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Sample records for technique water sampling

  1. Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling Details Activities (63) Areas (51) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling...

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Salmon, Mississippi, Site, Water Sampling Location Map .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........1 Water Sampling Locations at the Rulison, .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2014 LMSGRN.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and May 2014 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site October 2014 LMSRBLS00514 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site November 2014 LMS.........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site October 2015 LMS.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site July 2015 LMSMNT.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site October 2015 LMSRBLS00515 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site May 2015 LMSRULS00115 Available .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site December 2013 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site January 2016 LMSRULS00915 .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site July 2014 LMSMNT.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January 2014 LMSMNTS01013 This .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado Processing Site October 2013 LMSNAP.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMSTUB.........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data ...

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Static Water Level Data ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Data Durango Processing Site Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Natural Gas Analysis Data ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrographs Time-Concentration ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrograph Time-Concentration ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Time-Concentration Graph ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona Disposal Site June 2015 .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater, Surface Water, and Alternate Water Supply System Sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site December 2013 LMSRVTS00913 This page intentionally left blank ...

  19. Water and Sediment Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MDC Blank 7222014 Below MDC Below MDC Water Sampling Results Location Sample Date WIPP ... Tut Tank 3132014 Below MDC Below MDC Fresh Water Tank 3122014 Below MDC Below MDC Hill ...

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 100, 17B, 1A, 72, and 81 were classified as Category II. The sample results were qualified with a "Q" flag, indicating the data are qualitative because of the sampling technique. ...

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. ...

  2. Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2015 LMS/AMB/S01114 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2014, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico February 2015 RIN 14116607 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site Planned Sampling Map...........................................................3 Data

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site February 2015 LMS/MON/S01214 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-December 2014, Monument Valley, Arizona February 2015 RIN 14126645 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Monument Valley, Arizona, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ..................................................5

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Alternate Water Supply System Sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site May 2014 LMS/RVT/S00314 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-March 2014, Riverton, Wyoming May 2014 RIN 14035986 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, WY, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ...................................................................3 Data

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    February 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2015 LMS/GJO/S00215 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-February 2015, Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2015 RIN 15026795 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Sample Location Map

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map

  8. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and September 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites March 2014 LMS/DUD/DUP/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June and September 2013, Durango, Colorado March 2014 RIN 13055370 and 13085577 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Sample Location Map-June

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Interference Check Sample (ICS) Analysis ICP interference check samples ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the required frequency to verify the ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... the applicable MDL. Inductively Coupled Plasma Interference Check Sample Analysis ... and background correction factors for all inductively coupled plasma instruments. ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site March 2016 LMS/AMB/S01215 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-December 2015, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico March 2016 RIN 15117494 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site Planned Sampling Map...........................................................3 Data Assessment

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/GRJ/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Grand Junction, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13075515 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ....................................................3 Data Assessment

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle,

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The gross alpha, gross beta, radium-226, and radium-228 method blank results were below the DLC. Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Interference Check Sample (ICS) Analysis ICP ...

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2014 LMS/BLU/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2014 RIN 13115746 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site January 2014 LMS/BUR/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Burrell, Pennsylvania January 2014 RIN 13095638 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..........................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site February 2014 LMS/CAN/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania February 2014 RIN 13095639 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Disposal Site August 2014 LMS/LKD/S00514 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2014, Lakeview, Oregon, Disposal August 2014 RIN 14056157 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Lakeview, Oregon, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ...............................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Processing Site August 2014 LMS/LKP/S00514 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2014, Lakeview, Oregon, Processing August 2014 RIN 14056157 and 14056158 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Lakeview, Oregon, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ............................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2016 LMS/RVT/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Riverton, Wyoming February 2016 RINs 15097345, 15097346, and 15097347 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Planned Sampling Location Map .........................................7 Data Assessment Summary

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rifle, Colorado, New and Old Processing Sites January 2014 LMS/RFN/RFO/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Rifle, Colorado January 2014 RIN 13115731 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ........................................................5 Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites January 2015 LMS/RFN/RFO/S01114 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2014, Rifle, Colorado January 2015 RINs 14106568 and 14106569 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site, Planned Sampling Map ......................................................3 Old Rifle,

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites January 2016 LMS/SRE/SRW/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Slick Rock, Colorado January 2016 RINs 15087319 and 15107424 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .....................................................5 Data Assessment

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 10 pCiL Liquid Scintillation LMR-15 Uranium Vanadium Zinc Total No. of Analytes 4 0 ... 26, 2013 TO: Rick Findlay FROM: Jeff Price SUBJECT: Trip Report (LTHMP Sampling) ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater Sampling at the Central Nevada Test Area February 2015 LMS/CNT/S01214 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/scitech/ Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in

  10. Category:Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Water Sampling page? For detailed information on Water Sampling as...

  11. Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Downhole Fluid Sampling Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  12. Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration...

  13. Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, Philippines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration...

  14. Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration...

  15. August 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2015 LMSTUB.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  16. February 2016 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site April .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implements ... NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon components Posted: June 12, 2012 - 1:34pm The National Nuclear Security Administration...

  18. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  19. Category:Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Surface Water Sampling page? For detailed information on...

  20. Novel water-removal technique boosts performance of carbon nanomateria...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technique boosts performance of carbon nanomaterials Novel water-removal technique boosts ... amount of added water that collects between the oxygen-functionalized nanosheets. ...

  1. Water Sampling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Swanberg, 1976...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Swanberg, 1976) Exploration Activity...

  2. Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration...

  3. Water Sampling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Witcher, 2006...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Witcher, 2006) Exploration Activity...

  4. Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details...

  5. Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) Exploration Activity...

  6. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Trainer, 1974)...

  7. News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results May 11, 2012 - 3:25pm Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Laboratory results indicate water from the alternative water supply system is safe for residents to drink The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that residential drinking water testing from an alternative water supply system in Riverton,

  8. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papusch, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is to provide a basis for groundwater and surface water sampling at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations.

  9. ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING THROUGH AN IMPROVED AIR MONITORING TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, D.

    2010-06-07

    Environmental sampling (ES) is a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguarding approaches throughout the world. Performance of ES (e.g. air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) supports the IAEAs mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a State and has been available since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors (1992-1997). A recent step-change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities is an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Utilizing commonly used equipment throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories for particle analysis, researchers are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) silicon substrate has been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. The new collection equipment will allow IAEA nuclear safeguards inspectors to develop enhanced safeguarding approaches for complicated facilities. This paper will explore the use of air monitoring to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility that could be used for comparison of consistencies in declared operations. The implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Technical aspects of the air monitoring device and the analysis of its environmental samples will demonstrate the essential parameters required for successful application of the system.

  10. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project, Gunnison County, Colorado Author R. H. Carpenter Organization Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S....

  11. Ch. III, Interpretation of water sample analyses Waunita Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of water sample analyses Waunita Hot Springs area Gunnison County, Colorado Author R. H. Carpenter Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation...

  12. Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details...

  13. Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992)...

  14. Water Sampling At Little Valley Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Little Valley Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  15. Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  16. Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

  17. Water Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

  18. Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  19. Water Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details...

  20. Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  1. Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  2. Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  3. Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Water Sampling At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton...

  5. Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

  6. Water Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Carpenter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Carpenter, 1981) Exploration Activity...

  7. Water Sampling At Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. Water Sampling At Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  9. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration...

  10. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details...

  11. Surface Water Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity...

  12. Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  13. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity...

  14. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  15. Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002)...

  16. Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity...

  17. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

  18. Water Sampling At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Faulder...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Faulder, 1991) Exploration Activity...

  19. Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt...

  20. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982)...

  1. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Exploration...

  2. Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Geothermal Area (Trainer, 1974...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Geothermal Area (Trainer, 1974) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Water Sampling At Kauai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Kauai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kauai Area...

  5. Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  6. Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity...

  7. Water Sampling At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Heber Area...

  8. Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  9. Water Sampling At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details...

  10. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

  11. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration...

  12. Water Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  13. Water Sampling At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  14. Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Exploration Activity...

  16. Water Sampling At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  17. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Exploration...

  18. ACL monitoring using a low-flow sampling technique: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, D.F.; Whitehouse, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A dedicated low-flow groundwater sample collection system was designed for implementation in a post-closure ACL monitoring program at the Yaworski Lagoon NPL site in Canterbury, Connecticut. The system includes dedicated bladder pumps with intake ports located in the screened interval of the monitoring wells. This sampling technique was implemented in the spring of 1993. The system was designed to simultaneously obtain samples directly from the screened interval of nested wells in three distinct water bearing zones. Sample collection is begun upon stabilization of field parameters. Other than line volume, no prior purging of the well is required. It was found that dedicated low-flow sampling from the screened interval provides a method of representative sample collection without the bias of suspended solids introduced by traditional techniques of pumping and bailing. Analytical data indicate that measured chemical constituents are representative of groundwater migrating through the screened interval. Upon implementation of the low-flow monitoring system, analytical results exhibited a decrease in concentrations of some organic compounds and metals. The system has also proven to be a cost effective alternative to pumping and bailing which generate large volumes of purge water requiring containment and disposal.

  19. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Tuba City, Arizona, are described in the following sections of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). This plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the stations routinely monitored at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and the final EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  20. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  1. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid

  2. Ion source sample preparation techniques for carbon-14 AMS measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsley, D.R.; Farwell, G.W.; Grootes, P.M.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for preparing solid graphite, and other types of carbon samples possessing good geometrical characteristics and producing large beams are described. Amorphous carbon, or graphite powder, is encapsulated in tantalum, compressed to approx.14 kilobars, and heated in vacuum to approx.2500/sup 0/C. The end of the capsule is cut off, exposing a smooth and hard graphite surface which provides excellent emittance in a reflection-type sputter source. The powder is prepared from CO/sub 2/ by the hydrogen-iron powder catalyzation method. Silver-carbon mixtures with good geometrical properties can also be prepared with our press. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    > : , - ' and Precipitation Collected in - Connection with Calibration-Test Flaring of Gas From Test Well, - I August 15-October 13, 197,0,, Project Rulison-8, 197 1 HGS 9 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal center, Denver, Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER SAMPLES FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION

  4. Uranium isotopes in ground water as a prospecting technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

    1980-02-01

    The isotopic concentrations of dissolved uranium were determined for 300 ground water samples near eight known uranium accumulations to see if new approaches to prospecting could be developed. It is concluded that a plot of /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio (A.R.) versus uranium concentration (C) can be used to identify redox fronts, to locate uranium accumulations, and to determine whether such accumulations are being augmented or depleted by contemporary aquifer/ground water conditions. In aquifers exhibiting flow-through hydrologic systems, up-dip ground water samples are characterized by high uranium concentration values (> 1 to 4 ppB) and down-dip samples by low uranium concentration values (less than 1 ppB). The boundary between these two regimes can usually be identified as a redox front on the basis of regional water chemistry and known uranium accumulations. Close proximity to uranium accumulations is usually indicated either by very high uranium concentrations in the ground water or by a combination of high concentration and high activity ratio values. Ground waters down-dip from such accumulations often exhibit low uranium concentration values but retain their high A.R. values. This serves as a regional indicator of possible uranium accumulations where conditions favor the continued augmentation of the deposit by precipitation from ground water. Where the accumulation is being dispersed and depleted by the ground water system, low A.R. values are observed. Results from the Gulf Coast District of Texas and the Wyoming districts are presented.

  5. On the Applications of IBA Techniques to Biological Samples Analysis: PIXE and RBS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falcon-Gonzalez, J. M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Morilla Garcia, Y.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-11

    The analytical techniques based on ion beams or IBA techniques give quantitative information on elemental concentration in samples of a wide variety of nature. In this work, we focus on PIXE technique, analyzing thick target biological specimens (TTPIXE), using 3 MeV protons produced by an electrostatic accelerator. A nuclear microprobe was used performing PIXE and RBS simultaneously, in order to solve the uncertainties produced in the absolute PIXE quantifying. The advantages of using both techniques and a nuclear microprobe are discussed. Quantitative results are shown to illustrate the multielemental resolution of the PIXE technique; for this, a blood standard was used.

  6. Flow injection sample pretreatment in the determination of trace elements in waters by atomic spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Flow injection (FI) techniques are a way of automating sampling pretreatment procedures with direct coupling to the instrument. For a variety of reasons, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) would be the method of choice for the determination of trace elements in water samples were it not for some of the inherent limitations of this technique. These limitations are concerned with the various interferences that arise from matrix components and with the atom number density in the source. This together with the various noise sources sets detection limits which are not low enough for many applications. Thus many FI procedures are devised with the aim of overcoming these limitations and thus solid phase extraction (SPE) as a means of preconcentration features largely in recently published work. Results will be presented for the determination of trace elements in water samples (both fresh and saline) in which SPE procedures were used to (a) remove the potentially interfering sea-water matrix for determinations using ICP-MS and (b) preconcentrate cadmium from surface waters prior to determination by FAAS. Hydride generation methods have been applied for the determination of selenium and arsenic. In highly saline media the elevated recoveries of Se have been investigated and for the determination of As, an evaluation of the claim that the use of surfactants improves the performance of a flow based hydride generation system has critically evaluated.

  7. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

  8. Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal...

  9. Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the smoking gun evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activitythe focus of this reportwas a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey, in situ

  10. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  11. June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... DVP-June 2015, Green River, Utah U.S. Department of Energy RIN 15067102 August 2015 Page 12 Inductively Coupled Plasma Interference Check Sample Analysis Interference check samples ...

  12. Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of ...

  13. 384 Power plant waste water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagerty, K.J.; Knotek, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the 384 Power House Sampling and Analysis Plan. The Plan describes sampling methods, locations, frequency, analytes, and stream descriptions. The effluent streams from 384, were characterized in 1989, in support of the Stream Specific Report (WHC-EP-0342, Addendum 1).

