Sample records for technique hyperspectral imaging

  1. Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems Stephen E. Reichenbach University develop a method for assessing the in- formation density and efficiency of hyperspectral imaging systems width can efficiently gather information about a scene by allocating bandwidth among the bands according

  2. Hyperspectral Imaging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New Energy DevelopmentList ofHyperspectral Imaging

  3. Hyperspectral Imaging or Imaging Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    (nm) Cosmic Rays Gamma Rays X Rays Microwaves (Radar) Radio & Television WavesUV 105 106 107 108 109 the image cube by scanning through it. The conventional methods are whiskbroom (a), filter/Fourier transform Optics Scene FOVx X-Dimension Scanning Mechanism Focusing Optics #12;Whiskbroom Sensor Accumulation

  4. Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  5. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  6. Material characterization using a hyperspectral infrared imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimonetti, W D; Bixler, J V; Roberts, R S

    1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has found application in many areas including chemometrics, biomedical and biochemical studies, and atmospheric chemistry. This paper describes an investigation into the application of the LLNL Hyperspectral Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) to the non-destructive evaluation of man-made and natural materials. We begin by describing the HIRIS system and the objects studied in the investigation. Next, we describe the technique used to collect the hyperspec- tral imagery, and discuss the processing required to transform the data into usable form. We then describe a technique to analyze the data, and provide some preliminary results.

  7. Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using a Generalized Bilinear Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    interesting properties for abundance estimation, e.g., for scenes including mixtures of minerals [13 steps. The first step (referred to as endmember extraction) consists of extracting endmembers from the hyperspectral image. This extraction can be achieved in a supervised manner when prior information about

  8. Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using a Generalized Bilinear Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    interesting properties for abundance estimation, e.g., for scenes including mixtures of minerals [13]. Spectral unmixing includes two main steps. The first step (referred to as endmember extraction) consists of extracting endmembers from the hyperspectral image. This extraction can be achieved in a supervised manner

  9. GPU Implementation of Target and Anomaly Detection Algorithms for Remotely Sensed Hyperspectral Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    of Computers and Communications University of Extremadura, Avda. de la Universidad s/n 10071 C´aceres, Spain the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers in the WTC complex. Keywords: Hyperspectral imaging

  10. The Robust Classification of Hyperspectral Images Using Adaptive Wavelet Kernel Support Vector Data Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kollegala, Revathi

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of wavelet functions as kernels with Support Vector Data Description for target detection in hyperspectral images. Specifically, it proposes the Adaptive Wavelet Kernel Support Vector Data Description (AWK-SVDD) that learns the optimal wavelet function...

  11. 3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

  12. Erratum to "Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using a Generalized Bilinear Model"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    1 Erratum to "Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using a Generalized Bilinear Model for the four images. TABLE I UNMIXING ALGORITHM PERFORMANCES WITH ACTUAL AND ESTIMATED ENDMEMBERS (1ST AND 2ND SCENARIOS): RE AND SAM. 1st scenario 2nd scenario RE (×10-2 ) SAM (×10-2 ) RE (×10-2 ) SAM (×10-2 ) LMM FM

  13. 2008 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 21, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 SpectralSpatial Classification of Hyperspectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ­Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Data Based on a Stochastic Minimum Spanning Forest Approach Kévin Bernard, Yuliya is proposed. In particular, the notion of sto- chastic minimum spanning forest (MSF) is introduced spanning forest (MSF), multiple classifiers, stochastic. I. INTRODUCTION HYPERSPECTRAL imaging can

  14. Advanced Processing of Hyperspectral Images A. Plaza, J. A. Benediktsson, J. Boardman, J. Brazile, L. Bruzzone, G. Camps-Valls ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    from the interaction of solar energy with the molecular structure of the material. In this paper, we on recent, consolidated advances in technologies for efficient processing of hyperspectral imagery. First, we discuss hyperspectral image classification using support vector machines (SVMs), which are one

  15. Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    Large spills of oil and related petroleum products in the marine environment can have serious biologicalMapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002

  16. Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1 Ovidiu Ghita2 Pedro. In this paper we present a novel methodology to automate the recycling process of non-ferrous metal Waste from that the proposed solution can be used to replace the manual procedure that is currently used in WEEE recycling

  17. Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging to characterize lung tissue for detecting emphysematous tissues in lung volume reduction surgery. The system, the spectral signature of healthy lung tissue and simulated smokers lung tissue is obtained and compared

  18. Development of Research Infrastructure in Nevada for the Exploitation of Hyperspectral Image Data to Address Proliferation and Detection of Chemical and Biological Materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James V. Taranik

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was to exploit hyperspectral reflectance imaging technology for the detection and mapping variability (clutter) of the natural background against which gases in the atmosphere are imaged. The natural background consists of landscape surface cover composed of consolidated rocks, unconsolidated rock weathering products, soils, coatings on rock materials, vegetation, water, materials constructed by humans, and mixtures of the above. Human made gases in the atmosphere may indicate industrial processes important to detecting non-nuclear chemical and biological proliferation. Our research was to exploit the Visible and Near-Infrared (NIR) and the Short-wave Infrared (SWIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum to determine the properties of solid materials on the earth’s surface that could influence the detection of gases in the Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR). We used some new experimental hyperspectral imaging technologies to collect data over the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Center (NPTEC) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The SpecTIR HyperSpecTIR (HST) and Specim Dual hyperspectral sensors were used to understand the variability in the imaged background (clutter), that detected, measured, identified and mapped with operational commercial hyperspectral techniques. The HST sensors were determined to be more experimental than operational because of problems with radiometric and atmospheric data correction. However the SpecTIR Dual system, developed by Specim in Finland, eventually was found to provide cost-effective hyperspectral image data collection and it was possible to correct the Dual system’s data for specific areas. Batch processing of long flightlines was still complex, and if comparison to laboratory spectra was desired, the Dual system data still had to be processed using the empirical line method. This research determined that 5-meter spatial resolution was adequate for mapping natural background variations. Furthermore, this research determined that spectral resolution of 10um was adequate, but a signal to noise above 300:1 was desirable for hyperspectral sensors with this spectral resolution. Finally, we acquired a hyperspectral thermal dataset (SEBASS) at 3m spatial resolution over our study area in Beatty, Nevada that can be co-registered with the hyperspectral reflectance, LIDAR and digital Orthophoto data sets. This data set will enable us to quantify how measurements in the reflected infrared can be used to make inferences about the response of materials in the thermal infrared, the topic of our follow-on NA-22 investigation ending in 2008. These data provide the basis for our investigations proposed for the NA-22 2008 Broad Area Announcement. Beginning in June 2008, SpecTIR Corporation and Aerospace Corporation plan to fly the SpecTIR Dual and SEBASS in a stabilized mount in a twin Otter aircraft. This research provides the foundation for using reflected and emitted hyperspectral measurements together for mapping geologic and soil materials in arid to semi-arid regions.

