Sample records for techniques active sensors

  1. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants Re-direct Destination: This report describes research towards the development of...

  2. Intrusion Detection Techniques in Sensor Aikaterini Mitrokotsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the network administrator because communication between the access point and the clients is broadcastPDF PROOF Intrusion Detection Techniques in Sensor Networks Aikaterini Mitrokotsa Department Research has been conducted in wired network Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) for over 25 years. Although

  3. A Study of Approximate Data Management Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    the monitoring operation of sensor nodes by efficiently using their limited energy, bandwidth and computation. The network can therefore be treated as a distributed sensor data management system. Sensor networks differA Study of Approximate Data Management Techniques for Sensor Networks Adonis Skordylis, Niki

  4. Key Predistribution Techniques for Grid-Based Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key Predistribution Techniques for Grid-Based Wireless Sensor Networks Simon R. Blackburn1 , Tuvi sensor networks. Networks consisting of wireless sensor nodes ar- ranged in a grid pattern have many for the instantiation of these schemes. Key words: Key predistribution, wireless sensor networks; symmetric key

  5. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  6. Microwave Sensors Active and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    waves up through high energy gamma waves. Microwaves extend over an important part of the elec be classified as either passive (radiometers) or active (radars). Each sensor class provides unique insight instruments can be divided into two broad classes: pas- sive, known as radiometers, and active, known

  7. Active Sensor Wave Propagation Health Monitoring of Beam and Plate Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Active Sensor Wave Propagation Health Monitoring of Beam and Plate Structures Victor Giurgiutiu, Jingjing Bao, Wei Zhao University of South Carolina ABSTRACT Active sensor wave propagation technique is a relatively new method for in-situ nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Elastic waves propagating in material

  8. Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring with Coupled-Filed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring) is emerging as an effective and powerful technique in structural health monitoring (SHM). Modeling to analytical calculation and experimental data. Key words: Structural Health Monitoring, PWAS, finite element

  9. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical sensors are generally used as one-dimensional devices, where one measures the sensor’s response at a fixed setting, e.g., infrared absorption at a specific wavelength, or conductivity of a solid-state sensor at a specific operating...

  10. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the problem of estimating concentrations of the constituents in a gas mixture using a tunable sensor. We formulate this multicomponent-analysis problem as that of probabilistic state estimation, where each state represents a different concentration profile. We...

  11. Wireless Sensor Network Localization Techniques Guoqiang Mao, Baris Fidan and Brian D.O. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheuermann, Peter

    1 Wireless Sensor Network Localization Techniques Guoqiang Mao, Baris¸ Fidan and Brian D.O. Anderson Abstract-- Wireless sensor network localization is an important area that attracted significant on possible approaches to them. Index Terms-- wireless sensor networks, localization, AOA, RSS, TDOA. I

  12. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors Jingjing Chemical Biological Center, 5183 Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS

  13. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  14. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING: structural health monitoring (SHM), piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), nondestructive evaluation (NDE sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for structural health monitoring (SHM). After

  15. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  16. Techniques for mitigating congestion in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Bret Warren, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Network congestion occurs when offered traffic load exceeds available capacity at any point in a network. In wireless sensor networks, congestion causes overall channel quality to degrade and loss rates to rise, leads to ...

  17. Development and Implementation of a Compensation Technique for Luminescent Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Bradley

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite offering high specificity and speed compared to other methods, the dependency of the response of an enzymatic sensor on ambient oxygen concentrations. To investigate this issue, a reaction-diffusion model was developed using the finite...

  18. Hybrid Data and Decision Fusion Techniques for Model-Based Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Hybrid Data and Decision Fusion Techniques for Model-Based Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor, University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-2564,USA lrossi@usc.edu, bkrishna@usc.edu, cckuo@sipi.usc.edu Abstract-- The data gathering problem in wireless sensor networks for environmental monitoring, where

  19. An Interactive Context-aware Power Management Technique for Optimizing Sensor Network Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    An Interactive Context-aware Power Management Technique for Optimizing Sensor Network Lifetime an important event with desired fidelity). To that end, in this paper we propose a novel interactive power sensor data and system specifications (battery and solar panel specs, sensing and communication costs

  20. Medians and Beyond: New Aggregation Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jie

    databases, Query processing General Terms Algorithms Keywords Sensor Networks, Aggregation, Approximation Algorithms, Dis­ tributed Algorithms # The authors were supported by NSF grant IIS­0121562 and Army Research Organisation grant DAAD19­03­D­0004 through the In­ stitute for Collaborative Biotechnologies. Permission

  1. Medians and Beyond: New Aggregation Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    databases, Query processing General Terms Algorithms, Performance Keywords Sensor Networks, Aggregation, Approximation Algorithms, Dis- tributed Algorithms The authors were supported by NSF grant IIS-0121562 and Army Research Organisation grant DAAD19-03-D-0004 through the In- stitute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

  2. Embedded NDE with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors in Aerospace Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    The capability of embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) to perform in-situ nondestructive evaluation structural radar (EUSR). For quality assurance, PWAS are self-tested with the electromechanical impedance S s T d E D d T E = + = + (1) where E ijkls is the mechanical compliance of the material measured at zero

  3. ECE 501 the Project in lieu of Thesis Mine Detection Techniques Using Multiple Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    This work has four main objects, to survey previous research about mine detection, to collect signature data for the segmentation method. These methods are tested with actual mine data. #12;Table of Content Mine DetectionECE 501 the Project in lieu of Thesis Mine Detection Techniques Using Multiple Sensors Cheolha

  4. Flexible Sensor Array Wraps Beating Hearts to Map Cardiac Activity in Real Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Flexible Sensor Array Wraps Beating Hearts to Map Cardiac Activity in Real Time By Jeremy Hsu Flexible Silicon Sensors Put this sensor on your heart and tell me it's all over University of Illinois Getting a cardiac map of the electrical activity coursing through a live, beating heart has proven

  5. Activity recognition with end-user sensor installation in the home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockinson, Randy Joseph

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a system for recognizing activities in the home setting that uses a set of small and simple state-change sensors, machine learning algorithms, and electronic experience sampling is introduced. The sensors are ...

  6. Space Application of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Space Application of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring** V class of structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper presents and discusses with conclusions and suggestions for further work. Key Words: structural health monitoring, piezoelectric, sensors

  7. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  8. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 10, NO. 6, JUNE 2010 1075 Active Temperature Programming for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    temperature of metal-oxide (MOX) chemical sensors gives rise to gas-specific signatures that provide a wealth. Index Terms--Active sensing, hidden Markov models, metal- oxide (MOX) sensors, partially observable Markov decision pro- cesses (POMDP). I. INTRODUCTION METAL-OXIDE (MOX) gas sensors are robust, inexpen

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 57, NO. 5, MAY 2009 1303 A Chipless RFID Sensor System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phoha, Vir V.

    in the realization of battery-free RFID sensor tags such as tags with energy harvesting power source (eIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 57, NO. 5, MAY 2009 1303 A Chipless RFID

  10. A spatial-temporal imputation technique for classification with missing data in a wireless sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lynne E.

    -- for example, the use of seismic sensors (i.e., "unattended ground sensors") for the purpose of detecting

  11. Active Load Control Techniques for Wind Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinide Chemistry Turbines *Active809

  12. Optimization of amplifiers for monolithic active pixel sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorokhov, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High precision particle tracking and imaging applications require position sensitive detectors with high granularity, good radiation tolerance, low material budget, fast read-out and low power dissipation. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) [1] fabricated in a standard microelectronic technology provide an attractive solution for these demanding applications. The signal-to-noise ratio of MAPS can be increased by using in-pixel ampli ers. The compromise between speed, noise, gain and power consumption has to be achieved in the design of the ampli er. The charge collection ef ciency and total capacitance at the ampli er input is in uenced by the size of charge collecting diode. Therefore, in order to achieve better MAPS performances, both the geometry of the charge collecting diode and the ampli er design have to be considered in the optimization process. In this work different ampli er designs and geometries of the charge collecting diode are proposed. The characterization measurements of the ampli ers fab...

  13. Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors predictive modeling and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors ­ predictive modeling of the state of the art in structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and follows with conclusions and suggestions for further work Key Words: structural health monitoring, SHM, nondestructive

  14. Propagation of guided Lamb waves in bonded specimens using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Propagation of guided Lamb waves in bonded specimens using piezoelectric wafer active sensors and principles used for generation and propagation of ultrasonic guided waves (Lamb waves) using piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS). Keywords: Ultrasonic, Lamb waves, Damage detection, NDE, Wave propagation

  15. Efficient Electromechanical (E/M) Impedance Measuring Method for Active Sensor Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Efficient Electromechanical (E/M) Impedance Measuring Method for Active Sensor Structural Health an impedance analyzer that reads the in-situ E/M impedance of the piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS an improved algorithm for efficient measurement of the E/M impedance using PWAS transducers. Instead of using

  16. Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology in intact adult fruit flies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent, Gilles

    Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology of America Rafael Yuste, Columbia University, New York City, USA Genetically encoded optical indicators hold. However, the interpretation of images of brain activity produced using such sensors is not straightforward

  17. Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    chart show the trends in the power and energy flow behavior with remarkable peaks and valleys that can1 Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors a systematic investigation of power and energy transduction in piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS

  18. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Terzo; A. Macchiolo; R. Nisius; B. Paschen

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 $\\mu$m, produced at CiS, and 100-200 $\\mu$m thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of $1.4\\times10^{16}n_{eq}/cm^{2}$.

  19. activity monitoring sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processing. Individual sensors monitor specific physiological signals (such as EEG, ECG, GSR, etc.) and communicate with each other and the personal server. Personal server...

  20. Empirical Mode Decomposition Technique with Conditional Mutual Information for Denoising Operational Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Protopopescu, Vladimir A [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach is developed for denoising signals using the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) technique and the Information-theoretic method. The EMD technique is applied to decompose a noisy sensor signal into the so-called intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). These functions are of the same length and in the same time domain as the original signal. Therefore, the EMD technique preserves varying frequency in time. Assuming the given signal is corrupted by high-frequency Gaussian noise implies that most of the noise should be captured by the first few modes. Therefore, our proposition is to separate the modes into high-frequency and low-frequency groups. We applied an information-theoretic method, namely mutual information, to determine the cut-off for separating the modes. A denoising procedure is applied only to the high-frequency group using a shrinkage approach. Upon denoising, this group is combined with the original low-frequency group to obtain the overall denoised signal. We illustrate our approach with simulated and real-world data sets. The results are compared to two popular denoising techniques in the literature, namely discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). We found that our approach performs better than DWT and DFT in most cases, and comparatively to DWT in some cases in terms of: (i) mean square error, (ii) recomputed signal-to-noise ratio, and (iii) visual quality of the denoised signals.

  1. Title: Corrosion Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors Authors: Dustin T. Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    0 Title: Corrosion Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors Authors: Dustin T structural problems is corrosion. In fact the KC-135 now costs $1.2 billion a year to repair corrosion) in a pitch-catch configuration. The sensors were placed on a grid pattern. Material loss through corrosion

  2. Structural Health Monitoring with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Space Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural Health Monitoring with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Space Applications Adrian detection and structural health monitoring. Where appropriate, comparison between different methods-coupling coefficient I. Introduction STRUCTURAL health monitoring (SHM) is an emerging research area with multiple

  3. Application of piezoelectric active-sensors for SHM of wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to characterize the dynamic response of a CX-100 wind blade and the design parameters of SHM techniques as they apply to wind turbine blades, and to investigate the performance of high-frequency active-sensing SHM techniques, including lamb wave and frequency response functions, as a way to monitor the health of a wind turbine blade. The results of the dynamic characterization will be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. The focus of SHM study is to assess and compare the performance of each method in identifying incipient damage, with a special consideration given to field deployability. For experiments, a 9-m CX-100 blade was used. Overall, the methods yielded sufficient damage detection to warrant further investigation into field deployment. This paper also summarizes the SHM results of a full-scale fatigue test of 9-m CX-100 blade using piezoelectric active-sensors.

  4. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van [ERM-KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Mlynar, J. [Association Euratom-IPP.CR, Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Za Slovankou 3, CZ-182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Vermaercke, P. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  5. NRA-00-OES-08 A one-year pilot study for the inclusion of active optical sensors into PALACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    NRA-00-OES-08 1 A one-year pilot study for the inclusion of active optical sensors into PALACE, newly-developed solid-state, active optical sensors that measure chlorophyll a fluorescence in the ocean. The incorporation of this new generation of optical sensors on a even a subset of the ARGO floats

  6. Scheduling Sensor Activity for Point Information Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Vikram

    , to monitor some targets of interests at all times. Sensors are often equipped with non-rechargeable batteries such that all targets can be monitored all the time and the network can operate as long as possible. A solution network is the coverage problem [2], which addresses how well a target area is monitored. In some

  7. Design Techniques for Sensor Appliances: Foundations and Light Compass Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    sensors of the appliance, and (2) error minimization-based sensor data interpretation middleware. We have University of California, Los Angeles jwong@cs.ucla.edu Seapahn Megerian University of California, Los Angeles seapahn@cs.ucla.edu Miodrag Potkonjak University of California, Los Angeles miodrag

  8. Radiation interchange modeling for active infrared proximity sensor design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, James Clarice

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to tyle and content by: Sohi Rastegar (Co-Chair of Committee) Rai er J. Fink (Co-Chair of Committee) Hsin-i Wu (Member) ay Kuo (Head of Department) May 1999 Major Subject: Biomedical... necessitating the use of multiple source elements, sensor elements, or both. DEDICATION I dedicate this thesis to my parents and my sisters, who have always supported me in all my endeavors, however foreign to their hearts. VI ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like...

  9. active sensor configuration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind. Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie 2010-01-01 346 Measurements and simulations of MAPS (Monolithic Active Pixel...

  10. Tuned Lamb Wave Excitation and Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    and detect tuned Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is explored. First, a brief review of Lamb waves mode Lamb waves is demonstrated as an effective structural health monitoring method. Key Words: structural health monitoring, Lamb waves, piezoelectric wafer active sensors, aging aircraft, cracks, damage

  11. Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    41 Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring ends with a conceptual design of a structural health monitoring system and suggestions for aging damage detection Á structural health monitoring Á failure prevention Á ultrasonics Á pulse-echo Á emitter

  12. Context-aware energy-efficient wireless sensor architecture for body activity recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    conditions [13], [15], [16], and the usage of devices with higher computing, storage and energy capabilitiesContext-aware energy-efficient wireless sensor architecture for body activity recognition Tifenn 60205 Compičgne, France Abstract--In this paper, we present EEWAA, a new Energy- Efficient Wireless

  13. On the Modeling of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor Impedance Analysis for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    damage assessment, and are considered as a new non-destructive evaluation method. The in-situ impedance of experimental results obtained from previous work. The real part of the measured PWAS impedance presents twoOn the Modeling of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor Impedance Analysis for Structural Health

  14. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  15. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b) the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance

  16. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR the onset and progress of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b

  17. Corrosion Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors Dustin Thomas, John Welter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Corrosion Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors Dustin Thomas, John Welter Air a priority issue for today's Air Force. One of the most critical structural problems is corrosion. In fact the KC-135 now costs $1.2 billion a year to repair corrosion. In this paper, we plan to show the use

  18. BodyScope: A Wearable Acoustic Sensor for Activity Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    , speaking, laughing, and coughing. The F-measure of the Support Vector Machine classification of 12 of activities (e.g., eating, drinking, speaking, laughing and coughing) with BodyScope reveals that the system

  19. Decentralized TDOA Sensor Pairing in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Wei; Lihua, Xie; Wendong, Xiao

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    localization in wireless sensor networks,” IEEE Signallocalization in wireless sensor networks,” IEEE Trans.techniques for wireless sensor networks: A survey,” IEEE

  20. Machine Learning Techniques Applied to Sensor Data Correction in Building Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ; (3) refrigerator energy consumption; (4) heat pump liquid pressure; and (5) water flow. These data@ornl.gov Abstract--Since commercial and residential buildings account for nearly half of the United States' energy sensor's mean value, but took substantially longer to train. I. INTRODUCTION Commercial and residential

  1. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Tuan V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate therethrough to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex.

  2. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, T.V.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate there through to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex. 23 figs.

  3. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crawford, Susan L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konomi, Bledar A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Braatz, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coble, Jamie B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shumaker, Brent [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States); Hashemian, Hash [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of ongoing research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  5. Review of In-situ Fabrication Methods of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor for Sensing and Actuation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Review of In-situ Fabrication Methods of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor for Sensing-echo, and electromechanical impedance methods. Traditionally, structural integrity tests required attachment of sensors and magnitude of the surfaces measured (such as aircraft, bridges, structural supports, etc.). In addition

  6. activation analysis technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  7. activation analysis techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  8. Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique, originally presented on March 12, 2013.

  9. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Brady, T.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several current research programs at the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) relate to the development of activated carbons from Illinois coal, fly ash, and scrap tires. Preparation of activated carbons involves thermal processing steps that include preoxidation, pyrolysis and activation. Reaction time, temperature and gas composition during these processing steps ultimately determine the nature of the activated carbon produced. Thermal analysis plays a significant role in developing carbons by providing fundamental and engineering data that are useful in carbon production and characterization for process development.