  14. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  15. Burlap bands as a sampling technique for green anoles (Anolis carolinensis) and other reptiles commonly found on tree boles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the use and successfulness of using burlap bands on tree boles as a sampling technique for green anoles.

  16. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years.

  17. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  18. Water Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity...

  19. Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details...

  20. Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  1. Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  2. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  3. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration...

  4. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  5. Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  6. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie & Truesdell, 1977)...

  7. Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. Water Sampling At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Lake...

  9. Water Sampling At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity...

  10. Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  11. 400 area secondary cooling water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penn, L.L.

    1996-10-29

    This is a total rewrite of the Sampling and Analysis Plan in response to, and to ensure compliance with, the State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4501 issued on July 31, 1996. This revision describes changes in facility status and implements requirements of the permit.

  12. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  13. September 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2016 LMS/SHP/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Shiprock, New Mexico February 2016 RINs 15097348 and 15097349 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Planned Sampling Map Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

  14. January 2016 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site March 2016 LMS/GJT/S00116 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-January 2016, Grand Junction, Colorado March 2016 RIN 15127576 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site, Sample Location Map

  15. November 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites February 2016 LMS/RFN/RFO/S01115 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2015, Rifle, Colorado February 2016 RINs 15107463 and 15107464 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site, Planned Sampling Map

  16. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Ajay Sharma, Sumit

    2015-08-28

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  17. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities for calendar year 1995 to 1997 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Naturita, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, sampling frequency, and specific rationale for each routine monitoring station at the site. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  18. Development of novel separation techniques for biological samples in capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.T.

    1994-07-27

    This dissertation includes three different topics: general introduction of capillary electrophoresis (CE); gradient in CE and CE in biological separations; and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) for DNA separation. Factors such as temperature, viscosity, pH, and the surface of capillary walls affecting the separation performance are demonstrated. A pH gradient between 3.0 and 5.2 is useful to improve the resolution among eight different organic acids. A flow gradient due to the change in the concentration of surfactant, which is able to coat to the capillary wall to change the flow rate and its direction, is also shown as a good way to improve the resolution for organic compounds. A temperature gradient caused by joule heat is shown by voltage programming to enhance the resolution and shorten the separation time for several phenolic compounds. The author also shows that self-regulating dynamic control of electroosmotic flow in CE by simply running separation in different concentrations of surfactant has less matrix effect on the separation performance. One of the most important demonstrations in this dissertation is that the author proposes on-column reaction which gives several advantages including the use of a small amount of sample, low risk of contamination, and time saving and kinetic features. The author uses this idea with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a detection mode to detect an on-column digestion of sub-ng of protein. This technique also is applied to single cell analysis in the group.

  19. July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site October 2015 LMS/NAP/S00715 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-July 2015, Naturita, Colorado October 2015 RIN 15077222 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary

  20. May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

  1. May 2011 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 16-17, 2011, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry, and for tritium using the conventional method. Tritium was not measured using the enrichment method because the EPA laboratory no longer offers that service. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  2. Analysis of core soil and water samples from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1981-02-18

    Core soil samples and water samples were collected from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak for analysis of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am by both gamma spectroscopy and, through a contractor laboratory, by wet chemistry procedures. The samples processing methods, the analytical methods and the analytical quality control are all procedures developed for the continuing Marshall Island radioecology and dose assessment work.

  3. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  4. Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G + Gas Sampling (3 categories) 4 pages W + Water Sampling (2 categories) 3...

  5. May 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 9-10, 2012, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the site boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  6. Demonstrating Reliable High Level Waste Slurry Sampling Techniques to Support Hanford Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Steven E.

    2013-11-11

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HL W) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOC must demonstrate the ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP Waste Acceptance Criteria and Data Quality Objectives. The sampling method employed must support both TOC and WTP requirements. To facilitate information transfer between the two facilities the mixing and sampling demonstrations are led by the One System Integrated Project Team. The One System team, Waste Feed Delivery Mixing and Sampling Program, has developed a full scale sampling loop to demonstrate sampler capability. This paper discusses the full scale sampling loops ability to meet precision and accuracy requirements, including lessons learned during testing. Results of the testing showed that the Isolok(R) sampler chosen for implementation provides precise, repeatable results. The Isolok(R) sampler accuracy as tested did not meet test success criteria. Review of test data and the test platform following testing by a sampling expert identified several issues regarding the sampler used to provide reference material used to judge the Isolok's accuracy. Recommendations were made to obtain new data to evaluate the sampler's accuracy utilizing a reference sampler that follows good sampling protocol.

  7. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  8. Extraction of Plutonium From Spiked INEEL Soil Samples Using the Ligand-Assisted Supercritical Fluid Extraction (LA-SFE) Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.; Holmes, R.G.G.

    1999-08-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction for the removal of transuranic contaminations from soils an Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) silty-clay soil sample was obtained from near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex area and subjected to three different chemical preparations before being spiked with plutonium. The spiked INEEL soil samples were subjected to a sequential aqueous extraction procedure to determine radionuclide portioning in each sample. Results from those extractions demonstrate that plutonium consistently partitioned into the residual fraction across all three INEEL soil preparations whereas americium partitioned 73% into the iron/manganese fraction for soil preparation A, with the balance partitioning into the residual fraction. Plutonium and americium were extracted from the INEEL soil samples using a ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction technique. Initial supercritical fluid extraction runs produced plutonium extraction technique. Initial supercritical fluid extraction runs produced plutonium extraction efficiencies ranging from 14% to 19%. After a second round wherein the initial extraction parameters were changed, the plutonium extraction efficiencies increased to 60% and as high as 80% with the americium level in the post-extracted soil samples dropping near to the detection limits. The third round of experiments are currently underway. These results demonstrate that the ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction technique can effectively extract plutonium from the spiked INEEL soil preparations.

  9. Improved sampling and analytical techniques for characterization of very-low-level radwaste materials from commercial nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, D.E.; Robinson, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    This paper summarizes the unique sampling methods that were utilized in a recently completed project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to perform accurate and precise radiological characterizations of several very-low-level radwaste materials from commercial nuclear power stations. The waste types characterized during this project included dry active waste (DAW), oil, secondary-side ion exchange resin, and soil. Special precautions were taken to insure representative sampling of the DAW. This involved the initial direct, quantitative gamma spectrometric analyses of bulk quantities (208-liter drums) of DAW utilizing a specially constructed barrel scanner employing a collimated intrinsic germanium detector assembly. Subsamples of the DAW for destructive radiochemical analyses of the difficult-to-measure 10CF61 radionuclides were then selected which had the same isotopic composition (to within {+-}25%) as that measured for the entire drum of DAW. The techniques for accomplishing this sampling are described. Oil samples were collected from the top, middle and bottom sections of 208-liter drums for radiochemical analyses. These samples were composited to represent the entire drum of oil. The accuracy of this type of sampling was evaluated by comparisons with direct, quantitative assays of a number of the drums using the barrel scanning gamma-ray spectrometer. The accuracy of sampling drums of spent secondary-side ion exchange resin was evaluated by comparing the radionuclide contents of grab samples taken from the tops of the drums with direct assays performed with the barrel scanner. The results of these sampling evaluations indicated that the sampling methods used were generally adequate for providing a reasonably representative subsample from bulk quantities of DAW, oil, and resin. The study also identified a number of potential pitfalls, in sampling of these materials.

  10. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  11. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01

    The world’s most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  12. Rapid Column Extraction Method for Actinides and Sr-89/90 in Water Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAXWELL III, SHERROD L.

    2005-06-15

    The SRS Environmental Laboratory analyzes water samples for environmental monitoring, including river water and ground water samples. A new, faster actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method has been developed and implemented to improve productivity, reduce labor costs and add capacity to this laboratory. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized. The method can be used for routine analysis or as a rapid method for emergency preparedness. Thorium and curium are often analyzed separately due to the interference of the daughter of Th-229 tracer, actinium (Ac)-225, on curium isotopes when measured by alpha spectrometry. This new method also adds a separation step using DGA Resin{reg_sign}, (Diglycolamide Resin, Eichrom Technologies) to remove Ac-225 and allow the separation and analysis of thorium isotopes and curium isotopes at the same time.

  13. Statistical techniques for detecting the intergalactic magnetic field from large samples of extragalactic Faraday rotation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akahori, Takuya; Gaensler, B. M.; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: bryan.gaensler@sydney.edu.au

    2014-08-01

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. However, their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30° × 30° field of view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution from the Galaxy since the angular scale of this component toward high Galactic latitudes would be much larger than that expected for the IGMF. Present observations do not yet provide a sufficient source density to be able to estimate the RM of filaments. However, from the proposed approach with forthcoming surveys, we predict significant residuals of RM that should be ascribable to filaments. The predicted structure of the IGMF down to scales of 0.°1 should be observable with data from the Square Kilometre Array, if we achieve selections of sources toward which sightlines do not contain intervening galaxies and RM errors are less than a few rad m{sup –2}.

  14. Determination of formate in natural waters by a coupled enzymatic/high-performance liquid chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieber, D.J.; Vaughan, G.M.; Mopper, K.

    1988-09-01

    An enzymatic method was developed to quantify formic acid in natural water samples at submicromolar concentrations. The method is based on the oxidation of formate by formate dehydrogenase with corresponding reduction of ..beta..-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (..beta..-NAD/sup +/) to reduced ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ (..beta..-NADH); ..beta..-NADH is quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. An important feature of this method is that the enzymatic reaction occurs directly in aqueous media, even sea water, and does not require sample pretreatment other than sample filtration. The reaction proceeds at room temperature at a slightly alkaline pH (7.5 - 8.5) and is specific for formate with a detection limit of 0.5 ..mu..M (S/N = 4) for a 200-..mu..L injection. The precision of the method was 4.6% relative standard deviation (n = 6) for a 0.6 ..mu..M standard addition of formate to Sargasso sea water. Average recoveries of 2 ..mu..M additions of formate to sea water, pore water, or rain were 103, 103, and 87%, respectively. Intercalibration with a Dionex ion chromatographic system showed an excellent agreement of 98%. Concentrations of formate present in natural samples ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sea water, 0.4 to 10.0 ..mu..M for Miami rain, and 0.9 to 8.4 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sediment pore water.

  15. May and June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Inductively Coupled Plasma Interference Check Sample Analysis Interference check samples ... Inductively Coupled Plasma Interference Check Sample Analysis Interference check samples ...

  16. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah; Yahya, Redzuan; Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  17. Rapid Method for Ra-226 and Ra-228 in Water Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III

    2006-02-10

    The measurement of radium isotopes in natural waters is important for oceanographic studies and for public health reasons. Ra-226 (1620 year half-life) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in natural waters can be tedious and time-consuming. Different sample preparation methods are often required to prepare Ra-226 and Ra-228 for separate analyses. A rapid method has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory that effectively separates both Ra-226 and Ra-228 (via Ac-228) for assay. This method uses MnO{sub 2} Resin from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) to preconcentrate Ra-226 and Ra-228 rapidly from water samples, along with Ba-133 tracer. DGA Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) and Ln-Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) are employed in tandem to prepare Ra-226 for assay by alpha spectrometry and to determine Ra-228 via the measurement of Ac-228 by gas proportional counting. After preconcentration, the manganese dioxide is dissolved from the resin and passed through stacked Ln-Resin-DGA Resin cartridges that remove uranium and thorium interferences and retain Ac-228 on DGA Resin. The eluate that passed through this column is evaporated, redissolved in a lower acidity and passed through Ln-Resin again to further remove interferences before performing a barium sulfate microprecipitation. The Ac-228 is stripped from the resin, collected using cerium fluoride microprecipitation and counted by gas proportional counting. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  18. Experimental techniques to determine salt formation and deposition in supercritical water oxidation reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, J.P.C.; LaJeunesse, C.A.; Rice, S.F.

    1994-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for destroying aqueous organic waste. Feed material, containing organic waste at concentrations typically less than 10 wt % in water, is pressurized and heated to conditions above water`s critical point where the ability of water to dissolve hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals is greatly enhanced. An oxidizer, is then added to the feed. Given adequate residence time and reaction temperature, the SCWO process rapidly produces innocuous combustion products. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the feed emerge as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}; metals, heteroatoms, and halides appear in the effluent as inorganic salts and acids. The oxidation of organic material containing heteroatoms, such as sulfur or phosphorous, forms acid anions. In the presence of metal ions, salts are formed and precipitate out of the supercritical fluid. In a tubular configured reactor, these salts agglomerate, adhere to the reactor wall, and eventually interfere by causing a flow restriction in the reactor leading to an increase in pressure. This rapid precipitation is due to an extreme drop in salt solubility that occurs as the feed stream becomes supercritical. To design a system that can accommodate the formation of these salts, it is important to understand the deposition process quantitatively. A phenomenological model is developed in this paper to predict the time that reactor pressure begins to rise as a function of the fluid axial temperature profile and effective solubility curve. The experimental techniques used to generate effective solubility curves for one salt of interest, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, are described, and data is generated for comparison. Good correlation between the model and experiment is shown. An operational technique is also discussed that allows the deposited salt to be redissolved in a single phase and removed from the affected portion of the reactor. This technique is demonstrated experimentally.

  19. Investigation of the effects of various water mediums on desulfurization and deashing of a coal sample by flotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayhan, F.D. [Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various water mediums on desulfurization and deashing of a coal sample using flotation. For this purpose, experimental studies were conducted on a coal sample containing high ash and sulfur contents. The effects of pH, solid concentration, collector amount and frother amount on the flotation were investigated separately in Mediterranean Sea water, Cermik thermal spring water, snow water and tap water. Flotation, results indicated that, when comparing the various water mediums, the following order for the ash content was obtained: snow water < Cermik thermal spring water < tap water < the Mediterranean Sea water. For the reduction of total sulfur, the following order was obtained: snow water > Cermik thermal spring water > Mediterranean Sea water > tap water. When snow water was used as a flotation medium, it was found that a concentrate containing 3.01% total sulfur and 27.64% ash with a total sulfur reduction of 57.06% was obtained from a feed containing 7.01% total sulfur and 4.1.17% ash.