  19. Hyperspectral microscope for in vivo imaging of microstructures and cells in tissues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos; Stavros G. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical hyperspectral/multimodal imaging method and apparatus is utilized to provide high signal sensitivity for implementation of various optical imaging approaches. Such a system utilizes long working distance microscope objectives so as to enable off-axis illumination of predetermined tissue thereby allowing for excitation at any optical wavelength, simplifies design, reduces required optical elements, significantly reduces spectral noise from the optical elements and allows for fast image acquisition enabling high quality imaging in-vivo. Such a technology provides a means of detecting disease at the single cell level such as cancer, precancer, ischemic, traumatic or other type of injury, infection, or other diseases or conditions causing alterations in cells and tissue micro structures.

  20. Content-Based Hyperspectral Image Retrieval Using Spectral Unmixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    , Avda. de la Universidad s/n 10071 C´aceres, Spain ABSTRACT The purpose of content-based image retrieval weeks of September, 2001, only a few days after the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 49, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2011 4153 Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    interesting properties for abundance estimation, e.g., for scenes including mixtures of minerals [9], orchards]. Spectral unmixing includes two main steps. The first step (referred to as endmember extraction) con- sists of extracting endmembers from the hyperspectral image. This extraction can be achieved in a supervised manner

  2. Non-parametric Image Registration of Airborne LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Photographic Imagery of Wooded Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Juheon; Cai, Xiaohao; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane; Coomes, David A.

    2015-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    equalization function histeq. Using first returns yielded qualitatively similar results to using all returns. Hyperspectral imaging spectrometers measure solar energy reflected off the Earth’s surface within a swath of land. Hyper- spectral data were gathered... reg , T SURF reg , and TNGF-Curvreg , respectively, in these panels; yellow circle highlights areas of the images where differences among registration methods are seen. The third row zooms in on these highlighted circles. The final row of panels shows...

  3. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  4. Hyperspectral signal and image processing has witnessed a quantum leap due to recent advances of hyperspectral imaging sensors or spectrometers which use hundreds of contiguous spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    be identified by visual assessment, for example, rare minerals in geology, special species in agriculture exploitation. It is then followed by Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 on endmember extraction, Chapter 4 on unsupervised-Based Algorithms for Endmember Extraction from Hyperspectral Imagery by Chaudhry et al. investigates a popular

  5. Dissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Telluride Photovoltaics The goal of increasing the efficiency of solar cell devices is a universal oneDissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques for Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics. Increased photovoltaic (PV) performance means an increase in competition with other energy tech- nologies

  6. Novel Pattern Recognition Techniques for Improved Target Detection in Hyperspectral Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakla, Wesam Adel

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    first-order Markovbased scheme to exploit correlation between bands. Using these models, we present two techniques for meeting these challenges-the kernel-based support vector data description (SVDD) and spectral fringe-adjusted joint transform...

  7. Hyperspectral Microscopy of Explosives Particles Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using infrared hyperspectral imaging, we demonstrate microscopy of small particles of the explosives compounds RDX, tetryl, and PETN with near diffraction-limited performance. The custom microscope apparatus includes an external cavity quantum cascade laser illuminator scanned over its tuning range of 9.13-10.53 µm in four seconds, coupled with a microbolometer focal plane array to record infrared transmission images. We use the hyperspectral microscopy technique to study the infrared absorption spectra of individual explosives particles, and demonstrate sub-nanogram detection limits.

  8. Single-shot hyperspectral coherent Raman planar imaging in the range 0–4200 cm?¹

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bohlin, Alexis [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Kliewer, Christopher J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550, USA

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a technique for ultrabroadband planar coherent Raman spectroscopy that enables wideband chemically selective mapping of molecular partition functions in the gas-phase within a single-laser-shot. A spectral region spanning 0–4200 cm?¹ is excited simultaneously, in principle allowing for coherent planar imaging of most all fundamental Raman-active modes. This unique instantaneous and spatially correlated assessment enables multiplexed studies of transient dynamical systems in a two-dimensional (2D) field. Here, we demonstrate single-laser-shot high temperature diagnostics of H?, with spatially resolved 2D measurement of transitions of both the pure-rotational H? S-branch and the vibrational H? Q-branch, analyzing the temperature contour of a reacting fuel-species as it evolves at a flame-front.

  9. Single-shot hyperspectral coherent Raman planar imaging in the range 0–4200 cm?¹

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a technique for ultrabroadband planar coherent Raman spectroscopy that enables wideband chemically selective mapping of molecular partition functions in the gas-phase within a single-laser-shot. A spectral region spanning 0–4200 cm?¹ is excited simultaneously, in principle allowing for coherent planar imaging of most all fundamental Raman-active modes. This unique instantaneous and spatially correlated assessment enables multiplexed studies of transient dynamical systems in a two-dimensional (2D) field. Here, we demonstrate single-laser-shot high temperature diagnostics of H?, with spatially resolved 2D measurement of transitions of both the pure-rotational H? S-branch and the vibrational H? Q-branch, analyzing the temperature contour of amore »reacting fuel-species as it evolves at a flame-front.« less

  10. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  11. 1380 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 39, NO. 7, JULY 2001 Unsupervised Target Detection in Hyperspectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    and Tukey [1], [2] to be used as a technique for exploratory analysis of multivariate data and has been is reduced to a well-known technique, principal components analysis (PCA). Using PP for hyperspectral image set into a low dimensional data space while retaining desired informa- tion of interest. It utilizes

  12. Classification of hyperspectral images by tensor modeling and additive morphological decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . AMD defines a scale-space decomposition for multivariate images without any loss of information. AMD`emes, MINES Paristech, France Abstract Pixel-wise classification in high-dimensional multivariate images is modeled as a tensor structure and tensor principal components analysis is compared as dimensional

  13. USING RANDOM MATRIX THEORY TO DETERMINE THE NUMBER OF ENDMEMBERS IN A HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damelin, Steven

    chemical unmixing [1], extracting speech signals in a noisy band [2], unmixing minerals [3] and unmixing en of spectral endmembers in a hyper- spectral image is an important step in the spectral unmixing process of endmembers in an image is im- portant for the processing of many different types of data, in- cluding

  14. Determining the intrinsic dimension of a hyperspectral image using Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damelin, Steven

    chemical unmixing [1], extracting speech signals in a noisy line [2], unmixing minerals [3] and unmixing dimension of a hyper- spectral image is an important step in the spectral unmixing process and under the number of sources in a signal is important for the processing of many different types of data, including

  15. A parameter free approach for determining the intrinsic dimension of a hyperspectral image using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damelin, Steven

    chemical unmixing [1], extracting speech signals in a noisy line [2], unmixing minerals [3] and unmixing--Determining the intrinsic dimension of a hyper- spectral image is an important step in the spectral unmixing process the number of sources in a signal is important for the processing of many different types of data, including

  16. On the Use of Cluster Computing Architectures for Implementation of Hyperspectral Image Analysis Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    of applications aimed at detecting and/or tracking natural disasters such as forest fires, oil spills, and other sensors represent the most advanced instruments currently available for remote sensing of the Earth. The high spatial and spectral resolution of the images supplied by systems like the Airborne Visible Infra-Red

  17. Imaging techniques utilizing optical fibers and tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilke, M.; King, N.S.P.; Gray, N.; Johnson, D.; Esquibel, D.; Nedrow, P.; Ishiwata, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional, time-dependent images generated by neutrons, gamma rays, and x-rays incident on fast scintillators are relayed to streak and video cameras over optical fibers. Three dimensions, two spatial and one temporal, have been reduced to two, one in space and time utilizing sampling methods permitting reconstruction of a time-dependent, two-dimensional image subsequent to data recording. The manner in which the sampling is done optimized the ability to reconstruct the image via a maximization of entropy algorithm. This method uses four linear fiber optic arrays typically 30 meters long and up to 35 elements each. A further refinement of this technique collapses the linear array information into four single fibers by wavelength multiplexing. This permits economical transmission of the data over kilometer distances to the recording equipment.

