehole stratigraphic contacts data (DTN: M09811MWDGFM03.000) used as input to the Geologic Framework Model. A Technical Assessment method used to evaluate these data with a two-fold approach: (1) comparison to the geophysical logs on which the contacts were, in part, based; and (2) evaluation of the data by mapping individual units using the entire data set. Qualification of the geophysical logs is being performed in a separate activity. A representative subset of the contacts data was chosen based on importance of the contact and representativeness of that contact in the total data set. An acceptance window was established for each contact based on the needs of the data users. Data determined to be within the acceptance window were determined to be adequate for their intended use in three-dimensional spatial modeling and were recommended to be Qualified. These methods were chosen to provide a two-pronged evaluation that examines both the origin and results of the data. The result of this evaluation is a recommendation to qualify all contacts. No data were found to lie outside the pre-determined acceptance window. Where no geophysical logs are available, data were evaluated in relation to surrounding data and by impact assessment. These data are also recommended to be qualified. The stratigraphic contact data contained in this report (Attachment VII; DTN: M00004QGFMPICK.000) are intended to replace the source data, which will remain unqualified.

R.W. Clayton; C. Lum

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect

This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could make SSR surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive, particularly when geophone intervals of 25 cm or less are required. The most recent research analyzed the difference in seismic response of the geophones with variable geophone spike length and geophones attached to various steel media. Experiments investigated the azimuthal dependence of the quality of data relative to the orientation of the rigidly attached geophones. Other experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the data are being amplified in much the same way that an organ pipe amplifies sound have so far proved inconclusive. Taken together, the positive results show that SSR imaging within a few meters of the earth's surface is possible if the geology is suitable, that SSR imaging can complement GPR imaging, and that SSR imaging could be made significantly more cost effective, at least in areas where the topography and the geology are favorable. Increased knowledge of the Earth's shallow subsurface through non-intrusive techniques is of potential benefit to management of DOE facilities. Among the most significant problems facing hydrologists today is the delineation of preferential permeability paths in sufficient detail to make a quantitative analysis possible. Aquifer systems dominated by fracture flow have a reputation of being particularly difficult to characterize and model. At chemically contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and others at Department of Defense (DOD) installations worldwide, establishing the spatial extent of the contamination, along with the fate of the contaminants and their transport-flow directions, is essential to the development of effective cleanup strategies. Detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface is important not only in environmental, groundwater, and geotechnical engineering applications, but also in neotectonics, mining geology, and the analysis of petroleum reservoir analogs. Near-surface seismology is in the vanguard of non-intrusive approaches to increase knowledge of the shallow subsurface; our

Steeples, Don W.

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

Detailed surface co-seismic displacement of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in western Taiwan and implication of fault geometry in the shallow subsurface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the surface. The predicted thrust geometry is in good agreement with borehole data derived from two drilling segment of the Chelungpu Fault shows an unusually large co-seismic displacement from the event of the Mw 7 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Large earthquakes generated by thrust

Lee, Jian-Cheng

173

Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 90, 6, pp. 15281534, December 2000 Spatial Correlation of Seismic Slip at the HDR-Soultz Geothermal Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injection well at Soultz-sou-Fore^ts Hot Dry Rock geothermal site (Alsace, France). Variograms obtained Correlation of Seismic Slip at the HDR-Soultz Geothermal Site: Qualitative Approach by Peter Starzec, Michael of fractures in a borehole. We found that variograms exhibiting spatial dependency correlated well with zones

174

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012) 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2011 - 2012 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Map hydraulic structure within the field from seismic data Notes 2011: 16 years of seismicity were analyzed to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated since the 1980's. 2012: 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field were relocated using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for

175

Research and Application of Auger-air Drilling and Sieve Tube Borehole Protection in Soft Outburst-prone Coal Seams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hole accidents during drilling and borehole collapse during extracting are bottlenecks restricting gas drainage efficiency in soft outburst-prone coal seams in China. The auger-air combined drilling technique and sieve tube mounting method are an alternative solution to these technology bottlenecks. The auger-air drilling technique combines the advantages of dry style auger drilling and air drilling. Specially designed blade in drill rod can stir up large particles of coal so that large particles can be brought to ground smoothly using compressed air and is efficient to prevent borehole accidents. After drilling is completed, the sieve tube is tripped in through the inner hole of drilling pipes, and then lifting up drilling pipes, the tube sieve will provide a complete tunnel for gas extraction. Field application proves that with proper drilling parameter selection and appropriate tube install control, it is more promising to double drilling depth and raise gas drainage efficiency.

Ji Qianhui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Borehole breakdown pressure with drilling fluidsI. Empirical results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mining and civil engineering industries sometimes use drilling muds for stabilizing a borehole during drilling wells for methane drainage, geothermal energy and radioactive waste disposal. Standard theories predicting borehole breakdown pressure assume breakdown occurs when a small fracture initiates at a location where the largest tangential stress at the borehole reaches the tensile strength of formation. Fracturing tests conducted in this study, however, showed that when drilling fluid was used as an injection fluid, borehole breakdown did not occur even if a fracture initiated at a borehole wall. Borehole breakdown occurred when the initiated fracture became unstable after significant growth [with 0.76 cm (0.3 in.) to 7.62 cm (3 in.) in length]. The test results showed that all drilling muds had a tendency to seal narrow natural fractures or fractures induced by high borehole pressure. The sealing effect of the mud stabilized fractures and prevented fracture propagation. This effect is one of the primary factors for controlling wellbore stability. In this work [1], more than 40 large rock samples [76.2 76.2 76.2 cm (30 30 30 in.)] were fractured to test the drilling fluid effect on fracture initiation and fracture propagation around a borehole. The results show that borehole breakdown pressure is highly dependent on the Young's modulus of the formation, wellbore size and type of the drilling fluids. Note that the conventional linear wellbore stability theory has ignored all these facts. The results of this experiment are intended to apply to the lost circulation problems from an induced fracture or to the interpretation of the in situ stress measurements with gelled fluids where drilling or fracturing fluids contain significant amount of solid components. Similar phenomena occur for the standard hydraulic fracturing fluids; however, the process zone and the high flow friction at the narrow fracture tip become as important as the gel and solid plugging effect shown in this paper. Hence, the results should be modified before being applied to standard fracturing fluids.

N. Morita; A.D. Black; G.-F. Fuh

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Seismic Isolation and Decrease of Seismic Effects on Bridges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A planned road bridge in an active seismic zone near the city of ilina in Slovakia was analysed for seismic effects. The seismic analysis has shown that an inelastic structural ... is very likely. Because of the...

Associate Professor Rudolf roch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Seismic anisotropy in the crystalline upper crust: observations and modelling from the Outokumpu scientific borehole, Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......anisotropy of schists and shales, J. geophys. Res., 111...A review of wave motion in anisotropic and cracked elastic-media...1994. Overall properties of anisotropic materials containing cracks...R., 1997. Ultrasonic anisotropic phase velocity determination......

Heather Schijns; Douglas R. Schmitt; Pekka J. Heikkinen; Ilmo T. Kukkonen

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

m has weathered into unconsolidated saprolite that maintains4): (1) weathered saprolite (or unconsolidated bedrock); (2)interfaces between unconsolidated and consolidated bedrock,

Chen, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Spatial distribution of shear wave anisotropy in the crust of the southern Hyogo region by borehole observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......resulting in a large apparent intensity...also suggests that borehole waveforms with a...earthquake from a large number of high-quality...in particular borehole data. At stations...the active fault drilling borehole at Nojima Hirabayashi......

Takashi Mizuno; Kiyoshi Yomogida; Hisao Ito; Yasuto Kuwahara

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......penetration depth is large against the depth of the borehole magnetometer. As...neither influence the borehole measurements, since the drilling did not encounter...surrounding the drilling site. 9 Conclusions The borehole in Konigshofen provided......

Ulrich Schmucker; Klaus Spitzer; Erich Steveling

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Seismic characterization of fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic characterization of fractures. Jos M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

JM Carcione

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

184

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

185

Seismic design technology for Breeder Reactor structures. Volume 3: special topics in reactor structures  

SciTech Connect

This volume is divided into six chapters: analysis techniques, equivalent damping values, probabilistic design factors, design verifications, equivalent response cycles for fatigue analysis, and seismic isolation. (JDB)

Reddy, D.P. (ed)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Chapter 13 - Plugging In-Mine Boreholes and CBM Wells Drilled from Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Horizontal degasification boreholes drilled from within the mine or from the surface have proven to be effective in recovering coalbed methane (CBM) for degasification and commercial marketing. However, the inability to completely plug horizontal boreholes still producing gas prior to mine through has caused unsafe situations and significant coal production delays. To date, cement slurry has commonly been used to plug underground horizontal degasification boreholes CBM wells, including sidetracks. Over 546,000gallons of cross-linked polymer gel has been pumped to seal these 80 boreholes. The quantity of gel pumped is almost two times the calculated volume of the boreholes, including sidetracks. The gel effectively flows into the fracture system of the coal displacing gas and water. Finally, with an affinity to attach itself to everything, except for itself, the gel adhered to the inner wall of the borehole providing an impenetrable skin, minimizing gas, and water migrating back into the borehole as evidenced by mining into the boreholes.

Gary DuBois; Stephen Kravits; Joe Kirley; Doug Conklin; Joanne Reilly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Seismic fragility estimates for reinforced concrete framed buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the GLD RC frame buildings, the columns of the 2 and 3 story buildings are retrofitted by column strengthening. Fragility estimates developed for the retrofitted buildings show the effectiveness of the retrofit technique by the improved seismic performance...

Ramamoorthy, Sathish Kumar

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Methods for enhancing the efficiency of creating a borehole using high power laser systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena to enhance the formation of Boreholes. Methods for the laser operations to reduce the critical path for forming a borehole in the earth. These methods can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

Zediker, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Seismic image waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......involved in the seismic imaging process, for example the migration...revisited, 60th Ann. Int. Mtg., Soc. Expl. Geophys...involved in the seismic imaging process, for example the migration...revisited, 60th Ann. Int. Mtg., SOC. Expl. Geophys......

Peter Hubral; Martin Tygel; Jrg Schleicher

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Methods and apparatus for removal and control of material in laser drilling of a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of material from the path of a high power laser beam during down hole laser operations including drilling of a borehole and removal of displaced laser effected borehole material from the borehole during laser operations. In particular, paths, dynamics and parameters of fluid flows for use in conjunction with a laser bottom hole assembly.

Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O; Moxley, Joel F

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

On the imaging of radio-frequency electromagnetic data forcross-borehole mineral exploration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the subsurface. borehole|electromagnetic...determine future drilling or excavation targets...the Chinese JW-4 borehole electric-field...targets are rare. The large conductivity contrast...the transmitter borehole (Fig. 12). The...separations much larger than a characteristic......

L. Yu; M. Chouteau; D. E. Boerner; J. Wang

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analysis of Heat Flow DataI Detailed Observations in a Single Borehole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......determination of a single borehole may be considerablygreater...selected30-msection of borehole may yield a useful heat...Resourcesfor financing the drilling of the borehole; to the National Research...for pointing out the large amount of climatic information......

A. E. Beck; A. S. Judge

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Deep borehole log evidence for fractal distribution of fractures in crystalline rock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as well as large scale-lengths...fractures seen in drilling cores and...register on a borehole scanning...rock in the borehole wall. In...evidence in the drilling logs or retrieved...core that large-scale fractures...samples, and drilling history...control the large-scale trend...sensitive to borehole lithology......

Peter Leary

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks, including Buildings Tom Egill Hauksson #12;SCSN: what does it encompass? · ~360 Seismic Stations · ~60 stations from partners SCSN/SCEDC total of ~26 FTE's #12;Crowd Sourced Networks · Current broadband seismic network

Greer, Julia R.