  20. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill; Marutzky, Sam; Knapp, Kathryn

    2013-02-24

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

  1. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof

  2. INFRARED VIBRATIONAL PREDISSOCIATION SPECTROSCOPY OF WATER CLUSTERS BY THE CROSSED LASER MOLECULAR BEAM TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.; Krajnovich, D.J.; Kwok, H.S.; Lisy, J.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Lee, Y.T.

    1981-11-01

    between the dimer and larger polymers (trimer-hexamer) indicate a dramatic change in the hydrogen bonding, which is best explained as arising from the non-additive effects present when a water molecule is both donating and accepting a hydrogen bond. This difference between dimer and trimer also rationalizes the previous disagreement between potential functions based on condensed phase properties (where the water molecule is interacting with multiple neighbors) and those fit to imperfect gas or dimer properties which sample only the isolated pair potential. The data support an interpretation of the hydrogen bonded O-H stretching fundamental region as arising from a homogeneous broadening (not necessarily a result of the predissociation) whose width is characteristic of the hydrogen bond itself and not the sum of distinct bonding geometries. This is different from some previous theories of the water infrared absorption spectrum which assign each band to water molecules bound to different numbers of neighboring molecules.

  3. Analytical Data Report of Water Samples Collected For I-129 Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-10-26

    This is an analytical data report for samples received from the central plateau contractor. The samples were analyzed for iodine-129.

  4. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  5. Economic feasibility analysis of water-harvesting techniques for mined-land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Marti, M.H.

    1981-07-01

    A water harvesting, agricultural production system, field tested as a means of reclaiming strip-mined land is described. Though the technical feasibility of the system is becoming increasingly apparent, economic feasibility and legal issues may determine its potential application. The purpose of this study is to explore the economic feasibility of the system and to provide information for use in assessing whether further investigation of water harvesting reclamation techniques is warranted. The economic feasibility of the PNL reclamation system hinges on whether its net benefits exceed those of conventional reclamation. This preliminary feasibility study assesses the net private benefits of each system using data for the Peabody Coal Company's Kayenta mine on the Black Mesa in Arizona. To compare the alternative reclamation systems, the present value of direct net benefits (income minus production and reclamation costs) is calculated for grazing (conventional reclamation) or for cropping (PNL reclamation). Three of the PNL system slope treatments have lower estimated total costs than conventional reclamation. The difference is $3895/acre for compacted slope, $3025/acre for salt-compacted slope and $2310/acre for crop-on-slope. These differences constitute a substantial cost advantage for the system on the basis of the present value of land reclamation and maintenance costs. The system also has advantages based on the estimated value of agricultural production capacity. Even the lowest yield levels considered for alfalfa, corn, and pinto beans had higher net present values than grazing.

  6. June-July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    June-July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2015 LMS/RFL/S00615 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June and July 2015, Old and New Rifle, Colorado November 2015 RINs 15067100, 15067101, and 15077206 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site, Planned

  7. April 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-12

    Sampling and analysis were conducted on April 16-19, 2012, as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office Of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations SA1-1-H, HMH-5R, SA3-4-H, SA1-2-H, Pond W of GZ, and SA5-4-4. One trip blank was collected during this sampling event.

  8. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  9. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Retrieved from "http:...

  10. Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  11. Evaluation of an ambient air sampling system for tritium (as tritiated water vapor) using silica gel adsorbent columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Tinker, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Ambient air samples for tritium analysis (as the tritiated water vapor [HTO] content of atmospheric moisture) are collected for the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) using the solid adsorbent silica gel. The silica gel has a moisture sensitive indicator which allows for visual observation of moisture movement through a column. Despite using an established method, some silica gel columns showed a complete change in the color indicator for summertime samples suggesting that breakthrough had occurred; thus a series of tests was conducted on the sampling system in an environmental chamber. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum practical sampling volume and overall collection efficiency for water vapor collected on silica gel columns. Another purpose was to demonstrate the use of an impinger-based system to load water vapor onto silica gel columns to provide realistic analytical spikes and blanks for the Hanford Site SESP. Breakthrough volumes (V{sub b}) were measured and the chromatographic efficiency (expressed as the number of theoretical plates [N]) was calculated for a range of environmental conditions. Tests involved visual observations of the change in the silica gel`s color indicator as a moist air stream was drawn through the column, measurement of the amount of a tritium tracer retained and then recovered from the silica gel, and gravimetric analysis for silica gel columns exposed in the environmental chamber.

  12. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables.

  13. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-23

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  14. U Isotopic Compositions and Concentrations of Rocky Flats Water Samples Collected Over the Period 4/1/15 to 6/16/15 and Submitted to LBNL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U Isotopic Compositions and Concentrations of Rocky Flats Water Samples Collected Over the Period 4/1/15 to 6/16/15 and Submitted to LBNL John N. Christensen Data Report date 12/30/15 Twenty-one water samples were submitted by SM Stoller to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for uranium (U) isotopic analysis. The sample set includes four composite samples from the WALPOC location, one composite sample from GS10, one composite sample from the SW093 location, and one sample each from

  15. The Development and Optimization of Techniques for Monitoring Water Quality on-Board Spacecraft Using Colorimetric Solid-Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    April Hill

    2007-12-01

    The main focus of this dissertation is the design, development, and ground and microgravity validation of methods for monitoring drinking water quality on-board NASA spacecraft using clorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE). The Introduction will overview the need for in-flight water quality analysis and will detail some of the challenges associated with operations in the absence of gravity. The ability of C-SPE methods to meet these challenges will then be discussed, followed by a literature review on existing applications of C-SPE and similar techniques. Finally, a brief discussion of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy theory, which provides a means for analyte identification and quantification in C-SPE analyses, is presented. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 reports the results from microgravity testing of existing C-SPE methods and procedures aboard NASA's C-9 microgravity simulator. Chapter 2 discusses the development of a C-SPE method for determining the total concentration of biocidal silver (i.e., in both dissolved and colloidal forms) in water samples. Chapter 3 presents the first application of the C-SPE technique to the determination of an organic analyte (i.e., formaldehyde). Chapter 4, which is a departure from the main focus of the thesis, details the results of an investigation into the effect of substrate rotation on the kinetics involved in the antigen and labeling steps in sandwich immunoassays. These research chapters are followed by general conclusions and a prospectus section.

  16. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-21

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  17. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-08-15

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 ± 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS's non-detected result of 1.56 ± 0.59 pCi/L. NFS's data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC's request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.

  18. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandramohan, J.; Tholkappian, M.; Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R.

    2015-08-28

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ≤ 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg{sup −1} with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 238}U, ≤ 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 232}Th and 300.34 Bqkg{sup −1} to 449.08 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 40}K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Ra{sub eq}), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed gamma does rate (D{sub R}), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  19. An efficient parallel sampling technique for Multivariate Poisson-Lognormal model: Analysis with two crash count datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Xianyuan; Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-11-19

    Our study investigates the Multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) model that jointly models crash frequency and severity accounting for correlations. The ordinary univariate count models analyze crashes of different severity level separately ignoring the correlations among severity levels. The MVPLN model is capable to incorporate the general correlation structure and takes account of the over dispersion in the data that leads to a superior data fitting. But, the traditional estimation approach for MVPLN model is computationally expensive, which often limits the use of MVPLN model in practice. In this work, a parallel sampling scheme is introduced to improve the original Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation approach of the MVPLN model, which significantly reduces the model estimation time. Two MVPLN models are developed using the pedestrian vehicle crash data collected in New York City from 2002 to 2006, and the highway-injury data from Washington State (5-year data from 1990 to 1994) The Deviance Information Criteria (DIC) is used to evaluate the model fitting. The estimation results show that the MVPLN models provide a superior fit over univariate Poisson-lognormal (PLN), univariate Poisson, and Negative Binomial models. Moreover, the correlations among the latent effects of different severity levels are found significant in both datasets that justifies the importance of jointly modeling crash frequency and severity accounting for correlations.

  20. An efficient parallel sampling technique for Multivariate Poisson-Lognormal model: Analysis with two crash count datasets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhan, Xianyuan; Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-11-19

    Our study investigates the Multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) model that jointly models crash frequency and severity accounting for correlations. The ordinary univariate count models analyze crashes of different severity level separately ignoring the correlations among severity levels. The MVPLN model is capable to incorporate the general correlation structure and takes account of the over dispersion in the data that leads to a superior data fitting. But, the traditional estimation approach for MVPLN model is computationally expensive, which often limits the use of MVPLN model in practice. In this work, a parallel sampling scheme is introduced to improve the original Markov Chainmore » Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation approach of the MVPLN model, which significantly reduces the model estimation time. Two MVPLN models are developed using the pedestrian vehicle crash data collected in New York City from 2002 to 2006, and the highway-injury data from Washington State (5-year data from 1990 to 1994) The Deviance Information Criteria (DIC) is used to evaluate the model fitting. The estimation results show that the MVPLN models provide a superior fit over univariate Poisson-lognormal (PLN), univariate Poisson, and Negative Binomial models. Moreover, the correlations among the latent effects of different severity levels are found significant in both datasets that justifies the importance of jointly modeling crash frequency and severity accounting for correlations.« less

  1. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-05-28

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 ± 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS's result of -0.567 ± 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS's data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 ± 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and

  2. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A.; Riordan, C.J.; Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K.

    1992-08-01

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  3. SU-C-207-03: Optimization of a Collimator-Based Sparse Sampling Technique for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, T; Cho, S; Kim, I; Han, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) imaging, radiation dose delivered to the patient is one of the major concerns. Sparse-view CT takes projections at sparser view angles and provides a viable option to reducing dose. However, a fast power switching of an X-ray tube, which is needed for the sparse-view sampling, can be challenging in many CT systems. We have earlier proposed a many-view under-sampling (MVUS) technique as an alternative to sparse-view CT. In this study, we investigated the effects of collimator parameters on the image quality and aimed to optimize the collimator design. Methods: We used a bench-top circular cone-beam CT system together with a CatPhan600 phantom, and took 1440 projections from a single rotation. The multi-slit collimator made of tungsten was mounted on the X-ray source for beam blocking. For image reconstruction, we used a total-variation minimization (TV) algorithm and modified the backprojection step so that only the measured data through the collimator slits are to be used in the computation. The number of slits and the reciprocation frequency have been varied and the effects of them on the image quality were investigated. We also analyzed the sampling efficiency: the sampling density and data incoherence in each case. We tested three sets of slits with their number of 6, 12 and 18, each at reciprocation frequencies of 10, 30, 50 and 70 Hz/ro. Results: Consistent results in the image quality have been produced with the sampling efficiency, and the optimum condition was found to be using 12 slits at 30 Hz/ro. As image quality indices, we used the CNR and the detectability. Conclusion: We conducted an experiment with a moving multi-slit collimator to realize a sparse-sampled cone-beam CT. Effects of collimator parameters on the image quality have been systematically investigated, and the optimum condition has been reached.

  4. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... nickel, radium-226, radium-228, selenium, thorium-230, and uranium in site groundwater. ... The former licensee attributed elevated radium-228 levels at the site to natural thorium ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... extremely large or small relative to the rest of the data and, therefore, are suspected ... values that are much smaller than the rest of the data (case 1) and extreme values ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... DVP-June 2014, Hallam, Nebraska U.S. Department of Energy RIN 14056211 September 2014 Page 12 Electronic Data Deliverable (EDD) File The EDD files arrived on July 21, 2014. The ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Central Nevada Test Area March 2014 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited LMS/CNT/S01113 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site October 2013 LMS/GNO/S00113 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Project Shoal, Nevada, Site December 2013 LMS/SHL/S00513 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shoal, Nevada, Site July 2014 LMS/SHL/S00514 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/scitech/ Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... whether a statistical outlier should be discarded or corrected within a data set. ... The application compares the new data set (in standard environmental database units) with ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... levels at the site to natural thorium in the uranium ore. ... screened for radium-226 by gas flow proportional counting. ... Chromatography Peak Integration The integration of analyte ...

  14. Many-Group Cross-Section Adjustment Techniques for Boiling Water Reactor Adaptive Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multigroup neutron cross sections, including self-shielding correction factors, to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) core modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainties through various BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k{sub eff}, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multigroup cross sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR core modeling predictions and observed (i.e., measured) plant data. For this paper, observed plant data are virtually simulated in the form of perturbed three-dimensional nodal power distributions with the perturbations sized to represent actual discrepancies between predictions and real plant data. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics and core simulator calculations. The data adjustment equations are developed using a subspace approach that exploits the ill-conditioning of the multigroup cross-section covariance matrix to minimize computation and storage burden. Tikhonov regularization is also employed to improve the conditioning of the data adjustment equations. Expressions are also provided for posterior covariance matrices of both the multigroup cross-section and core attributes uncertainties.

  15. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  16. Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

  17. Determination of the original-gas-in-place and aquifer properties in a water-drive reservoir by optimization technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.L.; Lin, Z.S.; Chen, Y.L.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the original-gas-in-place (OGIP) of a water-drive reservoir using optimization algorithm for Port Arthur field, Texas, US. The properties of the associate aquifer were also obtained. The good agreement, between the results from this study and those from simulation study, would be demonstrated in this paper. In this study, material balance equation for a gas reservoir and van Everdingen-Hurst model for an aquifer were solved simultaneously to calculate cumulative gas production. The result was then compared with cumulative gas production measured in the field that observed at each pressure. The following parameters were manually adjusted to obtain: OGIP, thickness of the aquifer, water encroachment angle, ratio of aquifer to reservoir radius, and aquifer`s permeability. The procedure was then applied with simplex technique, an optimization algorithm, to adjust parameters automatically. When the difference between cumulative gas production calculated and observed was minimal, the parameters used in the model would be the results obtained. A water-drive gas reservoir, ``C`` sand gas reservoir in Port Arthur field, which had produced for about 12 years, was analyzed successfully. The results showed that the OGIP of 60.6 BCF estimated in this study was favorably compared with 56.2 BCF obtained by a numerical simulator in other study. In addition, the aquifer properties that were unavailable from the conventional plotting method can be estimated from this study. The estimated aquifer properties from this study were compared favorably with the core data.