  18. advanced imaging techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Image restoration Lfdahl, Mats 8 Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator. Open...

  19. Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy of a Mars analogue environment at the North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Cudahy, Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible and near infrared (VNIR) to shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral dataset of the Early Archaean North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, has been analysed for indications of hydrothermal alteration. Occurrence maps of hydrothermal alteration minerals were produced. It was found that using a spatial resolution on the ground of approximately 5 m and spectral coverage from 0.4 to 2.5 mm was sufficient to delineate several hydrothermal alteration zones and associated veins, including phyllic, serpentinitic and chloritic alteration. These results suggest this level of spectral and spatial resolution would be ideal for localising shallow epithermal activity, should such activity have existed, on the surface of Mars.

  20. Techniques calm fear of imaging machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Pelt, D.

    1990-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become a valuable tool in diagnosing diseases, and the imaging devices are now used as often as 2 million times a year in the United States. But as many as 10 percent of patients advised to undergo the procedure cannot because they become overwhelmed with claustrophobialike fear triggered by having to lie motionless in the machine's tunnel-like cylinder for about 45 minutes. To counteract this fear, several hospitals now practice various techniques to help reduce the feelings of confinement. One popular method is to give a patient special eyeglasses that allow him to look beyond his feet and see the tunnel opening. Other glasses use mirrors to direct the patient's vision out the back of the unit to large wilderness photographs or murals that simulate a sense of spaciousness. Even a basic item like a set of headphones that plays music can often distract a patient, and technicians frequently hold a patient's hand or foot during the procedure. Another trick is to invite family members and friends to remain with the patient during the scan to provide company and reassurance.

  1. The characterization of particle clouds using optical imaging techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jane), 1972-

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical imaging techniques can be used to provide a better understanding of the physical properties of particle clouds. The purpose of this thesis is to design, perform and evaluate a set of experiments using optical imaging ...

  2. Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast...

  3. Madonne: Document Image Analysis Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Madonne: Document Image Analysis Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documents Jean-Marc Ogier and Karl Tombre Abstract. This paper presents the Madonne project, a French initiative to use document image anal- ysis techniques for the purpose of preserving and exploiting heritage documents. 1

  4. Review of Parallel Computing Techniques for Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Review of Parallel Computing Techniques for Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction Jun Ni1, 3 representative analytic and iterative reconstruction algorithms for X-ray computed tomography (CT), we address X-ray computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important non-invasive medical imaging techniques

  5. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel. 10 figs.

  6. CMOS passive pixel image design techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimori, Iliana L. (Iliana Lucia)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CMOS technology provides an attractive alternative to the currently dominant CCD technology for implementing low-power, low-cost imagers with high levels of integration. Two pixel configurations are possible in CMOS ...

  7. USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING...

  8. Study of microfluidic measurement techniques using novel optical imaging diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaesung

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    is applied for a 3-D vector field mapping in a microscopic flow and a Brownian motion tracking of nanoparticles. This technique modifies OSSM system for a micro-fluidic experiment, and the imaging system captures a diffracted particle image having numerous...

  9. Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

  10. Implications and mitigation of model mismatch and covariance contamination for hyperspectral chemical agent detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Sidi

    Most chemical gas detection algorithms for long-wave infrared hyperspectral images assume a gas with a perfectly known spectral signature. In practice, the chemical signature is either imperfectly measured and/or exhibits ...

  11. A Review of Image-based Rendering Techniques Heung-Yeung Shum and Sing Bing Kang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Alex

    A Review of Image-based Rendering Techniques Heung-Yeung Shum and Sing Bing Kang Microsoft Research hshum, sbkang¡ @microsoft.com Abstract In this paper, we survey the techniques for image-based rendering. Unlike traditional 3D computer graphics in which 3D geometry of the scene is known, image-based rendering

  12. Technique Recovers Atomic Resolution in Spectrum Images | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Spectrum Images April 08, 2015 Raw Fe L-shell spectrum image data, which indicate magnetic properties of the material, were acquired using scanning transmission electron...

  13. Development of integrated imaging techniques for investigating biomarkers in glioblastoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Heisoog

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer is a diverse disease with many manifestations. Various imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been used to study human cancer. In this study, we ...

  14. Techniques on Analysis of Photo Phase Shift Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Robin 1990-

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . Real-time MRI temperature mapping was evaluated using the magnitude and phase difference DICOM images. To reduce noise on the temperature maps, a mask was created using the magnitude images and eliminating pixel values greater than a set threshold...

  15. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement in infrared imaging technology has allowed the thermal imaging to detect and visualize several gases, mostly hydrocarbon gases. In addition, infrared cameras could potentially be used as a non-contact temperature measurement for gas...

  16. Applying Reconfigurable Hardware to the Analysis of Multispectral and Hyperspectral Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    and hyperspectral images. Last year, we reported on an implementation of k­means clustering for multispectral images hardware to accelerate k­means clustering is clear; the disadvantage is the hardware implementation worked to easily change the k­means implemen­ tation for these different data sets is important. For this reason

  17. An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images Valliappa and are not transferrable between different types of geospatial images. Yet, with the multitude of remote sensing on different types of geospatial radar and satel- lite images. Pointers are provided on the effective choice

  18. Testing Hyperspectral Data for Geobatanical Anomaly Mapping,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data for Geobatanical Anomaly Mapping, Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Testing Hyperspectral Data...

  19. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral...