196

Volcanic eruption through a geothermal borehole at Nmafjall, Iceland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE eruption on 8 September 1977 in the Nmaf jail geothermal field was a part of a rifting event that took place during that day, ... the main rifting took place south of the caldera, just north of the Nmaf jail geothermal field. We give here a short account of this event and the borehole eruption. ...

Gudrn Larsen; Karl Grnvold; Sigurdur Thorarinsson

1979-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Apparatus for vibrating a pipe string in a borehole  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for vibrating a drill string having a central axis in a borehole. The apparatus comprising means for generating at a downhole location longitudinally directional vibrations along the central axis of the drill string in response to flow of fluid through the interior of the drill string and a shock absorbing element mounted in the drill string between the apparatus and a drill bit carried by the drill string effective to substantially isolate the drill bit from the vibration induced in the drill string. Also described is a method of feeding a drill string through a mon-vertical section of borehole comprising: generating a downhole location a longitudinally directional vibration along the central axis of the drill string by oscillating a body in a axial direction relative to the drill string in response to flow of fluid through the interior of the drill string. The vibrations preventing frictional sticking of the drill string against the borehole wall; isolating a drill bit at the end of the drill string from the effects of the vibration during drilling operations; and moving the pipe longitudinally in the borehole.

Worrall, R.N.; Stulemeijer, I.P.J.M.

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

Distributed Acoustic and Seismic Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An overview of fiber optic distributed acoustic and seismic sensor system architectures is presented.

Kirkendall, Clay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

202

Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

Burns, Daniel R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

204

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E . , and S. Keydar, 1998, Seismic monitoring of diffractionthe barrel. The Resonant Seismic Emission Source ReceiverFigure 1. Geometry o f the seismic experiment to locate a

Korneev, Valeri A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

SEI0: CENS Seismic Research: Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

catastrophe (from Berry 2002). Seismic waves show a smearedSeismology/index.html CENS Seismic Research: OverviewRecent developments in seismic source theory argue that

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Seismic demands in precast concrete diaphragms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mander, J. B. (2003). Seismic Performance of PrecastState-of-the-Art Report on Seismic Resistance of Prestresseddevelopment of a diaphragm seismic design methodology, PCI

Schoettler, Matthew John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401371

209

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401360"

210

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle Heimgartner, James B. Scott, Weston Thelen, Christopher R. Lopez, John N. Louie (2005) Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Refraction_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Heimgartner,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=401382

211

Neural network modelling and classification of lithofacies using well log data: A case study from KTB borehole site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......study from KTB borehole site Saumen Maiti...Continental Deep Drilling Project (KTB...from the KTB borehole log data and...and require a large amount of data...Continental Deep Drilling Project (KTB...the problems of borehole geophysics...to interpret large amount of borehole......

Saumen Maiti; Ram Krishna Tiwari; Hans-Joachim Kmpel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

18 - Seismic Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The damages and disruptions of the subsea pipelines caused by an earthquake may have severe effects on the service life, since it may lead to a significant financial loss due to service interruptions, fires, explosions, and environmental contamination. In general, the seismic analyses of the permanent ground deformation for buried and unburied pipes, and seismic ground waves for unburied pipes are required for designing pipeline systems. Many subsea pipelines are often buried for stability and mechanical protection in the shallow water area; otherwise, they are laid on the seabed. This chapter addresses available seismic design codes, standards and design criteria for subsea pipelines, a general design and analysis methodology for fault crossing and seismic ground wave, design and analysis examples using a static model for buried pipe subjected to permanent ground deformations due to the foundation failure, a time history dynamic model for unburied pipelines subjected to seismic ground waves, the mitigation methods for subsea pipelines to avoid seismic hazards including modifying loading and boundary conditions, modifying pipeline configuration, modifying pipeline route selection, and improving emergency response.

Qiang Bai; Yong Bai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Chapter 5 - Seismic Attribute Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Seismic attributes are the geometry, kinematics, dynamics, and statistical characteristics of seismic waves, which are extracted or derived from prestack and poststack seismic data by mathematical transformation. For a long time, seismic data only have been used to track lineups of seismic waves in order to delineate the geometry and structural characteristics of oil and gas reservoirs. In fact, there is rich information about lithology, physical properties, and fluid composition hidden in seismic data. As we all know, the characteristics of the seismic signal are caused by petrophysical characteristics and its variability. Geoscientists need to do seismic attribute analyses and calibration in order to eliminate data distortion and dig out lithological and physical properties hidden in seismic data. Especially when people are eager to cognize the heterogeneity of lithological and stratigraphic reservoirs, the rich information about the spatial variability in seismic data seems more precious. In recent years, with the advancement of reservoir interpretation and the needs of three dimensional (3-D) seismic data analysis, scientists have found out more and more new attributes on the basis of conventional seismic attributes. At the same time, methods and means used for the calculation and analysis of seismic attributes are increasing. Seismic attribute analysis has been successfully applied in reservoir lithological prediction, hydrocarbon potential prediction, and reservoir property estimates.

Ming Li; Yimin Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Bore-hole survey at Camp Century, 1989  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A combination of the directional surveys of the Camp Century borehole from 1966, 1967, 1969 and 1989 has revealed a deformation pattern similar to that measured at Dye-3, South Greenland and Byrd Station, Antarctica showing high deformation rate for Wisconsin ice. Compared to the Dye-3 profile, the deformation shows the same pattern even in details. The surface velocity obtained by integrating the bore hole deformation is in agreement with that obtained from satellite measurements.

N.S Gundestrup; D Dahl-Jensen; B.L Hansen; J Kelty

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Stability analysis of a borehole wall during horizontal directional drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, numerical simulation strategies are proposed and numerical analyses are performed to investigate the stability of a borehole wall during horizontal directional drilling in loose sand with an emphasis on the role of the filter cake in borehole stability. Two computational scenarios, one in the absence of a filter cake and one with the presence of a filter cake in a borehole wall, are investigated by considering both deep and shallow borehole situations. In the case where no filter cake is formed, the soildrilling fluid interaction analysis shows that the effective pressure on soil particles will quickly decrease to zero even at a low drilling fluid pressure because of the rapid drainage of the drilling fluids into the loose sands. This conforms to the classical liquefaction criterion, indicating that static (flow) liquefaction-based soil crumbling and sloughing will occur even at a very low drilling fluid pressure if an effective filter cake is not formed. Soils permeability effect on pore pressure and the transition to a steady flow are also studied. In the second scenario in which a filter cake is formed, the hydraulic fracture failures around the bores are investigated, which are caused by the expansion of the yielding zones. The yield zone sizes and critical drilling fluid pressures at the moment of hydraulic fracturing failure are calculated from the finite element analyses and the closed-form solution, which is based on classical plasticity theories. The critical fluid pressures from the finite element analyses and the closed-form solutions are very close, but there is a large discrepancy between the yield zone sizes.

X. Wang; R.L. Sterling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Shevenell & De Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=401374" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

217

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

218

Seismic response study for base-isolated CANDU 3  

SciTech Connect

The design of the CANDU 3 nuclear power plant rated at 450 MW of net output power is being developed by AECL. During the development of the CANDU 3 design, various design options including the use of seismic isolator bearings are considered to mitigate effects of seismic loads. The current design of CANDU 3 is of fixed-base construction. However, analytical studies are undertaken to determine the effects of using seismic isolation. This paper presents a study of the benefits of using seismic isolator bearings for the CANDU 3 nuclear power plant. To base-isolate the CANDU 3 plant, the reactor and other safety-related buildings would be located on a common mat isolated from the foundation with the use of elastomeric bearings. Seismic analyses are performed to predict the behavior of the structures. A mathematical model consisting of lumped masses and beams to represent different buildings of the CANDU 3 plant is considered in the analysis. The model considers the nonlinear characteristics of the elastomeric bearing. Nonlinear time-history analyses are performed to determine the seismic responses. The acceleration, displacement and floor response spectra of different buildings are determined for both the fixed-base and base-isolated cases. The results show that the use of seismic isolation would reduce the acceleration responses of the buildings significantly. However, the displacement responses of the buildings would be increased which would require special considerations for interconnected systems. Moreover, it is shown that the floor response spectra would be reduced drastically for a base-isolated structure as compared with a fixed-base structure. This reduction of seismic responses would be of considerable benefit for the design of structures and seismic qualification of components. Lastly, a parametric study is performed to determine the effect of varying seismic input using non-linear analysis techniques.

Biswas, J.K.; Saudy, A.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Civil Engineering Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

220

A real-time borehole correction of electromagnetic wave resistivity logging while drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The response of electromagnetic wave logging while drilling is influenced greatly by borehole and drilling fluid resistivity when the size of borehole is relatively large and drilling fluid resistivity is low. Borehole radius and drilling fluid resistivity were introduced to obtain more accurate transformed resistivity on the basis of the commonly used resistivity transformation model. The influence of borehole was considered in the newly established three dimensional transformation model, and a new borehole correction method was proposed. The resistivity transformation database can be established by calculation according to a certain instrument, and the true resistivity is obtained by three dimensional interpolation search technology of real-time correction in practical use. The results of numerical simulation and modeling verification show that the transformed resistivity by real-time correction coincides with the resistivity corrected by charts. The method can eliminate the borehole influence, reduce calculation dimension, and improve the inversion efficiency of highly deviated and horizontal wells logging data.

Zhen YANG; Jinzhou YANG; Laiju HAN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Controllable seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

The contribution of pattern recognition of seismic and morphostructural data to seismic hazard assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reliable statistical characterization of the spatial and temporal properties of large earthquakes occurrence is one of the most debated issues in seismic hazard assessment, due to the unavoidably limited observations from past events. We show that pattern recognition techniques, which are designed in a formal and testable way, may provide significant space-time constraints about impending strong earthquakes. This information, when combined with physically sound methods for ground shaking computation, like the neo-deterministic approach (NDSHA), may produce effectively preventive seismic hazard maps. Pattern recognition analysis of morphostructural data provide quantitative and systematic criteria for identifying the areas prone to the largest events, taking into account a wide set of possible geophysical and geological data, whilst the formal identification of precursory seismicity patterns (by means of CN and M8S algorithms), duly validated by prospective testing, provides useful constraints about impend...

Peresan, Antonella; Soloviev, Alexander; Panza, Giuliano F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Solid Earth Geophysics Harsh Gupta-3046 USA E-mail: vernon.cormier@uconn.edu Tel: 860-486-3547 Fax: 860-486-3346 #12;SEISMIC VISCOELASTIC ATTENUATION Synonyms Seismic intrinsic attenuation Definitions Linear viscoelastic attenuation. The loss

Cormier, Vernon F.

225

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement (more)

Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included.

Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment in Peru: Results From a Wireless Seismic Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensing Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment in Peru:results from a wireless seismic Network Igor Stubailo,deployed in Peru. UCLA seismic line in Peru Lake Titicaca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reconstruction of microseismogram from various waves in a borehole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. D. Neve s (Member) T. W. encer (M ber) T. R. Fischer (Member) W. B. Jones, Jr. (Head of Department) August 1983 ABSTRACT Reconstruct1on of Microseismograms from Various Waves in a Borehole (August 1983) Soetjipno Soetandio, B. S. , Texas... function in time-domain Source function in frequency-domain 20 21 Laplace contour in the complex w-plane and the singularities in the k - plane z 23 Compressional and shear wave travel paths . 26 Location of Bessel functions arguments 28 Acoustic...

Soetandio, Soetjipno

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Geothermal Prospecting Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Use of Geophysical Techniques...

233

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

234

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored.