  18. Evaluation of repeated measurements of radon-222 concentrations in well water sampled from bedrock aquifers of the Piedmont near Richmond, Virginia, USA: Effects of lithology and well characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Shelley A. . E-mail: saharris@vcu.edu; Billmeyer, Ernest R.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2006-07-15

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations in 26 ground water wells of two distinct lithologies in the Piedmont of Virginia were measured to assess variation in ground water radon concentrations (GWRC), to evaluate differences in concentrations related to well characteristics, lithology, and spatial distributions, and to assess the feasibility of predicting GWRC. Wells were sampled in accordance with American Public Health Association Method 7500 Rn-B, with modifications to include a well shaft profile analysis that determined the minimum purge time sufficient to remove the equivalent of one column of water from each well. Statistically significant differences in GWRC were found in the Trssu (1482{+-}1711 pCi/L) and Mpg (7750{+-}5188 pCi/L) lithologies, however, no significant differences were found among GWRC at each well over time. Using multiple regression, 86% of the variability (R {sup 2}) in the GWRC was explained by the lithology, latitudinal class, and water table elevation of the wells. The GWRC in a majority of the wells studied exceed US Environmental Protection Agency designated maximum contaminant level and AMCL. Results support modifications to sampling procedures and indicate that, in previous studies, variations in GWRC concentrations over time may have been due in part to differences in sampling procedures and not in source water.

  19. Method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H (tritium) concentrations of xylem waters and subsurface waters using time series sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Brian; Menchaca, Leticia

    1999-01-01

    A method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H concentrations of xylem and subsurface waters using time series sampling, insulating sampling chambers, and combined .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O, .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and .sup.3 H concentration data on transpired water. The method involves collecting water samples transpired from living plants and correcting the measured isotopic compositions of oxygen (.sup.18 O/.sup.16 O) and hydrogen (.sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and/or .sup.3 H concentrations) to account for evaporative isotopic fractionation in the leafy material of the plant.

  20. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  1. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  2. Research Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Techniques Research Techniques Print Coming Soon

  3. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

    1994-08-23

    A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

  4. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, Nicida L.; Parmeswar, Ravi; Brinkmeyer, Alan D.; Honarpour, Mehdi

    1994-01-01

    A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  6. Radiochemical procedures for analysis of Pu, Am, Cs and Sr in water, soil, sediments and biota samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1994-02-01

    The Environmental Radioactivity Analysis Laboratory (ERAL) was established as an analytical facility. The primary function of ERAL is to provide fast and accurate radiological data of environmental samples. Over the years, many radiochemical procedures have been developed by the staffs of ERAL. As result, we have found that our procedures exist in many different formats and in many different notebooks, documents and files. Therefore, in order to provide for more complete and orderly documentation of the radiochemical procedures that are being used by ERAL, we have decided to standardize the format and compile them into a series of reports. This first report covers procedures we have developed and are using for the radiochemical analysis of Pu, Am, Cs, and Sr in various matrices. Additional analytical procedures and/or revisions for other elements will be reported as they become available through continuation of these compilation efforts.

  7. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan

  8. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  9. Microbial water diversion technique-designed for near well treatment in low temperature sandstone reservoirs in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulsen, J.E.; Vatland, A.; Sorheim, R.

    1995-12-31

    A Norwegian Research Program on Improved Oil Recovery (IOR) in North Sea reservoirs was launched in 1992. Microbial methods, applied in this context, is a part of this program. The scope, the methodological approach, and results from the three first years are presented. Water profile control, using biomass to block high permeable zones of a reservoir, has been investigated using nitrate-reducing bacteria in the injected sea water as plugging agents. Emphasis has been put on developing a process that does not have disadvantages secondary to the process itself, such as souring and impairment of the overall injectivity of the field. Data from continuous culture studies indicate that souring may successfully be mitigated by adding nitrite to the injected seawater. The morphology and size of generic-nitrate-reducing seawater bacteria have been investigated. Screening of growth-promoting nutrients has been carried out, and some sources were detected as favorable. Transport and penetration of bacteria in porous media have been given special attention. Investigations with sand packs, core models, and pore micromodels have been carried out. The inherent problems connected with permeability contrasts and flow patterns, versus bacterial behavior, are believed to be critical for the success of this technology. Data from the transport and blocking experiments with the porous matrices confirm this concern. The technology is primarily being developed for temperatures less than 40{degrees}C.

  10. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  11. Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the...

  12. Implementation and testing of the on-the-fly thermal scattering Monte Carlo sampling method for graphite and light water in MCNP6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-23

    Here, a proper treatment of thermal neutron scattering requires accounting for chemical binding through a scattering law S(α,β,T). Monte Carlo codes sample the secondary neutron energy and angle after a thermal scattering event from probability tables generated from S(α,β,T) tables at discrete temperatures, requiring a large amount of data for multiscale and multiphysics problems with detailed temperature gradients. We have previously developed a method to handle this temperature dependence on-the-fly during the Monte Carlo random walk using polynomial expansions in 1/T to directly sample the secondary energy and angle. In this paper, the on-the-fly method is implemented into MCNP6 andmore » tested in both graphite-moderated and light water-moderated systems. The on-the-fly method is compared with the thermal ACE libraries that come standard with MCNP6, yielding good agreement with integral reactor quantities like k-eigenvalue and differential quantities like single-scatter secondary energy and angle distributions. The simulation runtimes are comparable between the two methods (on the order of 5–15% difference for the problems tested) and the on-the-fly fit coefficients only require 5–15 MB of total data storage.« less

  13. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of geothermometric calculations and geochemical modeling of the data. In the case of gas flux sampling, different measurement techniques and devices may disrupt or alter the...

  14. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protections: Sampling Protections: Sampling Protection #3: Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental Sampling Board, a key piece of the Strategy, ensures that LANL collects relevant and appropriate data to answer questions about the protection of human and environmental health, and to satisfy regulatory requirements. LANL must demonstrate the data are technically justified

  15. Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    500 mL), whereas analysis for stable isotopes that are present in greater abundance in natural samples requires less water to be sampled by a full order of magnitude (approximately...

  16. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection 3: Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental ...

  17. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental Sampling Board, a key piece...

  18. Category:Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Subcategories This category has the following 3 subcategories, out of 3 total. G Gas Flux Sampling 1 pages S Soil Gas Sampling 1 pages Surface Gas...

  19. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  20. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D.; Johnson, Craig

    2000-01-01

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  1. WATER TREATMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitman, R.W.; Conley, W.R. Jr.

    1962-12-01

    An automated system for adding clarifying chemicals to water in a water treatment plant is described. To a sample of the floc suspension polyacrylamide or similar filter aid chemicals are added, and the sample is then put through a fast filter. The resulting filtrate has the requisite properties for monitoring in an optical turbidimeter to control the automated system. (AEC)

  2. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  3. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  4. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  5. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  6. Analysis of supersaturated air in natural waters and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Aoust, B.G.; Clark, M.J.R.

    1980-11-01

    Supersaturation of water by air or other gases can be caused by temperature increase, air or gas injection by pressurized pumping, or turbulent injection by falling water that traps air. The physics of supersaturation are outlined, and alternative sampling and analysis techniques used to evaluate the extent of supersaturation are described. These techniques range from complex, exacting procedures commonly used in the biomedical analytical laboratory to simple, portable methods suited to field application or continuous monitoring. Analytical techniques tested during 1976-78 in the Columbia and Snake river system, both of which were seriously supersaturated as a result of entrainment of air into water spilling over hydroelectric dams, are comparatively evaluated.

  7. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  8. Field-deployable, nano-sensing approach for real-time detection of free mercury, speciation and quantification in surface stream waters and groundwater samples at the U.S. Department of Energy contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campiglia, Andres D.; Hernandez, Florencio E.

    2014-08-28

    The detrimental effects on human health caused by long-term exposure to trace contamination of toxic metals have been documented in numerous epidemiological and toxicological studies. The fact that metals are non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain poses a severe threat to the environment and human health. Their monitoring in drinking water, aquatic ecosystems, food and biological fluids samples is then essential for global sustainability. While research efforts employing established methodology continue to advance conceptual/computational models of contaminant behavior, the increasing awareness and public concern with environmental and occupational exposure to toxic metals calls for sensing devices capable to handle on-site elemental analysis in short analysis time. Field analysis with potable methodology prevents unnecessary scrutiny of un-contaminated samples via laboratory-bound methods, reduces analysis cost and expedites turnaround time for decision making and remediation purposes. Of particular toxicological interest are mercury and its species. Mercury is recognized as a major environmental pollution issue. The field-portable sensor developed in this project provides a unique and valuable tool for the on-site, real-time determination of inorganic mercury in surface waters. The ability to perform on-site analysis of mercury should prove useful in remote locations with difficult accessibility. It should facilitate data collection from statistically meaningful population sizes for a better understanding of the dose-effect role and the water-soil-plant-animal-human transfer mechanisms. The acquired knowledge should benefit the development of efficient environmental remediation processes, which is extremely relevant for a globally sustainable environment.

  9. Rapid determination of 226Ra in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.

    2012-02-04

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in < 6 hours. The method uses a rapid calcium carbonate precipitation enhanced with a small amount of phosphate added to enhance chemical yields (typically >90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

  10. Visual Sample Plan

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-10-25

    VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to risk decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 5.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. It also provides data quality assessment and statistical analysis functions to support evaluation of the data and determine whether the data support decisions regarding sitesmore » suspected of contamination. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (98, NT, 2000, Millennium Edition, CE, and XP) Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to two- and three-dimensional populations to be sampled (e.g., rooms and buildings, surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality. VSP is also applicable for designing sampling plans for assessing chem./rad/bio threat and hazard identification within rooms and buildings, and for designing geophysical surveys for UXO identification.« less

  11. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  12. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  13. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  14. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clague, David S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Elizabeth K. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Irvine, CA)

    2006-07-25

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  15. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2009-03-17

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  16. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  17. Nondestructive analysis of oil shales with PGNAA technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maly, J.; Bozorgmanesh, H.

    1984-02-01

    The feasibility of nondestructive analysis of oil shales using the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique was studied. The PGNAA technique, developed originally for continuous analysis of coal on the belt, was applied to the analysis of eight oil-shale samples, containing between 9 and 60 gallons of oil per ton and 0.8% to 3.4% hydrogen. The PGNAA technique was modified using four neutron moderation conditions: non-moderated neutrons; non-moderated and partially moderated neutrons reflected from a water box behind the source; neutrons moderated in a water box behind and in front of the source; and neutrons strongly moderated in a polyethylene block placed in front of the source and with reflected neutrons from a water box behind the source. The studied oil shales were measured in their aluminum or wooden (masonite) boxes. The obtained Ge-Li spectra were processed by LSI-11/23 computer, using the modified programs previously developed by SAI for continuous coal analysis. The results of such processing (the peak areas for several gamma lines) were corrected and plotted against the weight percent of each analyzed element (from the chemical analysis). Response curves developed for H, C, N, S, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Ca, Fe and K show generally good linear proportions of peak area to the weight percent of the element. For hydrogen determination, NMD conditions had to be used where the response curve was not linear, but followed a curve whose slope rose with hydrogen concentration. This effect is caused by improving neutron self-moderation in sample boxes of rich oil shales, as compared to poor self-moderation of neutrons in very lean oil shales. The moisture in oil shales was measured by microwave absorption technique in small masonite boxes. This method was calibrated four times using oil-shale samples mixed gradually with larger and larger amounts of water.

  18. Calculation of resistivity of irreducible water for reserves estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krieger, F.W.; Eadington, P.J.; Lisk, M.

    1996-12-31

    A new fluid inclusion technique that allows determination of the resistivity of irreducible water trapped during oil accumulation has been developed. The technique is directly applicable to problems associated with the evaluation of oil accumulations which arise when the salinity and thus the resistivity of present day formation waters differ from those of the irreducible water trapped during oil accumulation. It is possible by measuring the ice melting temperature of samples of formation water trapped during creation of three phase, oil-water-vapour inclusions to calculate a salinity for the irreducible water and thus calculate a resistivity to be used in reserves calculations. Salinities of 71,000 to 85,000 parts per million have been measured on three phase inclusions in oil zone samples from the Papuan Foldbelt. Present day salinities in the Papuan Foldbelt are about 10,000-12,000 parts per million indicating that oil charge occurred before the present day hydrologic system was emplaced. Using salinity data from three phase inclusions results in resistivity values of about 0.05 ohm/m for irreducible water while present day formation waters have a resistivity of about 0.3 ohm/m at formation temperatures of 60{degrees}C. Using the water saturation calculated from three phase fluid inclusion salinity data compared with using the water saturation from present day formation water results in an estimated 25 % increase in reserves for oil fields studied in the Papuan Foldbelt.