  20. Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Nevada, USA-Initial Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  1. Combined Illumination Cylindrical Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technique for Concealed Weapon Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed for personnel surveillance applications, including the detection of concealed weapons, explosives, drugs, and other contraband material. Millimeter-waves are high-frequency radio waves in the frequency band of 30-300 GHz, and pose no health threat to humans at moderate power levels. These waves readily penetrate common clothing materials, and are reflected by the human body and by concealed items. The combined illumination cylindrical imaging concept consists of a vertical, high-resolution, millimeter-wave array of antennas which is scanned in a cylindrical manner about the person under surveillance. Using a computer, the data from this scan is mathematically reconstructed into a series of focused 3-D images of the person. After reconstruction, the images are combined into a single high-resolution three-dimensional image of the person under surveillance. This combined image is then rendered using 3-D computer graphics techniques. The combined cylindrical illumination is critical as it allows the display of information from all angles. This is necessary because millimeter-waves do not penetrate the body. Ultimately, the images displayed to the operator will be icon-based to protect the privacy of the person being screened. Novel aspects of this technique include the cylindrical scanning concept and the image reconstruction algorithm, which was developed specifically for this imaging system. An engineering prototype based on this cylindrical imaging technique has been fabricated and tested. This work has been sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  2. Application of L1 Minimization Technique to Image Super-Resolution and Surface Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talavatifard, Habiballah

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface reconstruction and image enhancement non-linear finite element technique based on minimization of L1 norm of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Since minimization in the L1 norm is computationally expensive, we seek...

  3. A WAVELET-BASED IMAGE DENOISING TECHNIQUE USING SPATIAL PRIORS Aleksandra PIZURICA 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizurica, Aleksandra

    A WAVELET-BASED IMAGE DENOISING TECHNIQUE USING SPATIAL PRIORS Aleksandra PIZURICA 1 , Wilfried, Belgium ABSTRACT We propose a new wavelet-based method for image denoising that applies the Bayesian framework, using prior knowledge about the spatial clustering of the wavelet coefficients. Local spatial

  4. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  5. Optimization Digital Image Watermarking Technique for Patent Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elnajjar, Mahmoud; Zaidan, B B; Sharif, Mohamed Elhadi M; Alanazi, Hamdan O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of multimedia and internet allows for wide distribution of digital media data. It becomes much easier to edit, modify and duplicate digital information besides that, digital documents are also easy to copy and distribute, therefore it will be faced by many threats. It is a big security and privacy issue. Another problem with digital document and video is that undetectable modifications can be made with very simple and widely available equipment, which put the digital material for evidential purposes under question With the large flood of information and the development of the digital format, it become necessary to find appropriate protection because of the significance, accuracy and sensitivity of the information, therefore multimedia technology and popularity of internet communications they have great interest in using digital watermarks for the purpose of copy protection and content authentication. Digital watermarking is a technique used to embed a known piece of digital data within a...

  6. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  7. Oil Spill Detection and Mapping Along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline Based on Imaging Spectrometer Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Meryem Damla

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    based on hyperspectral images acquired along the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico. A number of AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) imaging spectrometer images were investigated in this research collected over Bay Jimmy and Wilkinson...

  8. Image-Based Modeling and Rendering Techniques: A Survey Manuel M. Oliveira1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Manuel M.

    Image-Based Modeling and Rendering Techniques: A Survey Manuel M. Oliveira1 Resumo: A recente denominadas modelagem e rendering baseados em imagens (MRBI). Modelagem baseada em imagens se refere ao processo de utilização de imagens para reconstrução de modelos geométricos 3D. Rendering baseado em imagens

  9. NREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions and identify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar cell producers are facing urgent pressures to lower module production cost.This achievementNREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions is an increasingly important issue for silicon solar cells. The issue has taken center stage now that the solar

  10. Digital Compressive Quantitation and Hyperspectral Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    cPurdue University, Department of Computer Science, West Lafayette, IN, USA .... through so ware available from Texas Instruments (Load ... (middle panel).

  11. Category:Hyperspectral Imaging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo Back to PV Economics By Buildingpage?

  12. Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

  13. Three dimension temperature field reconstruction with image processing technique on pulverized coal boiler furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Peihua; Qi Guoshui; Ma Zengyi [and others

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature field distribution measurement is important for combustion diagnostics. With CCD camera, the authors can obtain abundance digital data of flame image instantaneous. Every data represent radiation heat transfer along projection beam. Based on Optic geometric and heat transfer theory, they develop a 3-d flame temperature field reconstruction technique, which can calculate a 3-d zone temperature using two perspectives CCD camera. The optical geometric relation of CCD's image formation and flame radiation heat transfer model is deduced, they establish the reconstruction equation group from radiation heat transfer, and optimization is introduced to solve these equation. The result of a PC boiler is presented.

  14. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  15. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Mosher, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  16. Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the {open_quotes}top-view{close_quotes} of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf.

  17. Application of Image And X-Ray Microtomography Technique To Quantify Filler Distribution In Thermoplastic-Natural Rubber Blend Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Sahrim; Rasid, Rozaidi; Mouad, A. T. [Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Aziz Mohamed, A.; Abdullah, Jaafar; Dahlan, M.; Mohamad, Mahathir; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Hamzah Harun, M. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Yazid, Hafizal [Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Hafizal Yazid, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Abdullah, W. Saffiey W.

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray microtomography and ImageJ 1.39 u is used as a tool to quantify volume percentage of B{sub 4}C as fillers in thermoplastic-natural rubber blend composites. The use of percentage of area occupied by fillers as obtain from ImageJ from the microtomography sliced images enables the proposed technique to easily obtain the amount volume percentage of B{sub 4}C in the composite non-destructively. Comparison with other technique such as density measurement and chemical analysis proves the proposed technique as one of the promising approach.

  18. A novel millimeter-wave beam-steering technique using a dielectric-image-line-fed grating film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher Timothy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis introduces a novel, broadband, low-cost technique for beam steering at millimeter-wave frequencies using a moveable grating film fed by dielectric image line. An excellent radiation pattern is maintained over wide scan angles across...

  19. Ultra-fast Imaging of Two-Phase Flow in Structured Monolith Reactors; Techniques and Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heras, Jonathan Jaime

    This thesis will address the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to probe the “monolith reactor”, which consists of a structured catalyst over which reactions may occur. This reactor has emerged...

  20. NMR imaging techniques and applications in the flow behavior of fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halimi, Hassan I

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proton magnetic resonance technique can be used to determine the oil saturation in the pores of a rock. The NMR system can produce images of the molecules under investigation because the signals recorded are obtained directly from fluids contained... in liquids as well. This should enable us to obtain additional information about the fluids in the rock '4. Spin-spin relaxation has a characteristic time T~. T~ is the time constant for the decay of the precessing R-Zo component of the magnetization...

  1. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries -An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically-guided and template-guided) can improve the outcome of mo- saic arthroplasty procedures. Methods: Fifteen sheep were

  2. Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

  3. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  4. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  5. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wei

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian cells. New rotational information was obtained: (1) during endocytosis, cargoes lost their rotation freedom at the late stage of internalization; (2) cargoes performed train-like motion when they were transported along the microtubule network by motor proteins inside live cells; (3) During the pause stage of fast axonal transport, cargoes were still bound to the microtubule tracks by motor proteins. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is another non-invasive and far-field optical imaging technique. Because of its near-field illumination mechanism, TIRFM has better axial resolution than epi-fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy. In this work, an auto-calibrated, prism type, angle-scanning TIRFM instrument was built. The incident angle can range from subcritical angles to nearly 90{sup o}, with an angle interval less than 0.2{sup o}. The angle precision of the new instrument was demonstrated through the finding of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle of metal film coated glass slide. The new instrument improved significantly the precision in determining the axial position. As a result, the best obtained axial resolution was {approx} 8 nm, which is better than current existing instruments similar in function. The instrument was further modified to function as a pseudo TIRF microscope. The illumination depth can be controlled by changing the incident angle of the excitation laser beam or adjusting the horizontal position of the illumination laser spot on the prism top surface. With the new technique, i.e., variable-illumination-depth pseudo TIRF microscopy, the whole cell body from bottom to top was scanned.