  10. Self-activated ultrahigh chemosensitivity of oxide thin film nanostructures for transparent sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Hi Gyu

    One of the top design priorities for semiconductor chemical sensors is developing simple, low-cost, sensitive and reliable sensors to be built in handheld devices. However, the need to implement heating elements in sensor ...

  11. Hybrid intensity and time-of-flight signal processing techniques for intelligent distance sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi, Itariu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of "smart" consumer electronics, distance sensing is an increasingly important field in optical sensing. A novel approach to active infrared(IR) 1D distance sensing is proposed, employing both intensity and ...

  12. The Energy Sensor AMP-activated Protein Kinase Directly Regulates the Mammalian FOXO3 Transcription Factor*S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunet, Anne

    The Energy Sensor AMP-activated Protein Kinase Directly Regulates the Mammalian FOXO3 Transcription of homeostasis throughout an organism's life span requires constant adaptation to changes in energy lev- els. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role in the cellular responses to low energy

  13. DMAPS: a fully depleted monolithic active pixel sensor - analog performance characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Havránek; Tomasz Hemperek; Hans Krüger; Yunan Fu; Leonard Germic; Tetsuichi Kishishita; Theresa Obermann; Norbert Wermes

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) have been developed since the late 1990s based on silicon substrates with a thin epitaxial layer (thickness of 10-15 $\\mu$m) in which charge is collected on an electrode, albeit by disordered and slow diffusion rather than by drift in a directed electric field. As a consequence, the signal is small ($\\approx$ 1000 e$^-$) and the radiation tolerance is much below the LHC requirements by factors of 100 to 1000. In this paper we present the development of a fully Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) based on a high resistivity substrate allowing the creation of a fully depleted detection volume. This concept overcomes the inherent limitations of charge collection by diffusion in the standard MAPS designs. We present results from a test chip EPCB01 designed in a commercial 150 nm CMOS technology. The technology provides a thin (50 $\\mu$m) high resistivity n-type silicon substrate as well as an additional deep p-well which allows to integrate full CMOS circuitry inside the pixel. Different matrix types with several variants of collection electrodes have been implemented. Measurements of the analog performance of this first implementation of DMAPS pixels will be presented.

  14. Monitoring Erebus volcano's active lava lake; tools, techniques and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Nial John

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    are those that persistently expose magma at the Earth’s surface. In this respect, they encompass many of the popular stereo- types of volcanic activity, exhibiting sustained passive degassing, which is often ac- companied sporadically by varying degrees... serves the crater rim was replaced. The old system was approaching ten years of service, and had become overly com- plex, and unreliable. A combination of extreme winds and corrosive gases makes the crater rim of Erebus an unsuitable site for solar panels...

  15. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.B. Thien

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage to the actual pipeline itself, the proposed methods were used to demonstrate the capability of detecting deposits inside of pipelines. Monitoring these deposits can prevent clogging and other hazardous situations. Finally, suggestions are made regarding future research issues which are needed to advance this research. Because the research of this thesis has only demonstrated the feasibility of the techniques for such a SHM system, these issues require attention before any commercial applications can be realized.

  16. IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL.XXX, NO.XXX, XXX 1 Active Detection With A Barrier Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL.XXX, NO.XXX, XXX 1 Active Detection With A Barrier Sensor of publication XXX; date of current version XXX. This work was supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org. Digital Object Identifier XXX source target

  17. Energy Efficient Distributed Data Fusion In Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    processing for a wireless sensor networks. Each circle ’S’techniques in wireless sensor networks: A survey,” IEEEestimation for wireless sensor networks, part i: Gaussian

  18. iCalm: Wearable Sensor and Network Architecture for Wirelessly Communicating and Logging Autonomic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Kelly

    Widespread use of affective sensing in healthcare applications has been limited due to several practical factors, such as lack of comfortable wearable sensors, lack of wireless standards, and lack of low-power affordable ...

  19. Activity recognition in the home setting using simple and ubiquitous sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munguia Tapia, Emmanuel, 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past several years, researchers have demonstrated that when new wireless sensors are placed in the home environment, data collected from them can be used by software to automatically infer context, such as the ...

  20. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  1. Recent CESAR (Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research) research activities in sensor based reasoning for autonomous machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pin, F.G.; de Saussure, G.; Spelt, P.F.; Killough, S.M.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes recent research activities at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) in the area of sensor based reasoning, with emphasis being given to their application and implementation on our HERMIES-IIB autonomous mobile vehicle. These activities, including navigation and exploration in a-priori unknown and dynamic environments, goal recognition, vision-guided manipulation and sensor-driven machine learning, are discussed within the framework of a scenario in which an autonomous robot is asked to navigate through an unknown dynamic environment, explore, find and dock at the panel, read and understand the status of the panel's meters and dials, learn the functioning of a process control panel, and successfully manipulate the control devices of the panel to solve a maintenance emergency problems. A demonstration of the successful implementation of the algorithms on our HERMIES-IIB autonomous robot for resolution of this scenario is presented. Conclusions are drawn concerning the applicability of the methodologies to more general classes of problems and implications for future work on sensor-driven reasoning for autonomous robots are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  2. With the development of the MEMS technology and of wireless networking, the sensor network area has been an active field of research in the last five years. Sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3 The SoC/NoC Model. 16 3.1 System to monitoring applications and provide high resolution obser- vations of the environment. The main constraint of the sensor networks is energy as the nodes are powered with non renewable batteries, and numerous techniques

  3. Power and energy transduction analysis of piezoelectric wafer-active sensors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    the operational safety and reliability, would conceivably reduce the number of unscheduled repairs, and would and the associated safety issues are a growing national concern. Over 27% of our nation's bridges are structurally bring down maintenance cost. The type and efficiency of the SHM sensors play a crucial role in the SHM

  4. Advanced Detector Research - Fabrication and Testing of 3D Active-Edge Silicon Sensors: High Speed, High Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Sherwood I

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of 3D silicon radiation sensors employing electrodes fabricated perpendicular to the sensor surfaces to improve fabrication yields and increasing pulse speeds.

  5. Determination of tritium activity in environmental water samples using gas analyzer techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salsman, John Matthew

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    undesirable when looking for low levels of tritium activity in water. In general, gas analyzer techniques consist of dispersing the radioactive material in some type of gaseous medium and then pressurizing the system with this gas. The analyzer then uses... by reaction with gaseous hydrogen. The vapor HTO is formed readily, as shown by. Equation 2, and is the most commonly encountered form of tritium in the environment. HT + 820 H2 + HTO (2) The accumulation of tritium on the Earth occurs both naturally...

  6. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  7. MULTIFUNCTIONAL VEHICLE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OPPORTUNITIES WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    MULTIFUNCTIONAL VEHICLE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OPPORTUNITIES WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE and the research needs are also discussed. INTRODUCTION Structural Health Monitoring is a major component of the remaining structural life. For the health monitoring of an actual structure, networks of embedded active

  8. Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Transmitter INPUT Transmitter PWAS A'A Electrical response (7-mm transmitter) ­ Active power ­ Reactive power ­ Reactive power is dominant · capacitive behavior 0 200 400 600 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 Electrical Reactive Power frequency (kHz) Power(mW) 21 ^ 2 active RP Y V 21 ^ 2 reactive IP Y V Piezoelectric transduction

  9. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian, E-mail: boma@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  10. Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, Adam Ian

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

  11. Comparison of median frequency between traditional and functional sensor placements during activity monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Selina

    Long-term monitoring is of great clinical relevance. Accelerometers are often used to provide information about activities of daily living. The median frequency (f[subscript m]) of acceleration has recently been suggested ...

  12. A Reconfigurable Active Retrodirective/Direct Conversion Receiver Array for Wireless Sensor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    of California, Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 Abstract -- A reconfigurable active time. In a retrodirective system, the communication link between the transponder and base station can (a), the array system works as a direct conversion receiver and stores data received from remote

  13. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  14. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  15. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  16. Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated Antenna Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Abstract -- In this paper, effects of output harmonic terminations on PAE termination, we observe a substantial increase in PAE and output power. Further, we demonstrate the high

  17. On the Potential of Sensor-Enhanced Active RFIDs Ju-Peng Chen, Tsung-Han Lin, Polly Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    research and development opportunities in optimizing the energy efficiency in the sys- tem design and we the benefit of this sensor-enhanced approach towards energy efficient system design. The application idea derived from additional sensors can help. Our premise is to show in a practical everyday applica- tion

  18. Energy-Efficient Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardei, Mihaela

    successively. Only the sensors from the current active set are responsible for monitoring all targets

  19. Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensor for Assay of Salivary Cholinesterase Enzyme Activity: An Exposure Biomarker of Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary Cholinesterase Enzyme...

  20. Vibration detection in turbomachinery using non-contacting sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Eric D., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments have seen the introduction of multiple Eddy Current Sensors (ECS) into turbomachinery. These sensors employ an active magnetic field to monitor each blade as it passes the sensor. They generate an ...

  1. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L. (Westmont, IL); Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  2. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  3. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  4. Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Taek (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejon, Korea); Luk, Vincent K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

  5. A Current-Sensorless Digital Controller for Active Power Factor Correction Control Based on Kalman Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Jonathan W.

    A Current-Sensorless Digital Controller for Active Power Factor Correction Control Based on Kalman, by replacing the sensor with a Kalman filter, which is essentially a stochastic observer. Experimental results-power techniques are undesirable and the current sensor is too expensive. A Kalman filter [7] can be used

  6. Sensor networks for social networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farry, Michael P. (Michael Patrick)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the development of software that makes use of Bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real-world phenomena using data obtained from sensor networks. ...

  7. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  9. Wireless Sensor Network Energy Conversation Nathan A. Menhorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wireless Sensor Network Energy Conversation Techniques Nathan A. Menhorn October 20, 2005 #12;Contents 1 Introduction to Wireless Sensor Networks 3 1.1 General Overview A Wireless Sensor Network Glossary 68 2 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction to Wireless Sensor Networks 1.1 General

  10. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  11. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  12. Intrusion detection sensor testing tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrusion detection sensors must be frequently tested to verify that they are operational, and they must be periodically tested to verify that they are functioning at required performance levels. Concerns involving this testing can include: The significant amount of manpower required, inconsistent results due to variability in methods and personnel, exposure of personnel to hazardous environments, and difficulty in obtaining access to the areas containing some of the intrusion sensors. To address these concerns, the Department of Energy directed Sandia National Labs. to develop intrusion detection sensor testing tools. Over the past two years Sandia has developed several sensor testing tool prototypes. This paper describes the evolution of an exterior intrusion detection sensor tester and automatic data logger, and also describes various interior intrusion detection sensor test fixtures that can be remotely activated to simulate an intruder.

  13. THE EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTAL CONDITIONS AND EVALUATION TECHNIQUES ON THE ALTERATION OF LOW ACTIVITY GLASSES BY VAPOR HYDRATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Antonin (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Vienna, John D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Strachan, Denis M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vapor hydration test (VHT) is used to study the reaction between different materials and water with the aim to gain insight into the alteration behavior of the materials in aqueous environments. In nuclear waste immobilization, the test is primarily used as a screening tool to identify durable/non-durable glasses, and as a convenient method to generate and identify alteration products for use in performance modeling. The lack of a standard procedure for conducting this test resulted in a number of test methods, thus decreasing the ability to directly compare test results from different sources. In order to optimize the VHT procedure, a series of tests was conducted on simulated low-activity waste (LAW) glasses at temperatures ranging from 150?C to 300?C, with different volumes of water, specimen holders, specimen preparation techniques, and data-evaluation methods. Reaction progress was monitored by measuring the thicknesses of the remaining glass layer and the alteration layer . The apparent alteration rate at which glass is converted into the alteration products was determined from a linear portion of the alteration curve, plotted as a function of time. The resulting procedure for conducting VHT eliminates problems associated with the measurement of alteration layers and enables direct comparison of apparent alteration rates for different materials. Data obtained according to the developed procedure show a correlation with data found in literature.

  14. Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

  15. Picosecond to Second Dynamics Reveals a Structural Transition in Clostridium botulinum NO-Sensor Triggered by the Activator BAY-41-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the mammalian endogenous nitric oxide (NO 41-2272 (a lead compound for drug design in cardiovascular treatment), sGC can also be activatedGC) is the receptor of the endogenous messenger nitric oxide (NO) in many cells. It catalyzes the formation of c

  16. Annotating Smart Environment Sensor Data for Activity Learning S. Szewcyzk, K. Dwan, B. Minor, B.Swedlove, and D. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 52, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2004 2621 High-Q Active Resonators Using Amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Sangwook

    -Q Active Resonators Using Amplifiers and Their Applications to Low Phase-Noise Free-Running and Voltage in the design of low phase-noise oscillators. The proposed new technique uses an amplifier to generate and their applications to the low phase-noise oscillators

  18. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design, Implementation, and EvaluationImplementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim Bolbrock, Guohong Cao, and Tom La of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation

  19. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  20. Characterization of Sensor Performance and Durability for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Characterization of Sensor Performance and Durability for Structural Health Monitoring Systems with regard to successfully implementing Structural Health Monitoring technologies in Air Force systems sensor system design and packaging. Keywords: Structural Health Monitoring, Piezo Wafer Active Sensors

  1. Innovative, Lower Cost Sensors and Controls Yield Better Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors. ORNLs Pooran Joshi shows how the process enables...

  2. Innovative, lower cost sensors and controls yield better energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and controls yield better energy efficiency ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors....

  3. Design & implementation of a wireless sensor prototyping kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hope, Jamison Roger

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, wireless sensor networks (WSN) has become an active area of research among computer scientists. In this work, JONA, a prototyping kit for wireless sensors, will be described. The intention of this kit is ...

  4. ESC: Energy Synchronized Communication in Sustainable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ESC: Energy Synchronized Communication in Sustainable Sensor Networks Yu Gu, Ting Zhu and Tian He Abstract--With advances in energy harvesting techniques, it is now feasible to build sustainable sensor of sustainable sensor networks is to effectively utilize a continuous stream of ambient energy. Instead

  5. Insider Attacker Detection in Wireless Sensor Fang Liu & Xiuzhen Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Xiuzhen "Susan"

    to be low-cost and lack of tamper resistance. The compromise or capture of a sensor releases all the intrusion detection techniques developed for a fixed wired network. A typical low-cost sensor has limited working towards securing sensor networks in the fields of pairwise key establishment [13

  6. Studies on reducing leakage current of large-area silicon microstrip sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsay, W.C. [National Central Univ., Chung-Li (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering]|[Miracle Technology Co., Ltd., Hsin-Chu (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen, Y.A.; Laih, L.H. [National Central Univ., Chung-Li (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [and others

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8 x 4 cm{sup 2} single-sided p{sup +} {minus} i (or {nu}){minus}n{sup +} silicon microstrip sensors with coupling capacitors and polysilicon bias resistors were fabricated with the planar technology, and various techniques used to reduce the leakage currents of sensors and their results are presented. Different gettering processes have been employed to remove the impurities and defects from the sensor active regions, and the Electronic Research and Service Organization (ERSO`s) Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) gettering technique, combined with backside polysilicon and oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) deposition process, was found to be the most effective and suitable one. From the measurement results of the special p{sup +} {minus} i (or {nu}){minus}n{sup +} junction test structures, it was found that the sensor leakage current mainly came from the side-wall leakage of its p{sup +}-strip. A modified LOCal Oxidation of Silicon (LOCOS) isolation process has been used to reduce this side-wall leakage. Also, the Sirtl-etch analysis of the sensor revealed that the side-wall leakage current has been caused by residual boron-implantation defects after annealing. These defects would concentrate along the edge of p{sup +}-strip and be enhanced to cause dislocations by the film-edge-induced stress effect. Several annealing techniques have also been studied to remove the boron-implantation damages. The fabricated prototype sensors have been tested in a beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron area. The test results showed that the sensor concept under study is feasible.

  7. One Packaging Technique of Exposed MEMS Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gate drive Phase I Accomplishment -Modeling An inverter is interfaced with: * A large battery bank for energy storage. * An AC system. A Hawker Genesis battery (13Ah, 12V) and...

  8. One Packaging Technique of Exposed MEMS Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Acknowledgement Acknowledgement * This project is sponsored by the Energy Storage Program, U.S....

  9. Mixed potential sensors for CO monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, R. (Rangachary); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon monoxide sensor based on the phenomenon of 'mixed-potential' has been developed. The sensor consists of platinum and gold wire-electrodes embedded in a Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} electrolyte. The sensor response to 500 ppm of CO in room air is {approx} 100 mV at 400 C. The response time to 90% of level is < 5 sec and the response is stable over a period of several months. Moreover, the sensor to sensor reproducibility of these controlled-interface sensors is excellent. The sensor in combination with an activated carbon filter shows great promise for application as a room air CO monitor.