  19. Calculation of resistivity of irreducible water for reserves estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krieger, F.W.; Eadington, P.J.; Lisk, M. )

    1996-01-01

    A new fluid inclusion technique that allows determination of the resistivity of irreducible water trapped during oil accumulation has been developed. The technique is directly applicable to problems associated with the evaluation of oil accumulations which arise when the salinity and thus the resistivity of present day formation waters differ from those of the irreducible water trapped during oil accumulation. It is possible by measuring the ice melting temperature of samples of formation water trapped during creation of three phase, oil-water-vapour inclusions to calculate a salinity for the irreducible water and thus calculate a resistivity to be used in reserves calculations. Salinities of 71,000 to 85,000 parts per million have been measured on three phase inclusions in oil zone samples from the Papuan Foldbelt. Present day salinities in the Papuan Foldbelt are about 10,000-12,000 parts per million indicating that oil charge occurred before the present day hydrologic system was emplaced. Using salinity data from three phase inclusions results in resistivity values of about 0.05 ohm/m for irreducible water while present day formation waters have a resistivity of about 0.3 ohm/m at formation temperatures of 60[degrees]C. Using the water saturation calculated from three phase fluid inclusion salinity data compared with using the water saturation from present day formation water results in an estimated 25 % increase in reserves for oil fields studied in the Papuan Foldbelt.

  20. Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration...

  1. Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004)) Jump to: navigation, search...

  2. Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Colrado Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration...

  3. Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    WATERS Nuclear Test Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site Under the ...

  4. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. The routine sampling plan for the SESP has been revised this year to reflect changing site operations and priorities. Some sampling previously performed at least annually has been reduced in frequency, and some new sampling to be performed at a less than annual frequency has been added. Therefore, the SESP schedule reflects sampling to be conducted in calendar year 1991 as well as future years. The ground-water sampling schedule is for 1991. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operation, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford evirons.

  5. NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Site | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) hosts international CTBT on-site inspection experts at Nevada National Security Site Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 2:26pm CTBT surrogate inspectors and other inspection experts visited the Nevada National Security Site, a former nuclear explosive test site. Here they are pictured on the edge of the Sedan Crater. This month, NNSA hosted a Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on-site inspection activity at the Nevada National

  6. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  7. Automated fluid analysis apparatus and techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szecsody, James E.

    2004-03-16

    An automated device that couples a pair of differently sized sample loops with a syringe pump and a source of degassed water. A fluid sample is mounted at an inlet port and delivered to the sample loops. A selected sample from the sample loops is diluted in the syringe pump with the degassed water and fed to a flow through detector for analysis. The sample inlet is also directly connected to the syringe pump to selectively perform analysis without dilution. The device is airtight and used to detect oxygen-sensitive species, such as dithionite in groundwater following a remedial injection to treat soil contamination.

  8. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  9. LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory Kayla Zimmerman | (650) 926-6281 Lisa Hammon, LCLS Lab Coordinator Welcome to the LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory. This small general use wet lab is located in Rm 109 of the Far Experimental Hall near the MEC, CXI, and XCS hutches. It conveniently serves all LCLS hutches and is available for final stage sample preparation. Due to space limitations, certain types of activities may be restricted and all access must be scheduled in advance. User lab bench

  10. Automated sample collection and processing for radionuclide effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D.M.; Crandall, B.S.; Fledderman, P.D.

    1998-12-31

    In the United States, all nuclear facilities must provide for environmental monitoring of effluent points for radionuclides that have the potential for release to the environment. For the US Department of Energy (DOE) this means thousands of surface water analyses are performed each year at a cost of millions of dollars per year. Analytical costs for radiochemical analyses are often high due to the lengthy chemical separations required prior to counting for the selected analyte. At the Savannah River Site, a DOE facility located in South Carolina, a new technique has been demonstrated whereby samples are collected and processed in the field, at the time of collection, for selected radionuclides. The technique makes use of ion selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks being placed in a portable automatic aqueous sampler. Water from a surface stream or effluent sampling point is collected via an ISCO, Inc., 3710 SPX portable sampler. Weekly or biweekly (depending on the sampling requirements), the SPE disks are collected and returned to the laboratory for activity determination. The analytes that are currently being monitored by the new method are {sup 99}Tc, {sup 80}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The RAD SPE disks have been shown to be effective for the extraction of technetium, strontium, and cesium and cobalt from aqueous systems. The {sup 99}Tc and {sup 90}Sr activities are determined by direct counting of the SPE disk by gas flow beta proportional techniques; the {sup 137}Cs and radiocobalt activities are determined by direct counting of the SPE disk by gamma spectrometry. Because of the specificity of the SPE disks, there is no additional chemical separation required prior to counting the SPE disks for the selected activity determination.

  11. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  12. Characterization of uranium and plutonium in surface-waters and sediments collected at the Rocky Flats Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Roensch, F.R.; Perrin, R.E.; Banar, J.C.

    1994-05-01

    This study was initiated to characterize actinides in environmental samples collected at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) measurement techniques were used to measure the plutonium and uranium content of water and sediment samples collected from the ponds used to control surface-waters on-site at RFP. TIMS was also used to separate the uranium into anthropogenic and naturally occurring components. The results of these studies are presented.

  13. Visual Sample Plan Flyer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This flyer better explains that VSP is a free, easy-to-use software tool that supports development of optimal sampling plans based on statistical sampling theory.

  14. Sampling and analysis plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105 KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1996-08-09

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the equipment,procedures and techniques for obtaining gas and liquid samples from sealed K West fuel canisters. The analytical procedures and quality assurance requirements for the subsequent laboratory analysis of the samples are also discussed.

  15. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  16. Enhanced monitor system for water protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, David E [Knoxville, TN; Rodriquez, Jr., Miguel [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN

    2009-09-22

    An automatic, self-contained device for detecting toxic agents in a water supply includes an analyzer for detecting at least one toxic agent in a water sample, introducing a means for introducing a water sample into the analyzer and discharging the water sample from the analyzer, holding means for holding a water sample for a pre-selected period of time before the water sample is introduced into the analyzer, and an electronics package that analyzes raw data from the analyzer and emits a signal indicating the presence of at least one toxic agent in the water sample.

  17. Groundwater Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groundwater can be a useful geochemical indicator for geothermal exploration when other water chemistry techniques are ambiguous. This research was useful for locating some areas...

  18. Technique for fast and efficient hierarchical clustering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stork, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    A fast and efficient technique for hierarchical clustering of samples in a dataset includes compressing the dataset to reduce a number of variables within each of the samples of the dataset. A nearest neighbor matrix is generated to identify nearest neighbor pairs between the samples based on differences between the variables of the samples. The samples are arranged into a hierarchy that groups the samples based on the nearest neighbor matrix. The hierarchy is rendered to a display to graphically illustrate similarities or differences between the samples.

  19. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  20. The Sample Preparation Laboratories | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Patty 1 Sam Webb 2 John Bargar 3 Arizona 4 Chemicals 5 Team Work 6 Bottles 7 Glass 8 Plan Ahead! See the tabs above for Laboratory Access and forms you'll need to complete. Equipment and Chemicals tabs detail resources already available on site. Avoid delays! Hazardous materials use may require a written Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) before you work. Check the Chemicals tab for more information. The Sample Preparation Laboratories The Sample Preparation Laboratories provide wet lab

  1. Water Analytical Data Tables for 1CQ12.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    C Analytical Results for Water Samples-First Quarter CY 2012 This page intentionally left blank Appendix C1 Analytical Results for Water Samples - First Quarter CY 2012 ...

  2. Water Analytical Data Tables for 1CQ11.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Analytical Results for Water Samples-First Quarter CY 2011 This page intentionally left blank Appendix C1 Analytical Results for Water Samples - First Quarter CY 2011 LOCATIONCODE ...

  3. Water Analytical Data Tables for 1CQ10.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water SamplesFirst Quarter CY 2010 This page intentionally left blank Appendix C Analytical Results for Water Samples - First Quarter CY 2010 LOCATIONCODE LOCATIONTYPE DATE ...

  4. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Charles Kelsey | ckelsey@lanl.gov | 505.665.5579 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact theLujan Center Experiment Coordinator: TBA Chemistry Laboratories High-Pressure Laboratory X-ray Laboratory Spectroscopy Laboratory Clean Room Laboratory Glove box - He atmosphere High-purity water Diamond

  5. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  6. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  7. Aerosol sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  8. Category:Field Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sampling Field Techniques H Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) P Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:FieldTechniq...

  9. Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al.,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search...

  10. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  11. Adaptive Sampling Algorithms for Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Nuclear Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear simulations are often computationally expensive, time-consuming, and high-dimensional with respect to the number of input parameters. Thus exploring the space of all possible simulation outcomes is infeasible using finite computing resources. During simulation-based probabilistic risk analysis, it is important to discover the relationship between a potentially large number of input parameters and the output of a simulation using as few simulation trials as possible. This is a typical context for performing adaptive sampling where a few observations are obtained from the simulation, a surrogate model is built to represent the simulation space, and new samples are selected based on the model constructed. The surrogate model is then updated based on the simulation results of the sampled points. In this way, we attempt to gain the most information possible with a small number of carefully selected sampled points, limiting the number of expensive trials needed to understand features of the simulation space. We analyze the specific use case of identifying the limit surface, i.e., the boundaries in the simulation space between system failure and system success. In this study, we explore several techniques for adaptively sampling the parameter space in order to reconstruct the limit surface. We focus on several adaptive sampling schemes. First, we seek to learn a global model of the entire simulation space using prediction models or neighborhood graphs and extract the limit surface as an iso-surface of the global model. Second, we estimate the limit surface by sampling in the neighborhood of the current estimate based on topological segmentations obtained locally. Our techniques draw inspirations from topological structure known as the Morse-Smale complex. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using a global prediction model versus local topological view of the simulation space, comparing several different strategies for adaptive sampling in both

  12. Multivariate calibration techniques applied to NIRA (near infrared reflectance analysis) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, C.L.

    1991-02-01

    Multivariate calibration techniques can reduce the time required for routine testing and can provide new methods of analysis. Multivariate calibration is commonly used with near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two feasibility studies were performed to determine the capability of NIRA, using multivariate calibration techniques, to perform analyses on the types of samples that are routinely analyzed at this laboratory. The first study performed included a variety of samples and indicated that NIRA would be well-suited to perform analyses on selected materials properties such as water content and hydroxyl number on polyol samples, epoxy content on epoxy resins, water content of desiccants, and the amine values of various amine cure agents. A second study was performed to assess the capability of NIRA to perform quantitative analysis of hydroxyl numbers and water contents of hydroxyl-containing materials. Hydroxyl number and water content were selected for determination because these tests are frequently run on polyol materials and the hydroxyl number determination is time consuming. This study pointed out the necessity of obtaining calibration standards identical to the samples being analyzed for each type of polyol or other material being analyzed. Multivariate calibration techniques are frequently used with FTIR data to determine the composition of a large variety of complex mixtures. A literature search indicated many applications of multivariate calibration to FTIR data. Areas identified where quantitation by FTIR would provide a new capability are quantitation of components in epoxy and silicone resins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in oils, and additives to polymers. 19 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Dynamical behaviors of structural, constrained and free water in calcium- and magnesium-silicate-hydrate gels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le, Peisi; Fratini, Emiliano; Ito, Kanae; Wang, Zhe; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2016-01-28

    We present the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of cement pastes depend strongly on their porosities. In a saturated paste, the porosity links to the free water volume after hydration. Structural water, constrained water, and free water have different dynamical behavior. Hence, it should be possible to extract information on pore system by exploiting the water dynamics. With our experiments we investigated the slow dynamics of hydration water confined in calcium- and magnesium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H and M-S-H) gels using high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. C-S-H and M-S-H are the chemical binders present in calcium rich and magnesium rich cements. Wemore » measured three M-S-H samples: pure M-S-H, M-S-H with aluminum-silicate nanotubes (ASN), and M-S-H with carboxyl group functionalized ASN (ASN-COOH). A C-S-H sample with the same water content (i.e. 0.3) is also studied for comparison. We found that structural water in the gels contributes to the elastic component of the QENS spectrum, while constrained water and free water contribute the quasi-elastic component. The quantitative analysis suggests that the three components vary for different samples and indicate the variance in the system porosity, which controls the mechanical properties of cement pastes.« less

  14. Creating Sample Plans

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to bemore » analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.« less

  15. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  16. Adaptive Sampling Proxy Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-10-22

    ASPA is an implementation of an adaptive sampling algorithm [1-3], which is used to reduce the computational expense of computer simulations that couple disparate physical scales. The purpose of ASPA is to encapsulate the algorithms required for adaptive sampling independently from any specific application, so that alternative algorithms and programming models for exascale computers can be investigated more easily.

  17. Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

    2007-05-03

    Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

  18. Biological sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  19. Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  20. Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  1. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 min of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  2. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2005-07-13

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17 {beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  3. Colorimetric detection of uranium in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVol, Timothy A.; Hixon, Amy E.; DiPrete, David P.

    2012-03-13

    Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

  4. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants.

  5. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants. 2 figs.

  6. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Williams, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  7. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  8. Accurate LPG analysis begins with sampling procedures, equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, C.M. )

    1990-11-05

    Proper equipment and procedures are essential for obtaining representative samples from an LPG stream. This paper discusses how sampling of light liquid hydrocarbons generally involves one of two methods: flow- proportional composite sampling by a mechanical device or physical transfer of hydrocarbon fluids from a flowing pipeline or other source into a suitable portable sample container. If sampling by proper techniques and equipment supports careful chromatographic analysis, full advantage of accurate mass measurement of LPG can be realized.

  9. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  10. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  11. Assessment of produced water contaminated soils to determine remediation requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clodfelter, C.