  6. Zero source insertion technique to account for undersampling in GPR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  7. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  8. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  9. Ground-Based Demonstration of Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometry and Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurtz, R; Cook,K H; Bennett, C L; Bixler, J; Carr, D; Wishnow, E H

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a four-port Michelson interferometer built to demonstrate imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy for astronomical applications.

  10. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  11. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long| Open EnergyLake PaiuteOpen

  12. Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book: Hyperspectral...

  13. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

  14. Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space A one of the world's largest sources of atmospheric mineral dust. Mineral composition optical properties, and mineral deposition to Amazon forests. In this study we examine hyperspectral

  15. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-6-2014_Imaging Techniques Applied to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Cover Illustration: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of organic grain in Marcellus Shale taken with...

  16. Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

  17. Abstract--Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. While conventional imaging techniques,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    and assessment of thermal therapy on solid tumors. Index Terms--Backscatter coefficients, envelope statistics including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, flow estimation and envelope statistics will be discussed in this paper. Specifically, spectral-based techniques and envelope statistics at clinical

  18. The MARTE VNIR Imaging Spectrometer Experiment: Design and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Dunagan, Stephen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design, operation, and data analysis methods employed on the VNIR imaging spectrometer instrument that was part of the Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). The imaging spectrometer is a hyperspectral scanning pushbroom device sensitive to VNIR wavelengths from 400-1000 nm. During the MARTE project, the spectrometer was deployed to the Rio Tinto region of Spain. We analyzed subsets of 3 cores from Rio Tinto using a new band modeling technique. We found most of the MARTE drill cores to contain predominantly goethite, though spatially coherent areas of hematite were identified in Core 23. We also distinguished non Fe-bearing minerals that were subsequently analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be primarily muscovite. We present drill core maps that include spectra of goethite, hematite, and non Fe-bearing minerals.

  19. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    techniques used in osteoporosis Received: 10 December 2009vertebral fracture in osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int 5.for postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review of the evidence

  20. How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classification Techniques for Difference Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Wong, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classi?methods: statistical — supernovae: general — techniques:for objects such as supernovae, active galactic nuclei,

  1. Fatigue testing of high-density polyethylene and polycarbonate with crack length measurement using image processing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riemslag, A.C. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Lab. of Materials Science)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new automated method of measuring fatigue cracks in polymers is discussed. The new method is based on a video signal of the crack which is analyzed with image processing techniques. With this technique the crack length is measured every 20 s during a fatigue test. The accuracy of one single measurement is about 0.05 mm, but this can be increased by averaging a large number of measurements. The applied automated data collection and subsequent data processing is discussed in relation to the recommendations given in ASTM E 647, Test method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Rates. The use of the new technique is illustrated on the basis of fatigue tests performed on transparent polycarbonate (PC) and nontransparent polyethylene (PE). The fatigue behavior of PE and PC is briefly discussed.

  2. Capabilities and limitations of Phase Contrast Imaging techniques with X-rays and neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damato, Antonio Leonardo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) was studied with the goal of understanding its relevance and its requirements. Current literature does not provide insight on the effect of a relaxation in coherence requirements on the PCI ...

  3. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K., E-mail: nishim11@nuclear.es.kit.ac.jp; Sanpei, A., E-mail: sanpei@kit.ac.jp; Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  4. An iterative technique for refinement of selective excitations for magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebsack, Eliot Todd

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective RF pulses are needed or many application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The desired excitation profile is omen used as the spectrum of the applied RF pulse; the modulation waveform of the RF pulse which approximately excites...

  5. Development of Automatic Techniques for Segmentation of Brain Tissues fromMultispectral MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by radiofrequency inhomogeneity acrossfield-of-view; (2) strip- ping away image pixels which represent skull. 0-7803-2544-3195 $4.00 0 1995 IEEE 1453 matters, in addition to low radiation and multispectral is extended to investigate the automation of (a) correc- tion for radiofrequency (RF)inhomogeneity across

  6. A STEREO-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF COLOR AND LADAR IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    In many remote robotic tasks involving tele-operation, operator performance is enhanced by integrating difficulty in designing such a multi-sensor system is the development of methods for combining the various position in the Imaging, Robotics and Intelligent Systems laboratory and to Dr. R. C. Gonzales for choosing

  7. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY) [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  8. Evaluating imaging biomarkers for neurodegeneration in pre-symptomatic Huntington's disease using machine learning techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aron, Adam

    data, we applied multivariate pattern analysis techniques to several derived voxel-based and segmented e, a Department of Neuroscience, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA b of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA d Department of Psychology, University

  9. Earth system science related imaging spectroscopy--An assessment Michael E. Schaepman a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    for Geo-Information, Wageningen Univ., Wageningen, The Netherlands b Remote Sensing Laboratories, Dept 9 March 2009 Keywords: Imaging spectroscopy Imaging spectrometry Hyperspectral imaging Remote the achievements of thirty years of imaging spectroscopy and strongly recommend this community to increase its