235

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

236

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

237

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital

238

Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic monitoring is a technique to seismically image an area utilizing earthquakes originating from distances greater than 1,000 km from the measurement site.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A teleseism is the tremor caused by an earthquake that is very far away. According to the USGS, the term, teleseismic refers to earthquakes that occur more than 1000 km from the measurement site. Often teleseismic events can be picked up only by seismometers that are in low background noise locations; whereas, in general, a tremor of a magnitude 5.3 earthquake can be seen anywhere in the world with modern seismic

239

Seismic protection of critical infrastructures through innovative technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of new technologies for seismic protection will better support the sustainable urban systems. The paper focuses on development of an innovative technology for seismic protection of bridges using smart materials. The seismic protection of structures with the use of special devices is widely accepted as a very effective technique, both for new constructions and for retrofitting of existing ones. Shape memory alloys show the potential to eliminate the limitations of the present technologies, presenting broader application domain. Damper cum restraining device with recentering capabilities has been developed within the laboratory and shake table experiments were conducted on an equivalent SDOF system for a specific narrow band spectrum. The model was subjected to a strong resonant earthquake ground motion in the horizontal direction and analytical investigations were carried out. The damper is found to be very effective for seismic performance enhancement of critical facilities like bridges offering great benefits for the sustainable development of urban systems.

R. Sreekala; N. Gopalakrishnan; K. Muthumani; K. Sathishkumar; G.V. Rama Rao; Nagesh R. Iyer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989  

SciTech Connect

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Wave propagation along a cylindrical borehole in an anisotropic poroelastic solid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......borehole is filled with liquid. anisotropic|borehole|dispersion...porous solid. Generally, anisotropic parameters characterize the...felt to be necessary. Since shale and finely layered sedimentary...which is not possible in an anisotropic medium. The waves are quasi-waves......

Anil K. Vashishth; Poonam Khurana

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analysis of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in elastic formations using a perturbation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underbalance drilling in the pres- ence of large tectonic stresses, can cause complex perturbationsAnalysis of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in elastic formations using a perturbation model a perturbation model to obtain flexural mode dispersions of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in homogeneous

Simsek, Ergun

244

The Determination of Virgin Strata Temperatures from Observations in Deep Survey Boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Hopton Pool Borehole changed in diameter...temperature of the drilling fluid for differentboreholes...effect of a larger hole in rock...the hole was large in diameter in the Hopton Pool Borehole at least 27...virgin strata and drilling fluid temperatures......

L. R. Cooper; C. Jones

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geochemistry of Samples from Borehole C3177(299-E24-21)  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of geochemical and physical property analyses of twelve samples from the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) borehole #2. The borehole is in the middle of the 200 East Area, at the northeast corner of the ILAW disposal site.

Horton, Duane G.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Parker, Kent E.

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating within a borehole an intermittent low frequency vibration that propagates as a tube wave longitudinally to the borehole and induces a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the borehole; generating within the borehole a sequence of high frequency pulses directed such that they travel longitudinally to the borehole within the surrounding material; and receiving, at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole, a signal that includes components from the low frequency vibration and the sequence of high frequency pulses during intermittent generation of the low frequency vibration, to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

Borehole Geologic Data for the 216-Z Crib Facilities, A Status of Data Assembled through the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assembling existing borehole geologic information to aid in determining the distribution and potential movement of contaminants released to the environment and to aid selection of remedial alternatives. This information is being assembled via the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS), which is being developed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, managed by PNNL, and the Remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this particular study was to assemble the existing borehole geologic data pertaining to sediments underlying the 216-Z Crib Facilities and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Zone. The primary objective for Fiscal Year 2006 was to assemble the data, complete log plots, and interpret the location of major geologic contacts for each major borehole in and around the primary disposal facilities that received carbon tetrachloride. To date, 154 boreholes located within or immediately adjacent to 19 of the 216-Z crib facilities have been incorporated into HBGIS. Borehole geologic information for the remaining three Z-crib facilities is either lacking (e.g. 216-Z-13, -14, and -15), or has been identified as a lesser priority to be incorporated at a later date.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local,

249

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

250

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The

251

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our passive seismic survey revealed a surprisingly high and sustained activity of local seismic events originating within the crust of Kilauea Iki. We recorded about 8000 events in a single day of operation at nail 17 with a seismograph having a peak magnification of 280,000 at 60 Hz (Fig. 10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii

252

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park_Area_(Janik_%26_Mclaren,_2010)&oldid=425654"

253

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

254

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

255

Measurement of 238U, 232Th and 40K in boreholes at Gosa and Lugbe, Abuja, north central Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......concentrations at Site A borehole for 238U have a mean...concentrations at Site B borehole for 238U have a mean...earth crust which to a large extent constitute the...sources come from the borehole/aquifer-bearing...treatment and during drilling processes; it cuts......

Omeje Maxwell; Husin Wagiran; Noorddin Ibrahim; Siak Kuan Lee; Soheil Sabri

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. , and Z. Wang, 1992, Seismic properties of pore ?uids:2005, Relationships between seismic and hydrological proper-by d/dt ? ? / ? t ? u ?. Seismic stimulation Biot, M. A. ,

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling Three-Dimensional Upper Mantle Seismic Anisotropy with Higher Mode Surface Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic Anisotropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Seismic Wave Propagation in a Weakly Anisotropicof seismic anisotropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Yuan, Kaiqing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Category: NEPA Resources...

259

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

260

Room Q data report: Test borehole data from April 1989 through November 1991  

SciTech Connect

Pore-pressure and fluid-flow tests were performed in 15 boreholes drilled into the bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation from within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The tests measured fluid flow and pore pressure within the Salado. The boreholes were drilled into the previously undisturbed host rock around a proposed cylindrical test room, Room Q, located on the west side of the facility about 655 m below ground surface. The boreholes were about 23 m deep and ranged over 27.5 m of stratigraphy. They were completed and instrumented before excavation of Room Q. Tests were conducted in isolated zones at the end of each borehole. Three groups of 5 isolated zones extend above, below, and to the north of Room Q at increasing distances from the room axis. Measurements recorded before, during, and after the mining of the circular test room provided data about borehole closure, pressure, temperature, and brine seepage into the isolated zones. The effects of the circular excavation were recorded. This data report presents the data collected from the borehole test zones between April 25, 1989 and November 25, 1991. The report also describes test development, test equipment, and borehole drilling operations.

Jensen, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howard, C.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Peterson, T.P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

Mammadova, Elnara

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

263

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori- entations and intensity anisotropy as a routine technique for fracture characterization is partly because of its inability to pro- vide information about sizes and vol- ume of fractures. Although both grain-scale micro

Edinburgh, University of

264

Induced Seismicity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Induced Seismicity Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

265

Crosswell seismic study in a seismically poor data area  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell traveltime tomography and reflection imaging assisted a reservoir characterization effort in an area of poor-quality surface seismic data. Both the tomogram and the reflection image proved useful in the description of the fractured reservoir interval. The velocity tomogram shows that: (1) the vertical resolution was sufficient to identify and characterize a 50-ft (15 m) thick lithological unit of brittle rocks, which was the most important interval for the characterization of this fractured reservoir; (2) different lithological units present sufficient velocity contrast to be identifiable on the tomogram; and (3) the tomogram velocity is higher than the sonic velocity implying that the rocks in the interwell area may be anisotropic. Correlation of the lithologies with the tomogram implies that the major controlling factor of the anisotropy is the shale content in the formation. The crosswell reflection image, generated by a VSP-CDP mapping technique defines the fractured reservoir interval in terms of high-frequency reflections. The lateral resolution of this reflection image is difficult to define because the survey coverage is nonuniform as a result of the receiver spacing being much larger than the source spacing. The dips of the reflections do not quite agree with the dips that are inferred from well log ties. The authors believe this disagreement is a result of the anisotropy of the medium and the use of an isotropic imaging algorithm. Improved data acquisition (finer spatial sampling) that would allow better wavefield separation techniques to be used would probably have produced higher quality crosswell reflection images.

Lee, D.S.; Walden, A.F. [Unocal Corp., Brea, CA (United States)] [Unocal Corp., Brea, CA (United States); Lazaratos, S.K. [Tomoseis Inc., Houston, TX (United States)] [Tomoseis Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Borehole data package for the 100-K area ground water wells, CY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Borehole, hydrogeologic and geophysical logs, drilling, as-built diagrams, sampling, and well construction information and data for RCRA compliant groundwater monitoring wells installed in CY 1994 at the 100-K Basins.

Williams, B.A.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

269

SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING Norimitsu Nakata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING by Norimitsu Nakata #12;c Copyright by Norimitsu Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has

Snieder, Roel

270

Test instructions for the horizontal borehole demonstration at the Near-Surface Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This test outlines the planned activities designed to demonstrate the horizontal borehole drilling and testing operations at the Near Surface Test Facility prior to the performance of these methods within the Exploratory Shaft underground facility. This document will also lead to establishing the operating and safety procedures which will be implemented in the Exploratory Shaft long exploratory borehole drilling and testing program. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

McLellan, G.W. (Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (USA). Energy Systems Group)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A multi-physics, integrated approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the immediate vicinity of the wellbore. Examples are shown of the estimation of porosity, absolute permeability, effective porosity, and absolute permeability. Similarly, sonic logs are used to assess mechanical, permeability anisotropy, and initial water saturation using combinations of electromagnetic logs, formation

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

272

A Coulomb stress model for induced seismicity distribution due to fluid injection and withdrawal in deep boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plane of maximum cumulative Coulomb stress...that used in the field injection experiments...equivalent manner, to oil/gas withdrawal...the injection and production wells (over 650...differences in the stress field changes for injection...the regional stress field, as the injection......

Antonio Troiano; Maria Giulia Di Giuseppe; Claudia Troise; Anna Tramelli; Giuseppe De Natale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Coulomb stress model for induced seismicity distribution due to fluid injection and withdrawal in deep boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......seismology| INTRODUCTION Geothermal resources represent...fossil fuels. Enhanced geothermal system (EGS) technologies...powerful way to produce geothermal electric energy in almost every area...depending on the drilling costs needed to reach a suitable......

Antonio Troiano; Maria Giulia Di Giuseppe; Claudia Troise; Anna Tramelli; Giuseppe De Natale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Direct-Current Resistivity At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Central Nevada Seismic At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

276

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New

277

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401370"

278

Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden"

279

Instruments and Methods New technique for access-borehole drilling in shelf glaciers using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is penetration through hours for penetration through 200 m of ice, (2) installation of sensors up to 120 mm in diameter and (3 require lightweight, rapid-rate drilling equipment and a low logistical burden. A small drilling team

Howat, Ian M.

280

Preliminary Characterization of a NAPL-Contaminated Site using Borehole Geophysical Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preliminary results from an on-going geophysical investigation of the former DOE Pinel- las site, a site and side-effects from previous remediation activities. Continuing research at the Pinellas site will focus presents preliminary results from our on-going geophysical investigation of a former U.S. Department

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most...

282

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A broadband seismic and infrasound array deployment at MountNumerical experiments . . . . . . . .1. Seismic- acousticFigure 3.2: Infrasonic and seismic waveforms at CDWR for an

Matoza, Robin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Priestley M.J.N. (1992). Seismic Design of Reinforced2007). Displacement Based Seismic Design of Structures.318-99 Provisions for Seismic Design of Structural Walls.

Panagiotou, Marios

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

286

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature

287

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In December 1997 LBNL obtained a VSP in well 46-28 to determine the seismic reflectivity in the area and to obtain velocity information for the design and potential processing of the proposed 3-D seismic survey Feighner et al. (1998). Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. References M. Feighner, R. Gritto, T. M. Daley, H. Keers, E. L. Majer (1999)

288

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys Notes Different migration procedures were applied to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data. After carefully preprocessing seismic data, the 2-D and 2.5-D pre-stack depth migration of line 109 in the Coso Geothermal Field shows a well defined reflector at about 16,000 ft depth. Compared to the 2-D pre-stack migrated image, the 2.5-D pre-stack migrated image

289

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

290

Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating a first low frequency acoustic wave within the borehole, wherein the first low frequency acoustic wave induces a linear and a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a radius of the borehole; directing a first sequence of high frequency pulses in a direction perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the borehole into the material contemporaneously with the first acoustic wave; and receiving one or more second high frequency pulses at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole produced by an interaction between the first sequence of high frequency pulses and the one or more features undergoing linear and nonlinear elastic distortion due to the first low frequency acoustic wave to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

How to Remedy Non-optimal Seismic Data by Seismic Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic data processing mostly takes into account the ... be done by subtractive coherency filtering. Multiple seismic reflections also can be suppressed by this...