  10. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  11. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  12. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  13. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  14. Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara, California Sector: Solar

  15. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  16. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  17. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  18. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer, it may impair the ability of the sensor network to function. Therefore, minimizing energy consumption energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  19. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  20. Nanostructures and Porous Silicon: Activity at Interfaces in Sensors & Photocatalytic Reactors Chui-Lai Cheung, New York University, 2010 SURF Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    was the anode. The current density was kept constant anywhere between 3 mA/cm2 and 50 mA/cm2 for each individual be formed by etching silicon wafers under a constant current density in HF solutions. These silicon­ as efficient gas sensors, for example. Metal particles can be deposited on the increased surface area

  1. Duty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    active and dormant states, so as to conserve energy and extend the network lifetime. Unfortunately fails to capture the uniqueness of energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. The sensor nodesDuty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks Feng Wang Jiangchuan Liu School of Computing

  2. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  3. Configurable dynamic privacy for pervasive sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Nan-Wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ubiquitous computing sensor networks have greatly augmented the functionality of interactive media systems by adding the ability to capture and store activity-related information. Analyzing the information recorded from ...

  4. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  5. The AmeriFlux Data Activity and Data System: An Evolving Collection of Data Management Techniques, Tools, Products and Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Krassovski, Misha B [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the U.S. Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Over this period, climate change science has expanded from research focusing on basic understanding of geochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle, to integrated research addressing climate change impacts, vulnerability, adaptation, and mitigation. Interests in climate change data and information worldwide have grown remarkably and, as a result, so have demands and expectations for CDIAC s data systems. To meet the growing demands, CDIAC s strategy has been to design flexible data systems using proven technologies blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. CDIAC development teams are multidisciplinary and include computer science and information technology expertise, but also scientific expertise necessary to address data quality and documentation issues and to identify data products and system capabilities needed by climate change scientists. CDIAC has learned there is rarely a single commercial tool or product readily available to satisfy long-term scientific data system requirements (i.e., one size does not fit all and the breadth and diversity of environmental data are often too complex for easy use with commercial products) and typically deploys a variety of tools and data products in an effort to provide credible data freely to users worldwide. Like many scientific data management applications, CDIAC s data systems are highly customized to satisfy specific scientific usage requirements (e.g., developing data products specific for model use) but are also designed to be flexible and interoperable to take advantage of new software engineering techniques, standards (e.g., metadata standards) and tools and to support future Earth system data efforts (e.g., ocean acidification). CDIAC has provided data management support for numerous long-term measurement projects crucial to climate change science. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We share our approaches in satisfying the challenges of delivering AmeriFlux data worldwide to benefit others with similar challenges handling climate change data, further heighten awareness and use of an outstanding ecological data resource, and highlight expanded software engineering applications being used for climate change measurement data.

  6. "Trace Analysis of Speciality and Electronic Gases," Chapter 4, "Emerging Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques for Gas Analysis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascola, R.; McWhorter, S.; Tittel, F.; Lewicki, R.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications of Semiconductor LAS Based Trace Gas Sensor Systems.

  7. active magnetic regenerative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position...

  8. active rf pulse: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position...

  9. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  10. Achievements of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Nellist

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the HL-LHC upgrade, the ATLAS experiment plans to introduce an all-silicon inner tracker to cope with the elevated occupancy. To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project (PPS) was established comprising 19 institutes and more than 90 scientists. The paper provides an overview of the research and development project and highlights accomplishments, among them: beam test results with planar sensors up to innermost layer fluences (> 10^16 n_eq cm^2); measurements obtained with irradiated thin edgeless n-in-p pixel assemblies; recent studies of the SCP technique to obtain almost active edges by postprocessing already existing sensors based on scribing, cleaving and edge passivation; an update on prototyping efforts for large areas: sensor design improvements and concepts for low-cost hybridisation; comparison between Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry results and TCAD simulations. Together, these results allow an assessment of the state-of-the-art with respect to radiation-hard position-sensitive tracking detectors suited for the instrumentation of large areas.

  11. Evaluation of infrasound sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kromer, R.P.; McDonald, T.S.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia is evaluating the performance of various infrasound sensors that could be used as part of the International Monitoring Systems (IMS). Specifications for infrasound stations are outlined in CTBT/PC/II/1/Add.2. This document specifies minimum requirements for sensor, digitizer and system. The infrasound sensors evaluation task has the following objectives: provide an overview of the sensors presently in use; evaluate these sensors with respect to the requirements of the IMS.

  12. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Jacobson, K. Bruce (Oak Ridge, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN); Kennel, Stephen J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  13. Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channel-Specific Wireless Sensor Network Path Data”. In:Average Power in Wireless Sensor Networks through Data Ratedesign space of wireless sensor networks”. In: IEEE Wireless

  14. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gale et al. (2006) and evaluation of sensor performance byConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systemsConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systems

  15. New functional polymers for sensors, smart materials and solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobez Comeras, Jose Miguel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic polymers can be used as the active component of sensors, smart materials, chemical-delivery systems and the active layer of solar cells. The rational design and modification of the chemical structure of polymers ...

  16. Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on an embedded server, and temperature sensors that were distributed throughout the house. The residence is divided into four Control Zones. Zone 1 contains the downstairs living, dining, and kitchen area. Zone 2 contains the bathrooms and laundry... radiation. The temperature and humidity sensors are manufactured by Sensirion, models SH11 and SH15. The light sensors consist of a thermally sensitive radiation sensor (TSR) and a photosynthetic active radiation sensor, manufactured by Hamamatsu...

  17. Imaging of absolute electrical properties using electroquasistatic and magnetoquasistatic sensor arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlicker, Darrell Eugene

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the enhancement of electroquasistatic and magnetoquasistatic nondestructive evaluation techniques. The terminals of the sensors involved are connected to conductors which are traditionally located ...

  18. Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kevin

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report details research works performed supported by a Department of Energy grant (DE-FE0003859), which was awarded under the University Coal Research Program administrated by National Energy Technology Laboratory. This research program studied high temperature fiber sensor for harsh environment applications. It developed two fiber optical sensor platform technology including regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed fiber optical sensing based on Rayleigh backscattering optical frequency domain reflectometry. Through the studies of chemical and thermal regenerative techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fabrication, high-temperature stable FBG sensors were successfully developed and fabricated in air-hole microstructured fibers, high-attenuation fibers, rare-earth doped fibers, and standard telecommunication fibers. By optimizing the laser processing and thermal annealing procedures, fiber grating sensors with stable performance up to 1100oC have been developed. Using these temperature-stable FBG gratings as sensor platform, fiber optical flow, temperature, pressure, and chemical sensors have been developed to operate at high temperatures up to 800oC. Through the integration of on-fiber functional coating, the use of application-specific air-hole microstructural fiber, and application of active fiber sensing scheme, distributed fiber sensor for temperature, pressure, flow, liquid level, and chemical sensing have been demonstrated with high spatial resolution (1-cm or better) with wide temperature ranges. These include the demonstration of 1) liquid level sensing from 77K to the room temperature, pressure/temperature sensing from the room temperature to 800C and from the 15psi to 2000 psi, and hydrogen concentration measurement from 0.2% to 10% with temperature ranges from the room temperature to 700C. Optical sensors developed by this program has broken several technical records including flow sensors with the highest operation temperature up to 750oC, first distributed chemical measurements at the record high temperature up to 700oC, first distributed pressure measurement at the record high temperature up to 800oC, and the fiber laser sensors with the record high operation temperature up to 700oC. The research performed by this program dramatically expand the functionality, adaptability, and applicability of distributed fiber optical sensors with potential applications in a number of high-temperature energy systems such as fossil-fuel power generation, high-temperature fuel cell applications, and potential for nuclear energy systems.

  19. Sequence-Based Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Sequence-Based Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks Kiran Yedavalli and Bhaskar Krishnamachari Abstract--We introduce a novel sequence-based localization technique for wireless sensor networks. We show that the localization space can be divided into distinct regions that can each be uniquely identified by sequences

  20. Application of proximity sensors to robotic manipulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Rainer J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor based finger attached to a UMI RTX robot. Although the system operated quite slowly, Etter reported that the system functioned as a voice activated assist system for grasping stationary objects. Results indicated that a more sensitive, accurate...APPLICATION OF PROXIMITY SENSORS TO ROBOTIC MANIPULATIONS A Thesis by RAINER Z. FINK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

  1. Autonomous Robot System for Sensor Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Frank Carney; Miles Walton; Heather Hunting; Ron Lujan

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses an innovative application of new Markov localization techniques that combat the problem of odometry drift, allowing a novel control architecture developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to be utilized within a sensor characterization facility developed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) in Nevada. The new robotic capability provided by the INEEL will allow RSL to test and evaluate a wide variety of sensors including radiation detection systems, machine vision systems, and sensors that can detect and track heat sources (e.g. human bodies, machines, chemical plumes). By accurately moving a target at varying speeds along designated paths, the robotic solution allows the detection abilities of a wide variety of sensors to be recorded and analyzed.

  2. Millimeter-wave sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seoktae

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter wave interferometric, multifunctional sensors have been studied for industrial sensing applications: displacement measurement, liquid-level gauging and velocimetry. Two types of configuration were investigated to implement the sensor...

  3. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  4. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  5. Loss-Resilient Proactive Data Transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jianliang

    environments. Moreover, sensor nodes are con- strained by energy, computation power and storage. Existing to the destination without loss. However, existing reliable transmission techniques either are too costly forecast, structural condition assessment) require reliable data communications, such that a target

  6. This paper presents an investigation of power and energy transduction in piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) on isotropic structure for structural health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    crested wave pattern. The power and energy transduction flow chart for a complete pitch-catch setup to structure. This 1-D and 2-D model allows examination of power and energy flow for linear and circular is sensed by active interrogation of the structure with elastic waves. The power and energy flow in active

  7. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  8. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a full-range, low cast humidity sensor has led Honeywell to develop a capacitive relative humidity (RH) sensor with resistance to environmental contaminants. The sensor is used in a bridge circuit to give either a voltage or a current...

  9. Sensor Networks and Consensus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    3 Dic 2009 1/32 Sensor Networks and Consensus An application: Localization and Tracking Distributed Sensors Calibration Randomized Kalman Filter Distributed Kalman Smoother Simone Del Favero PhD Thesis: Localization and Tracking Distributed Sensors Calibration Randomized Kalman Filter Distributed Kalman Smoother

  10. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a full-range, low cast humidity sensor has led Honeywell to develop a capacitive relative humidity (RH) sensor with resistance to environmental contaminants. The sensor is used in a bridge circuit to give either a voltage or a current...

  11. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  12. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance for Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Charles C [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Rossiter, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Hensley, Zachary [Tennessee Technological University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on technologies that use a wide range of sensors to develop and characterize building energy performance. The management of high-resolution sensor data, analysis, and tracing lineage of such activities is challenging. Missing or corrupt data due to sensor failure, fouling, drifting, calibration error, or data logger failure is another issue. This paper focuses on sensor data management, validation, correction, and provenance to combat these issues, ensuring complete and accurate sensor datasets for building technologies applications and research. The design and development of two integrated software products are discussed: Sensor Data Validation and Correction (SensorDVC) and the Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS) platform.

  13. Optimized Node Selection for Compressive Sleeping Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei; Wassell, Ian J.

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    1Optimized Node Selection for Compressive Sleeping Wireless Sensor Networks Wei Chen, Member, IEEE, and Ian J. Wassell Abstract—In this paper, we propose an active node selection framework for compressive sleeping wireless sensor networks (WSNs... development oftechnologies in sensing, computing and communication has made it possible to employ wireless sensor networks (WSNs) to continuously monitor physical phenomena in a variety of applications, for example air quality monitoring, wildlife tracking...

  14. Unattended ground sensor situation assessment workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeppesen, D.; Trellue, R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective utilization of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) in a theater reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and kill assessment environment requires that a human operator be able to interpret, and collectively assess, the significance of real time data obtained from UGS emplacements over large geographical regions of interest. The products of this UGS data interpretation and assessment activity can then be used in the decision support process for command level evaluation of appropriate courses of action. Advancements in both sensor hardware technology and in software systems and processing technology have enabled the development of practical real time situation assessment capabilities based upon information from unattended ground sensors. A decision support workstation that employs rule-based expert system processing of reports from unattended ground sensors is described. The primary goal of this development activity is to produce a suite of software to track vehicles using data from unattended ground sensors. The situational assessment products from this system have stand-alone utility, but are also intended to provide cueing support for overhead sensors and supplementary feeds to all-source fusion centers. The conceptual framework, developmental architecture, and demonstration field tests of the system are described.

  15. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  16. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged to the sharing of sensor resources in wireless sensor networks. There are several issues and challenges

  17. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  18. Modeling Human Behavior from Simple Sensors in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canny, John

    Modeling Human Behavior from Simple Sensors in the Home Ryan Aipperspach, Elliot Cohen, and John {ryanaip, jfc}@cs.berkeley.edu, emcohen3@berkeley.edu Abstract. Pervasive sensors in the home have a variety of applications including energy minimization, activity monitoring for elders, and tutors

  19. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  20. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  1. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  2. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  3. EVALUATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE CHILDREN: AN APPLICATION OF DYNAMIC P-TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borner, Kelsey

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    activity can be detrimental to HRQOL, regardless of current weight status. More consistent associations between physical activity and quality of life have been demonstrated among adults (Vuillemin et al., 2005; Penedo & Dahn, 2005), but less is known...

  4. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  5. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

  6. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; /SINTEF, Oslo; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; /SLAC; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  7. Towards optimal energy-quality tradeoff in tracking via sensor Alessio Benavoli and Luigi Chisci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisci, Luigi

    proportional to the number of active sensors, energy efficiency calls for the implementation, inside about the current sensor energy status. This is certainly efficient in terms of tracking qualityTowards optimal energy-quality tradeoff in tracking via sensor networks Alessio Benavoli and Luigi

  8. We propose a wearable PIR thermal sensor system that can help users to perceive the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    We propose a wearable PIR thermal sensor system that can help users to perceive the surrounding environment from a thermal perspective. Wireless PIR sensor network technology has been developed to track and recognize multiple moving human subjects, as well as understand their activities. However, the PIR sensor

  9. QueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    , it uses a series of custom active infrared sensors to detect the length of a line in a store or restaurant the design, implementation, and evaluation of QueueTrak, a sensor network that measures the length of linesQueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network Jared Alexander, Matthew

  10. 6189-47, Session 10 Optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensor for real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6189-47, Session 10 Optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensor for real-time in-plane vibration-contact, low-cost optical sensor for real time detection and active vibration control of mechanical devices sensitivity to any translational vibration. The calibration of the sensor is independent of the optical

  11. Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  12. SET/RESET PULSE CIRCUITS FOR MAGNETIC SENSORS AN-201 Honeywell's line of magnetoresistive permalloy sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SET/RESET PULSE CIRCUITS FOR MAGNETIC SENSORS AN-201 Honeywell's line of magnetoresistive permalloy be achieved by using Honeywell's unique on-chip current strap to set/reset the permalloy film. This technique about the zero field output. Honeywell has a patented on-chip current strap for performing this re

  13. Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical...

  14. Gyro Enhanced Orientation Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal

    ­ container handling, hydraulic lift systems, machine tools www.microstrain.com #12;Copyright © 2006 Micro3DM-GX1® Gyro Enhanced Orientation Sensor Technical Product Overview Micro Sensors.Big Ideas protocol. Embedded microcontrollers relieve the host system from the burden of orientation calculations

  15. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  16. Inference in sensor networks : graphical models and particle methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihler, Alexander T. (Alexander Thomas), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensor networks have quickly risen in importance over the last several years to become an active field of research, full of difficult problems and applications. At the same time, graphical models have shown themselves to ...

  17. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  18. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris B. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  19. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  20. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  1. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim on implementation and evaluation due to the difficulty of building mobile sensors. In the litera- ture, some--Mobile sensors are useful in many environments because they can move to increase the sensing coverage

  2. Mobile RobotsSensor Networks Autonomous Sensor/Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breu, Ruth

    mobile networks with dynamic topology Optimized task allocation and communication based on application and energy constraints Secure communication and data management in mobile sensor networks Solution SpaceMobile RobotsSensor Networks Autonomous Sensor/Actuator Networks ROSES RObot assisted SEnsor

  3. Portable Analyzer Based on Microfluidics/Nanoengineered Electrochemical Sensors for in Situ Characterization of Mixed Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Joseph

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable Analyzer Based on Microfluidic/Nanoengineered Electrochemical Sensors for in Situ Characterization of Mixed Wastes PI: Dr. Joseph Wang (In Collaboration with the PNNL PI Dr. Y. Lin). Objective of Research: This research effort aims at developing a portable analytical system for fast, sensitive, and inexpensive, on-site monitoring of toxic transition metals and radionuclides in contaminated DOE Sites. The portable devices will be based on Microscale Total Analytical systems ( -TAS) or 'Lab-on-a-chip' in combination with electrochemical (stripping-voltammetric) sensors. The resulting microfluidics/electrochemical sensor system would allow testing for toxic metals to be performed more rapidly, inexpensively, and reliably in a field setting. Progress Summary/Accomplishments: This report summarizes the ASU activity over the second year of the project. In accordance to our original objectives our studies have focused on various fundamental and practical aspects of sensing and microchip devices for monitoring metal contaminants. As described in this section, we have made a substantial progress, and introduced effective routes for improving the on-site detection of toxic metals and for interfacing microchips with the real world. This activity has already resulted in 7 research papers (published or in press in major international journals). The electrochemical sensors being developed rely on the highly sensitive adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) technique to detect metal ions of interest to the DOE, particularly uranium and chromium. Traditionally, AdSV measurements of U and Cr require the use of mercury electrodes which are not suitable attractive for field deployment. Our initial goal was thus to replace these toxic mercury electrodes with 'environmentally-friendly' sensor materials. In particular, we demonstrated recently that bismuth-film electrodes offer high-quality measurements of heavy metals that compare favorably with that of mercury electrodes. Bismuth is a 'green' element, with very low toxicity, and widespread pharmaceutical use. A major effort of our activity this year has been devoted to the development of a 'mercury-free' uranium sensor based on the bismuth film electrode. Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have thus been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping voltammetric measurements of trace uranium in the presence of the cupferron complexing agent.