  10. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P. [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Grandmont, F. [ABB Bomem Inc., 585 boulevard Charest est, Suite 300, Quebec, Quebec G1K 9H4 (Canada); Binette, L., E-mail: maxime.charlebois.1@ulaval.c, E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.c, E-mail: anne-pier.bernier.1@ulaval.c [Instituto de AstronomIa, UNAM, Ap.70-264, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}4959, {lambda}5007, H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}6548, {lambda}6584, and [S II] {lambda}6717, {lambda}6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [S II] {lambda}6717 /[S II] {lambda}6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  11. A Voluntary Breath-Hold Treatment Technique for the Left Breast With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy Using Surface Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierga, David P., E-mail: dgierga@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Turcotte, Julie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sharp, Gregory C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sedlacek, Daniel E.; Cotter, Christopher R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatments can be used to reduce cardiac dose for patients with left-sided breast cancer and unfavorable cardiac anatomy. A surface imaging technique was developed for accurate patient setup and reproducible real-time BH positioning. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional surface images were obtained for 20 patients. Surface imaging was used to correct the daily setup for each patient. Initial setup data were recorded for 443 fractions and were analyzed to assess random and systematic errors. Real time monitoring was used to verify surface placement during BH. The radiation beam was not turned on if the BH position difference was greater than 5 mm. Real-time surface data were analyzed for 2398 BHs and 363 treatment fractions. The mean and maximum differences were calculated. The percentage of BHs greater than tolerance was calculated. Results: The mean shifts for initial patient setup were 2.0 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.3 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The mean 3-dimensional vector shift was 7.8 mm. Random and systematic errors were less than 4 mm. Real-time surface monitoring data indicated that 22% of the BHs were outside the 5-mm tolerance (range, 7%-41%), and there was a correlation with breast volume. The mean difference between the treated and reference BH positions was 2 mm in each direction. For out-of-tolerance BHs, the average difference in the BH position was 6.3 mm, and the average maximum difference was 8.8 mm. Conclusions: Daily real-time surface imaging ensures accurate and reproducible positioning for BH treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  12. High-speed spiral imaging technique for an atomic force microscope using a linear quadratic Gaussian controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibullah, H., E-mail: h.habib@student.adfa.edu.au; Pota, H. R., E-mail: h.pota@adfa.edu.au; Petersen, I. R., E-mail: i.petersen@adfa.edu.au [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2612 (Australia)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates a high-speed spiral imaging technique for an atomic force microscope (AFM). As an alternative to traditional raster scanning, an approach of gradient pulsing using a spiral line is implemented and spirals are generated by applying single-frequency cosine and sine waves of slowly varying amplitudes to the X and Y-axes of the AFM’s piezoelectric tube scanner (PTS). Due to these single-frequency sinusoidal input signals, the scanning process can be faster than that of conventional raster scanning. A linear quadratic Gaussian controller is designed to track the reference sinusoid and a vibration compensator is combined to damp the resonant mode of the PTS. An internal model of the reference sinusoidal signal is included in the plant model and an integrator for the system error is introduced in the proposed control scheme. As a result, the phase error between the input and output sinusoids from the X and Y-PTSs is reduced. The spirals produced have particularly narrow-band frequency measures which change slowly over time, thereby making it possible for the scanner to achieve improved tracking and continuous high-speed scanning rather than being restricted to the back and forth motion of raster scanning. As part of the post-processing of the experimental data, a fifth-order Butterworth filter is used to filter noises in the signals emanating from the position sensors and a Gaussian image filter is used to filter the images. A comparison of images scanned using the proposed controller (spiral) and the AFM PI controller (raster) shows improvement in the scanning rate using the proposed method.

  13. Hyperspectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate...

  14. Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and hematite were detected. The analyses revealed several outcrops with these minerals. One large outcrop showed abundant high temperature alteration minerals. The study...

  15. Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlteration JumpDixieHyper2010) |

  16. Hyperspectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Martini, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlterationAl., 2004) | Open

  17. Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long

  18. Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long| Open Energy

  19. A spectral graph based approach to analyze hyperspectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    A spectral graph based approach to analyze hyperspectral data Blake Hunter Department of Mathematics, UCLA 520 Portola Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90095 Email: blakehunter@math.ucla.edu Yifei Lou Department of Mathematics, UCLA 520 Portola Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90095 Email: bertozzi

  20. Wavelet Packets for multi-and hyper-spectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehler, Martin

    Wavelet Packets for multi- and hyper-spectral imagery J. J. Benedetto, W. Czaja, M. Ehler, C. Flake spatial and spectral data distribution we combine the Wavelet Packet Transform with the linear dimension reduction method of Principal Component Analysis. Each spectral band is decomposed by means of the Wavelet

  1. Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

  2. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, François [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 ± 0.16 and 1.86 ± 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 ± 7.6 to 234.9 ± 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 ± 17.0 and 251.2 ± 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 ± 25.3 and 432.5 ± 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%–40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

  3. Automated Identification of Endmembers from Hyperspectral Data Using Mathematical Morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    analysis and pattern recognition technique that has proved to be especially well suited to segment images Informática, Universidad de Extremadura, Spain. b Global Science and Technology. NASA/Goddard Space Flight with irregular and complex shapes, but has rarely been applied to the classification/segmentation of multivariate

  4. Investigation of the Degradation Mechanisms of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices by Combination of Imaging Techniques - The ISOS-3 Inter-Laboratory Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosch, R.; Tanenbaum, D. M.; Jrgensen, M.; Seeland, M.; Barenklau, M.; Hermenau, M.; Voroshazi, E.; Lloyd, M. T.; Galagan, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Wurfel, U.; Hosel, M.; Dam, H. F.; Gevorgyan, S. A.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Andriessen, R.; Teran-Escobar, G.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of degradation of seven distinct sets (with a number of individual cells of n {>=} 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices prepared by leading research laboratories with a combination of imaging methods is reported. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at Riso DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. Imaging of device function at different stages of degradation was performed by laser-beam induced current (LBIC) scanning; luminescence imaging, specifically photoluminescence (PLI) and electroluminescence (ELI); as well as by lock-in thermography (LIT). Each of the imaging techniques exhibits its specific advantages with respect to sensing certain degradation features, which will be compared and discussed here in detail. As a consequence, a combination of several imaging techniques yields very conclusive information about the degradation processes controlling device function. The large variety of device architectures in turn enables valuable progress in the proper interpretation of imaging results -- hence revealing the benefits of this large scale cooperation in making a step forward in the understanding of organic solar cell aging and its interpretation by state-of-the-art imaging methods.

  5. Investigation of the Degradation Mechanisms of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices by Combination of Imaging Techniques—the ISOS-3Inter-laboratory Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germack D.; Rosch, R.; Tanenbaum, D.M.; Jorgensen, M.; Seeland, M.; Barenklau, M.; Hermenau, M.; Voroshazi, E.; Lloyd, M.T.; Galagan, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Wurfel, U.; Hosel, M.; Dam, H.F.; Gevorgyan, S.A.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Andriessen, R.; Teran-Escobar, G.; Lira-Cantu, M.; Rivaton, A.; Uzunoglu, G.Y.; Andreasen, B.; Madsen, M.V.; Norrman, K.; Hoppe, H.; Krebs, F.C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of degradation of seven distinct sets (with a number of individual cells of n {ge} 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices prepared by leading research laboratories with a combination of imaging methods is reported. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at Risoe DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. Imaging of device function at different stages of degradation was performed by laser-beam induced current (LBIC) scanning; luminescence imaging, specifically photoluminescence (PLI) and electroluminescence (ELI); as well as by lock-in thermography (LIT). Each of the imaging techniques exhibits its specific advantages with respect to sensing certain degradation features, which will be compared and discussed here in detail. As a consequence, a combination of several imaging techniques yields very conclusive information about the degradation processes controlling device function. The large variety of device architectures in turn enables valuable progress in the proper interpretation of imaging results - hence revealing the benefits of this large scale cooperation in making a step forward in the understanding of organic solar cell aging and its interpretation by state-of-the-art imaging methods.