    1995-12-31

    Produced water and drilling fluids can impact the agricultural properties of soil and result in potential regulatory and legal liabilities. Produced water typically is classified as saline or a brine and affects surface soils by increasing the sodium and chloride content. Sources of produced water which can lead to problems include spills from flowlines and tank batteries, permitted surface water discharges and pit areas, particularly the larger pits including reserve pits, emergency pits and saltwater disposal pits. Methods to assess produced water spills include soil sampling with various chemical analyses and surface geophysical methods. A variety of laboratory analytical methods are available for soil assessment which include electrical conductivity, sodium adsorption ratio, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable sodium percent and others. Limiting the list of analytical parameters to reduce cost and still obtain the data necessary to assess the extent of contamination and determine remediation requirements can be difficult. The advantage to using analytical techniques is that often regulatory remediation standards are tied to soil properties determined from laboratory analysis. Surface geophysical techniques can be an inexpensive method to rapidly determine the extent and relative magnitude of saline soils. Data interpretations can also provide an indication of the horizontal as well as the vertical extent of impacted soils. The following discussion focuses on produced water spills on soil and assessment of the impacted soil. Produced water typically contains dissolved hydrocarbons which are not addressed in this discussion.

  12. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  13. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  14. Air sampling in the workplace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, E.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Strom, D.J.; Cicotte, G.R.; Wiblin, C.M.; McGuire, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC`s Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ``Air sampling in the Workplace.`` That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC`s regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed.

  15. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied ScienceTechniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class...

  16. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  17. Creating ensembles of decision trees through sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick

    2005-08-30

    A system for decision tree ensembles that includes a module to read the data, a module to sort the data, a module to evaluate a potential split of the data according to some criterion using a random sample of the data, a module to split the data, and a module to combine multiple decision trees in ensembles. The decision tree method is based on statistical sampling techniques and includes the steps of reading the data; sorting the data; evaluating a potential split according to some criterion using a random sample of the data, splitting the data, and combining multiple decision trees in ensembles.

  18. Geochemical and isotopic water results, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Heikoop, Jeff; Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent

    2012-07-18

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  19. Scanning measurement of Seebeck coefficient of a heated sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iwanaga, Shiho

    2016-04-19

    A novel scanning Seebeck coefficient measurement technique is disclosed utilizing a cold scanning thermocouple probe tip on heated bulk and thin film samples. The system measures variations in the Seebeck coefficient within the samples. The apparatus may be used for two dimensional mapping of the Seebeck coefficient on the bulk and thin film samples. This technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separations in the sub-mm range of various thermoelectric materials.

  20. Computed microtomography of reservoir core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, M.E.; Muegge, E.L.; Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.

    1995-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is often utilized to evaluate and characterize structural characteristics within reservoir core material systems. Generally, medical CT scanners have been employed because of their availability and ease of use. Of interest lately has been the acquisition of three-dimensional, high resolution descriptions of rock and pore structures for characterization of the porous media and for modeling of single and multiphase transport processes. The spatial resolution of current medical CT scanners is too coarse for pore level imaging of most core samples. Recently developed high resolution computed microtomography (CMT) using synchrotron X-ray sources is analogous to conventional medical CT scanning and provides the ability to obtain three-dimensional images of specimens with a spatial resolution on the order of micrometers. Application of this technique to the study of core samples provides two- and three-dimensional high resolution description of pore structure and mineral distributions. Pore space and interconnectivity is accurately characterized and visualized. Computed microtomography data can serve as input into pore-level simulation techniques. A generalized explanation of the technique is provided, with comparison to conventional CT scanning techniques and results. Computed microtomographic results of several sandstone samples are presented and discussed. Bulk porosity values and mineralogical identification were obtained from the microtomograms and compared with gas porosity and scanning electron microscope results on tandem samples.

  1. Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximat...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximate potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte ...

  2. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface ...

  3. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  4. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  5. Heuristic-biased stochastic sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresina, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a search technique for scheduling problems, called Heuristic-Biased Stochastic Sampling (HBSS). The underlying assumption behind the HBSS approach is that strictly adhering to a search heuristic often does not yield the best solution and, therefore, exploration off the heuristic path can prove fruitful. Within the HBSS approach, the balance between heuristic adherence and exploration can be controlled according to the confidence one has in the heuristic. By varying this balance, encoded as a bias function, the HBSS approach encompasses a family of search algorithms of which greedy search and completely random search are extreme members. We present empirical results from an application of HBSS to the realworld problem of observation scheduling. These results show that with the proper bias function, it can be easy to outperform greedy search.

  6. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  7. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  8. Analysis procedure for americium in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holloway, R.W.; Hayes, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Several methods for the analysis of /sup 241/Am in environmental samples were evaluated and a preferred method was selected. This method was modified and used to determine the /sup 241/Am content in sediments, biota, and water. The advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. The method is also suitable for /sup 244/Cm analysis.

  9. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  10. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    X X X X X Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center December 19, 2014 Sampling Report for August 15 2014 WIPP Samples Lawrence ...

  11. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. )

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  12. Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, John

    2006-02-06

    Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

  13. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  14. ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tait, G.W.C.

    1959-03-31

    A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

  15. Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water,and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea...

  16. Field Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Mapping Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Macrophotography Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Field Sampling Gas Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Surface Gas...

  17. Microfluidic-Based sample chips for radioactive solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripp, J. L.; Law, J. D.; Smith, T. E.; Rutledge, V. J.; Bauer, W. F.; Ball, R. D.; Hahn, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Historical nuclear fuel cycle process sampling techniques required sample volumes ranging in the tens of milliliters. The radiation levels experienced by analytical personnel and equipment, in addition to the waste volumes generated from analysis of these samples, have been significant. These sample volumes also impacted accountability inventories of required analytes during process operations. To mitigate radiation dose and other issues associated with the historically larger sample volumes, a microcapillary sample chip was chosen for further investigation. The ability to obtain microliter volume samples coupled with a remote automated means of sample loading, tracking, and transporting to the analytical instrument would greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste volumes. Sample chip testing was completed to determine the accuracy, repeatability, and issues associated with the use of microfluidic sample chips used to supply µL sample volumes of lanthanide analytes dissolved in nitric acid for introduction to an analytical instrument for elemental analysis.

  18. Microfluidic-Based Sample Chips for Radioactive Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Tripp; J. D. Law; T. E. Smith; V. J. Rutledge; W. F. Bauer; R. D. Ball; P. A. Hahn

    2014-02-01

    Historical nuclear fuel cycle process sampling techniques required sample volumes ranging in the tens of milliliters. The radiation levels experienced by analytical personnel and equipment, in addition to the waste volumes generated from analysis of these samples, have been significant. These sample volumes also impacted accountability inventories of required analytes during process operations. To mitigate radiation dose and other issues associated with the historically larger sample volumes, a microcapillary sample chip was chosen for further investigation. The ability to obtain microliter volume samples coupled with a remote automated means of sample loading, tracking, and transporting to the analytical instrument would greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste volumes. Sample chip testing was completed to determine the accuracy, repeatability, and issues associated with the use of microfluidic sample chips used to supply L sample volumes of lanthanide analytes dissolved in nitric acid for introduction to an analytical instrument for elemental analysis.

  19. Microfluidic-Based sample chips for radioactive solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripp, J. L.; Law, J. D.; Smith, T. E.; Rutledge, V. J.; Bauer, W. F.; Ball, R. D.; Hahn, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Historical nuclear fuel cycle process sampling techniques required sample volumes ranging in the tens of milliliters. The radiation levels experienced by analytical personnel and equipment, in addition to the waste volumes generated from analysis of these samples, have been significant. These sample volumes also impacted accountability inventories of required analytes during process operations. To mitigate radiation dose and other issues associated with the historically larger sample volumes, a microcapillary sample chip was chosen for further investigation. The ability to obtain microliter volume samples coupled with a remote automated means of sample loading, tracking, and transporting to the analytical instrument would greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste volumes. Sample chip testing was completed to determine the accuracy, repeatability, and issues associated with the use of microfluidic sample chips used to supply L sample volumes of lanthanide analytes dissolved in nitric acid for introduction to an analytical instrument for elemental analysis.

  20. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Spectroscopic Technique Reveals the Dynamics of Operating Battery Electrodes ... The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Laser ...

  1. Effect of canopy structure and open-top chamber techniques on micrometeorological parameters and the gradients and transport of water vapor, carbon dioxide and ozone in the canopies of plum trees (`prunus salicina`) in the San Joaquin valley. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Metheny, P.A.; Malkus, P.; Wosnik, K.

    1995-03-15

    Plum trees (Prunus salicina cv. Casselman) were exposed to ozone in open-top chambers (OTC) or chamberless plots, and trace gas concentrations and microenvironmental conditions were monitored within tree canopies inside the outside the OTC. Concentrations of ozone, carbon dioxide and water vapor, leaf and air temperature, light intensity, and wind speed were measured at nine positions in the tree canopies. The objectives were to: (1) map the distribution of microenvironmental parameters within the canopies inside and outside the OTC; (2) determine transport parameters for gas exchange, and (3) calculate ozone flux. Significant vertical and horizontal gradients were observed; gradients were diminished and often inverted inside relative to outside the OTC due to air distribution at the bottom of the OCT. Ozone flux was readily modeled from measures of stomatal conductance, nonstomatal conductance and ozone concentration at the leaf surface.

  2. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul William; Gara, Alan Gene; Jackson, Rory; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent; Nathanson, Ben Jesse; Vranas, Paylos Michael; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-08-26

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  3. Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information...

  4. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  5. A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscio, J.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M.

    2007-02-12

    In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

  6. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  7. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-04-16

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, gibbsite, hydrated sodium bicarbonate, and muscovite. Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate approximately 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and {approx}1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The preliminary data on the oxalic acid leaching test indicate the three acid contacts at 45 C dissolved from {approx}34-47% of the solids. The somewhat higher dissolution found in the oxalic acid leaching test versus the water leaching test might be offset by the tendency of the oxalic acid solutions to take on a gel-like consistency. The filtered solids left behind after three oxalic acid contacts were sticky and formed large clumps after drying. These two observations could indicate

  9. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  10. Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock...

  11. Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock...

  12. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  13. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  14. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  15. Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Part 2 of Sample Deliverables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J-4) Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Part 2 of Sample Deliverables for Task Orders, IDIQ Attachment. J-4) Document offers a post-award deliverables sample for an energy savings ...

  16. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  17. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  18. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  19. Surface Water Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Waring, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    calcium and magnesium concentrations were measured, with elevated levels of silica and sulfate. Surface fumarole gases were tested with a flame to indicate carbon dioxide...

  20. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Precipitation Collected October Conjunction With the First Production Test, Project Rulison-9, HGSlO DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. RQTICB ~him+.i$ort w a r n prepared aa an a c c m n t of work .pa%or;il-by the United Stacam C o v e r a n t . ~=itlw-Pthe United Statom nor the United S t a t o ~ ~ t o i ~ ~ h ~ ~ t & y U a m i o l l , nor any of t h e i r ap'lAyea/,/nor any

  1. Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (136C), Buffalo Valley (130C), Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Ranch; 125C), and Smith Creek Valley (119C). Authors Lisa Shevenell and Larry Garside Conference GRC Annual...

  2. Water Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Water Security HomeTag:Water Security Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) ...

  3. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary PowerEnergy Conversion EfficiencyWater Power Water Power Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-01T22:32:54+00:00 Enabling a successful water power industry. Hydropower ...

  4. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Smiecinski, A.

    1996-04-30

    This is the final report for the Analytical Laboratory and Mobile Sampling Platform project. This report contains only major findings and conclusions resulting from this project. Detailed reports of all activities performed for this project were provided to the Project Office every quarter since the beginning of the project. This report contains water chemistry data for samples collected in the Nevada section of Death Valley National Park (Triangle Area Springs), Nevada Test Site springs, Pahranagat Valley springs, Nevada Test Site wells, Spring Mountain springs and Crater Flat and Amargosa Valley wells.

  5. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  6. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  7. water scarcity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  8. water savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  9. water infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  10. Water Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  11. drinking water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drinking water - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ...

  12. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Power Sandia's 117-scale WEC device with being tested in the maneuvering and ... EC, News, Renewable Energy, Water Power Sandia National Laboratories Uses Its Wave Energy ...

  13. Water Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership ...ate.mcmordie@pnnl.gov * Francis Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com ...

  14. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  15. Water Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Security - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ...

  16. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  17. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  18. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

  19. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  20. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  1. Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

  2. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resource at depth. These hand samples can be collected using a rock hammer or sledge. Data Access and Acquisition Under a detailed investigation, a systematic sampling procedure...

  3. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  4. CNEEC - Synchrotron Techniques Tutorial by Profs. Pianetta and Toney

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Techniques

  5. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Thomas, Edward V.

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  6. DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

    2013-06-18

    On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facilitys Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPFs proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

  7. Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Technique Lithology: StratigraphicStructural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems...

  8. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udey, R. N.; Corzett, T. H.; Alcaraz, A.

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  9. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-01-21

    This document contains the calendar year 2011 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and the Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis. If a sample will not be collected in 2011, the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2011.

  10. Quarterly Technical Progress Report *** SAMPLE *...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and CO 2 flux data that were used for a 3D model of ground water flow circulations. ... Page 5 of 87 A second part of this project was to couple ground water flow to the ...

  11. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, A.; Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P.

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  12. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W; Langner, Diana; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Razinkov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  13. Device and technique for in-process sampling and analysis of molten metals and other liquids presenting harsh sampling conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Joseph L.; Watson, Lloyd D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuously analyzing liquids by creating a supersonic spray which is shaped and sized prior to delivery of the spray to a analysis apparatus. The gas and liquid are mixed in a converging-diverging nozzle where the liquid is sheared into small particles which are of a size and uniformly to form a spray which can be controlled through adjustment of pressures and gas velocity. The spray is shaped by a concentric supplemental flow of gas.

  14. Device and technique for in-process sampling and analysis of molten metals and other liquids presenting harsh sampling conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, J.L.; Watson, L.D.

    1988-01-21

    An apparatus and method for continuously analyzing liquids by creating a supersonic spray which is shaped and sized prior to delivery of the spray to a analysis apparatus. The gas and liquid is sheared into small particles which are of a size and uniformity to form a spray which can be controlled through adjustment of pressures and gas velocity. The spray is shaped by a concentric supplemental flow of gas. 5 figs.