J. Fertig; M. Thomas; R. Thomas

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Three Dimensional Non-linear Anisotropic Thermo-Chemo-Poro-Elastoplastic Modelling of Borehole Stability in Chemically Active Rocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Borehole stability problems are mostly encountered when drilling through chemically active formations such as shales. Shales are highly laminated rocks with transversely isotropic behaviour, and (more)

Roshan, Hamid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Interactive seismic facies classification using textural attributes and neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between seismic data, seismic facies, environment of deposition (EOD), and rock property relationships. Here, typical deepwater...between seismic data, seismic facies, environment of deposition (EOD), and rock property relationships. Here, typical deepwater...

Brian P. West; Steve R. May; John E. Eastwood; Christine Rossen

296

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Analyze seismic data to develop reservoir models that characterize the geothermal system Notes Large-amplitude, secondary arrivals are modeled as scattering anomalies. Polarization and ray tracing methods determine the orientation and location of the scattering body. Two models are proposed for the scatterer: (1) a point scatterer located anywhere in a one-dimensional (1-D), layered velocity model; and (2) a dipping interface between two homogeneous half

297

Comparison between seismic retrofitting solutions for existing reinforced concrete buildings: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In assessing the safety of existing buildings, the specific actions dedicated to the knowledge of the structure delineate the parameters of the linear or non-linear analysis aimed at identifying the most appropriate structural intervention. In this context, the present paper collects the seismic analysis of a school building in reinforced concrete, illustrating the different stages concerning the acquisition of geometrical and mechanical data, problems about structural modelling and the features of the seismic retrofitting proposed. In closing, a critical comparison between the results derived from some techniques frequently used to seismically improve existing structures.

Francesco Porco; Andrea Fiore; Siro Casolo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Remotely sensing the thickness of the Bushveld Complex UG2 platinum reef using borehole radar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The planar, 80 cm thick, lossy dielectric reefs of the Bushveld are embedded in rocks that are almost transparent at ground penetrating radar frequencies of 10125 MHz. Pothole sensing practices are based largely on using borehole radars to observe departures of the reefs from planarity. Surveys are run in ~200 m near-horizontal boreholes that are drilled into the footwalls of the reef. Careful laboratory measurements of the Jonscher dielectric parameters of the stratigraphic column through the UG2 reef are translated by electro-dynamic modelling into a prediction that platinum reef thinning can be sensed remotely by footwall borehole radars. This proposition sheds light on the results of a recent borehole radar survey that was shot in ~180 m long AXT (48 mm diameter) boreholes. Areas of sub-economical UG2 thickness (typically less than ~50 cm) were mapped by studying the relative amplitudes of echoes from the reef and a pyroxeniteanorthosite interface in its hanging wall, with the radar deployed beneath the UG2 in its footwall.

C M Simmat; P Le R Herselman; M Rtschlin; I M Mason; J H Cloete

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

How can Seismics, Especially Active, Assist in Geothermal Energy Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, many possibilities exist where seismics, especially active seismics, may be helpful in the utilization of geothermal energy.

Th. Krey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic energy are consistent with independent measurements, where available. We find no dependence in individual seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment, J. Geophys

Prieto, Germán A.

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301

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Numerous geophysical logs have been made in three deep wells and in several intermediate depth core holes in the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho. Laboratory analyses of cores from the intermediate depth holes were used to provide a qualitative and quantitative basis for a detailed interpretation of logs from the shallow part of the reservoir. A less detailed interpretation of logs from the deeper part of the reservoir

302

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Seismic Attribute Analysis Using Higher Order Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic data processing depends on mathematical and statistical tools such as convolution, crosscorrelation and stack that employ second-order statistics (SOS). Seismic signals are non-Gaussian and therefore contain information beyond SOS. One...

Greenidge, Janelle Candice

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Seismic imaging using higher order statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in seismic resolution beyond typical seismic wavelength will have significant implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production. Conventional imaging algorithms can be derived as a least squared optimization problem in which...

Srinivasan, Karthik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Lumped Model for a Seismic Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article A Lumped Model for a Seismic Source M. S. Giammarinaro S. Micciancio...parameters are dimensionless and describe: the seismic wave quality factor of the medium (Q...results are: (i) the system exhibits a seismic or an aseismic steady state solution...

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Petr Bulant, Charles University in Prague, Jol H. Le Calvez*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Not performing accurate borehole deviation surveys for hydraulic fracture monitoring (HFM) and neglecting fracture parameters. Introduction Recently a large number of hydraulic fracture treatments have been

Cerveny, Vlastislav

309

Seismic scattering in the subduction zone of the Middle America region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vi 4 Scattering of seismic waves in heterogenousvii 6 Evaluation of seismic scattering usingan alternative seismic network . .

Dominguez, Luis Antonio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR

311

Deterministic seismic hazard in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......interest are represented by a number of flat layers with different thicknesses, densities...one on sandy soil, the other on the rocky soil in Aqaba) were 0.10 and 0.05...Contract UVO-ROSTE 875.669.9 Seismic safety of urban areas: ground motion modelling......

A. El-Sayed; F. Vaccari; G. F. Panza

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Application of short-radius horizontal boreholes in the naturally fractured Yates field  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the performance and simulation of short-radius horizontal boreholes being used in the Marathon-operated Yates field Unit in west Texas to minimize drawdown and therefore to reduce gas and water coning in a thin oil column. Yates is a very prolific field with extensive fracturing and high-quality reservoir rock. Superimposed on a high-density orthogonal fracture network are widely spaced regional joints with a strong directional tendency. Major questions are how these directional joints affect the horizontal-well performance and whether wells should be drilled parallel or perpendicular to the joints. Dual-permeability reservoir simulation studies were performed to study optimum orientation of the borehole with respect to the natural fracture network. Additionally, optimum well-completion elevation was studied. Forty-six vertical wells have been recompleted as short-radius horizontal boreholes since 1986. The large productivity increase of the horizontal boreholes compared with the previous vertical completions indicates that the wells are intersecting the regional joints.

Gilman, J.R.; Rothkopf, B.W. (Marathon Petroleum Technology Center, Littleton, CO (United States)); Bowzer, J.L. (Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole in Russia and nearby areas to reconstruct the ground surface temperature history (GSTH) over the past five Siberia. We derive GSTHs for each region individually, and a composite ``all-Russia'' GSTH from the full

Smerdon, Jason E.

314

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

315

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1975 - 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate thermal regime and potential of the system Notes Three-dimensional Q -1 model of the Coso Hot Springs known geothermal resource area was conducted. To complete the model a regional telemetered network of sixteen stations was operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; deployed a portable Centipede array of 26 three-component stations near the

316

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1998 - 2002 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two recent earthquake sequences near the Coso geothermal field show clear evidence of faulting along conjugate planes. Results from analyzing an earthquake sequence occurring in 1998 are presented and compared with a similar sequence that occurred in 1996. The two sequences followed mainshocks that occurred on 27 November, 1996 and 6 March, 1998. Both mainshocks ruptured approximately colocated regions of the same fault

317

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal

318

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Figure 4 illustrates seismicity from January of 1969 to June of 1977 (Rapolla and Keller, 1984). During this span, most of the seismicity occurred in the region of the Geysers geothermal field. Additional clustered activity was noted to the north and east of the Collayomi Fault in the Clear Lake region. Curiously, no unusual earthquake activity was noted along the major trend of the Collayomi Fault. Instead, the Collayomi Fault seems to separate two areas of active seismicity. References Catherine K. Skokan (1993) Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States

319

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes In spite of the complications discovered in this b-value analysis of Kilauea's South Flank, there are many similarities with the case histories of the other volcanoes we have studied, and the correlation of high b-value anomalies withmagma reservoirs is confirmed.

320

Using borehole images for target-zone evaluation in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal wells are rarely horizontal. Instead, operators commonly try to drill such wells into particular rock layers, or target zones, which may or may not be truly horizontal. Thicknesses of target zones commonly range from a few feet to a few tens of feet (1-10 m). Target-zone evaluation concerns whether a horizontal well was successfully located and drilled in a given rock layer. Borehole-imaging logs provide a powerful tool for stratigraphic interpretation and target-zone evaluation in the Austin Chalk, Niobrara Formation, San Andres Formation, and other units. This study uses borehole images generated by Schlumberger's Formation MicroScanner (FMS), a microconductivity logging device. Open fractures and clay-rich interbeds appear as dark, high-conductivity tracers on the FMS log. These traces can be fit with sinusoidal curves and oriented on a computer workstation. The shape of the sinusoidal curve that fits a particular bedding plane tells the interpreter whether the borehole was moving upward or downward through the strata. STRATLOG (trademark of Sierra Geophysics, Inc., a Halliburton Company) software has been used to display borehole profiles by combining FMS data on fracture intensities and bedding-plane intersections with gamma-ray logs, mud logs, and borehole-deviation surveys. To aid in planning future wells, multiple penetrations of the same horizon can be detected and used to calculate highly accurate bedding-plane dips. Fault interpretation, including the detection of rollover beds, it also possible. Finally, stratigraphic interpretation can be combined with observed fractures to determine which rock layers are most highly fractured, and, therefore, should be target zones.9 refs., 5 figs.

Hurley, N.F.; Carlson, J.L. (Marathon Oil Company, Littleton, CO (United States)); Thorn, D.R. (Schlumberger Well Services, Aurora (Colombia)); Eichelberger, L.W. (Marathon Oil Company, Tyler, TX (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) Updated Users Guide for Web-based Data Access and Export  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) is a prototype web-based graphical user interface (GUI) for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data. The HBGIS is being developed as part of the Remediation Decision Support function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. Recent efforts have focused on improving the functionality of the HBGIS website in order to allow more efficient access and exportation of available data in HBGIS. Users will benefit from enhancements such as a dynamic browsing, user-driven forms, and multi-select options for selecting borehole geologic data for export. The need for translating borehole geologic data into electronic form within the HBGIS continues to increase, and efforts to populate the database continue at an increasing rate. These new web-based tools should help the end user quickly visualize what data are available in HBGIS, select from among these data, and download the borehole geologic data into a consistent and reproducible tabular form. This revised users guide supersedes the previous users guide (PNNL-15362) for viewing and downloading data from HBGIS. It contains an updated data dictionary for tables and fields containing borehole geologic data as well as instructions for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data.

Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Seismic Isolation Working Meeting Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate goal in nuclear facility and nuclear power plant operations is operating safety during normal operations and maintaining core cooling capabilities during off-normal events including external hazards. Understanding the impact external hazards, such as flooding and earthquakes, have on nuclear facilities and NPPs is critical to deciding how to manage these hazards to expectable levels of risk. From a seismic risk perspective the goal is to manage seismic risk. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components (SSCs)). There are large uncertainties associated with evolving nature of the seismic hazard curves. Additionally there are requirements within DOE and potential requirements within NRC to reconsider updated seismic hazard curves every 10 years. Therefore opportunity exists for engineered solutions to manage this seismic uncertainty. One engineered solution is seismic isolation. Current seismic isolation (SI) designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed, in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 4 standard, to be released in 2014, for Light Water Reactors (LWR) facilities using commercially available technology. However, there is a lack of industry application to the nuclear industry and uncertainty with implementing the procedures outlined in ASCE-4. Opportunity exists to determine barriers associated with implementation of current ASCE-4 standard language.