  4. Aircraft as a meteorological sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Meteorological Institute 2 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Photo cover: A KLM Airbus A330-200 landsAircraft as a meteorological sensor Using Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance data to derive upper air Meteorological Institute 3 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Aircraft as a meteorological sensor Using

  5. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

    1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  6. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  7. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  8. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  9. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  10. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  11. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  12. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed to place the sensor nodes in the field. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  13. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  14. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  15. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  17. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM); Lentine, Anthony L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  18. High-sensitivity optical monitoring of a micro-mechanical resonator with a quantum-limited optomechanical sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Arcizet; P. -F. Cohadon; T. Briant; M. Pinard; A. Heidmann; J. -M. Mackowski; C. Michel; L. Pinard; O. Francais; L. Rousseau

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate the high-sensitivity optical monitoring of a micro-mechanical resonator and its cooling by active control. Coating a low-loss mirror upon the resonator, we have built an optomechanical sensor based on a very high-finesse cavity (30000). We have measured the thermal noise of the resonator with a quantum-limited sensitivity at the 10^-19 m/rootHz level, and cooled the resonator down to 5K by a cold-damping technique. Applications of our setup range from quantum optics experiments to the experimental demonstration of the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical resonator.

  19. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  20. Novel Hall sensors developed for magnetic field imaging systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cambel, V.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Bartolome, E.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Soltys, J.; Materials Science Division; Slovak Academy of Sciences; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here on the fabrication and application of novel planar Hall sensors based on shallow InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) as an active layer. The sensors are developed for two kinds of experiments. In the first one, magnetic samples are placed directly on the Hall sensor. Room temperature experiments of permalloy objects evaporated onto the sensor are presented. In the second experiment, the sensor scans close over a multigranular superconducting sample prepared on a YBCO thin film. Large-area and high-resolution scanning experiments were performed at 4.2 K with the Hall probe scanning system in a liquid helium flow cryostat.

  1. Wireless Sensor Networks for Home Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Sensor Networks for Home Health Care Chris R.Cooperation between wireless sensor networks and existingapplications of wireless sensor networks. In this paper we

  2. Special Issue on “Wireless Sensor Networks”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Kung; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Qing

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Special Issue on “Wireless Sensor Networks” Kung Yao & Qianand tracking, etc. Wireless sensor networks utilize theaspects of wireless sensor networks. The first paper, “

  3. Data Transport Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongwei; Naik, Vinayak S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Congestion in Wireless Sensor Networks. ACM SenSys SandeepJohn Anderson (2002). Wireless Sensor Networks for HabitatWorkshop on Wireless Sensor Networks and Applications Miklos

  4. Antenna-based "Smart Skin" Sensors for Sustainable, Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Antenna-based "Smart Skin" Sensors for Sustainable, Wireless Sensor Networks Hoseon Leet, George-less, or sustainable, wireless sensor networks with "smart skin" sensor nodes. These sensors are highly applicable a wireless sensor network with smart sensors requires a lot of power due to the mass number of sensor nodes

  5. Chemical micro-sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical capillary electrophoresis system for analyzing an analyte. A modulated optical pump beam impinges on an capillary containing the analyte/buffer solution which is separated by electrophoresis. The thermally-induced change in the index of refraction of light in said electrophoresis capillary is monitored using an integrated micro-interferometer. The interferometer includes a first interferometer arm intersecting the electrophoresis capillary proximate the excitation beam and a second, reference interferometer arm. Changes in index of refraction in the analyte measured by interrogating the interferometer state using white light interferometry and a phase-generated carrier demodulation technique. Background thermo-optical activity in the buffer solution is cancelled by splitting the pump beam and exciting pure buffer solution in a second section of capillary where it crosses the reference arm of the interferometer.

  6. Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    portions of the fuselage #12;Dr. Victor Giurgiutiu - Univ. South Carolina3 Motivation ­ American Airlines Giurgiutiu - Univ. South Carolina5 The Opportunity The Need: - Integrated Vehicle Health Management system Victor Giurgiutiu (jurjutzu) University of South Carolina #12;Motivation: Aloha Airlines Boeing 737 April

  7. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  8. Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSLInformationMissouri:Catalyst2-M Probe Survey

  9. Estimating pixel variances in the scenes of staring sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simonson, Katherine M. (Cedar Crest, NM); Ma, Tian J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for detecting changes in a scene perceived by a staring sensor is disclosed. The technique includes acquiring a reference image frame and a current image frame of a scene with the staring sensor. A raw difference frame is generated based upon differences between the reference image frame and the current image frame. Pixel error estimates are generated for each pixel in the raw difference frame based at least in part upon spatial error estimates related to spatial intensity gradients in the scene. The pixel error estimates are used to mitigate effects of camera jitter in the scene between the current image frame and the reference image frame.

  10. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today outside of cost, derive from excessive false positives and false negatives arising from signal drift and unstable sensor baseline; both of these problems necessitate the need for unacceptable frequent calibration.

  11. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  12. A Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khedo, Kavi K; Mungur, Avinash; Mauritius, University of; Mauritius,; 10.5121/ijwmn.2010.2203

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensor networks are currently an active research area mainly due to the potential of their applications. In this paper we investigate the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) for air pollution monitoring in Mauritius. With the fast growing industrial activities on the island, the problem of air pollution is becoming a major concern for the health of the population. We proposed an innovative system named Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System (WAPMS) to monitor air pollution in Mauritius through the use of wireless sensors deployed in huge numbers around the island. The proposed system makes use of an Air Quality Index (AQI) which is presently not available in Mauritius. In order to improve the efficiency of WAPMS, we have designed and implemented a new data aggregation algorithm named Recursive Converging Quartiles (RCQ). The algorithm is used to merge data to eliminate duplicates, filter out invalid readings and summarise them into a simpler form which significantly reduce the amount of dat...

  13. Demo: On the High Quality Sensor Placement for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    Demo: On the High Quality Sensor Placement for Structural Health Monitoring Bo Li Dept. of Civil for structural health monitoring systems today. Existing studies on sensor systems from computer science associated with these techniques less useful. We consider the structural health monitoring (SHM) appli

  14. Secure Proximity Detection for NFC Devices based on Ambient Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Nitesh

    relay attack against such systems. In this paper, we develop secure proximity detection techniques based sensors. Keywords: NFC, RFID, relay attacks, context awareness, sensors 1 Introduction Radio Frequency launching test programs of NFC based payment system in the US [8]. It is predicted that mobile payments

  15. TinyVM: An Energy-Efficient Execution Infrastructure for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgstaller, Bernd

    TinyVM: An Energy-Efficient Execution Infrastructure for Sensor Networks Technical Report CS@cs.yonsei.ac.kr scholz@it.usyd.edu.au ABSTRACT Energy-efficient implementation techniques for virtual machines (VMs) have that bytecode interpretation is affordable for sensor networks if we synthesize VMs specifically for energy-efficiency

  16. Research Themes and Tasks CIOSS activities are described within three categories: Administration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    . Satellite Sensors and Techniques: Evaluation of existing and proposed satellite sensors, algorithms in this category, as are workshops designed to develop or evaluate present and planned sensors and techniques. b of CIOSS research is to develop, evaluate, improve and use methods of ocean remote sensing and ocean

  17. Structural vibration measurement and analysis using a novel digital sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minier, Elizabeth Altagracia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the sensors into the laminae of a composite material. The primary uses of these sensors include providing feedback signals to active vibration dampers and reporting the occurance of damage. It is the purview of the conceptual designer to exploit new.../QB = BN3903 NPN Transistor Figure 8. Schematic diagram of digital sensor circuit 24 will snap "high". Similarly as the signal falls below the reference level, the outputs will snap "low". The resulting signals are near-square wave outputs at two logic...

  18. Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic University of California, Berkeley Sing Yiu Cheung, Sinem Coleri, and Pravin Varaiya 2 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle wireless sensor networks compete? 7 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle

  19. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  20. Unsupervised Activity Analysis and Monitoring Algorithms for Effective Surveillance Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in escalators and at platforms as well as human presence at lift ) that provide a global view of the activ- ity of sensors deployed in the real world, being it in large scale sensor networks or closed-circuit television

  1. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  2. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  3. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  4. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  5. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  6. Development and Implementation of a Compensation Technique for Luminescent Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Bradley

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    suitable method for monitoring multiple responses in vivo has yet to be developed. Due to the measurement flexibility provided by luminescence, a time-domain luminescence lifetime measurement system was developed. The Dynamic Rapid Lifetime Determination...

  7. Statistical Pattern Recognition Techniques for Target Differentiation using Infrared Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barshan, Billur

    systems [1, 2, 3]. Dif- ferentiation is also important in industrial applications where different detector. These devices are inexpensive, practical, and widely available. The emitted light is reflected classifiers) for target differentiation. We provide a comparison of these approaches based on real data

  8. Tactile sensing using elastomeric sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaodan (Xiaodan Stella)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GelSight, namely, elastomeric sensor, is a novel tactile sensor to get the 3D information of contacting surfaces. Using GelSight, some tactile properties, such as softness and roughness, could be gained through image ...

  9. Portable Analyzer Based on Microfluidics, Nanoengineered Electrochemical Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Joseph

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the NMSU activity over the first year of the project (i.e., the 11/03-8/04 period). This research effort aims at developing a portable analytical system for fast, sensitive, and inexpensive, on-site monitoring of toxic transition metals and radionuclides in contaminated DOE Sites. In accordance to our original objectives our studies have focused on various fundamental and practical aspects of microchip devices for monitoring metal contaminants. As described in this section, we have made a substantial progress, and introduced effective routes for improving the reliability of devices for field screening of toxic metals. This 11-mos activity has already resulted in 2 research papers (published or in press in major journals), and several invited presentations in major meetings. (Several more publications are expected in the late part of 2004.) The electrochemical sensors being investigated rely on the highly sensitive adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) technique to detect metal ions of interest to the DOE, particularly uranium and chromium.

  10. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  11. Chemical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  12. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  13. A Comparison of Digital Signal Extraction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M; Dowla, F

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the performance of two methods of digital filtering to detect a radioactive source moving past a gamma-ray sensor. The first method is the box-car filter, which is a standard method used in the detection of a moving radioactive source. The second method is the matched filter, which takes into account the variation in the number of photons absorbed in a gamma-ray sensor as a source moves past the sensor. We optimize both methods to detect a source moving at 5, 10, 15 and 20 mph, and the receiver-operator characteristics of the two techniques are plotted for comparison. The improvement of the matched filter over the box car filter is 27% at 5 mph and 22% at 10 mph for a 90% probability of detection and an average hours between false alarms equal to 10.

  14. Sensors & Measurement | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Electronics Systems Research Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Sensors &...

  15. Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Lothian, Josh [ORNL

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

  16. Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineering Laboratory Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors are rapidly becoming the technology of choiceFuture Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors

  17. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  18. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  19. Sensors and Controls Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Maley; Robert R. Romanosky

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher operating efficiencies, emission reductions, improved reliability, and lower operating costs are benefits that the power industry can realize with the utilization of sensors and controls. However, for the power industry to derive the maximum benefit from sensors and controls, improvements in existing technologies and novel approaches to challenging measurements are needed. Recognizing the importance of sensors and controls, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a sensors and controls workshop on April 17 to 18, 2001, in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on identifying technology needs in sensors and controls for existing fossil-energy power plants as well as future facilities conceived under the Vision 21 Program. Forty-six experts from 29 organizations, including private industry, research laboratories, academia, and government agencies, attended the workshop. The meeting opened with keynote speakers from NETL and the private sector. NETL officials spoke of the Vision 21 and advanced research programs. Speakers from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Delphi Automotive Systems Research Laboratory discussed the improvements realized with their respective operation through the use of sensors and controls. NETL keynote speakers Robert Romanosky and Carl Bauer emphasized that developing sensor and control systems plays a critical role in DOE Office of Fossil Energy Vision 21 Program, clean coal activities under the Power Plant Improvement Initiative, and the proposed Clean Coal Power Initiative. The Vision 21 Program is aimed at providing technologies for ultra-clean fossil-fuel-based energy production with 60- to 75-percent efficiencies and near zero emissions. The program also uses a modular approach to present opportunities to not only generate power, but also co-produce clean fuels, chemicals, steam, and other useful products. The ultra-high efficiency and environmental performance goals of the Vision 21 Program mean that facilities must operate at optimum conditions, while adapting in real-time to changes in load and feedstock. These are challenging performance goals. They will require advanced control and sensing systems that can be adapted and optimized in real time. To improve the overall plant performance of existing power plants, one of the most cost-effective methods is to update the sensor and control systems.

  20. IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

    2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: ? Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, ? Selects the right sensors for process conditions ? Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and ? Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur. This paper discusses the process to identify and demonstrate new sensor technologies for the Savannah River TP.

  1. Gas Main Sensor and Communications Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagen Schempf

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatika, Inc. was contracted by the Department of Energy (DOE) and with co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), to develop an in-pipe natural gas prototype measurement and wireless communications system for assessing and monitoring distribution networks. This projected was completed in April 2006, and culminated in the installation of more than 2 dozen GasNet nodes in both low- and high-pressure cast-iron and steel mains owned by multiple utilities in the northeastern US. Utilities are currently logging data (off-line) and monitoring data in real time from single and multiple networked sensors over cellular networks and collecting data using wireless bluetooth PDA systems. The system was designed to be modular, using in-pipe sensor-wands capable of measuring, flow, pressure, temperature, water-content and vibration. Internal antennae allowed for the use of the pipe-internals as a waveguide for setting up a sensor network to collect data from multiple nodes simultaneously. Sensor nodes were designed to be installed with low- and no-blow techniques and tools. Using a multi-drop bus technique with a custom protocol, all electronics were designed to be buriable and allow for on-board data-collection (SD-card), wireless relaying and cellular network forwarding. Installation options afforded by the design included direct-burial and external polemounted variants. Power was provided by one or more batteries, direct AC-power (Class I Div.2) and solar-array. The utilities are currently in a data-collection phase and intend to use the collected (and processed) data to make capital improvement decisions, compare it to Stoner model predictions and evaluate the use of such a system for future expansion, technology-improvement and commercialization starting later in 2006.

  2. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  3. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  4. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  5. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  6. Analytical Analysis of Data and Decision Fusion in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay

    accuracy and reliability of sensed readings of a network of wireless devices, while increasing the lifetime the significance of CSP might prompt hardware and software designers to optimize wireless sensor networks operations by simple averaging techniques. In practice, d is much larger than f. Therefore, total

  7. Power Control for Mobile Sensor Networks: An Experimental Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Power Control for Mobile Sensor Networks: An Experimental Approach JeongGil Ko Department--Techniques for controlling the transmission power of wireless mobile devices have been widely studied in ad-hoc and cellular characteristics of these networks, such as severe resource constraints, suggest that transmission power control

  8. Broadband UHF RFID/Sensor Modules for Pervasive Cognition Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    printing, can be used instead of metal etching techniques. In addition, paper is compatible with circuit additional modules like sensors and batteries to be mounted on or embedded in. A fast process like inkjet constant r (~3) is close to air's which means electromagnetic power can penetrate easily even if the RFID

  9. Analytical Chemistry CHM1102H Biosensors & Chemical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    hyphenated techniques that bridge to information detectors such as mass spectrometers. New opportunitiesAnalytical Chemistry CHM1102H Biosensors & Chemical Sensors (Cross-listed Undergraduate CHM414H-called "electronic nose". CHM1103H Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry (Cross-listed Undergraduate CHM414H - UTM

  10. Protecting bridges: reorganizing sensor networks after catastrophic events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bölöni, Ladislau L

    ¨ol¨oni and Damla Turgut Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Orlando cycle of a sensor network is the fragmentation of a network which still has many functional and well of packets. This paper describes the Bridge Protection Algorithm (BPA), a combination of techniques which

  11. Cross-Database Evaluation Using an Open Finger Vein Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , transmitting NIR light around 850nm through the finger appears to be a suitable technique to image the vein. in 2001 and obtained in 2004 [4]. Commercial physical access control devices based on finger vein were]. As a consequence, research on finger vein recognition requires both to develop and build sensors as well

  12. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  13. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  14. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  15. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  16. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  17. U.S. IOOS Regional Association Ocean Acidificiation Monitoring Activities April 2013 update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Activity Funding Source ACT FY12 ­ pH sensor evaluation ACT Fy10 and FY11 ­ pCO2 sensor evaluation ACT and biogeochemical controls on OA. AOOS AOOS contributes funds to a consortium to support maintenance of OA sensors, AOOS funds were used to add OA sensors to an NSF-funded mooring in the Chukchi Sea, enabling

  18. A Simple Technique for Islanding Detection with Negligible Nondetection Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirtley Jr, James L.