  6. A New Method for Target Detection in Hyperspectral Imagery Based on Extended Morphological Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    morphology operations. The performance of the resulting detector is experimentally evaluated using simulated and real hyperspectral data collected by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Visible/Infrared and identification of target materials from airborne and satellite platforms using hyperspectral sensors are of great

  7. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  8. 18th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in MIedicineand BiollogySociety, Amsterdam 1996 3.3.1: MR Imaging Systems and Reconstruction Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya

    Society, Amsterdam 1996 3.3.1: MR Imaging Systems and Reconstruction Techniques MEASURINGAC MAGNETIC FIELD is given in Fig.1. In the absence of an applied AC current, this pulse sequence is the same asthe one used by Maudsley A.A. et.al. to calculate the DC magnetic field inhomo se RP .,A_ II I f 0Gz I " v - who & - Fig.1

  9. Clinical Evaluation of Spatial Accuracy of a Fusion Imaging Technique Combining Previously Acquired Computed Tomography and Real-Time Ultrasound for Imaging of Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Deschamps, Frederic; Garcia Marques de Carvalho, Enio; Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; De Baere, Thierry [Gustave Roussy Institute (France)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the spatial accuracy of matching volumetric computed tomography (CT) data of hepatic metastases with real-time ultrasound (US) using a fusion imaging system (VNav) according to different clinical settings. Methods: Twenty-four patients with one hepatic tumor identified on enhanced CT and US were prospectively enrolled. A set of three landmarks markers was chosen on CT and US for image registration. US and CT images were then superimposed using the fusion imaging display mode. The difference in spatial location between the tumor visible on the CT and the US on the overlay images (reviewer no. 1, comment no. 2) was measured in the lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical axis. The maximum difference (Dmax) was evaluated for different predictive factors.CT performed 1-30 days before registration versus immediately before. Use of general anesthesia for CT and US versus no anesthesia.Anatomic landmarks versus landmarks that include at least one nonanatomic structure, such as a cyst or a calcificationResultsOverall, Dmax was 11.53 {+-} 8.38 mm. Dmax was 6.55 {+-} 7.31 mm with CT performed immediately before VNav versus 17.4 {+-} 5.18 with CT performed 1-30 days before (p < 0.0001). Dmax was 7.05 {+-} 6.95 under general anesthesia and 16.81 {+-} 6.77 without anesthesia (p < 0.0015). Landmarks including at least one nonanatomic structure increase Dmax of 5.2 mm (p < 0.0001). The lowest Dmax (1.9 {+-} 1.4 mm) was obtained when CT and VNav were performed under general anesthesia, one immediately after the other. Conclusions: VNav is accurate when adequate clinical setup is carefully selected. Only under these conditions (reviewer no. 2), liver tumors not identified on US can be accurately targeted for biopsy or radiofrequency ablation using fusion imaging.

  10. Technique and application of a non-invasive three dimensional image matching method for the study of total shoulder arthroplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimini, Daniel Frank

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of in-vivo glenohumeral joint biomechanics after total shoulder arthroplasty are important for the improvement of patient function, implant longevity and surgical technique. No data has been published on the ...

  11. Bacterial protein complexes studied by single-molecule imaging and single-cell micromanipulation techniques in microfluidic devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Marcel

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological systems of bacteria were investigated at the single-cell and single-molecule level. Additionally, aspects of the techniques employed were studied. A unifying theme in each project is the reliance on optical ...

  12. Development and application of a high speed digital data acquisition technique to study steam bubble collapse using particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidl, William Daniel

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    John Poston ( Head of Department ) ABSTRACT Development anil Appl&cat&on of a. H&vh Speed D&g&tal Data A?qu&s&t&on Techn&que to Study Steam Bubble & 'ollapse us&ng Part&cle Image L'elo imetry I August 1090) K&)liam Dan&el Schr&n Jl. B S . 1&nited... vnth the practical applicatloils of the hardware used in this prelect. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION I 1 Background I 9 Background for Pulsed Laser Velocimetry I 3 tlethodnlogy for Particle Image Velocimetry 14 Background...

  13. Applications of Remote Sensing Techniques to Identify Major Faults in the Island of Puerto Rico using SAR and SLAR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Rico using SAR and SLAR images Ashlyann Arana Morales1 , Daniel J. Mercado Rosario2 1 Bo Tanama 1B Calle 1 Arecibo P.R, 00612-5578, ashlyann.arana@upr.edu 2 #15 Calle Iglesia Quebradilla P.R, 00678

  14. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNotSeventyTechnologiesfacilityImaging

  15. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuilding EnergyImaging Print The

  16. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuilding EnergyImaging Print

  17. Cooling rate of some active lavas determined using an orbital imaging spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    Click Here for Full Article Cooling rate of some active lavas determined using an orbital imaging flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing

  18. Semi-Automated DIRSIG Scene Modeling from 3D LIDAR and Passive Imaging Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    powerful tool for algorithm testing and sensor evaluation. However, the extensive time required to create given the parameters of the sensor. This may be done to evaluate an existing sensor under a host synthetic multispectral and hyperspectral images from the visible to long wave infrared (0.4 to 20 microns

  19. Calibration of a thin metal foil for infrared imaging video bolometer to estimate the spatial variation of thermal diffusivity using a photo-thermal technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Shwetang N., E-mail: pandya.shwetang@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Sano, Ryuichi [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Peterson, Byron J.; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Takashi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Drapiko, Evgeny A. [Fusion Centre, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)] [Fusion Centre, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Alekseyev, Andrey G. [Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)] [Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Itomi, Muneji [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin metal foil is used as a broad band radiation absorber for the InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB), which is a vital diagnostic for studying three-dimensional radiation structures from high temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. The two-dimensional (2D) heat diffusion equation of the foil needs to be solved numerically to estimate the radiation falling on the foil through a pinhole geometry. The thermal, physical, and optical properties of the metal foil are among the inputs to the code besides the spatiotemporal variation of temperature, for reliable estimation of the exhaust power from the plasma illuminating the foil. The foil being very thin and of considerable size, non-uniformities in these properties need to be determined by suitable calibration procedures. The graphite spray used for increasing the surface emissivity also contributes to a change in the thermal properties. This paper discusses the application of the thermographic technique for determining the spatial variation of the effective in-plane thermal diffusivity of the thin metal foil and graphite composite. The paper also discusses the advantages of this technique in the light of limitations and drawbacks presented by other calibration techniques being practiced currently. The technique is initially applied to a material of known thickness and thermal properties for validation and finally to thin foils of gold and platinum both with two different thicknesses. It is observed that the effect of the graphite layer on the estimation of the thermal diffusivity becomes more pronounced for thinner foils and the measured values are approximately 2.5–3 times lower than the literature values. It is also observed that the percentage reduction in thermal diffusivity due to the coating is lower for high thermal diffusivity materials such as gold. This fact may also explain, albeit partially, the higher sensitivity of the platinum foil as compared to gold.