  15. Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UNCLASSIFIED iii Table of Contents WIPP Panel 7 Sampling May-June, 2014 ... 15 LLNL-TR-667001 Section 1 WIPP Panel 7 Sampling May-June, 2014 1. Summary of ...

  16. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 L L N L - X X X X - X X X X X Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center December 19, 2014 Sampling Report for August 15 2014 WIPP Samples Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UNCLASSIFIED ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or

  17. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  18. Rheology and TIC/TOC results of ORNL tank samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Hansen, E. K.

    2013-04-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)) was requested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and rheological measurements for several Oak Ridge tank samples. As received slurry samples were diluted and submitted to SRNL-Analytical for TIC and TOC analyses. Settled solids yield stress (also known as settled shear strength) of the as received settled sludge samples were determined using the vane method and these measurements were obtained 24 hours after the samples were allowed to settled undisturbed. Rheological or flow properties (Bingham Plastic viscosity and Bingham Plastic yield stress) were determined from flow curves of the homogenized or well mixed samples. Other targeted total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations samples were also analyzed for flow properties and these samples were obtained by diluting the as-received sample with de-ionized (DI) water.

  19. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into ...

  20. Water Summit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    host Water Summit March 21, 2016 Los Alamos watershed research among featured projects LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 21, 2016-On Tuesday, March 22, 2016-World Water Day-the ...

  1. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into...

  2. Quantification of Organic Porosity and Water Accessibility in Marcellus Shale Using Neutron Scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Xin; Mildner, David F. R.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Slingerland, Rudy; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-04-28

    Pores within organic matter (OM) are a significant contributor to the total pore system in gas shales. These pores contribute most of the storage capacity in gas shales. Here we present a novel approach to characterize the OM pore structure (including the porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, and water accessibility) in Marcellus shale. By using ultrasmall and small-angle neutron scattering, and by exploiting the contrast matching of the shale matrix with suitable mixtures of deuterated and protonated water, both total and water-accessible porosity were measured on centimeter-sized samples from two boreholes from the nanometer to micrometer scale withmore » good statistical coverage. Samples were also measured after combustion at 450 °C. Analysis of scattering data from these procedures allowed quantification of OM porosity and water accessibility. OM hosts 24–47% of the total porosity for both organic-rich and -poor samples. This porosity occupies as much as 29% of the OM volume. In contrast to the current paradigm in the literature that OM porosity is organophilic and therefore not likely to contain water, our results demonstrate that OM pores with widths >20 nm exhibit the characteristics of water accessibility. In conclusion, our approach reveals the complex structure and wetting behavior of the OM porosity at scales that are hard to interrogate using other techniques.« less

  3. Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    identification was also undertaken for selected samples using standard X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Since the VTTS fossil...

  4. Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies...

  5. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V.; Baranwal, Rita

    2009-12-08

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  6. Weld braze technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanne, Jr., William R.; Kelker, Jr., John W.; Alexander, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  7. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and other relatively straight-forward laboratory manipulations. These include buffer preparations, solid sample grinding, solution concentration, filtration, and...

  8. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  9. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  10. Balanced pressure techniques applied to geothermal drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dareing, D.W.

    1981-08-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate balanced pressure drilling techniques for use in combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling. Drilling techniques evaluated are: aerated drilling mud, parasite tubing, concentric drill pipe, jet sub, and low density fluids. Based on the present state of the art of balanced pressure drilling techniques, drilling with aerated water has the best overall balance of performance, risk, availability, and cost. Aerated water with a 19:1 free air/water ratio reduce maximum pressure unbalance between wellbore and formation pressures from 1000 psi to 50 psi. This pressure unbalance is within acceptable operating limits; however, air pockets could form and cause pressure surges in the mud system due to high percent of air. Low density fluids used with parasite tubing has the greatest potential for combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling, when performance only is considered. The top portion of the hole would be aerated through the parasite tube at a 10:1 free air/mud ratio and the low density mud could be designed so that its pressure gradient exactly matches the formation pore pressure gradient. The main problem with this system at present is the high cost of ceramic beads needed to produce low density muds.

  11. Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical Properties See Electrical Techniques Electromagnetic techniques utilize EM induction processes to measure one or more electric or magnetic field components resulting...

  12. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using Direct Liquid Extraction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Julia; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2015-11-13

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that enables label-free spatial localization and identification of molecules in complex samples.1-4 MSI applications range from forensics5 to clinical research6 and from understanding microbial communication7-8 to imaging biomolecules in tissues.1, 9-10 Recently, MSI protocols have been reviewed.11 Ambient ionization techniques enable direct analysis of complex samples under atmospheric pressure without special sample pretreatment.3, 12-16 In fact, in ambient ionization mass spectrometry, sample processing (e.g., extraction, dilution, preconcentration, or desorption) occurs during the analysis.17 This substantially speeds up analysis and eliminates any possible effects of sample preparation on the localization of molecules in the sample.3, 8, 12-14, 18-20 Venter and co-workers have classified ambient ionization techniques into three major categories based on the sample processing steps involved: 1) liquid extraction techniques, in which analyte molecules are removed from the sample and extracted into a solvent prior to ionization; 2) desorption techniques capable of generating free ions directly from substrates; and 3) desorption techniques that produce larger particles subsequently captured by an electrospray plume and ionized.17 This review focuses on localized analysis and ambient imaging of complex samples using a subset of ambient ionization methods broadly defined as “liquid extraction techniques” based on the classification introduced by Venter and co-workers.17 Specifically, we include techniques where analyte molecules are desorbed from solid or liquid samples using charged droplet bombardment, liquid extraction, physisorption, chemisorption, mechanical force, laser ablation, or laser capture microdissection. Analyte extraction is followed by soft ionization that generates ions corresponding to intact species. Some of the key advantages of liquid extraction techniques include the ease

  13. Preliminary study of an angiographic and angio-tomographic technique based on K-edge filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golosio, Bruno; Brunetti, Antonio; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo; Luca Masala, Giovanni; Meloni, Francesco; Battista Meloni, Giovanni

    2013-08-14

    Digital Subtraction Angiography is commonly affected by artifacts due to the patient movements during the acquisition of the images without and with the contrast medium. This paper presents a preliminary study on an angiographic and angio-tomographic technique based on the quasi-simultaneous acquisition of two images, obtained using two different filters at the exit of an X-ray tube. One of the two filters (K-edge filter) contains the same chemical element used as a contrast agent (gadolinium in this study). This filter absorbs more radiation with energy just above the so called K-edge energy of gadolinium than the radiation with energy just below it. The other filter (an aluminium filter in this study) is simply used to suppress the low-energy contribution to the spectrum. Using proper calibration curves, the two images are combined to obtain an image of the contrast agent distribution. In the angio-tomographic application of the proposed technique two images, corresponding to the two filter types, are acquired for each viewing angle of the tomographic scan. From the two tomographic reconstructions, it is possible to obtain a three-dimensional map of the contrast agent distribution. The technique was tested on a sample consisting of a rat skull placed inside a container filled with water. Six small cylinders with 4.7 mm internal diameter containing the contrast medium at different concentrations were placed inside the skull. In the plain angiographic application of the technique, five out of six cylinders were visible, with gadolinium concentration down to 0.96%. In the angio-tomographic application, all six cylinders were visible, with gadolinium concentration down to 0.49%. This preliminary study shows that the proposed technique can provide images of the contrast medium at low concentration without most of the artifacts that are present in images produced by conventional techniques. The results encourage further investigation on the feasibility of a clinical

  14. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  15. Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 L L N L - X X X X - X X X X X Sampling Report for May- June, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center January 8, 2015 Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UNCLASSIFIED ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or

  16. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2007-01-31

    This document contains the calendar year 2007 schedule for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sampling frequencies, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 2007 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. Maps showing approximate sampling locations are included for media scheduled for collection in 2007.

  17. Fissile material measurements using the differential die-away self interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Tobin, Stephen J; Evans, Louise G; Lee, S Y

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is substantial research effort focused on quantifying plutonium (Pu) mass in spent fuel using non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques. Of the several techniques being investigated for this purpose, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation (DDSI) is a recently proposed, neutron-based NDA technique capable of quantifying the total fissile content in an assembly. Unlike the conventional Differential Die-Away (DDA) technique, DOSI does not require an external neutron source for sample interrogation, but rather, uses the spontaneous fission neutrons originating from {sup 244}Cm within the spent fuel for self-interrogation. The essence of the technique lies in the time separation between the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 244}Cm and the detection of induced fission neutrons at a later time. The DDSI detector design imposes this time separation by optimizing the die-away times ({tau}) of the detector and sample interrogation regions to obtain an early and late neutron distribution respectively. The ratio of the count rates in the late gate to the early gate for singles, doubles, and triples is directly proportional to the fissile content present in the sample, which has already been demonstrated for simplified fuel cases using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The current work applies the DDSI concept to more complex samples, specifically spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies with varying isotopics resulting from a range of initial enrichment, bumup, and cooling time. We assess the feasibility of using the late gate to early gate ratio as a reliable indicator of overall fissile mass for a range of assemblies by defining a {sup 239}Pu effective mass which indicates the mass of {sup 239}Pu that would yield the same DDSI signal as the combined mass of major fissile isotopes present in the sample. This work is important for assessing the individual capability of the DDSI instrument in quantifying fissile mass in

  18. Nitrogen concentration and isotope dataset for environmental samples from 2012 and 2013, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Heikoop; Heather Throckmorton

    2015-05-15

    Dataset includes nitrate concentrations for polygonal active layer samples, snowmelt; ammonium concentrations for active layer samples; nitrate isotopes for active layer samples, snowmelt, permafrost; ammonium isotopes for active layer samples; and nitrogen isotopes for soils and dissolved organic nitrogen extracted from soil pore waters.

  19. Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  20. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  1. Water pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

  2. Sample page | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sample pages; Help pages; References Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso...

  3. Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical ...

  4. Rapid analysis of steels using laser-based techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremers, D.A.; Archuleta, F.L.; Dilworth, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the data obtained by this study, we conclude that laser-based techniques can be used to provide at least semi-quantitative information about the elemental composition of molten steel. Of the two techniques investigated here, the Sample-Only method appears preferable to the LIBS (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy) method because of its superior analytical performance. In addition, the Sample-Only method would probably be easier to incorporate into a steel plant environment. However, before either technique can be applied to steel monitoring, additional research is needed.

  5. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-07-23

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

  6. FASTGAS: Fast Gas Sampling for palladium exchange tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.; VerBerkmoes, A.A.

    1991-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique for measuring the composition of gas flows in rapid H/D exchange reactions in palladium compacts has been developed. This method, called FASTGAS (Fast Gas Sampling)'' has been used at atmospheric pressures and above with a time response of better than 100 ms. The current implementation of the FASTGAS technique is described in detail and examples of its application to palladium hydride exchange tests are given. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  7. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  8. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  9. Sample push-out fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biernat, John L.

    2002-11-05

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  10. Water Wars

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-11

    Sandia National Laboratories and Intel Corporation are cooperating on a project aimed at developing serious games to assist in resource planners in conducting open and participatory projects. Water Wars serves as a prototype game focused on water issues. Water Wars is a multi-player, online role-playing "serious game" combining large-scale simulation (e.g. SimCity), with strategy and interpersonal interaction (e.g. Diplomacy). The game is about water use set in present-day New Mexico. Players enact various stakeholder rolesmore » and compete for water while simultaneously cooperating to prevent environmental collapse. The gamespace utilizes immersive 3D graphics to bring the problem alive. The game integrates Intel's OpenSim visualization engine with Sandia developed agent-based and system dynamics models.« less

  11. Microfluidic-Based sample chips for radioactive solutions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tripp, J. L.; Law, J. D.; Smith, T. E.; Rutledge, V. J.; Bauer, W. F.; Ball, R. D.; Hahn, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Historical nuclear fuel cycle process sampling techniques required sample volumes ranging in the tens of milliliters. The radiation levels experienced by analytical personnel and equipment, in addition to the waste volumes generated from analysis of these samples, have been significant. These sample volumes also impacted accountability inventories of required analytes during process operations. To mitigate radiation dose and other issues associated with the historically larger sample volumes, a microcapillary sample chip was chosen for further investigation. The ability to obtain microliter volume samples coupled with a remote automated means of sample loading, tracking, and transporting to the analytical instrument wouldmore » greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste volumes. Sample chip testing was completed to determine the accuracy, repeatability, and issues associated with the use of microfluidic sample chips used to supply µL sample volumes of lanthanide analytes dissolved in nitric acid for introduction to an analytical instrument for elemental analysis.« less

  12. Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 | Sample Preparation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 Who Should Attend This course is mandatory for: SLAC employees and non-employees who need unescorted access to SSRL or LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratories Note: This course may be taken in lieu of Course 199, Laboratory CHP training for SLAC employees. Prerequisites 115 - General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Take Training Please see the notes section below for information on how to take this training. Course Details

  13. Hybrid opto-electric techniques for molecular diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haque, Aeraj Ul [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid optoelectric techniques reflect a new paradigm in microfluidics. In essence, these are microfluidic techniques that employ a synergistic combination of optical and electrical forces to enable noninvasive manipulation of fluids and/or particle-type entities at the micro/nano-scale [1]. Synergy between optical and electrical forces bestows these techniques with several unique features that are promising to bring new opportunities in molecular diagnostics. Within the scope of molecular diagnostics, several aspects of optoelectric techniques promise to play a relevant role. These include, but are not limited to, sample preparation, sorting, purification, amplification and detection.