    Although active islanding detection techniques have smaller nondetection zones than passive techniques, active methods could degrade the system power quality and are not as simple and easy to implement as passive methods. ...

  19. Advanced technologies for perimeter intrusion detection sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.D.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of integrated circuit fabrication techniques and the resulting devices have contributed more to the advancement of exterior intrusion detectors and alarm assessment devices than any other technology. The availability of this technology has led to the improvements in and further development of smaller more powerful computers, microprocessors, solid state memories, solid state cameras, thermal imagers, low-power lasers, and shorter pulse width and higher frequency electronic circuitry. This paper presents information on planning a perimeter intrusion detection system, identifies the site characteristics that affect its performance, and describes improvements to perimeter intrusion detection sensors and assessment devices that have been achieved by using integrated circuit technology.

  20. Sensor Development and Readout Prototyping for the STAR Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, L.; Anderssen, E.; Matis, H.S.; Ritter, H.G.; Stezelberger, T.; Szelezniak, M.; Sun, X.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designing a new vertex detector. The purpose of this upgrade detector is to provide high resolution pointing to allow for the direct topological reconstruction of heavy flavor decays such as the D{sup 0} by finding vertices displaced from the collision vertex by greater than 60 microns. We are using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) as the sensor technology and have a coupled sensor development and readout system plan that leads to a final detector with a <200 {micro}s integration time, 400 M pixels and a coverage of -1 < {eta} < 1. We present our coupled sensor and readout development plan and the status of the prototyping work that has been accomplished.

  1. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Wang; H. Xiao; R. May

    1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient and complete recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has proven difficult due to a lack of robust instrumentation that can monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multi-lateral wells. The main objective of the research program is to develop cost-effective, reliable fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring and /or control of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. This report presents the detailed research work and technical progress from October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999. The research performed over the first year of the program has followed the schedule as proposed, and solid research progress has been made in specification of the technical requirements, design and fabrication of the SCIIB sensor probes, development of the sensor systems, development of DSP-based signal processing techniques, and construction of the test systems. These technical achievements will significantly help to advance continued research on sensor tests and evaluation during the second year of the program.

  2. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  3. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  4. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  5. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  6. Sensor Network Demonstration for In Situ Decommissioning - 13332

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Rivera, J.; McGill, J. [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)] [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and large scale demonstrations of promising technologies. During FY11, FIU collaborated with Savannah River National Laboratory in the development of an experimental test site for the demonstration of multiple sensor systems for potential use in the in situ decommissioning process. In situ decommissioning is a process in which the above ground portion of a facility is dismantled and removed, and the underground portion is filled with a cementious material such as grout. In such a scenario, the question remains on how to effectively monitor the structural health of the grout (cracking, flexing, and sinking), as well as track possible migration of contaminants within and out of the grouted monolith. The right types of sensors can aid personnel in better understanding the conditions within the entombed structure. Without sensors embedded in and around the monolith, it will be very difficult to estimate structural integrity and contaminant transport. Yet, to fully utilize the appropriate sensors and the provided data, their performance and reliability must be evaluated outside a laboratory setting. To this end, a large scale experimental setup and demonstration was conducted at FIU. In order to evaluate a large suite of sensor systems, FIU personnel designed and purchased a pre-cast concrete open-top cube, which served as a mock-up of an in situ DOE decommissioned facility. The inside of the cube measures 10 ft x 10 ft x 8 ft. In order to ensure that the individual sensors would be immobilized during the grout pouring activities, a set of nine sensor racks were designed. The 270 sensors provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Mississippi State University (MSU), University of Houston (UH), and University of South Carolina (USC) were secured to these racks based on predetermined locations. Once sensor racks were installed inside the test cube, connected and debugged, approximately 32 cubic yards of special grout material was used to entomb the sensors. MSU provided and demonstrated four types of fiber loop ring-down (FLR) sensors for detection of water, temperature, cracks, and movement of fluids. INL provided and demonstrated time differenced 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), advanced tensiometers for moisture content, and thermocouples for temperature measurements. University of Houston provided smart aggregate (SA) sensors, which detect crack severity and water presence. An additional UH sensor system demonstrated was a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fiber optic system measuring strain, presence of water, and temperature. USC provided a system which measured acoustic emissions during cracking, as well as temperature and pH sensors. All systems were connected to a Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) data networking and collection system designed, developed and provided by FIU. The purpose of SRAS was to collect and allow download of the raw sensor data from all the sensor system, as well as allow upload of the processed data and any analysis reports and graphs. All this information was made available to the research teams via the Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management and Information Tool (D and D KM-IT). As a current research effort, FIU is performing an energy analysis, and transferring several sensor systems to a Photovoltaic (PV) System to continuously monitor energy consumption parameters and overall power demands. Also, One final component of this research is focusing on developing an integrated data network to capture, log and analyze sensor system data in near real time from a single inte

  7. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  8. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  9. Final report on the PNL program to develop an alumina sensor. Sensors Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Brenden, B.B.; Koski, O.H.; Williford, R.E.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alumina concentration sensor was required to ensure safe operating conditions for cermet inert anodes that were under development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(a) for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. The Sensors Development Program at PNL was conducted in response to this need for an alumina sensor. In all, eight different approaches to developing an alumina sensor were evaluated as part of this program. Each approach sought to correlate alumina concentration either to some spectral, physical, or electrical property of the molten electrolytic, or alternatively, to some operational characteristic of the reduction cell such as the integrity of the cermet anodes or the electrical noise generated by them during cell operation. The studies on electrical noise were performed using a large number of digital signal analysis (DSA) methods. There were two primary requirements for success for an alumina sensor to be used in conjunction with cermet anodes: (1) adequate sensitivity to alumina concentration at concentrations close to saturation, and (2) ease of use in an industrial setting. After numerous laboratory experiments as well as field studies in some cases, it was concluded that none of the approaches sufficiently satisfied the two criteria to serve as the basis for an alumina sensor. If further work is to continue in this area, it is recommended that the research focus on altemative DSA approaches, primarily because DSA methods would be so easy to use in an industrial environment. Due to the lack of correlation using DSA in the present work, however, it is recommended that altemative strategies for data collection and analysis be used in any further development activities.

  10. Force controlled manipulation is a common technique for compli antly contacting and manipulating uncertain environments. Visual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Force controlled manipulation is a common technique for compli­ antly contacting guide a manipulator simplifies the force control problem by allowing the effective use of low gain force force sensor and a stiff manipulator position control loop. Because the force sensor measures all forces

  11. Sensors 2010, 10, 5872-5887; doi:10.3390/s100605872 ISSN 1424-8220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a pre-defined reference speed, to economize on fuel or energy consumption, to avoid speeding fines; sensorial fusion; RFID; autonomous vehicle OPEN ACCESS #12;Sensors 2010, 10 5873 1. Introduction Road.mdpi.com/journal/sensors Article An RFID-Based Intelligent Vehicle Speed Controller Using Active Traffic Signals Joshué Pérez

  12. Optimal Deployment of Large Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toumpis, Stavros

    1 Optimal Deployment of Large Wireless Sensor Networks S. Toumpis, Member, IEEE, and Leandros, Sensor networks. I. INTRODUCTION A. Wireless Sensor Networks Wireless sensor networks are comprised of sensors that are equipped with wireless transceivers and so are able to form a wireless network [3

  13. Optimal Deployment of Impromptu Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    Optimal Deployment of Impromptu Wireless Sensor Networks Prasenjit Mondal, K. P. Naveen and Anurag to deploy sensors (such as motion sensors, or even imaging sensors) and a wireless interconnection network an impromptu deploy- ment of a wireless sensor network in a building. Fig. 2. Problem studied in this paper

  14. TRS-Fiber Optic Classifier Sensor Installation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    TRS-Fiber Optic Classifier Sensor Installation The sensor that the Traffic Recording System (TRS) uses is the Flexsense Portable Fiberoptic Sensor System by Optical Sensor Systems. This includes two is undetected by the TRS. The user must make sure that the sensors do not get bent or twisted or the fiber optic

  15. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Battaglia, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Caberera, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlstrom, J E [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, C. L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Da Via, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Demarteau, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fast, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frisch, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States), et al.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  16. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Rudnick, Thomas Jeffery

    2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor array is configured based upon capacitive sensor techniques to measure stresses at various positions in a sheet simultaneously and allow a stress map to be obtained in near real-time. The device consists of single capacitive elements applied in a one or two dimensional array to measure the distribution of stresses across a mat surface in real-time as a function of position for manufacturing and test applications. In-plane and normal stresses in rolling bodies such as tires may thus be monitored.

  17. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  18. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  19. SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1 and Rajkumar Buyya2 Keywords: Sensors, Sensor Networks, Grid computing, SensorML, SensorWeb. 1. Introduction Recent advances in electronic circuit miniaturization and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the creation

  20. Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    aquatic environments. Marine surveillance, pollution detection and monitoring, and oceanographic data (salinity, conductivity, turbidity, pH, oxygen, temperature, depth, etc.) - Sediments and pollution sensor nodes - Acoustic sensors - Underwater sensor network architectures - Wired and wireless protocols

  1. Sensors & Measurement | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elements. The nexus of sensors, signal processing and analysis, modeling, and advanced control algorithms and architectures underpin this important field of technology at ORNL....

  2. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  3. Techniques in Active and Generic Software Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jacob N.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    at the end of a multiyear journey into computer science ? especially software engineering and the development of software libraries. I would like to thank my adviser Dr. Jaakko J?arvi first and foremost. Little does he know that it was reading his papers (and... managed to actually work on a project together. Hand-in-hand I would like to thank everyone in Dr. Bjarne Stroustrup?s lab (including Bjarne for being such a good sport): Luke Wagner for helping me to understand logic and language theory; Yuriy Solodkyy...

  4. Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation,Barriers

  5. Active Load Control Techniques for Wind Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinide Chemistry Turbines

  6. Inter-sensor propagation delay estimation using sources of opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Rémy; Michel, Olivier; Lacoume, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation delays are intensively used for Structural Health Monitoring or Sensor Network Localization. In this paper, we study the performances of acoustic propagation delay estimation between two sensors, using sources of opportunity only. Such sources are defined as being uncontrolled by the user (activation time, location, spectral content in time and space), thus preventing the direct estimation with classical active approaches, such as TDOA, RSSI and AOA. Observation models are extended from the literature to account for the spectral characteristics of the sources in this passive context and we show how time-filtered sources of opportunity impact the retrieval of the propagation delay between two sensors. A geometrical analogy is then proposed that leads to a lower bound on the variance of the propagation delay estimation that accounts for both the temporal and the spatial properties of the sources field.

  7. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulating means for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor means compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. 4 figs.

  8. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  9. On the robustness of clustered sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Jin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart devices with multiple on-board sensors, networked through wired or wireless links, are distributed in physical systems and environments. Broad applications of such sensor networks include manufacturing quality control and wireless sensor...

  10. FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS ZHIHUA HU, BAOCHUN LI Abstract. Understanding the fundamental performance limits of wireless sensor networks is critical towards. Key words. Wireless sensor networks, network capacity, network lifetime. 1. Introduction. When

  11. Wireless Sensor Network Infrastructure : Construction and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Wireless Sensor Network Infrastructure : Construction and Evaluation Kamal Beydoun, Violeta Felea main features for efficient energy management in wireless sensor networks. This paper aims to present a distributed and low-cost topology construction algorithm for wireless sensor networks, addressing

  12. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous mobile sensor networks consist of a number of autonomous mobile robots equipped with various sensors and tasked with a common mission. This thesis considers the topology control of such an ad hoc mobile sensor network. In particular, I...

  13. active noise control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    significant noise ... Hong, Seung Hyuck 2009-01-01 2 Design of an Active Noise Control System using Plasma Actuators Engineering Websites Summary: and analysed from sensors located...

  14. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  15. Intelligent Software Agents: Sensor Integration and Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesz, James J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract In a post Macondo world the buzzwords are Integrity Management and Incident Response Management. The twin processes are not new but the opportunity to link the two is novel. Intelligent software agents can be used with sensor networks in distributed and centralized computing systems to enhance real-time monitoring of system integrity as well as manage the follow-on incident response to changing, and potentially hazardous, environmental conditions. The software components are embedded at the sensor network nodes in surveillance systems used for monitoring unusual events. When an event occurs, the software agents establish a new concept of operation at the sensing node, post the event status to a blackboard for software agents at other nodes to see , and then react quickly and efficiently to monitor the scale of the event. The technology addresses a current challenge in sensor networks that prevents a rapid and efficient response when a sensor measurement indicates that an event has occurred. By using intelligent software agents - which can be stationary or mobile, interact socially, and adapt to changing situations - the technology offers features that are particularly important when systems need to adapt to active circumstances. For example, when a release is detected, the local software agent collaborates with other agents at the node to exercise the appropriate operation, such as: targeted detection, increased detection frequency, decreased detection frequency for other non-alarming sensors, and determination of environmental conditions so that adjacent nodes can be informed that an event is occurring and when it will arrive. The software agents at the nodes can also post the data in a targeted manner, so that agents at other nodes and the command center can exercise appropriate operations to recalibrate the overall sensor network and associated intelligence systems. The paper describes the concepts and provides examples of real-world implementations including the Threat Detection and Analysis System (TDAS) at the International Port of Memphis and the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization System (BWIC) Environmental Monitoring (EM) Component. Technologies developed for these 24/7 operational systems have applications for improved real-time system integrity awareness as well as provide incident response (as needed) for production and field applications.

  16. Online, In-Situ Monitoring Combustion Turbines Using Wireless Passive Ceramic Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Xun; An, Linan; Xu, Chengying

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to develop high-temperature wireless passive ceramic sensors for online, real-time monitoring combustion turbines. During this project period, we have successfully demonstrated temperature sensors up to 1300{degrees}C and pressure sensors up to 800oC. The temperature sensor is based on a high-Q-factor dielectric resonator and the pressure sensor utilizes the evanescent-mode cavity to realize a pressure-sensitive high-Q-factor resonator. Both sensors are efficiently integrated with a compact antenna. These sensors are wirelessly interrogated. The resonant frequency change corresponding to either temperature or pressure can be identified using a time-domain gating technique. The sensors realized in this project can survive harsh environments characterized by high temperatures (>1000{degrees}C) and corrosive gases, owing to the excellent material properties of polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) developed at University of Central Florida. It is anticipated that this work will significantly advance the capability of high-temperature sensor technologies and be of a great benefit to turbine industry and their customers.

  17. Gamification and Visualization of Sensor Data Analysis in Research Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Jackson A [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Castello, Charles C [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of video game elements in non-gaming systems, or gamification , has potential value in transforming data analysis. Our study focused on creating a web-based videogame that models two physical test buildings, each of which contains hundreds of sensors. After the application renders the models, the player can walk through the environments and interact with the virtual representations of the sensors inside. Rather than trudging through a database with textual commands and screens full of data, the user can (virtually) walk up to a sensor and view its data graphically. But these features only scratch the surface of what is possible using our new gamification approach. We anticipate being able to show that recent progress in game design techniques and capacities can contribute to the field of analysis through gamification. The net result could be more stimulating, intuitive, user-friendly interfaces, as well as potentially more informative and insightful applications.

  18. Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are disclosed for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 24 figs.

  19. Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  20. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, Stewart S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Wilson, C. Thomas (Norris, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transformer current sensor having primary turns carrying a primary current for a superconducting coil and secondary turns only partially arranged within the primary turns. The secondary turns include an active winding disposed within the primary turns and a dummy winding which is not disposed in the primary turns and so does not experience a magnetic field due to a flow of current in the primary turns. The active and dummy windings are wound in opposite directions or connected in series-bucking relationship, and are exposed to the same ambient magnetic field. Voltages which might otherwise develop in the active and dummy windings due to ambient magnetic fields thus cancel out. The resultant voltage is purely indicative of the rate of change of current flowing in the primary turns.

  1. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  2. Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: The development of in situ sensors for ultratrace detection applications in process control and environmental monitoring remains a significant challenge. Such sensors...

  3. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  4. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fourth vehicle downstream signature (five vehicleof Figures Upstream and downstream middle sensor raw signals2.2 Upstream and downstream middle sensor signature

  5. Flexible Pressure Sensors: Modeling and Experimental Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viana, J.C.

    Flexible capacitive pressure sensors fabricated with nanocomposites were experimentally characterized and results compared with simulations from analytical modeling. Unlike traditional diaphragm silicon pressure sensors, ...