Justin Coleman; Piyush Sabharwall

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

324

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow

325

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

326

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pritchett, 2004) Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general

328

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39  

SciTech Connect

This report contains geologic, geochemical, and physical characterization data collected on sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. The measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared to a nearby borehole 299-W10-196 placed through the plume from the 1973 T-106 tank leak. This report also presents the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the T Tank Farm. Sediment samples were characterized for: moisture content, gamma-emission radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, radionuclide and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We observed slight elevated pH values in samples from borehole C4104. The sediments from the three boreholes, C4104, C4105, and 299-W10-196 do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present below tank T-106 and have formed a salt plume. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms and slightly less than those from the most saline porewater found in contaminated TX tank farm sediments. The boreholes could not penetrate below the gravel-rich strata of the Ringold Formation Wooded Island member (Rwi) (refusal was met at about 130 ft bgs); therefore, we could not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. The moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, and technetium-99 profiles versus depth in the three contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106.

Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

330

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

SciTech Connect

Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance assessment, inclusion of dose calculations from collocated low-level waste in the boreholes for the individual protection requirements, further assessments of engineered barriers and conditions associated with the assurance requirements, and expansion of documentation provided for assessing the groundwater protection requirements. The Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group approved the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in 2001 and did not approve the Application of the Assurance Requirements. Remaining issues concerned with engineered barriers and the multiple aspects of the Assurance Requirements will be resolved at the time of closure of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. This is the first completion and acceptance of a performance assessment for transuranic materials under the U.S. Department of Energy self-regulation. The Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes are only the second waste disposal configuration to meet the safety regulatory requirements of 40 CFR 191.

Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments  

SciTech Connect

In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 g/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.32.5 g/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of total uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

335

Seismic Hazard and Public Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Seismic Safety Organization (ISSO) has been formed to promote public safety by being prepared for the largest potential events which can happen at any time, rather than for certain probable events which have been exceeded in several recent earthquakes with disastrous consequences. The position of ISSO is available now in English, Italian, Russian, Hebrew, Spanish, and Hindi at http://www.issoquake.org. That position has been misrepresented elsewhere and this short note is to counter such inaccurate viewpoints.

Mualchin, Lalliana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A seismic signature of river bedload transport during storm events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008), Spectral analysis of seismic noise induced by rivers:analysis of high?frequency seismic noise, J. Geophys. Res. ,and V. Manville (2009), Seismic sig- nals of snow?slurry

Brodsky, Emily E.; Hsu, Leslie; Finnegan, Noah J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Performance Based Implementation of Seismic Protective Devices for Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.I. , Wu, B. (2012). Seismic Protection of Nonlinearfor the Evaluation of Seismic Mitigation in BuildingM.H. and Sung, Y.C. (2000). Seismic Performance of Highway

Xi, Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frame model 10TN (Northridge seismic input) floor 1 floor 2frame model 10TC (Northridge seismic input) Slip (mm) floorframe models 06TC, 10TC and 14TC (Northridge seismic input)

Barbato, Michele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.  

SciTech Connect

The HH Seismic hammer is a large, %22weight-drop%22 source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

Jones, Kyle Richard

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

LLNL-TR-400563 Seismic Data  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion A. Rodgers January 18, 2008 Disclaimer This document was...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys * Exploratory drilling using various.S. citizens engaged in a specific activity (other than commercial fishing) in a specified geographical region

342

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

343

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

344

Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seismic events are typically shallow (for example blasts generated in mines, quarries, and roadcuts; volcanoes; atmospheric phenomena). In the crustal earthquake catalog...

345

Integrating seismic exploration methods into a geological sciences curriculum at Brigham Young Unversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuing expansion in petroleum and other resource exploration and in geological hazard assessment for infrastructure development have combined to dramatically increase the need for training of university students in seismic imaging methods. This need is being met at Brigham Young University (BYU) by forming alliances or collaborations with private industry and government in order to provide financial support for research using seismic techniques to obtain access to proprietary datasets and to place students in the workplace as part of their university experience. Infrastructure support has been provided by BYU in the form of acquisition of seismic recording equipment procuring of state?of?the?art software for data processing and geologic mapping and building of a dedicated 3D visualization lab. This infrastructure creates an environment that mimics research and exploration programs in private industry. Seismicgeophysical research foci at BYU include (1) seismic characterization of deep reservoirs for carbon sequestration (2) 3D seismic attribute analysis for petroleum prospecting (3) high?resolution seismicexploration applied to landslide and earthquake hazard assessments (4) exploration of deep sedimentary basins that may be prospective for oil or gas and (5) oilfield applications of seismic mapping in order to detect and map shallow faults that may function as leakage pathways.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Evaluating Local Elastic Anisotropy of Rocks and Sediments by Means of Optoacoustics While Drilling Oil and Gas Boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optoacoustic method of evaluation of local elastic anisotropy while drilling oil or gas boreholes usually assumes laboratory tests...1]. These are so-called go-through tests. The pick-up of the pulse is pro...

A. V. Gladilin; S. V. Egerev; O. B. Ovchinnikov

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geophysical Techniques page? For detailed information on Geophysical Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geophysical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geophysical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total. E [+] Electrical Techniques‎ (2 categories) 5 pages G [×] Gravity Techniques‎ 3 pages M [×] Magnetic Techniques‎ 3 pages S [+] Seismic Techniques‎ (2 categories) 2 pages Pages in category "Geophysical Techniques" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. D DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) E Electrical Techniques G Gravity Techniques M Magnetic Techniques

348

Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist`s borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152.

Lindberg, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Spane, F.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Use of an acoustic borehole televiewer to investigate casing corrosion in geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of well and surface equipment due to the presence of hot, corrosive brines is one of the major problems facing geothermal operators. For wellbore casing, this problem is complicated by the fact that in-place inspection is difficult at best. In an attempt to improve this situation, a prototype acoustic borehole televiewer designed to operate in geothermal wells was used to study the corrosion damage to casing in three commercial wells. The results of this experiment were promising. The televiewer returns helped to define areas of major corrosion damage and to indicate the extent of the damage. This paper briefly discusses the corrosion problem, describes the acoustic borehole televiewer, and then summarizes the results of the field test of the televiewer's capability for investigating corrosion.

Carson, C.C.; Bauman, T.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Waveform-based simulated annealing of crosshole transmission data: a semi-global method for estimating seismic anisotropy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......geometry, and acoustic borehole logging results from...which leads into the large Easter Deeps Chamber...geological information, the borehole paths mainly intersected...approximately 720m. After drilling, the borehole geometries were surveyed......

Michael V. Afanasiev; R. Gerhard Pratt; Rie Kamei; Glenn McDowell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Seismic reflection imaging of a geothermal aquifer in an urban setting  

SciTech Connect

A seismic reflection survey that was conducted in downtown Boise, Idaho, to help city planners site a new well for injection of spent geothermal water illustrates some methods to safely and successfully employ a seismic reflection survey in an urban setting. The objective of the seismic survey was to estimate the depth and continuity of a basalt and rhyolite volcanic sequence. Well siting was based on geothermal aquifer depth, location of interpreted faults, projected thermal impact of injection on existing wells, surface pipe extension costs, and public land availability. Seismic acquisition tests and careful processing were used to ensure high-quality data while minimizing the potential for damage along city streets. A video camera placed in a sewer and a blast vibration monitor were used to confirm that energy from the seismic source (a 75-in{sup 3} land air gun) did not damage nearby buildings, street surfaces, or buried utilities along the survey lines. Walkaway seismic tests were also used to compare signal quality of the air-gun source to an explosive source for imaging targets up to 800 m depth. These tests show less signal bandwidth from the air-gun source compared to the buried explosive source, but the air-gun signal quality was adequate to meet imaging objectives. Seismic reflection results show that the top of this rhyolite/basalt sequence dips ({approximately}8--1{degree}) southwest away from the Boise foothills at depths of 200 to 800 m. Seismic methods enabled interpretation of aquifer depths along the profiles and located fault zones where injected water may encounter fracture permeability and optimally benefit the existing producing system. The acquisition and processing techniques used to locate the Boise injection well may succeed for other hydrogeologic and environmental studies in urban settings.

Liberty, L. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface] [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shear connection (Imperial Valley seismic input) Floor #site), and (ii) the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake recordedFig. 12 relates to the Imperial Valley seismic input. Unless

Barbato, Michele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

354

Approximate Effects of Off-Center Acoustic Sondes and Elliptic Boreholes Upon Full Waveform Logs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full waveform acoustic well logging has become instrumental to hydrocarbon exploration because of its ability to determine in situ velocity information for P and S waves as well as the attenuation (or absorption) of seismic ...

Willis, M. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Borehole logging methods for exploration Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation o f uranium deposits . Philip H. O d d , Robert F. Bmullad and Carl P. Lathan rej~rinkttl fnlm Mining and Groundwater Geophysiall967 Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation of uranium deposits Philip H. Dodd, Robert F. Droullard and Carl P. Lathan US. Atomic Energy Commhwn GmrPd Jtinct&n, Colorado Abstract, M o l e 1 - i s thc geophysical methad mast exten&@ w r t i n the Udtrrd States for exploratio~ md edwtim of wanhi &pod&. dammow lop, C o r n r n d j suppkrnentd with a singbz-pobt msfstailee log, m t l y supply about 80 percent of the bask data for om regerve c W t i o R a d mu& of the w ~ k r 6 . p ~ &ngk inf~nnatio~ Tmck-mounted 'rotmy eqnipmcnt i s EMhmody emphy&& holes usually hwre a nominai b

356

Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing  

SciTech Connect

In the field of nuclear explosion monitoring, it has become a priority to detect, locate, and identify seismic events down to increasingly small magnitudes. The consideration of smaller seismic events has implications for a reliable monitoring regime. Firstly, the number of events to be considered increases greatly; an exponential increase in naturally occurring seismicity is compounded by large numbers of seismic signals generated by human activity. Secondly, the signals from smaller events become more difficult to detect above the background noise and estimates of parameters required for locating the events may be subject to greater errors. Thirdly, events are likely to be observed by a far smaller number of seismic stations, and the reliability of event detection and location using a very limited set of observations needs to be quantified. For many key seismic stations, detection lists may be dominated by signals from routine industrial explosions which should be ascribed, automatically and with a high level of confidence, to known sources. This means that expensive analyst time is not spent locating routine events from repeating seismic sources and that events from unknown sources, which could be of concern in an explosion monitoring context, are more easily identified and can be examined with due care. We have obtained extensive lists of confirmed seismic events from mining and other artificial sources which have provided an excellent opportunity to assess the quality of existing fully-automatic event bulletins and to guide the development of new techniques for online seismic processing. Comparing the times and locations of confirmed events from sources in Fennoscandia and NW Russia with the corresponding time and location estimates reported in existing automatic bulletins has revealed substantial mislocation errors which preclude a confident association of detected signals with known industrial sources. The causes of the errors are well understood and are primarily the result of spurious identification and incorrect association of phases, and of excessive variability in estimates for the velocity and direction of incoming seismic phases. The mitigation of these causes has led to the development of two complimentary techniques for classifying seismic sources by testing detected signals under mutually exclusive event hypotheses. Both of these techniques require appropriate calibration data from the region to be monitored, and are therefore ideally suited to mining areas or other sites with recurring seismicity. The first such technique is a classification and location algorithm where a template is designed for each site being monitored which defines which phases should be observed, and at which times, for all available regional array stations. For each phase, the variability of measurements (primarily the azimuth and apparent velocity) from previous events is examined and it is determined which processing parameters (array configuration, data window length, frequency band) provide the most stable results. This allows us to define optimal diagnostic tests for subsequent occurrences of the phase in question. The calibration of templates for this project revealed significant results with major implications for seismic processing in both automatic and analyst reviewed contexts: one or more fixed frequency bands should be chosen for each phase tested for. the frequency band providing the most stable parameter estimates varies from site to site and a frequency band which provides optimal measurements for one site may give substantially worse measurements for a nearby site. slowness corrections applied depend strongly on the frequency band chosen. the frequency band providing the most stable estimates is often neither the band providing the greatest SNR nor the band providing the best array gain. For this reason, the automatic template location estimates provided here are frequently far better than those obtained by analysts. The second technique is that of matched field processing whereby spatial covariance

Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Deep-towed High Resolution multichannel seismic imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High Resolution (2201050Hz) seismic acquisition performed in deep water using deep-towed systems provides unrivalled lateral resolution when compared to conventional surface seismic. The lateral resolution of these acquisitions is controlled by the width of the first Fresnel zone, taking advantage of their positions close to the sea bottom. No current existing deep towed equipment can benefit from seismic imaging processing techniques to improve this resolution as a consequence of positioning inaccuracies. The technological developments of a digital deep-towed multichannel streamer are presented with a particular attention to positioning: each hydrophone incorporates a pitch, roll and heading sensor in order to monitor the constant deformation of the streamer in operation. The sea trials took place in July 2013 in the Mediterranean Sea. Pre-stack depth migration applied to the deep-towed multichannel data illustrates the potential of this emerging methodology in terms of penetration (12dB improvement in Signal/Noise) and lateral resolution (mean signal wavelength: 3m) when compared with deep-towed single-channel acquisition.