  14. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  15. Development of a System for Rapid Detection of Contaminants in Water Supplies Using Magnetic Resonance and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowery, Thomas J; Neely, Lori; Chepin, James; Wellman, Parris; Toso, Ken; Murray, Paul; Audeh, Mark; Demas, Vasiliki; Palazzolo, Robert; Min, Michael; Phung, Nu; Blanco, Matt; Raphel, Jordan; O'Neil, Troy

    2010-09-14

    To keep the water supply safe and to ensure a swift and accurate response to a water supply contamination event, rapid and robust methods for microbial testing are necessary. Current technologies are complex, lengthy and costly and there is a need for rapid, reliable, and precise approaches that can readily address this fundamental security and safety issue. T2 Biosystems is focused on providing solutions to this problem by making breakthroughs in nanotechnology and biosensor techniques that address the current technical restrictions facing rapid, molecular analysis in complex samples. In order to apply the T2 Biosystems nucleic acid detection procedure to the analysis of nucleic acid targets in unprocessed water samples, Bacillus thuringeinsis was selected as a model organism and local river water was selected as the sample matrix. The initial assay reagent formulation was conceived with a manual magnetic resonance reader, was optimized using a high throughput system, and transferred back to the MR reader for potential field use. The final assay employing the designed and manufactured instruments was capable of detecting 10 CFU/mL of B. thuringiensis directly within the environmental water sample within 90 minutes. Further, discrimination of two closely related species of Bacilli was accomplished using the methods of this project; greater than 3-fold discrimination between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis at a concentrations spanning 10 CFU/mL to 10{sup 5} CFU/mL was observed.

  16. Enhanced AFCI Sampling, Analysis, and Safeguards Technology Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Svoboda

    2009-09-01

    The focus of this study includes the investigation of sampling technologies used in industry and their potential application to nuclear fuel processing. The goal is to identify innovative sampling methods using state of the art techniques that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements. Sampling and analysis of nuclear fuel recycling plant processes is required both to monitor the operations and ensure Safeguards and Security goals are met. In addition, environmental regulations lead to additional samples and analysis to meet licensing requirements. The volume of samples taken by conventional means, can restrain productivity while results samples are analyzed, require process holding tanks that are sized to meet analytical issues rather than process issues (and that create a larger facility footprint), or, in some cases, simply overwhelm analytical laboratory capabilities. These issues only grow when process flowsheets propose new separations systems and new byproduct material for transmutation purposes. Novel means of streamlining both sampling and analysis are being evaluated to increase the efficiency while meeting all requirements for information. This report addresses just a part of the effort to develop and study novel methods by focusing on the sampling and analysis of aqueous samples for metallic elements. It presents an overview of the sampling requirements, including frequency, sensitivity, accuracy, and programmatic drivers, to demonstrate the magnitude of the task. The sampling and analysis system needed for metallic element measurements is then discussed, and novel options being applied to other industrial analytical needs are presented. Inductively coupled mass spectrometry instruments are the most versatile for metallic element analyses and are thus chosen as the focus for the study. Candidate novel means of process sampling, as well as modifications that are necessary to couple such instruments to

  17. Technology recommendations for pre-screening of IAEA swipe samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Smith, Nicholas A.; Lee, Denise L.; Huckabay, Heath A.; Ticknor, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories have prepared an analysis of recommended, possible, and not recommended technologies for pre-screening and prioritizing IAEA swipes. The analytical techniques listed under the recommended technology list are the most promising techniques available to date. The recommended list is divided into two sections: Argonne’s recommended techniques and Oak Ridge’s recommended techniques. This list was divided based upon the expertise of staff in each subject area and/or the instrumentation available at each laboratory. The following section, titled Possible Techniques, is a list of analytical techniques that could be used for pre-screening and prioritizing swipes if additional instrumentation and effort were provided. These techniques are not necessarily top priority, but should not be discounted for future or expanded efforts. Lastly, a list of not recommended techniques is provided to outline the analytical methods and instrumentation that were investigated by each lab but deemed not suitable for this task. In addition to the recommendation list, a short procedure is provided outlining the steps followed for destructive analysis by the Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) for determination of uranium concentrations, isotopic content of sample and swipe. Swipes generated for this project will be given to ORNL’s NWAL laboratory for analysis after analysis by other techniques at both laboratories.

  18. Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. StratigraphicStructural: Structural geology-...

  19. Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities StratigraphicStructural: Structural geology-...

  20. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  1. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  2. A technique for synthesizing metal tritide standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, H. T.; Allen, T. H.; Hill, D. D.; Martinez, P. T.; Schwarz, R. B.; Paglieri, S. N.; Wermer, J. R.

    2008-07-15

    Before surplus plutonium pits can be decommissioned and converted into metal oxides to be used as reactor fuels, residual tritium must be reduced to an acceptable level. We have developed two analytical methods involving melting and acid dissolution, combined with liquid scintillation counting as a quantitative and sensitive technique for measuring residual tritium in Pu metal. The detection limit, linearity, and reproducibility of these analytical methods must be validated with a series of metal tritide standards. Since there are no commercially available metal tritide standards, we have developed a technique for their synthesis. The synthesis of these low-level metal tritide standards is accomplished by charging cerium powder with a known amount of tritium to form a master cerium tritide alloy and then by aliquoting from this master alloy and diluting with pure cerium powder to form a series of standards with different tritium concentrations. The major difficulty in synthesizing these standards is that the samples contain extremely low levels of tritium, which span over three decades of concentrations. The synthesis technique and initial data obtained for cerium hydride samples will be presented. (authors)

  3. Sample Business Plan Framework 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 5: A program that establishes itself as a government entity, then operates using a fee-based structure.

  4. Sample Business Plan Framework 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  5. Sample Business Plan Framework 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 4: A program seeking to continue in the post-grant period as a marketing contractor to a utility.

  6. Sample Business Plan Framework 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 3: A government entity running a Commercial PACE program in the post-grant period.

  7. UNDERSTANDING THE AIR SAMPLING DATA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For more comparisons, see the millirem comparisons poster. Dose estimates have been calculated based on the low-volume air sampler results. Low-volume air samplers collect samples ...

  8. Air Sampling System Evaluation Template

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-05-09

    The ASSET1.0 software provides a template with which a user can evaluate an Air Sampling System against the latest version of ANSI N13.1 "Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities". The software uses the ANSI N13.1 PIC levels to establish basic design criteria for the existing or proposed sampling system. The software looks at such criteria as PIC level, type of radionuclide emissions, physical state ofmore » the radionuclide, nozzle entrance effects, particulate transmission effects, system and component accuracy and precision evaluations, and basic system operations to provide a detailed look at the subsystems of a monitoring and sampling system/program. A GAP evaluation can then be completed which leads to identification of design and operational flaws in the proposed systems. Corrective measures can then be limited to the GAPs.« less

  9. Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21KBr Centrifuge Centrifuge SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Saint Gobain K-104 Sanyo MIR-154 Cooled Incubator Temperature Control LCLS Sample Prep Lab 999 109 Sanyo MPR-215F...

  10. Sample Business Plan Framework 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  11. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  12. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1998-07-07

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  13. Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...016-03-01T17:12:00+00:00 March 1st, 2016|News, News & Events, Water Power, Workshops|0 Comments Read More Wave energy distribution example Permalink Gallery Sandia releases 2nd ...

  14. January 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-01

    Annual sampling was conducted January 19, 2011, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1.Water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

  15. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    This report evaluates the chemistry of seep water occurring in three desert drainages near Shiprock, New Mexico: Many Devils Wash, Salt Creek Wash, and Eagle Nest Arroyo. Through the use of geochemical plotting tools and multivariate statistical analysis techniques, analytical results of samples collected from the three drainages are compared with the groundwater chemistry at a former uranium mill in the Shiprock area (the Shiprock site), managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The objective of this study was to determine, based on the water chemistry of the samples, if statistically significant patterns or groupings are apparent between the sample populations and, if so, whether there are any reasonable explanations for those groupings.

  16. Novel Method of Ethanol/Water Separation with Nanoporous Polymer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fermentation systems such as this, but also in liquid water purification and desalination. ... While this technique has been proven effective with desalination, the resulting pore size ...

  17. Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigdon, L.

    1980-06-03

    Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

  18. Ball assisted device for analytical surface sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ElNaggar, Mariam S; Van Berkel, Gary J; Covey, Thomas R

    2015-11-03

    A system for sampling a surface includes a sampling probe having a housing and a socket, and a rolling sampling sphere within the socket. The housing has a sampling fluid supply conduit and a sampling fluid exhaust conduit. The sampling fluid supply conduit supplies sampling fluid to the sampling sphere. The sampling fluid exhaust conduit has an inlet opening for receiving sampling fluid carried from the surface by the sampling sphere. A surface sampling probe and a method for sampling a surface are also disclosed.

  19. Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric tests and other experiments with nuclear materials were conducted on the Frenchman Flat playa at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; residual radionuclides are known to exist in Frenchman Flat playa soils. Although the playa is typically dry, extended periods of winter precipitation or large single-event rainstorms can inundate the playa. When Frenchman Flat playa is inundated, residual radionuclides on the typically dry playa surface may become submerged, allowing water-soil interactions that could provide a mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from known areas of contamination. The potential for radionuclide transport by occasional inundation of the Frenchman Flat playa was examined using geographic information systems and satellite imagery to delineate the timing and areal extent of inundation; collecting water samples during inundation and analyzing them for chemical and isotopic content; characterizing suspended/precipitated materials and archived soil samples; modeling water-soil geochemical reactions; and modeling the mobility of select radionuclides under aqueous conditions. The physical transport of radionuclides by water was not evaluated in this study. Frenchman Flat playa was inundated with precipitation during two consecutive winters in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Inundation allowed for collection of multiple water samples through time as the areal extent of inundation changed and ultimately receded. During these two winters, precipitation records from a weather station in Frenchman Flat (Well 5b) provided information that was used in combination with geographic information systems, Landsat imagery, and image processing techniques to identify and quantify the areal extent of inundation. After inundation, water on the playa disappeared quickly, for example, between January 25, 2011 and February 10, 2011, a period of 16 days, 92 percent of the areal extent of inundation receded (2,062,800 m2). Water sampling provided

  20. Home Energy Score Sample Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sample Report Home Energy Score Sample Report The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems. Recommendations show how to improve the energy efficiency of the home to achieve a higher score and save money. Home Energy Score: Sample Report (1.98 MB) More

  1. Evidence for Gropun-Water Stratification Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Futa; B.D. Marshall; Z.E. Peterman

    2006-03-24

    Major- and trace-element concentrations and strontium isotope ratios (strontium-87/strontium-86) in samples of ground water potentially can be useful in delineating flow paths in the complex ground-water system in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water samples were collected from boreholes to characterize the lateral and vertical variability in the composition of water in the saturated zone. Discrete sampling of water-producing intervals in the saturated zone includes isolating borehole sections with packers and extracting pore water from core obtained by sonic drilling. Chemical and isotopic stratification was identified in the saturated zone beneath southern Fortymile Wash.

  2. Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

    2012-07-18

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  3. Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  4. Tank characterization technical sampling basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-04-28

    Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis (this document) is the first step of an in place working process to plan characterization activities in an optimal manner. This document will be used to develop the revision of the Waste Information Requirements Document (WIRD) (Winkelman et al. 1997) and ultimately, to create sampling schedules. The revised WIRD will define all Characterization Project activities over the course of subsequent fiscal years 1999 through 2002. This document establishes priorities for sampling and characterization activities conducted under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Characterization Project. The Tank Waste Characterization Project is designed to provide all TWRS programs with information describing the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of the contents of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. These tanks contain radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons materials at the Hanford Site. The waste composition varies from tank to tank because of the large number of chemical processes that were used when producing nuclear weapons materials over the years and because the wastes were mixed during efforts to better use tank storage space. The Tank Waste Characterization Project mission is to provide information and waste sample material necessary for TWRS to define and maintain safe interim storage and to process waste fractions into stable forms for ultimate disposal. This document integrates the information needed to address safety issues, regulatory requirements, and retrieval, treatment, and immobilization requirements. Characterization sampling to support tank farm operational needs is also discussed.

  5. The how-to of stormwater sampling--Not just a drop in the bucket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, C.T. ); Ray, J.A. )

    1993-10-01

    This article examines the stormwater sampling program of Winston-Salem, South Carolina as an example of a winning strategy. The topics of the article include sampling techniques, personnel availability, laboratory flexibility, outline of the program, being prepared, equipment selection and storage on site, sampling activities, demobilization, cleanup, and personnel training and morale.

  6. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the microbatches of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  7. Model-Based Sampling and Inference

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation James R. Knaub, Jr., Energy Information Administration, EI-53.1 James.Knaub@eia.doe.gov Key Words: Survey statistics, Randomization, Conditionality, Random sampling, Cutoff sampling Abstract: Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling within groups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic random sampling), may be familiar to a lot of people. These are design-based samples.

  8. Viscous-sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1979-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge is disclosed. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  9. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-11-13

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  10. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  11. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  12. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, Katharine H.

    1990-01-01

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  13. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  14. Diagnostic techniques used in AVLIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    This is the second part of a general overview talk on the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. In this presentation the authors will discuss the diagnostic techniques used to measure key parameters in their atomic vapor including densities, temperature, velocities charge exchange rates and background ionization levels. Although these techniques have been extensively applied to their uranium program they do have applicability to other systems. Relevant data demonstrating these techniques will be shown.

  15. Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in density, such as at fault contacts. 2 Gravity techniques are also applied towards reservoir monitoring for subsidence and mass gain or loss within a geothermal reservoir...

  16. Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in-situ within the well, downhole techniques are capable of accurately constraining these reservoir parameters relative to depth.2 Gaining an understanding of these reservoir...

  17. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  18. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  19. techniques | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and discussion of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques. The Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program is authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act of...

  20. WATER CONSERVATION PLAN

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Average water consumers can save thousands of gallons of water per year by being aware of ... program on the water distribution systems to include water saving replacement parts. ...