  6. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  7. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  8. Collaborative Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor Networks using Measurement Co-Occurrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    activity of many WSN applica- tions. We focus on applications in which each sensor con- tinuously monitors the targets of interests in a field, and the base station is interested in getting every (discrete enumer

  9. HandWave : design and manufacture of a wearable wireless skin conductance sensor and housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Marc D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis report details the design and manufacture of HandWave, a wearable wireless Bluetooth skin conductance sensor, and dedicated housing. The HandWave collects Electrodermal Activity (EDA) data by measuring skin ...

  10. Monday, March 29, 2010 A Bendable Heart Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Monday, March 29, 2010 A Bendable Heart Sensor New flexible electronics can better chart the heart a more detailed picture of the electrical activity of a beating heart. This high-resolution electrical map could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of heart abnormalities by pinpointing areas

  11. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  12. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVM LoanActiveMission »AdvancedServices »Sensors

  13. Energy efficient sensor network implementations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, Janette R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.; Rosten, Ed [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.; Wolinski, Christophe [IRISA; Wagner, Charles [IRISA; Charot, Francois [IRISA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

  14. Structural and environmental monitoring of tracker and vertex systems using Fiber Optic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibre optic sensors (FOS) are an established technique for environmental and deformation monitoring in several areas like civil engineering, aerospace, and energy. Their immunity to electromagnetic and magnetic fields and nuclear environments, its small size, multiplexing capability and the possibility to be embedded make them an attractive technology for the structural and environmental monitoring of collider particle physics experiments. Between all the possible Fibre Optic sensors FBGs (Fiber Bragg Grating) seems to be the best solution for HEP applications. The first step was to characterize FBG sensors for it use in High Energy Physics environment. During last two years we have checked the resistance of the Fibre Bragg Grating sensors to radiation. Two irradiation campaigns with protons have been done at CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores). In the near future these sensors are being planned to be used in detectors (the closest one Belle II.). Several work on integration issues in Belle II PXD-SVD, and ...

  15. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo­ tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  16. Wireless Sensor Network for Advanced Energy Management Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter J. Theisen; Bin Lu, Charles J. Luebke

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Eaton has developed an advanced energy management solution that has been deployed to several Industries of the Future (IoF) sites. This demonstrated energy savings and reduced unscheduled downtime through an improved means for performing predictive diagnostics and energy efficiency estimation. Eaton has developed a suite of online, continuous, and inferential algorithms that utilize motor current signature analysis (MCSA) and motor power signature analysis (MPSA) techniques to detect and predict the health condition and energy usage condition of motors and their connect loads. Eaton has also developed a hardware and software platform that provided a means to develop and test these advanced algorithms in the field. Results from lab validation and field trials have demonstrated that the developed advanced algorithms are able to detect motor and load inefficiency and performance degradation. Eaton investigated the performance of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) within various industrial facilities to understand concerns about topology and environmental conditions that have precluded broad adoption by the industry to date. A Wireless Link Assessment System (WLAS), was used to validate wireless performance under a variety of conditions. Results demonstrated that wireless networks can provide adequate performance in most facilities when properly specified and deployed. Customers from various IoF expressed interest in applying wireless more broadly for selected applications, but continue to prefer utilizing existing, wired field bus networks for most sensor based applications that will tie into their existing Computerized Motor Maintenance Systems (CMMS). As a result, wireless technology was de-emphasized within the project, and a greater focus placed on energy efficiency/predictive diagnostics. Commercially available wireless networks were only utilized in field test sites to facilitate collection of motor wellness information, and no wireless sensor network products were developed under this project. As an outgrowth of this program, Eaton developed a patented energy-optimizing drive control technology that is complementary to a traditional variable frequency drives (VFD) to enable significant energy savings for motors with variable torque applications, such as fans, pumps, and compressors. This technology provides an estimated energy saving of 2%-10% depending on the loading condition, in addition to the savings obtained from a traditional VFD. The combination of a VFD with the enhanced energy-optimizing controls will provide significant energy savings (10% to 70% depending on the load and duty cycle) for motors that are presently connected with across the line starters. It will also provide a more favorable return on investment (ROI), thus encouraging industries to adopt VFDs for more motors within their facilities. The patented technology is based on nonintrusive algorithms that estimate the instantaneous operating efficiency and motor speed and provide active energy-optimizing control of a motor, using only existing voltage and current sensors. This technology is currently being commercialized by Eaton’s Industrial Controls Division in their next generation motor control products. Due to the common nonintrusive and inferential nature of various algorithms, this same product can also include motor and equipment condition monitoring features, providing the facility owner additional information to improve process uptime and the associated energy savings. Calculations estimated potential energy savings of 261,397GWh/Yr ($15.7B/yr), through retrofitting energy-optimizing VFDs into existing facilities, and incorporating the solution into building equipment sold by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and installed by mechanical and electrical contractors. Utilizing MCSA and MPSA for predictive maintenance (PM) of motors and connected equipment reduces process downtime cost and the cost of wasted energy associated with shutting down and restarting the processes. Estimated savings vary depending on the industry segment and equi

  17. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  18. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  19. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  20. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  1. Comparison of soft computing techniques for a three-phase oil field centrifuge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. E. (Ronald E.); Parkinson, w; Miller, N. (Neal)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we compare fuzzy techniques to neural network techniques for building a soft sensor for a three-phase oil field centrifuge. The soft sensor is used in a feed-forward control system that augments a feedback control system. Two approaches were used to develop the soft sensor. The first approach was to use a fuzzy rule based system based upon the experience of an expert operator. The expert operator's experience was supplemented using a computer model of the system. The second approach was to use a neural network to build the inverse of the computer model. The pros and cons of both techniques are discussed. KEYWORDS: fuzzy logic, neural networks, soft sensor, soft computing

  2. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  3. Radioactive Target Detection Using Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    Chapter 31 Radioactive Target Detection Using Wireless Sensor Network Tonglin Zhang Abstract for wireless sensor network data to detect and locate a hidden nuclear target in a large study area. The method assumes multiple radiation detectors have been used as sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network

  4. Sensors for Safety & Performance Stationary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles · Interfacial Stability of Thin Film H2 Sensors · Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems · Micro-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Fuel Cell Monitoring #12;Discussion Points Barriers ·Cost ·Application ·Lifetime ·Flexibility ·Public

  5. Multifunctional (NOx/CO/O2) Solid-State Sensors For Coal Combustion Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state sensors were developed for coal combustion control and the understanding of sensing mechanisms was advanced. Several semiconducting metal oxides (p-type and n-type) were used to fabricate sensor electrodes. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and catalytic activities of these materials were measured with Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR) experiments. The sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of these sensors were measured for steps of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vapor in simple N{sub 2}-balanced and multi-component, simulated combustion-exhaust streams. The role of electrode microstructure and fabrication parameters on sensing performance was investigated. Proof for the proposed sensing mechanism, Differential Electrode Equilibria, was demonstrated by relating the sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities) of the various electrode materials to their gas adsorption/desorption behaviors and catalytic activities. A multifunctional sensor array consisting of three sensing electrodes and an integrated heater and temperature sensors was fabricated with tape-casting and screen-printing and its NO{sub x} sensing performance was measured. The multifunctional sensor demonstrated it was possible to measure NO{sub 2} independent of NO by locally heating one of the sensing electrodes. The sensor technology was licensed to Fuel FX International, Inc. Fuel FX has obtained investor funding and is developing prototype sensors as a first step in their commercialization strategy for this technology.

  6. SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Yunxia Chen in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Analyzing the lifetime per unit cost of a linear WSN, we find that deploying of sensors deployed in the network, can be used to measure the utilization efficiency of sensors

  7. Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Deployment and Topology Control Based on Irregular Sensor Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Deployment and Topology Control Based on Irregular Sensor Introduction Wireless sensor network (WSN) is a key element of the pervasive/ubiquitous computing sensor network (heterogeneous WSN) consists of sensor nodes with different ability, such as different

  8. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  9. FY2011 Progress Report: Agreement 8697 - NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) OBD II systems; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing methods that are compatible with mass fabrication; and (3) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization. Approach used is: (1) Use an ionic (O{sup 2-}) conducting ceramic as a solid electrolyte and metal or metal-oxide electrodes; (2) Correlate NO{sub x} concentration with changes in cell impedance; (3) Evaluate sensing mechanisms and aging effects on long-term performance using electrochemical techniques; and (4) Collaborate with Ford Research Center to optimize sensor performance and perform dynamometer and on-vehicle testing. Work in FY2011 focused on using an algorithm developed in FY2010 in a simplified strategy to demonstrate how data from controlled laboratory evaluation could be applied to data from real-world engine testing. The performance of a Au wire prototype sensor was evaluated in the laboratory with controlled gas compositions and in dynamometer testing with diesel exhaust. The laboratory evaluation indicated a nonlinear dependence of the NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} sensitivity with concentration. For both NO{sub x} and O{sub 2}, the prototype sensor had higher sensitivity at concentrations less than {approx}20 ppm and {approx}7%, respectively, compared to lower NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} sensitivity at concentrations greater than {approx}50 ppm and {approx}10.5%, respectively. Results in dynamometer diesel exhaust generally agreed with the laboratory results. Diesel exhaust after-treatment systems will likely require detection levels less than {approx}20 ppm in order to meet emission regulations. The relevant mathematical expressions for sensitivity in different concentration regimes obtained from bench-level laboratory evaluation were used to adjust the sensor signal in dynamometer testing. Both NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} exhibited non-linear responses over the concentration regimes examined (0-100 ppm for NO{sub x} and 4-7% for O{sub 2}). Adjusted sensor signals had better agreement with both a commercial NO{sub x} sensor and FTIR measurements. However, the lack of complete agreement indicated that it was not possible to completely account for the nonlinear sensor behavior in certain concentration regimes. The agreement at lower NO{sub x} levels (less than 20 ppm) was better than at higher levels (50-100 ppm). Other progress in FY2011 included dynamometer testing of sensors with imbedded heaters and protective housings that were mounted directly into the exhaust manifold. Advanced testing protocols were used to evaluate the sensors. These experiments confirmed the potential for sensor robustness and durability. Advanced material processing methods appropriate for mass manufacturing, such as sputtering, are also being evaluated. A major milestone for this past year was the licensing of the LLNL NO{sub x} sensor technology to EmiSense Technologies, LLC. EmiSense has extensive experience and resources for the development of emission control sensors. A CRADA is in development that will allow LLNL to work in partnership with EmiSense to bring the LLNL NO{sub x} sensor technology to commercialization. Ford Motor Company is also a partner in this effort.

  10. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So, Hye-Mi [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Jin Woo [Advanced Nano Technology Ltd., Seoul 132-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jinhyeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Department of Energy Science and School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok, E-mail: paul@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  11. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  12. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  13. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor capable of detecting intruders from the pressure of their weight on the earth's surface was investigated in the laboratory and in field tests. The presence of an intruder above or in proximity...

  14. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique...

  15. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  16. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  17. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  18. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  19. A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Articles A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring performance and health. KEYWORDS: wireless sensors, structural monitoring, dam- age detection, smartb). Called structural health monitoring (SHM), this new paradigm offers an auto- mated method

  20. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  1. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  2. New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin -Heart Rate Monitors -Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/new-electronic-sensors-stick-to-your-skin?click=pm_latest[8/14/2011 5:59:45 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin - Heart Rate Monitors - Popular Mechanics http://www Electronic Sensors That Stick to Your Skin Like Temporary Tattoos Nice tattoo. Or is it a heart-rate monitor to measure the electrical activity of the heart, muscles and brain. And using the same principles behind

  3. Energy Aware Self-Organizing Density Management in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrer, Erwan Le; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Viana, Aline; Bertier, Marin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption is the most important factor that determines sensor node lifetime. The optimization of wireless sensor network lifetime targets not only the reduction of energy consumption of a single sensor node but also the extension of the entire network lifetime. We propose a simple and adaptive energy-conserving topology management scheme, called SAND (Self-Organizing Active Node Density). SAND is fully decentralized and relies on a distributed probing approach and on the redundancy resolution of sensors for energy optimizations, while preserving the data forwarding and sensing capabilities of the network. We present the SAND's algorithm, its analysis of convergence, and simulation results. Simulation results show that, though slightly increasing path lengths from sensor to sink nodes, the proposed scheme improves significantly the network lifetime for different neighborhood densities degrees, while preserving both sensing and routing fidelity.

  4. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  5. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  6. Improving the performance of distributed simulations of wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Zhong-Yi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of Wireless Sensor Networks . . 2.1.2 Difficultiesin parallel a wireless sensor network with two duty cycledin parallel a wireless sensor network with three nodes that

  7. Scalable Coverage Maintenance for Dense Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jun; Wang, Jinsu; Suda, Tatsuya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    get coverage in wireless sensor networks,” in Proceedings ofscheme for large wireless sensor networks,” in Pro- ceedingsWorkshop on Wireless Sensor Networks and Applications (

  8. Cubic-based 3-D Localization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shwe, Hnin Yu; Chong, Peter HJ

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scheme in Stereo Wireless Sensor Networks,” in Advances infor mobile wireless sensor networks," Ad Hoc Networks, vol.and B. D. O. Anderson, "Wireless sensor network localization

  9. Data-driven modeling of phenomena in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamthe, Ankur U.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experimentation in wireless sensor networks. Commun. ACM,of Phenomena in Wireless Sensor Networks A dissertationBoavida, editors, Wireless Sensor Networks, volume 5970 of

  10. Reliable and Efficient Programming Abstractions for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kothari, Nupur; Gummadi, Ramakrishna; Millstein, Todd; Govindan, Ramesh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macro-programming wireless sensor networks using Kairos. InAbstractions for Wireless Sensor Networks Nupur Kothari ?Keywords Wireless Sensor Networks, Macroprogramming, En-

  11. Fault Tolerant Evaluation of Continuous Selection Queries over Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, Iosif; Han, Qi; Mehrotra, Sharad; Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Continuous Selection Queries over Sensor Dataevaluation of continuous selection queries (CSQs) over sensor-sensor suffices and there is no Fault Tolerant Evaluation of

  12. The silicon microstrip sensors of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G; ATLAS SCT Collaboration

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bias resistors. 6. Sensor Evaluation and Quality AssuranceHowever, an extensive evaluation of sensor characteristics6.3. Evaluation and Quality Assurance of irradiated sensors

  13. Optical and mechanical behavior of the optical fiber infrasound sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWolf, Scott

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor . . . . . . .Fiber Infrasound Sensor Optical fibers are well known forSchnidrig. An optical fiber infrasound sensor: A new lower

  14. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  15. A Computational Study of Feeding Rules and Yield Improvement Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    A Computational Study of Feeding Rules and Yield Improvement Techniques Christoph Beckermann improvement techniques is presented. The computer simulations were performed using a commercial solidification chills (termed passive methods), and active heating and cooling are presented and compared. The benefits

  16. Secure Hop-by-Hop Aggregation of End-to-End Concealed Data in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlaih, Esam

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-network data aggregation is an essential technique in mission critical wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for achieving effective transmission and hence better power conservation. Common security protocols for aggregated WSNs are either hop-by-hop or end-to-end, each of which has its own encryption schemes considering different security primitives. End-to-end encrypted data aggregation protocols introduce maximum data secrecy with in-efficient data aggregation and more vulnerability to active attacks, while hop-by-hop data aggregation protocols introduce maximum data integrity with efficient data aggregation and more vulnerability to passive attacks. In this paper, we propose a secure aggregation protocol for aggregated WSNs deployed in hostile environments in which dual attack modes are present. Our proposed protocol is a blend of flexible data aggregation as in hop-by-hop protocols and optimal data confidentiality as in end-to-end protocols. Our protocol introduces an efficient $O(1)$ heuristic for checking...

  17. Information-based self-organization of sensor nodes of a sensor network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Teresa H. (Castro Valley, CA); Berry, Nina M. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor node detects a plurality of information-based events. The sensor node determines whether at least one other sensor node is an information neighbor of the sensor node based on at least a portion of the plurality of information-based events. The information neighbor has an overlapping field of view with the sensor node. The sensor node sends at least one communication to the at least one other sensor node that is an information neighbor of the sensor node in response to at least one information-based event of the plurality of information-based events.

  18. Artificial neural networks for centroiding elongated spots in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mello, A T; Guzman, D; Guesalaga, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of Adaptive Optics in Extremely Large Telescopes brings new challenges, one of which is the treatment of Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensors images. When using this type of sensors in conjunction with laser guide stars for sampling the pupil of telescopes with 30+ m in diameter, it is necessary to compute the centroid of elongated spots, whose elongation angle and aspect ratio are changing across the telescope pupil. Existing techniques such as Matched Filter have been considered as the best technique to compute the centroid of elongated spots, however they are not good at coping with the effect of a variation in the Sodium profile. In this work we propose a new technique using artificial neural networks, which take advantage of the neural network's ability to cope with changing conditions, outperforming existing techniques in this context. We have developed comprehensive simulations to explore this technique and compare it with existing algorithms.