B. Marsset; E. Menut; S. Ker; Y. Thomas; J.-P. Regnault; P. Leon; H. Martinossi; L. Artzner; D. Chenot; S. Dentrecolas; B. Spychalski; G. Mellier; N. Sultan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Estimating quality factor and mean grain size of sediments from high-resolution marine seismic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30 m of unconsolidated marine sediments. Our spectral-ratio technique does not require assumptions-resolution seismic-reflection data, and shows how such estimates can be related to mean grain sizes of unconsolidated for intrinsic atten- uation in saturated, unconsolidated marine sediments. Biot-Stoll Biot, 1956a, 1956b; Stoll

National Oceanography Centre Southampton

360

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Dennise Templeton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

SciTech Connect

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Dennise Templeton

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

SciTech Connect

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

Definition: Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids intersected by a well. These petrophysical data are fundamental to developing the understanding of a geothermal reservoir.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Petrophysics (from the Greek πέτρα, petra, "rock" and φύσις, physis, "nature") is the study of physical and chemical rock properties and their interactions with fluids. A major application of petrophysics is in studying reservoirs for the hydrocarbon industry. Petrophysicists are employed to help reservoir engineers and geoscientists understand the rock properties of the reservoir, particularly how pores in

364

Definition: Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Drilling Techniques There are a variety of drilling techniques which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well drilling is the process of drilling a hole in the ground for the extraction of a natural resource such as ground water, brine, natural gas, or petroleum, for the injection of a fluid from surface to a subsurface reservoir or for subsurface formations evaluation or monitoring.

365

The Oblique Seismic Experiment on DSDP Leg 52  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Vol...the IPOD crustal borehole as a means of investi...may be caused by large cracks with a preferred...are received in a borehole (Fig. 1). In...International Phase of Ocean Drilling) crustal drilling......

R. A. Stephen; K. E. Louden; D. H. Matthews

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than 15 years ago. New understanding of the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation are now being applied to image fractures in gas and oil environments. It now may be appropriate to apply these methods, with modifications, to geothermal applications. It is assumed that to implement the appropriate methods an industry coupled program tightly linked to actual field cases, iterating between development and application will be pursued. The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

Majer, E.L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

A VSP transformation technique for the determination of subsurface structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the dominant wavelength. With the surface reflection profiling technique, resolution typically ranges from tens to hundreds of meters. With this degree of resolution, a detailed understanding of the subsurface is hard to achieve, In a vertical seismic... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Terry W. Spencer An algorithm was developed which transforms a vertical seismic profile (VSP) from the time-depth domain into the offset-time domain. The procedure operates by calculating the dips of the reflectors...

Malloy, Jeffrey Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of vertical resolution of seismic signals associated with a reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be enhanced by increasing the dominant frequency of the signals through data processing techniques. DATA A seismic reflection survey, line BCR 39, was conducted by AMOCO during 1972 in Grimes county, Texas (Fig. 1). Line BCR 39 trends in a Northwest... configuration the source is located somewhere in the 30 45' 0 30o$0' J 6* 30'3 ICOS 'wxm ~o 30 30I 95 10' ~ r I seaaas 96 Fig. 1 Map showing the location of seismic reflection line BCR 39. SHOT DIAGRAM 10 20 I? Cl 413 30 40 50 10 20 30 40...

Hudgens, Eric Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrothermal al- teration would combine to reduce the effectiveness of standard 3-D seismic processing.

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2005 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis More detailed analysis of microearthquakes over a longer period of time Notes The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides high-quality microearthquake (MEQ) data that are well suited to investigating temporal variations in structure related to processes within the geothermal reservoir. A preliminary study (Julian, et al. 2003; Julian

371

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kilauea volcano has high seismicity, most of which is associated with specific fault zones on the volcano and with movement of magma at depth (Koyanagi and Endo, 1971; Koyanagi et al., 1976). Certain groups of earthquakes have been observed at very shallow depths, however, and some of these have been concentrated in a zone that lies near the resistivity anomaly and the center of inflation. The data show that this shallow

372

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1996 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To look at time dependent seismic tomography Notes Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio V p/V s at shallow depths. The period from 1996 through 2006 was studied, and the results to date using the traditional method show, for a 2-km horizontal grid spacing, an irregular strengthening

373

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geodetic_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401367

374

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine extent of low velocity body Notes An area showing approximately 0.2-s excess travel time that migrates with changing source azimuth, suggesting that the area is the 'delay shadow' produced by a deep, low-velocity body. Inversion of the relative residual data for three-dimensional velocity structure determines the lateral variations in velocity to a depth of 22.5 km beneath the array. An intense low-velocity body, which coincides with the surface expressions of late Pleistocene rhyolitic volcanism, high heat flow, and hydrothermal activity,

375

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425676"

376

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Andrew V. Newman, Timothy H. Dixon, Noel Gourmelen (2006) A Four-Dimensional Viscoelastic Deformation Model For Long Valley Caldera, California, Between 1995 And 2000 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Newman,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=425656"

377

Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

378

Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516  

SciTech Connect

Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W. [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The effect of seismic waves on earthquake nucleation and fault strength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great Earthquakes and Global Seismic Networks, Seismologicaland D. C. Agnew (2006), Seismic waves increase permeability,Great Earthquakes and Global Seismic Networks, Seismological

van der Elst, Nicholas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Seismic Performance of Reinforced Concrete Bridges Allowed to Uplift During Multi-Directional Excitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abghari, A. (1999). Seismic Soil-Pile Structure InteractionNo. 9. Caltrans (2004). Seismic Design Criteria, Versionand Mander, J. (1994). Seismic energy-based fatigue damage

Espinoza, Andres Oscar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Seismic Performance, Modeling, and Failure Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T. Y. , and Moehle, J.P. , Seismic safety evaluation of theEffective Stiffness for Seismic Analysis, ACI Journal ofResearch/ California seismic safety commission, The

Tuna, Zeynep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Seismic bridge response modification due to degradation of viscous dampers performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soong, & Mahamoodi. (1989). Seismic responce of steel frameUMCE 01/1987). Elastic seismic response of buildings withanalytical investigation of seismic response of structures

Graziotti, Francesco

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Seismic Deployments and Experiments: PeruNet, GeoNet, and SeismoPhone.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Seismic Deployments and Experiments:PeruNet: Installing a UCLA seismic line in Latin Americadata quality controll Seismic tomography to reveal slab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Seismic response of precast segmental bridge superstructures with bonded tendons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31 2.4. Current Seismic Design Practice inS.H. , and Seible, F. , Seismic Performance of Precastand Commentary for the Seismic Rehabilitation of Buildings,

Veletzos, Marc John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Senfaute G. (2005). Seismic precursory patterns F. (2010). The seismic signature of rockslides: statistical analysis of seismic signals. Journal of

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Continental seismic events observed by the MPL vertical DIFAR array  

SciTech Connect

The vertical DIFAR array, an underwater acoustic sensor system, deployed by the Marine Physical Laboratory (MPL) was in place over the continental shelf off of Southern California and recorded the HUNTERS TROPHY nuclear test and nearly a score of after-shocks of the Landers/Big Bear earthquakes. Data from this array raise the possibility that detection thresholds for continental events may be significantly lower for arrays over the continental shelf than for arrays in the deep ocean basins. Offshore stations could be used to fill gaps in land-based seismic networks for monitoring the NPT and a CTBT, especially for monitoring non-cooperating nations with large coastlines. This preliminary report provides an analysis of the HUNTERS TROPHY observation as well as one of the Landers aftershocks. The analysis suggests detection thresholds for vertical hydrophone arrays below mb 3.0 at ranges between 3 and 4 degrees, and below mb 4.4 out to 6 degrees. This report also describes two signal processing techniques that enhance the detection potential of short vertical arrays. These methods are deterministic null steering to suppress horizontally propagating ambient ocean noise, and matched field processing for vertically-incident acoustic fields. The latter technique is ideally suited for acoustic fields derived from incident seismic waves, and may be viewed as a {open_quotes}synthetic aperture{close_quotes} approach to increase the effective aperture of the array.

Harris, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); D`Spain, G. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States). Marine Physical Lab.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

388

Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4.4). In support of this model, Pratt (2012) presented a depth-migrated seismic reflection profile across the Saddle Mountain anticline with the interpretation of a moderately...

389

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) analysis is typically...

Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

The evolution of shallow seismic exploration methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-surface seismic methods have developed considerably and have been applied much more widely since the 1970s. Improvements in instrumentation, along with cheaper computer power, have greatly affected the capabilities of these methods in recent...

Steeples, Don W.; Schmeissner, Chris M.; Macy, Brian

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II Prepared by: Environment, Health and Safety Division Environmental Services Group May 2010 Revision 1 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ..................................................................................................................... 15 2.1.1 Demolition of Building 25/25B

395

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the Cornell-McGuire method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provided. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder off an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The seismic velocity structure of some NE Atlantic continental rise sediments; a lithification index?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......indicates a large downward increase...nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) borehole where it is...of the Ocean Drilling Program, Part...indicates a large downward increase...nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) borehole where it is......

R. B. Whitmarsh; P. R. Miles; L. M. Pinheiro

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Estimating the crust permeability from fluid-injection-induced seismic emission at the KTB site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in the German Continental Deep Drilling Borehole (KTB) in December 1994,microseismic...in the German Continental Deep Drilling Borehole in the depth interval 9030-9100...are scale-dependent. Thus, large-spatial-scale measurements......

Sergei A. Shapiro; Ernst Huenges; Gnter Borm

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the pressence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into the formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

404

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first broad-band acoustic pulse at a first broad-band frequency range having a first central frequency and a first bandwidth spread; generating a second broad-band acoustic pulse at a second broad-band frequency range different than the first frequency range having a second central frequency and a second bandwidth spread, wherein the first acoustic pulse and second acoustic pulse are generated by at least one transducer arranged on a tool located within the borehole; and transmitting the first and the second broad-band acoustic pulses into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated pulse by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic pulses, wherein the collimated pulse has a frequency equal to the difference in frequencies between the first central frequency and the second central frequency and a bandwidth spread equal to the sum of the first bandwidth spread and the second bandwidth spread.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method and system for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact array of transducers is employed as a downhole instrument for acoustic investigation of the surrounding rock formation. The array is operable to generate simultaneously a first acoustic beam signal at a first frequency and a second acoustic beam signal at a second frequency different than the first frequency. These two signals can be oriented through an azimuthal rotation of the array and an inclination rotation using control of the relative phases of the signals from the transmitter elements or electromechanical linkage. Due to the non-linearity of the formation, the first and the second acoustic beam signal mix into the rock formation where they combine into a collimated third signal that propagates in the formation along the same direction than the first and second signals and has a frequency equal to the difference of the first and the second acoustic signals. The third signal is received either within the same borehole, after reflection, or another borehole, after transmission, and analyzed to determine information about rock formation. Recording of the third signal generated along several azimuthal and inclination directions also provides 3D images of the formation, information about 3D distribution of rock formation and fluid properties and an indication of the dynamic acoustic non-linearity of the formation.