  19. iCalm: Measuring electrodermal activity in almost any setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Elliott Bruce

    The iCalm sensor is a wireless, wearable, washable wristband that can measure electrodermal activity and physical activity in almost any natural setting. This platform has many applications including health monitoring for ...

  20. 1014 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 52, NO. 3, MARCH 2004 Recycling Ambient Microwave Energy With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1014 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 52, NO. 3, MARCH 2004 Recycling are in wireless powering of industrial sensors and recycling of ambient RF energy. A 64-el- ement dual

  1. Sensor systems for the Altair Lunar Lander:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariella, R

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Altair Lunar Lander will enable astronauts to learn to live and work on the moon for extended periods of time, providing the experience needed to expand human exploration farther into the solar system. My overriding recommendation: Use independent and complementary [sometimes referred to as 'orthogonal'] techniques to disambiguate confounding/interfering signals. E.g.: a mass spectrometer ['MS'], which currently serves as a Majority Constituent Analyzer ['MCA'] can be very valuable in detecting the presence of a gaseous specie, so long as it falls on a mass-to-charge ratio ['m/z'] that is not already occupied by a majority constituent of cabin air. Consider the toxic gas, CO. Both N{sub 2} and CO have parent peaks of m/z = 28, and CO{sub 2} has a fragment peak at m/z = 28 [and at 16 and 12], so the N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} m/z=28 signals could mask low, but potentially-dangerous levels of CO. However there are numerous surface-sensitive CO detectors, as well as tunable-diode-laser-based CO sensors that could provide independent monitoring of CO. Also, by appending a gas chromatograph ['GC'] as the front-end sample processer, prior to the inlet of the MS, one can rely upon the GC to separate CO from N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, providing the crew with another CO monitor. If the Altair Lunar Lander is able to include a Raman-based MCA for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2}, then each type of MCA would have cross-references, providing more confidence in the ongoing performance of each technique, and decreasing the risk that one instrument might fail to perform properly, without being noticed. See, also Dr. Pete Snyder's work, which states 'An orthogonal technologies sensor system appears to be attractive for a high confidence detection of presence and temporal characterization of bioaerosols.' Another recommendation: Use data fusion for event detection to decrease uncertainty: tie together the outputs from multiple sensing modalities - eNose, solid-state sensors, GC-IMS, GC-MS - via nonlinear algorithms, such as an 'artificial neural net.' MA Ryan at the JPL and Henry Abarbanel at UCSD are possible candidates to implement such an approach.

  2. Forty-Four Pass Fibre Optic Loop for Improving the Sensitivity of Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin B Su; Jun Kameoka

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A forty-four pass fibre optic surface plasmon resonance sensor that enhances detection sensitivity according to the number of passes is demonstrated for the first time. The technique employs a fibre optic recirculation loop that passes the detection spot forty- four times, thus enhancing sensitivity by a factor of forty-four. Presently, the total number of passes is limited by the onset of lasing action of the recirculation loop. This technique offers a significant sensitivity improvement for various types of plasmon resonance sensors that may be used in chemical and biomolecule detections.

  3. Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Peng; Drapier, Sylvain; Vautrin, Alain; Minni, Jean-Christophe; 10.1177/0021998311410479

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel direct approach to detect the resin flow front during the Liquid Resin Infusion process under industrial environment is proposed. To detect the resin front accurately and verify the results, which are deduced from indirect micro-thermocouples measurements, optical fiber sensors based on Fresnel reflection are utilized. It is expected that the results derived from both techniques will lead to an improvement of our understanding of the resin flow and in particular prove that micro-thermocouples can be used as sensors as routine technique under our experimental conditions. Moreover, comparisons with numerical simulations are carried out and experimental and simulated mold filling times are successfully compared.

  4. Review of uranium bioassay techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

  5. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  6. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  7. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  8. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  9. Sensors Synergistic With Nature For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To be able to evolve fuel and structural microstructure within a nuclear power reactor in an engineered manner, an effective extreme environment sensor must exist. The development of sensor technology for nondestructive and nonintrusive measurements in harsh environments is a very active field. However most of the effort has been in adapting existing sensing technology to meet the harsh environmental requirements. A different approach is being presented. The fundamental question that we are trying to answer is how do we take advantage of the harsh environment and maintain synergy between the sensor and the environment. This paper will discuss the synergistic senor being developed that takes advantage of the harsh environments.

  10. Finite Energy and Bounded Attacks on Control System Sensor Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control system networks are increasingly being connected to enterprise level networks. These connections leave critical industrial controls systems vulnerable to cyber-attacks. Most of the effort in protecting these cyber-physical systems (CPS) has been in securing the networks using information security techniques and protection and reliability concerns at the control system level against random hardware and software failures. However, besides these failures the inability of information security techniques to protect against all intrusions means that the control system must be resilient to various signal attacks for which new analysis and detection methods need to be developed. In this paper, sensor signal attacks are analyzed for observer-based controlled systems. The threat surface for sensor signal attacks is subdivided into denial of service, finite energy, and bounded attacks. In particular, the error signals between states of attack free systems and systems subject to these attacks are quantified. Optimal sensor and actuator signal attacks for the finite and infinite horizon linear quadratic (LQ) control in terms of maximizing the corresponding cost functions are computed. The closed-loop system under optimal signal attacks are provided. Illustrative numerical examples are provided together with an application to a power network with distributed LQ controllers.

  11. Research Profile Research activities of the Electromagnetic Field Theory Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    with the sealing of high power microwaves. In cooperation with Bosh and Sie- mens, a new sealing technique antennas will be applicable in sensor technology, near-field optical microscopy or spectros- copy

  12. Energy-Aware Active Chemical Sensing Rakesh Gosangi and Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    ,rgutier}@cse.tamu.edu Abstract-- We propose an adaptive sensing framework for metal-oxide (MOX) sensors that seeks to minimize, the responses obtained by modulating the working temperature of MOX sensors during gas exposure contain more to actively modulate the operating temperature of MOX sensors according to the two criteria mentioned above

  13. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Hydrogen Safety Sensor Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -of-plant components such as air compressors, and sensors and controls." #12;Safety Sensor Performance Goals

  14. Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jungsoo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced pipeline monitoringDesign of mobile pipeline floating sensor “SewerSnortIllustration of mobile pipeline floating sensor monitoring

  15. Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

  16. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  17. Cantilever Sensors: Nanomechanical Tools for Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datar, Ram

    Cantilever sensors have attracted considerable attention over the last decade because of their potential as a highly sensitive sensor platform for high throughput and multiplexed detection of proteins and nucleic acids. A ...

  18. Automatic Calibration of Multiple Coplanar Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookshire, Jonathan

    This paper describes an algorithm for recovering the rigid 3-DOF transformation (offset and rotation) between pairs of sensors mounted rigidly in a common plane on a mobile robot. The algorithm requires only a set of sensor ...

  19. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  20. Nanocomposite Flexible Pressure Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fachin, F.

    A new approach for the fabrication of flexible pressure sensors based on aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs) is described in this paper. The technology is suitable for blood pressure sensors that can be attached to a stent-graft ...

  1. Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

  2. Distributed MIMO for wireless sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Xiaojun

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, wireless sensor networks have gained more research attention for their potential applications in healthcare, defense, environmental monitoring, etc. Due to the strict energy limitation in the sensor ...

  3. Simultaneous sensor calibration and path estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudoy, Melanie Beth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents two topics related to the simultaneous calibration of a network of imaging sensors, i.e. cameras, and the recovery of the trajectory of an object moving among those sensors. The non-overlapping fields ...

  4. Design guidelines for optical resonator biochemical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimerling, Lionel C.

    In this paper, we propose a design tool for dielectric optical resonator-based biochemical refractometry sensors. Analogous to the widely accepted photodetector figure of merit, the detectivity D*, we introduce a new sensor ...

  5. Underwater Data Collection Using Robotic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinger, Geoffrey A.

    We examine the problem of utilizing an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to collect data from an underwater sensor network. The sensors in the network are equipped with acoustic modems that provide noisy, range-limited ...

  6. Bias identification in PWR pressurizer instrumentation using the generalized liklihood-ratio technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting and identifying biases in the pressure and level sensors of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizer is described. The generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) technique performs statistical tests on the innovations sequence of a Kalman filter state estimator and is capable of determining when a bias appears, in what sensor the bias exists, and estimating the bias magnitude. Simulation results using a second-order linear, discrete PWR pressurizer model demonstrate the capabilities of the GLR method.

  7. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, Franklin R. (Loudon, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  8. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  9. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  10. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  11. Feasibility study of long-life micro fuel cell power supply for sensor networks for space and terrestrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manyapu, Kavya Kamal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensor networks used for activities like border security, search and rescue, planetary exploration, commonly operate in harsh environments for long durations, where human supervision is minimal. A major challenge confronting ...

  12. Sensor Wars: Detecting and Defending Against Spam Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Albert

    network are discussed in [7]. Security, network bandwidth and power consumption in sensor networksSensor Wars: Detecting and Defending Against Spam Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks Serdar Sancak@sabanciuniv.edu Abstract--Anti-nodes deployed inside a wireless sensor network can frequently generate dummy data packets

  13. Extension of the Semantic Sensor Network Ontology for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Extension of the Semantic Sensor Network Ontology for Wireless Sensor Networks: The Stimulus Wireless Se- mantic Sensor Network ontology, in an agri-environmental scenario to illustrate the interest technolo- gies, Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) becomes widely used. WSN usually consists of a set

  14. Sensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxxxxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that is designed to only be sensitive to axial deflections of the probe. The optical-encoder force sensor exhibits­membrane interactions under various physiological conditions. The force sensor is an optical encoder based on transSensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxx­xxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive

  15. Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aylott, Jonathan W. (Ann Arbor, MI); Chen-Esterlit, Zoe (Ann Arbor, MI); Friedl, Jon H. (Ames, IA); Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Savvateev, Vadim N. (Ames, IA); Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA)

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

  16. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  17. Presented by SensorNet: The New Science of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy DeNap_SensorNet_SC10 SensorNet Collection Processing DisseminationSecurity Knowledge requirements Regulations Technology Intelligent Real world #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DeNap_SensorNet_SC10 SensorNet SensorNet is ORNL's research in sensor network interoperability

  18. Algorithms For Wireless Sensor Networks Sartaj Sahni and Xiaochun Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahni, Sartaj K.

    Algorithms For Wireless Sensor Networks Sartaj Sahni and Xiaochun Xu Department of Computer for wireless sensor networks. We focus on sensor deployment and coverage, routing and sensor fusion. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, algorithms, routing, coverage, fusion. 1 Introduction A wireless sensor network

  19. Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A. (Honeywell Intercorr)

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

  20. Performance Characterization of Random Proximity Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Grant J.

    Performance Characterization of Random Proximity Sensor Networks Agostino Capponi Department-- In this paper, we characterize the localization per- formance and connectivity of sensors networks consisting for signal processing. Each sensor has severe constraints on the battery power, and can only communicate

  1. 700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder is a world leader in space-based research including measurements of the Sun with respect to sun center. LASP has built sun position sensors for decades beginning with sensors for sub

  2. Mobile Phone Based Drifting Lagrangian Flow Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    predicting the outcome and impact of silt disturbed by dredging operations; maintaining the health of fish a new approach to the design of low-cost floating sensors for hydrodynamic studies, leveraging low-cost mobile phone sensor platforms have recently been developed to provide low-cost sensor data collection [1

  3. Gradient Clock Synchronization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradient Clock Synchronization in Wireless Sensor Networks Philipp Sommer Computer Engineering- olution. Without doubt, time is a first-class citizen in wireless sensor networks. Without accurate time if the nodes in the wireless sensor network manage to have an adequate agreement of time. Indeed

  4. DISTRIBUTED OPPORTUNISTIC TRANSMISSION FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    DISTRIBUTED OPPORTUNISTIC TRANSMISSION FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Qing Zhao and Lang Tong School Strategy We consider the problem of information retrieval in sensor networks with mobile access points on Communica- tion and Networks under Grant DAAD19-01-2-0011. ˘ Fig. 1: Sensor networks with mobile access

  5. Distributed A Wireless Sensor Network for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Computing A Wireless Sensor Network for Orienteering Competitions Master's Thesis-wave Monopole Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 5 MAC and Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks 14 5.1 Medium and waterproof cases free of charge. i #12;Abstract This thesis deals with the development of a wireless sensor

  6. A Virtual Infrastructure for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    &CHAPTER 4 A Virtual Infrastructure for Wireless Sensor Networks STEPHAN OLARIU and QINGWEN XU Old, and wireless communications 107 Handbook of Sensor Networks: Algorithms and Architectures, Edited by I and communication infra- structures, called wireless sensor networks, will have a significant impact on a wide array

  7. Detecting Phantom Nodes in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae-Shik

    Detecting Phantom Nodes in Wireless Sensor Networks Joengmin Hwang, Tian He and Yongdae Kim With thousands of tiny devices, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can support ubiquitous surveillance with a very number of phantom nodes. Key words: Sensor networks, localization, secure localization, location

  8. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  9. Environmental Cyberinfrastructure Needs For Distributed Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    1 Environmental Cyberinfrastructure Needs For Distributed Sensor Networks 12-14 August 2003;2 Environmental Cyberinfrastructure Needs for Distributed Sensor Networks A Report from a National Science Cyberinfrastructure Needs for Distributed Sensor Networks: A Report from a National Science Foundation Sponsored

  10. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Otagawa, Takaaki (Solon, OH)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level.

  11. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level. 5 figures.

  12. Radiochemical Sensor for Continuous and Remote Liquid Effluents Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarancon, A.; Garcia, J.F.; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica. Facultat de Quimica. Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Padro, A. [Serveis Cientifico-Tecnics. Universitat de Barcelona. Sole Sabaris Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-line radioactivity monitoring in liquid effluents is an increasing need according to the international regulations at present. Classical activity determination procedures include the sequence of sampling, chemical treatment, measurement and data treatment. These steps are man-power consuming, generate a great amount of waste and introduce an important delay between the potential pollution event and its detection and quantification. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a radiochemical sensor for liquid effluents capable of sending information about the specific activity and volume of a contamination episode to a remote position, on line and continuously. The capabilities of the sensor developed here allow detecting and quantifying contamination pulses of alpha, beta and gamma emitters of different volumes and activity levels included in a continuous stream. Sensor receptor includes two detection systems, one addressed to determine alpha, beta and gamma events and the other to detect sample gamma emissions. Detailed sensor structure will be shown at the conference because patent is in process at this moment. Detection efficiencies (%) obtained in the alpha-beta-gamma system for the range of contamination volumes considered (2- 300 ml) are: 1.6 - 3.2%, for Pu-240; 22.2 - 58.4%, for Sr-90/Y-90 and 8.8 -17.7%, for Cs-134. In the gamma system, values for Cs-134 detection range from 0.6% to 1.3%. Prediction errors obtained show that sensor is capable to detect Sr-90/Y-90 contamination pulses of at least 2 ml and 3 Bq/ml with a relative error lower of 10% in activity and 60% in volume. When contamination pulse increases up to 7 ml, relative errors decrease to 5% for both magnitudes. For Pu-240 and Cs-134, when contamination pulses are of at least 7 ml and 300 Bq/ml, the relative errors obtained in determinations performed in the alpha-beta-gamma system are lower than 10% in activity and 20 % in volume. The same errors are obtained in the gamma system for Cs-134 when contamination pulses are higher than 7 ml and activities up to 1300 Bq/ml. (authors)

  13. Consensus Filters for Sensor Networks and Distributed Sensor Fusion Reza Olfati-Saber and Jeff S. Shamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamma, Jeff S.

    Consensus Filters for Sensor Networks and Distributed Sensor Fusion Reza Olfati-Saber and Jeff S for sensor fusion in sensor networks. This paper introduces a distributed filter that allows the nodes of a sensor network to track the average of n sensor measurements using an average consensus based distributed

  14. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

  15. Seal Whiskers as Sensors! INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 2) to develop a flow sensor capable of detecting hydrodynamic features, such as the vortex street them, allowing them to reduce drag by avoiding strong head-on currents, lock into and track the wake to vibrate. Compared to a circular cylinder (top leB) and an ellipse (top

  16. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  17. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  18. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  19. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  20. Network Embedded Systems Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Battery Energy Reserve Manager = Bank Each task requests an account with conditions W ­ fraction Tracking 9 #12;Virtual Battery: An Energy Reserve Abstraction for Embedded Sensor Networks Qing Cao of real battery allocated N ­ number of energy installments L ­ expected lifetime of the task C

  1. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  2. REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasi Sridhar; Garth Tormoen; Ashok Sabata

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipelines present a unique challenge to monitoring because of the great geographical distances they cover, their burial depth, their age, and the need to keep the product flowing without much interruption. Most other engineering structures that require monitoring do not pose such combined challenges. In this regard, a pipeline system can be considered analogous to the blood vessels in the human body. The human body has an extensive ''pipeline'' through which blood and other fluids are transported. The brain can generally sense damage to the system at any location and alert the body to provide temporary repair, unless the damage is severe. This is accomplished through a vast network of fixed and floating sensors combined with a vast and extremely complex communication/decision making system. The project described in this report mimics the distributed sensor system of our body, albeit in a much more rudimentary fashion. Internal corrosion is an important factor in pipeline integrity management. At present, the methods to assess internal corrosion in pipelines all have certain limitations. In-line inspection tools are costly and cannot be used in all pipelines. Because there is a significant time interval between inspections, any impact due to upsets in pipeline operations can be missed. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) is a procedure that can be used to identify locations of possible internal corrosion. However, the uncertainties in the procedure require excavation and location of damage using more detailed inspection tools. Non-intrusive monitoring techniques can be used to monitor internal corrosion, but these tools also require pipeline excavation and are limited in the spatial extent of corrosion they can examine. Therefore, a floating sensor system that can deposit at locations of water accumulation and communicate the corrosion information to an external location is needed. To accomplish this, the project is divided into four main tasks related to wireless data transmission, corrosion sensor development, sensor system motion and delivery, and consideration of other pipeline operations issues. In the first year of the program, focus was on sensor development and wireless data transmission. The second year of the program, which was discontinued due to funding shortfall, would have focused on further wireless transmission development, packaging of sensor on wireless, and other operational issues. Because, the second year funding has been discontinued, recommendations are made for future studies.

  3. Energy Management for Time-Critical Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    -based architecture to dynamically adjust CPU frequencies and radio transmit speeds of sensor nodes, hence regulate such as solar, wind or wa- ter flow, WSN nodes potentially have perpetual energy supply. However, given technique saves computation energy by simultaneously reducing CPU supply voltage and frequency. The DMS

  4. Energy Aware Efficient Geographic Routing in Lossy Wireless Sensor Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    1 Energy Aware Efficient Geographic Routing in Lossy Wireless Sensor Networks with Environmental, GREES-L and GREES-M, which combine geographic routing and energy efficient routing techniques and take supply when making routing decisions. Simulation results show that GREESs are more energy efficient than

  5. Energy-Agile Laptops: Demand Response of Mobile Plug Loads Using Sensor/Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Energy-Agile Laptops: Demand Response of Mobile Plug Loads Using Sensor/Actuator Networks Nathan@me.berkeley.edu Abstract--This paper explores demand response techniques for managing mobile, distributed loads with on observed. Our first simulation study explores a classic demand response scenario in which a large number

  6. A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres P-vacancy centre within a few nanometres of a sample, and then scan it across the sample surface, while preserving the centre's spin coherence and readout fidelity. However, existing scanning techniques, which use a single

  7. Geo-Logical Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks* Dulanjalie C. Dhanapala and Anura P. Jayasumana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayasumana, Anura P.

    Geo-Logical Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks* Dulanjalie C. Dhanapala and Anura P. Jayasumana Abstract-- Geo-Logical Routing (GLR) is a novel technique that combines the advantages of geographic. In logical domain, a node is characterized by a VC vector consisting of minimum number of hops to a set

  8. RadioTriggered WakeUp Capability for Sensor Networks Lin Gu and John A. Stankovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankovic, John A.

    of Computer Science, University of Virginia flingu, stankovicg@cs.virginia.edu Abstract Power management is an important technique to prolong the lifespan of sensor networks. Many power­management protocols employ wake­up/sleep schedules, which are often complicated and inefficient. We present power management schemes that eliminate

  9. Sensor-Based Organizational Engineering Daniel Olgun Olgun and Alex (Sandy) Pentland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensor-Based Organizational Engineering Daniel Olguín Olguín and Alex (Sandy) Pentland MIT Media in the workplace, combined with data mining techniques and social network analysis for organizational engineering Descriptors H.5.3 [Information Interfaces and Presentation]: Group Organization Interfaces-- Organizational

  10. An Energy Model for Simulation Studies of Wireless Sensor Networks using OMNeT++

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breu, Ruth

    An Energy Model for Simulation Studies of Wireless Sensor Networks using OMNeT++ Feng Chen, Isabel for the simulation frame- work OMNeT++. The model allows to accurately evaluate the energy performance (in terms Simulation is frequently used to evaluate the performance of networking algorithms and techniques in wireless

  11. A Wireless Batch Sealed Absolute Capacitive Pressure Sensor Orhan Akar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Tayfun

    -etch stop technique. Fabricated devices measure 2.6x1.6 mm 2 in size and houses 24 turns of gold, however, these devices are often big and require a power source in the form of an implanted battery pressure sensors. The structure utilizes a parallel inductor-capacitor resonant circuit. The capacitor

  12. Sensitivity analysis of a directional potential drop sensor for creep monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    an accelerated 400-hour creep test are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique to monitorSensitivity analysis of a directional potential drop sensor for creep monitoring Elhoucine Madhi Accepted 1 August 2011 Available online 9 August 2011 Keywords: ACPD Creep monitoring Resistivity

  13. Rotation estimation for a satellite from Sun sensors Lionel Magnis Nicolas Petit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the angle of incidence of solar radiation, the output signal of a Sun sensor is, roughly speaking, a cosine attitude deter- mination [2], the data produced with these techniques have to be consolidated using another , photocells 3 and 4 lie in the shadow of the satellite. The output currents of photocells 1 and 2 are roughly

  14. New Insights into the Calibration of ToF-Sensors Marvin Lindner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanz, Volker

    recognition, collision prevention or scene recon- struction. However, ToF cameras like the Photonic Mixer Device (PMD) still exhibit a number of challenges regarding static and dynamic effects, e.g. systematic distance errors and mo- tion artefacts, respectively. Sensor calibration techniques reducing static system

  15. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  16. Audio-based localisation for ubiquitous sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalton, Benjamin Christopher

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents novel techniques for acoustic-source location for both actively triggered, and passively detected signals using pervasive, distributed networks of devices, and investigates the combination of existing ...

  17. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  18. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  19. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  20. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Query Processing in Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo- tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes, and pa

  1. Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anbo Wang; Gary Pickrell

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program â??Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systemsâ?ť funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

  2. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dammers, Jürgen, E-mail: J.Dammers@fz-juelich.de; Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Jon Shah, N. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA)—Translational Brain Medicine, Jülich (Germany)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  3. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  4. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  5. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Letant, Sonia (Livermore, CA); Stadermann, Michael (Dublin, CA); Artyukhin, Alexander B. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  6. Laser cooling of infrared sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselbeck, M. P. (Michael P.); Sheik-Bahae, M (Mansoor); Thiede, J. (Jared); Distel, J. R. (James R.); Greenfield, S. R. (Scott R.); Patterson, Wendy M.; Bigotta, S.; Imangholi, B.; Seletskiy, D. (Denis); Bender, D.; Vankipuram, V.; Vadiee, N.; Epstein, Richard I.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of laser cooling of solids. In this all-solid-state approach to refrigeration, heat is removed radiatively when an engineered material is exposed to high power laser light. We report a record amount of net cooling (88 K below ambient) that has been achieved with a sample made from doped fluoride glass. Issues involved in the design of a practical laser cooler are presented. The possibility of laser cooling of semiconductor sensors is discussed.

  7. Embedded Sensor System for Early Pathology Detection in Building Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Santiago J Barro

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure pathology detection is an important security task in building construction, which is performed by an operator by looking manually for damages on the materials. This activity could be dangerous if the structure is hidden or difficult to reach. On the other hand, embedded devices and wireless sensor networks (WSN) are becoming popular and cheap, enabling the design of an alternative pathology detection system to monitor structures based on these technologies. This article introduces a ZigBee WSN system, intending to be autonomous, easy to use and with low power consumption. Its functional parts are fully discussed with diagrams, as well as the protocol used to collect samples from sensor nodes. Finally, several tests focused on range and power consumption of our prototype are shown, analysing whether the results obtained were as expected or not.

  8. Application of Geiger-mode photo sensors in Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Ahmed; Paul Buehler; Michael Cargnelli; Roland Hohler; Johann Marton; Herbert Orth; Ken Suzuki

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. In our institute we are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  9. Application of Geiger-mode photo sensors in Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Gamal; Cargnelli, Michael; Hohler, Roland; Marton, Johann; Orth, Herbert; Suzuki, Ken

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. In our institute we are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  10. Anticipatory precrash restraint sensor feasibility study: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explores feasibility of an anticipatory precrash restraint sensor. The foundation principle is the anticipation mechanism found at a primitive level of biological intelligence and originally formalized by the mathematical biologist Robert Rosen. A system based on formal anticipatory principles should significantly outperform conventional technologies. It offers the prospect of high payoff in prevention of death and injury. Sensors and processes are available to provide a good, fast, and inexpensive description of the present dynamical state of the vehicle to the embedded system model in the anticipation engine. The experimental part of this study found that inexpensive radar in a real-world setting does return useful data on target dynamics. The data produced by a radar system can be converted to target dynamical information by good, fast and inexpensive signal-processing techniques. Not only is the anticipatory sensor feasible, but further development under the sponsorship of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is necessary and desirable. There are a number of possible lines of follow-on investigation. The level of effort and expected benefits of various alternatives are discussed.

  11. Cross delay line sensor characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, Israel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remelius, Dennis K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tiee, Joe J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buck, Steven E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whittemore, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shirey, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a wealth of information in the scientific literature on the physical properties and device characterization procedures for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), charge coupled device (CCD) and avalanche photodiode (APD) format detectors. Numerous papers and books have also treated photocathode operation in the context of photomultiplier tube (PMT) operation for either non imaging applications or limited night vision capability. However, much less information has been reported in the literature about the characterization procedures and properties of photocathode detectors with novel cross delay line (XDL) anode structures. These allow one to detect single photons and create images by recording space and time coordinate (X, Y & T) information. In this paper, we report on the physical characteristics and performance of a cross delay line anode sensor with an enhanced near infrared wavelength response photocathode and high dynamic range micro channel plate (MCP) gain (> 10{sup 6}) multiplier stage. Measurement procedures and results including the device dark event rate (DER), pulse height distribution, quantum and electronic device efficiency (QE & DQE) and spatial resolution per effective pixel region in a 25 mm sensor array are presented. The overall knowledge and information obtained from XDL sensor characterization allow us to optimize device performance and assess capability. These device performance properties and capabilities make XDL detectors ideal for remote sensing field applications that require single photon detection, imaging, sub nano-second timing response, high spatial resolution (10's of microns) and large effective image format.

  12. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than one order of magnitude increase in chemical sensitivity is expected through the use of ultra-thin aD membranes in the FPW sensor. The discoveries and development of the aD microsystems technology that were made in this project have led to new research projects in the areas of aD bioMEMS and aD radio frequency MEMS.

  13. Collecting and Disseminating Smart Home Sensor Data in the CASAS Project D.J. Cook, M. Schmitter-Edgecombe, Aaron Crandall, Chad Sanders, and Brian Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Collecting and Disseminating Smart Home Sensor Data in the CASAS Project D.J. Cook, M. Schmitter a physical smart home testbed. Expertise and resources are needed to design and install the sensors to test, compare, and enhance smart home and telemedicine technologies such as user modeling, activity

  14. Combinatorial Design of Key Distribution Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    Combinatorial Design of Key Distribution Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks Seyit A. C¸amtepe1 of the most challenging security issues in wireless sensor networks where sensor nodes are randomly scattered-chain sizes. 1 Introduction and Problem Definition In this work, we consider a sensor network in which sensor

  15. Combinatorial Design of Key Distribution Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    Combinatorial Design of Key Distribution Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks Seyit A. C� amtepe of the most challenging security issues in wireless sensor networks where sensor nodes are randomly scattered­chain sizes. 1 Introduction and Problem Definition In this work, we consider a sensor network in which sensor

  16. Position Estimation With Moving Beacons in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Liang

    Position Estimation With Moving Beacons in Wireless Sensor Networks Liang Dong and Frank L nodes in a wireless sensor network. Without GPS capability on any of the sensors, the position issue in wireless sensor networks. Accurate positions of sensor nodes improve the routing efficiency

  17. PSFQ: A Reliable Transport Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    PSFQ: A Reliable Transport Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Chieh-Yih Wan Dept. of Electrical class of reliable data applications emerging in wireless sensor networks. For example, currently sensor of sensors in wireless sensor networks on the fly (e.g., during disaster recovery). Due to the application

  18. Hallway Monitoring: Distributed Data Processing with Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgartner, Tobias

    infrared sensors (PIRs), con- nected to 30 wireless sensor nodes. There are also 29 LEDs and speakers, development, and evaluation of higher-level algorithms in real de- ployments in which sensor nodes can share, and 29 passive infrared sensors (PIRs) for motion detection. The construction of the load sensors has

  19. NONNEGATIVE UNMIXING METHODOLOGY APPLIED ON BRILLOUIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NONNEGATIVE UNMIXING METHODOLOGY APPLIED ON BRILLOUIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR Edouard Buchoud1 As a complement to conventional sensors, Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors (DOFS) have gradually played. In complementary to traditional sensors, distributed fiber optic sensors (DOFS) are an attractive tool for SHM [1

  20. Micromachined pressure sensors: Review and recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachines Dept.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of piezoresistivity in silicon in the mid 1950s, silicon-based pressure sensors have been widely produced. Micromachining technology has greatly benefited from the success of the integrated circuits industry, burrowing materials, processes, and toolsets. Because of this, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are now poised to capture large segments of existing sensor markets and to catalyze the development of new markets. Given the emerging importance of MEMS, it is instructive to review the history of micromachined pressure sensors, and to examine new developments in the field. Pressure sensors will be the focus of this paper, starting from metal diaphragm sensors with bonded silicon strain gauges, and moving to present developments of surface-micromachined, optical, resonant, and smart pressure sensors. Considerations for diaphragm design will be discussed in detail, as well as additional considerations for capacitive and piezoresistive devices.

  1. Sensor network and soft sensor design for stable nonlinear dynamic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Abhay Kumar

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is designing soft sensors for a given measurement structure. In case of high-dimensional systems, the application of conventional soft sensor or observer designs may not always be practical due to the high computational requirements or the resulting observers...

  2. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  3. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  4. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  5. DOI 10.1007/s11276-006-0724-8 Relay sensor placement in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lusheng

    DOI 10.1007/s11276-006-0724-8 Relay sensor placement in wireless sensor networks Xiuzhen Cheng Sensor Networks (WSNs) are ad hoc multihop sys- tems containing sensors connected by wireless links sensor net- works. In our study, this problem is modelled by a NP-hard network optimization problem named

  6. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K. (Knoxville, TN); Allgood, Glenn O. (Powell, TN); Mooney, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN); Turner, John C. (Clinton, TN); Treece, Dale A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  7. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    advanced prototype built on an alumina substrate, provided by Ford, with an integrated heating element * Substrate packaged by U.S. automotive supplier into a commercial sensor...

  8. Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    112 productivity and safety, and boost the U.S. sensor and automation industry. 113 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 114 2.1 Performance advances 115 DRAFT -...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Sensors & Optical Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimizing Engines for Alternative Fuels On September 10, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Sensors & Optical Diagnostics,...

  10. Cognitive Radio Networks as Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandari, Dorna; Yang, Seung R.; Zhao, Yue; Pottie, Gregory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assuming the cognitive radios know their own coordinates.Networked Sensing Cognitive Radio Networks As SensorIntroduction: Cognitive Radio (CR) Networks The Need For

  11. Compiling functional reactive macroprograms for sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Ryan Rhodes, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensor networks present a number of novel programming challenges for application developers. Their inherent limitations of computational power, communication bandwidth, and energy demand new approaches to programming that ...

  12. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies - Teaming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies - Teaming with DOE to Develop, Transfer, and Deploy Technologies Ames Laboratory scientists are contributing their expertise...

  13. Explicit Sensor Network Localization using Semidefinite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 Graph of partial EDM with sensors ? and anchors ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ...... 1 Load UBi ? R|Ci|×(r+1) representing the face corresponding to clique Ci;.

  14. MB3a Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.; McDowell, Kyle D.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated a new infrasound sensor, the MB3a, manufactured by Seismo Wave. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by researchers at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the technology was recently licensed to Seismo Wave for production and sales. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, seismic sensitivity, and self- calibration ability. The MB3a infrasound sensors are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  15. A small, rugged and inexpensive hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Hughes, R.C.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new generation hydrogen sensor developed at Sandia National laboratories that is smaller, faster, sturdier, and less expensive to manufacture.

  16. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4112 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to:2MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity

  17. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4705 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to:2MHK ISDB/Sensors/TurbidityMHK

  18. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Tide Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to:2MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented

  19. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Wave Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to:2MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/VentedMHK

  20. Mesh-based Sensor Relocation for Coverage Maintenance in Mobile Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoro, Nicola

    sophisticated protocols, mobile sensor networks are more flexible and adaptive to unknown or hazardous of reasons. All of them rely on global/cross-network message transmissions for discovering nearby replacementMesh-based Sensor Relocation for Coverage Maintenance in Mobile Sensor Networks Xu Li SCS, Carleton