Johnson Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Ten Cate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert (Reno, NV); Le Bas, Pierre-Yves (Los Alamos, NM); Vu, Cung (Houston, TX); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Blind seismic deconvolution using variational Bayesian method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Blind seismic deconvolution, which comprises seismic wavelet and reflectivity sequence, is a strongly ill-posed problem. The reflectivity sequence is modeled as a BernoulliGaussian (BG) process, depending on four parameters (noise variance, high and low reflector variances, and reflector density). These parameters need to be estimated from the seismic record, which is the convolution of the reflectivity sequence and the seismic wavelet. In this paper, we propose a variational Bayesian method for blind seismic deconvolution which can determine the reflectivity sequence and the seismic wavelet. The connection between variational Bayesian blind deconvolution and the minimization of the KullbackLeibler divergence of two probability distributions is also established. The gamma, beta distributions are used for the unknown parameters (hyperparameters) as prior distribution and also we give how these distributions can be inferred in actual situations. The proposed algorithms are tested by simulation and compared to existing blind deconvolution methods. The results show that variational Bayesian method has better agreement with the actual value.

Li Yanqin; Zhang Guoshan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Testing to determine relay seismic ruggedness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The seismic qualification of equipment in operating nuclear plants has been identified as a potential safety concern in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46, Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Power Plants. In response to this concern, the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG), with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has undertaken a program to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of essential equipment by the use of actual experience with such equipment in plants which have undergone significant earthquakes and by the use of available test data for similar equipment. An important part of this program is the development of the methodology and test data for verifying the functionality of electrical relays used in essential circuits needed for plant shutdown during a seismic event. This paper describes the EPRI supported relay testing program to supplement existing relay test data. Many old relays which are used in safe shutdown systems of SQUG plants and for which seismic test data do not exist have been shake-table tested. The testing performed on these relays and the test results for two groups of relays are summarized in this paper.

K.L. Merz; M.P. Wade; Jess Betlack

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Isotropic Events Observed with a Borehole Array in the Chelungpu Fault Zone, Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...finite-difference simulation [fig. S3...tensors. The modeling shows that the...source in the modeling. The observed...and BHS4. Our modeling suggests that the...injection layer. The rapid attenuation...Roth M. , Automated seismic event...ground motion simulation of the 1999...

Kuo-Fong Ma; Yen-Yu Lin; Shiann-Jong Lee; Jim Mori; Emily E. Brodsky

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Borehole closure and test zone volume determination program for brine-permeability test results within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground facility  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, hydrologic characterization in closed sections of boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has relied on measurements of pressure and temperature to establish the permeability of the host geological formations. There were no provisions for monitoring tool compliance and salt creep resulting from borehole closure. The new permeability test tool used to characterize the WIPP underground facility has been equipped with a series of sensors to measure the movement of the tool with respect to the borehole and borehole wall movement. A FORTRAN program can interpret the output data from each test and calculate the change in borehole radius, test zone length, and test zone volume. These values provide a correlation of fluid compressibility and tool compliance with the permeability results derived from the test data. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Jensen, A.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

Lane, Michael

412

Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010  

SciTech Connect

Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

Michael Lane

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos Canyon 21B well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ?2ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ?1.9km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gas hydrate saturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21 B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gas hydrate saturation in the target sand section in the AC21-B well can be constrained to the range of 828%, with 20% being our best estimate.

M.W. Lee; T.S. Collett; K.A. Lewis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During operation, the heat of combustion of the contaminantstoluene, which has a heat of combustion seven times greater

Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Workshop on borehole measurements and interpretation in scientific drilling - identification of problems and proposals for their solution: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Critical instrumentation needs for borehole-oriented, geoscience research were identified in a program consisting of formal presentations, psoter sessions and a workshop. The proceedings include results of the workshops, abstracts of the papers and poster sessions, and the attendance list. Details of any of the presentations should be obtained from the individual authors. Separate entries were prepared for individual presentations.

Cooper, D.L.; Traeger, R.K. (eds.)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Detection and quantification of 3D hydraulic fractures with multi-component low-frequency borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-bearing shale but no commercial in-situ borehole methods are available except microseismic monitoring to enhance hydrocarbon production from organic shales and tight-gas sands. While hydro-fracture technology and arbitrarily-oriented fractures in electrically complex backgrounds, such as in anisotropic layered media

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

417

Measurement of 238U, 232Th and 40K in boreholes at Gosa and Lugbe, Abuja, north central Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......boreholes to augment public water supplies which...beneath the 300 areas, Hanford Site, Washington...partners Coordinating Meeting, Daily Triumph Newspaper...Geol. Surv. of Nig. Public. 11-43. 17 Caby R...Soc. Lond. Speci. Public. (2008) 294:121-136......

Omeje Maxwell; Husin Wagiran; Noorddin Ibrahim; Siak Kuan Lee; Soheil Sabri

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Fresh Look at Greater Confinement Boreholes for Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect

The United States Federal government has responsibility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with concentrations of radionuclides that exceed limits established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for Class C LLW. Since Greater-Than-Class-C (GTCC) LLW is from activities licensed by NRC or NRC Agreement States, a disposal facility by law must be licensed by NRC. The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to site, design, construct, operate, decommission, and provide long-term care for GTCC LLW disposal facilities. On May 11, 2005, DOE issued an advance notice of intent to begin preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for GTCC LLW disposal. Since the initiation of the EIS, analysis has focused on compiling the inventory of commercial GTCC LLW and DOE GTCC-like wastes, reviewing disposal technologies, and other preliminary studies. One of the promising disposal technologies being considered is intermediate depth greater confinement boreholes. Greater confinement boreholes have been used effectively to safely dispose of long-lived radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The DOE took a fresh look at global experiences with the use of greater confinement borehole disposal, including current considerations being given for future applications in the U.S., and concluded that the U.S. is positioned to benefit from international collaboration on borehole disposal technology, and could ultimately become a pilot project, if the technology is selected. (authors)

Tonkay, D.W.; Joyce, J.L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Disposal Operations, Washington, DC (United States); Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

INTERNATIONALJOURNAL FOR NUMERICALAND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN GEOMECHANICS. VOL 17, 659-667 (1993) TENSILE STRESSES AROUND BOREHOLES DUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the efficient recovery of coalbed methane, and the avoidance of borehole stability problems in conventional gas naturally in coal. Specifically,Logan et al." give a description of a coalbed methane completion technology called 'openhole cavity completion'. In this techno- logy, a coalbed methane well is shut-in so

Chan, Derek Y C

420

Processing of a nine-component near-offset VSP for seismic anisotropy  

SciTech Connect

A convolutional sequence of matrix operators is offered as a convenient deterministic scheme for processing a multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP). This sequence is applied to a nine-component near-offset VSP recorded at the Conoco borehole test facility, Kay County, Oklahoma. These data are corrected for tool spin and near-surface anisotropy together with source coupling or imbalance. After wave-field separation using a standard f-k filter, each source and receiver pair for the upgoing waves is adjusted to a common reference depth using a matrix operator based on the downgoing wavefield. The up- and downgoing waves are then processed for anisotropy by a similarity transformation, to separate the qS1 and qS2 waves, from which the anisotropic properties are estimated. These estimates reveal a strong (apparent) vertical birefringence in the near-surface, but weak or moderate values for the majority of the subsurface. The target zone consists of a thin sandstone and deeper shale layer, both of which possess a strong vertical birefringence. The sandstone corresponds to a zone of known fluid flow. An observed qS2 attenuation and polarization change in the shale suggest it contains large fractures.

MacBeth, C.; Li, X.Y.; Zeng, X. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cox, D.; Queen, J. [Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States). Exploration Research/Services Div.] [Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States). Exploration Research/Services Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the possibility that brine could be displaced upward into potable water through wells. Because of the large volumes of CO2 to be injected, the influence of the zone of elevated pressure on potential conduits such as well boreholes could extend many kilometers from the injection site-farther than the CO2 plume itself. The traditional approach to address potential brine leakage related to fluid injection is to set an area of fixed radius around the injection well/zone and to examine wells and other potentially open pathways located in the ''Area-of-Review'' (AoR). This suggests that the AoR eeds to be defined in terms of the potential for a given pressure perturbation to drive upward fluid flow in any given system rather than on some arbitrary pressure rise. We present an analysis that focuses on the changes in density/salinity of the fluids in the potentially leaking wellbore.

Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Bryant, S.L.; Hovorka, S.D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

423

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac (Houston, TX); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Pantea, Cristian (Los Alamos, NM); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac (Houston, TX); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Pantea, Cristian (Los Alamos, NM); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Understanding the Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, geothermal system using temperature and pressure data from exploration boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chena Hot Springs is a small, moderate temperature, deep circulating geothermal system, apparently typical of those associated to hot springs of interior Alaska. Multi-stage drilling was used in some exploration boreholes and was found to be useful for understanding subsurface flow characteristics and developing a conceptual model of the system. The results illustrate how temperature profiles illuminate varying pressure versus depth characteristics and can be used alone in cases where staged drilling is not practical. The extensive exploration activities helped define optimal fluid production and injection areas, and showed that the system could provide sufficient hot fluids (?57C) to run a 400-kWe binary power plant, which came on line in 2006.

Kamil Erkan; Gwen Holdmann; Walter Benoit; David Blackwell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

civilization documentary, economic, social and even political or spiritual value #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERINGS E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION of Research Infrastructures in Performance-based Earthquake Engineering Shaking table testing of models

427

Time-lapse seismic monitoring of subsurface fluid flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-lapse seismic monitoring repeats 3 D seismic imaging over a reservoir to map fluid movements in a reservoir. During hydrocarbon production, the fluid saturation, pressure, and temperature of a reservoir change, thereby altering the acoustic...

Yuh, Sung H.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Seismic Fragility Analysis and Loss Estimation for Concrete Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to develop a methodology to assess seismic vulnerability of concrete structures and to estimate direct losses related to structural damage due to future seismic events. This dissertation contains several...

Bai, Jong Wha

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect

This report describes seismic activity at and around the Hanford Site during Fiscal Year 2004. It is also the first description of seismic activity during the fourth quarter of FY04.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Three dimensional seismic imaging of the Rye Patch geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic imaging of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Three dimensional seismic imaging of the Rye Patch...

431

Justification Of The Use Of Boreholes For Disposal Of Sealed Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

Soon there will be only 14 states in two compacts that are able to dispose of Low Level Waste (LLW): the Northwest and Rocky Mountain compact with disposal options in Richland, Washington, and the Atlantic compact with disposal options in Barnwell, South Carolina. How do states not in one of the two compacts dispose of their LLW? The Off-Site Source Recovery Project can take possession and dispose of some of the unwanted transuranic sources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). However, there will be no path forward for states outside of the two compacts for disposal of their non-transuranic LLW. A solution that has been much discussed, debated and researched, but has not been put into wide scale practice, is the borehole disposal concept. It is the author's position that companies that drill and explore for oil have been disposing of sources in borehole-like structures for years. It should be noted that these companies are not purposely disposing of these sources, but the sources are irretrievable and must be abandoned. Additionally, there are Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations that must be followed to seal the well that contains the lost and abandoned source. According to the NRC Event Notification Reports database, there were a minimum of 29 reports of lost and abandoned sources in oil wells between December 1999 and October 2006. The sources were lost at depths between 2,018-18,887 feet, or 600-5,750 meters. The companies that are performing explorations with the aid of sealed radiological sources must follow regulation 10 CFR Part 39. Subsection 15 outlines the procedures that must be followed if sources are determined to be irretrievable and abandoned in place. If the NRC allows and has regulations in place for oil companies, why can't states and/or companies be allowed to dispose of LLW in a similar fashion?

Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

First Quarter Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the earthquake data collected from October 2005 to December 2005 from the Hanford Seismic Network

Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Seismic Stratigraphy and Sedimentation along the Ninetyeast Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the stratigraphy and sediment thickness on the ridge using new seismic data to describe the sedimentary history of NER. More than 3700 km of 2D multichannel seismic reflection profiles were collected along NER at seven sites between 5.5? N............................................................................ 28 Figure 2 Seismic Survey Map of KNOX06RR Site 758 .................................. 29 Figure 3 Total Sediment Thickness Isopach Map of KNOX06RR Site 758 .... 30 Figure 4 Seismic Reflection Profile from KNOX06RR Site 758 .................... 31...

Eisin, Amy Elizabeth

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Seismic constraints on open clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive knowledge on the global and structural parameters of low-mass stars using asteroseismology and taking advantage of the stellar collective behavior within open clusters. We build stellar models and compute the seismic signal expected from main sequence objects in the 0.8-1.6 Msun range. We first evaluate apparent magnitudes and oscillations-induced luminosity fluctuations expected in the Hyades, the Pleiades and the alpha Persei clusters. The closest cluster presents a feasible challenge to observational asteroseismology in the present and near future. We combine seismological and classical computations to address three questions: what can be inferred about 1) mass, 2) composition and 3) extension of outer convection zones of solar analogs in the Hyades. The first issue relies on the strong sensitivity of the large separation to mass. Then large separations and second differences are used to respectively constrain metal and helium fractions in the Hyades.When plotted for several masses, the relation of effective temperature vs large separation is found to be strongly dependent on the metal content. Besides this the second difference main modulation is related to the second ionization of helium.The second difference modulations are also partly due to the discontinuity in stellar stratification at the convective envelope / radiative core transition. They permit direct insight in the stellar structure. We compute acoustic radii of the convective bases for different values of the mixing length theoryparameter alpha_MLT in convection modelling, i.e. different convective efficiency in the superadiabatic layers. For a given effectivetemperature we show that the acoustic radius changes with convection efficiency.

L. Piau; J. Ballot; S. Turck-Chieze

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Results of Tank-Leak Detection Demonstration Using Geophysical Techniques at the Hanford Mock Tank Site-Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

During July and August of 2001, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), hosted researchers from Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National laboratories, and a private contractor, HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., for deployment of the following five geophysical leak-detection technologies at the Hanford Site Mock Tank in a Tank Leak Detection Demonstration (TLDD): (1) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT); (2) Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction (CEMI); (3) High-Resolution Resistivity (HRR); (4) Cross-Borehole Radar (XBR); and (5) Cross-Borehole Seismic Tomography (XBS). Under a ''Tri-party Agreement'' with Federal and state regulators, the U.S. Department of Energy will remove wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) and other miscellaneous underground tanks for storage in the double-shell tank system. Waste retrieval methods are being considered that use very little, if any, liquid to dislodge, mobilize, and remove the wastes. As additional assurance of protection of the vadose zone beneath the SSTs, tank wastes and tank conditions may be aggressively monitored during retrieval operations by methods that are deployed outside the SSTs in the vadose zone.

Barnett, D BRENT.; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Results of hydraulic tests at Gibson Dome No. 1, Elk Ridge No. 1, and E. J. Kubat boreholes, Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic testing was conducted in three boreholes in southeastern Utah to provide a portion of the data needed to characterize the hydrogeology of the Elk Ridge and Gibson Dome areas of the western Paradox Basin, Utah. The tests at the E. J. Kubat borehole yielded representative values of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and potentiometric levels of the Leadville Limestone. Testing at Elk Ridge No. 1 provided values of similar parameters for the combined thickness of the upper Honaker Trail, Elephant Canyon, and Cedar Mesa formations. Composite transmissivities of similar zones from these borehole tests compared closely with the results of testing at borehole GD-1. A comparison of results from lab tests on core with results of extensive borehole testing at GD-1 indicates that short-term drill stem tests in a single well can provide representative estimates of bulk transmissivities and hydraulic conductivities in this field area for test zones that have a hydraulic conductivity of greater than about 1 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sec. However, lab tests produce more representative values of effective porosity and matrix permeability of individual strata. Results of lab tests and long-term borehole tests confirm that the lower Honaker Trail and upper Paradox formations have extremely low conductivities in the vicinity of the GD-1 borehole. The results of these tests were complete as of January 1981. 22 references, 29 figures, 5 tables.

Thackston, J.W.; Preslo, L.M.; Hoexter, D.E.; Donnelly, N.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

Snieder, Roel

438

Exposure to seismic survey alters blue whale acoustic communication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Animal behaviour 1001 14 Exposure to seismic survey alters blue whale acoustic communication...their natural functions. Sounds from seismic surveys are intense and have peak frequency...changed their vocal behaviour during a seismic survey that deployed a low-medium power...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Continuous Seismic Reflexion Profiles in the Red Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1970 research-article Continuous Seismic Reflexion Profiles in the Red Sea J. D. Phillips D. A. Ross Twenty continuous seismic reflexion profiles have been made across...in the deeper axial trough. A strong seismic reflector is observed at depths up to...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Three-dimensional seismic imaging of a dymanic Earth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...M. T. Thompson Three-dimensional seismic imaging of a dymanic Earth Lidia Lonergan...UK ( nwhite@esc.cam.ac.uk ) Seismic imaging is the most important tool used...and application of three-dimensional seismic reflection technology. Routinely used...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Seismic Refraction Shooting in an Area of the Eastern Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

17 June 1952 research-article Seismic Refraction Shooting in an Area of the...described in this paper a new method of seismic refraction shooting was developed. With...1952002328 Interpretation of results of seismic refraction shooting carried out in the...

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DEMONSTRATION OF NONLINEAR SEISMIC SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION AND APPLICABILITY TO NEW SYSTEM FRAGILITY CURVES SEISMIC  

SciTech Connect

Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it wasnt the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Decision analysis for seismic retrofit of structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aa a dG S fS GS dS ?? =? ? ?? ?? . (2.3) Annualized seismic hazard exceedance curves containing discrete values of () a GS for locations throughout the United States are available from the United States Geological Survey (USGS). These curves.... Applying the method of integration of seismic vulnerability and hazard, EAL can be defined as ()() 0 a aaa S EAL V y S v S dS ? = = ? (3.1) 14 where V denotes the replacement value of a building, the random variable () a yS is the total damage...

Williams, Ryan J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Seismic Crystals And Earthquake Shield Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically demonstrate that earthquake shield made of seismic crystal can damp down surface waves, which are the most destructive type for constructions. In the paper, seismic crystal is introduced in aspect of band gaps (Stop band) and some design concepts for earthquake and tsunami shielding were discussed in theoretical manner. We observed in our FDTD based 2D elastic wave simulations that proposed earthquake shield could provide about 0.5 reductions in magnitude of surface wave on the Richter scale. This reduction rate in magnitude can considerably reduce destructions in the case of earthquake.

B. Baykant Alagoz; Serkan Alagoz

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

446

Seismic Search for Strange Quark Nuggets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to one ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

Eugene T. Herrin; Doris C. Rosenbaum; Vigdor L. Teplitz

2005-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

Parametric study of relay seismic capacity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An evaluation of the existing relay test data base at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has indicated that the seismic capacity of a relay may depend on various parameters related to the design or the input motion. In order to investigate the effect of these parameters on the seismic fragility level, BNL has conducted a relay test program. Establishing the correlation between the single frequency fragility test input and the corresponding multifrequency response spectrum (TRS) is also an objective of this test program. The testing has been performed at Wyle Laboratories. This paper discusses the methodology used for testing and presents a brief summary of important test results.

K. Bandyopadhyay; C. Hofmayer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

449

Dismantling techniques  

SciTech Connect

Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule.

Wiese, E.

1998-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Accelerated Seismic Release and Related Aspects of Seismicity Patterns on Earthquake Faults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of seismicity patterns associated with several theoretical frameworks. The subcritical crack growth approach developed to describe deformation on a crack prior to the occurrence of dynamic rupture predicts great

Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

451

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

452

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Seismic Travel-Time Residuals and Plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......United States, Canada and Greenland under the auspices of Project Vela Uniform (Long Range Seismic Measurements 1966). Arrival...1 that if we plot residuals on the focal sphere, we are at liberty to ascribe these residuals to source effects, receiver effects......

D. Davies; D. P. McKenzie

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Seismic Look Under the Continents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resources. C. Hamilton's Views of the Solar System includes a presentation by R...presents relief maps of Earth. Views of the Solar System includes an Earth topography animation...information on broadband seismic experiments in Tanzania and South Africa are included. A. Nyblade...

Karen M. Fischers; Rob D. van der Hilst

1999-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

455

Recommissioning the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Center of Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established under the technical direction of Dr. James E. Beavers with a mandate to assess, by analyses and testing, the seismic capacity of building structures that house sensitive processes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This mandate resulted in a need to recommission the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, which had been shutdown for 6 years. This paper documents the history of the facility and fives some salient construction, operation, and performance details of its 8-ton, 20-foot center of gravity payload bi-axial seismic simulator. A log of activities involved in the restart of this valuable resource is included as Table 1. Some of problems and solutions associated with recommissioning the facility under a relatively limited budget are included. The unique attributes of the shake table are discussed. The original mission and performance requirements are compared to current expanded mission and performance capabilities. Potential upgrades to further improve the capabilities of the test facility as an adjunct to the CNPE are considered. Additional uses for the facility are proposed, including seismic qualification testing of devices unique to enrichment technologies and associated hazardous waste treatment and disposal processes. In summary, the STF restart in conjunction with CNPE has added a vital, and unique facility to the list of current national resources utilized for earthquake engineering research and development. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wynn, C.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Brewer, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis  

SciTech Connect

In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

458

Estimation of Dry-Rock Elastic Moduli Based on the Simulation of Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs Tobiloluwa Odumosu, SPE, Carlos Torres-Verdín, SPE, Jesús M Salazar, SPE. Jun Ma, Ben Voss, and Gong Li Wang, SPE, The University of Texas at Austin Copyright 2007, Society

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

459

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This collaborative project will perform the following tasks to fully define the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoir underlying the Jemez Reservation: - Conduct 1-6,000-scale geologic mapping of 6 mi2 surrounding the Indian Springs area. - Using the detailed geologic map, locate one N-S and two E-W seismic lines and run a seismic survey of 4 mi2; reduce and analyze seismic data using innovative high-resolution seismic migration imaging techniques developed by LANL, and integrate with 3-D audio-frequency MT/MT data acquired at the same area for fault and subsurface structure imaging and resource assessment.

460

4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "techniques borehole seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Definition: Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic)

462

Application of borehole geophysics to fracture identification and characterization in low porosity limestones and dolostones  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical logging was conducted in exploratory core holes drilled for geohydrological investigations at three sites used for waste disposal on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. Geophysical log response was calibrated to borehole geology using the drill core. Subsequently, the logs were used to identify fractures and fractured zones and to characterize the hydrologic activity of such zones. Results of the study were used to identify zones of ground water movement and to select targets for subsequent piezometer and monitoring well installation. Neutron porosity, long- and short-normal resistivity, and density logs exhibit anomalies only adjacent to pervasively fractured zones and rarely exhibit anomalies adjacent to individual fractures, suggesting that such logs have insuf