  20. Hyperspectral landcover classification for the Yakima Training Center, Yakima, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinmaus, K.L.; Perry, E.M.; Petrie, G.M.; Irwin, D.E.; Foote, H.P.; Wurstner, S.K.; Stephen, A.J.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked in FY97-98 to conduct a multisensor feature extraction project for the Terrain Modeling Project Office (TMPO) of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The goal of this research is the development of near-autonomous methods to remotely classify and characterize regions of military interest, in support of the TMPO of NIMA. These methods exploit remotely sensed datasets including hyperspectral (HYDICE) imagery, near-infrared and thermal infrared (Daedalus 3600), radar, and terrain datasets. The study site for this project is the US Army`s Yakima Training Center (YTC), a 326,741-acre training area located near Yakima, Washington. Two study areas at the YTC were selected to conduct and demonstrate multisensor feature extraction, the 2-km x 2-km Cantonment Area and the 3-km x 3-km Choke Point area. Classification of the Cantonment area afforded a comparison of classification results at different scales.

  1. Utility of spatially-resolved atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques as alternatives to mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in drug metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blatherwick, Eleanor Q. [University of Warwick, UK; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Pickup, Kathryn [AstraZeneca R& D Sweden; Johansson, Maria K. [AstraZeneca R& D Sweden; Beaudoin, Marie-Eve [AstraZeneca, USA; Cole, Roderic [ORNL; Day, Jennifer M. [AstraZeneca R& D, UK; Iverson, Suzanne [AstraZeneca R& D Sweden; Wilson, Ian D. [AstraZeneca R& D, UK; Scrivens, James H. [University of Warwick, UK; Weston, Daniel J. [AstraZeneca R& D, UK

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Tissue distribution studies of drug molecules play an essential role in the pharmaceutical industry and are commonly undertaken using quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA) methods. 2. The growing need for complementary methods to address some scientific gaps around radiography methods has led to increased use of mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) technology over the last 5 to 10 years. More recently, the development of novel mass spectrometric techniques for ambient surface sampling has redefined what can be regarded as fit-for-purpose for MSI in a drug metabolism and disposition arena. 3. Together with a review of these novel alternatives, this paper details the use of two liquid microjunction (LMJ)- based mass spectrometric surface sampling technologies. These approaches are used to provide qualitative determination of parent drug in rat liver tissue slices using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) and to assess the performance of a LMJ surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) interface for quantitative assessment of parent drug in brain, liver and muscle tissue slices. 4. An assessment of the utility of these spatially-resolved sampling methods is given, showing interdependence between mass spectrometric and QWBA methods, in particular there emerges a reason to question typical MSI workflows for drug metabolism; suggesting the expedient use of profile or region analysis may be more appropriate, rather than generating time-intensive molecular images of the entire tissue section.

  2. Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

  3. Hyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant Danielle A. Simmons, John P. Kerekes and Nina G. Raqueno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    . Harnessing plants as bio-sensors allows for distributed sensing without a power supply. Monitoring the bioHyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant sentinels Danielle A. Simmons, John P ABSTRACT Automated detection of chemical threats is essential for an early warning of a potential attack

  4. Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery James-plume pixels are inadvertently included, then that background characterization will be contaminated. In broad in the scene are off- plume, so some contamination is inevitable. In general, the contaminated background

  5. Hyperspectral laboratory and remote sensing applied to clay minerals identification and mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hyperspectral laboratory and remote sensing applied to clay minerals identification and mapping contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage susceptibility. At local scale, characterization of soil properties and identification of clay minerals using

  6. STUDIES ON THE GOES-R HYPERSPECTRAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUITE (HES) ON , Timothy, J. Schmit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    resolution infrared radiances from the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) on Geostationary Operational with capabilities from current sensors. Corresponding author address: Jun Li, Cooperative Institute and 2 km relative humidity (RH) rms were created to evaluate the retrieval difference between LW + LMW

  7. WEAK SIGNAL DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY USING SPARSE MATRIX TRANSFORM (SMT) COVARIANCE ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WEAK SIGNAL DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY USING SPARSE MATRIX TRANSFORM (SMT) COVARIANCE. In this paper, we describe the sparse matrix transform (SMT) and investigate its utility for estimating the covariance matrix from a limited number ofsamples. The SMT is formed by a product of pairwise coordinate

  8. USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperspectral imagery and the corresponding ability to conduct analysis below the pixel level have tremendous potential to aid in landcover monitoring. During large ecosystem restoration projects, being able to monitor ...

  9. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Boye, Clinton A. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Descour, Michael R. (Tucson, AZ)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  10. Pellet imaging techniques on ASDEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, G.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow in-situ velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 nanoseconds and exposures every 50 microseconds, the evolution of each pellet in a multi-pellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened D{sub {alpha}}D{sub {beta}}, and D{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2 {times} 10{sup 17}cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of D{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational q-surfaces, but instead are a result of a dynamic, non-stationary, ablation process. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Change detection for hyperspectral sensing in a transformed low-dimensional space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foy, Bernard R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Theiler, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to the problem of change in hyperspectral imagery that operates in a two-dimensional space. The coordinates in the space are related to Mahalanobis distances for the combined ('stacked') data and the individual hyperspectral scenes. Although it is only two-dimensional, this space is rich enough to include several well-known change detection algorithms, including the hyperbolic anomalous change detector, based on Gaussian scene clutter, and the EC-uncorrelated detector based on heavy-tailed (elliptically contoured) clutter. Because this space is only two-dimensional, adaptive machine learning methods can produce new change detectors without being stymied by the curse of dimensionality. We investigate, in particular, the utility of the support vector machine for learning boundaries in this 2-D space, and compare the performance of the resulting nonlinearly adaptjve detector to change detectors that have themselves shown good performance.

  12. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this technique has been especially popular in imaging such complex structures as aerogels and yeast cells. When applying the CDI technique to a magnetic system, the same...

  13. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon (India)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  14. Hyperspectral imaging of oil producing microalgae under thermal and nutritional stress.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Powell, Amy Jo; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This short-term, late-start LDRD examined the effects of nutritional deprivation on the energy harvesting complex in microalgae. While the original experimental plan involved a much more detailed study of temperature and nutrition on the antenna system of a variety of TAG producing algae and their concomitant effects on oil production, time and fiscal constraints limited the scope of the study. This work was a joint effort between research teams at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico and California. Preliminary results indicate there is a photosystem response to silica starvation in diatoms that could impact the mechanisms for lipid accumulation.

  15. A New Morphological Anomaly Detection Algorithm for Hyperspectral Images and its GPU Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    and Communications University of Extremadura, Avda. de la Universidad s/n 10071 C´aceres, Spain ABSTRACT Anomaly (WTC) in New York, five days after the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers in the WTC

  16. Monitoring effects of a controlled subsurface carbon dioxide release on vegetation using a hyperspectral imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    oil recovery and CO2 storage in the Weyburn oil field (Whittaker, 2004; Whittaker et al., 2002 at itssource, such as a power generating facility. This CO2 is then stored in a geologic storage site such as depleted oil wells, underground coal seams, or in deep saline formations, effectively removing the CO2 from

  17. Inductively coupled plasma chemistry examinations with visible acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffin, Kirk

    to be a powerful tool for plasma chemistry research. Introduction Inductively coupled plasma optical emission

  18. Design and Implementation of a Parallel Heterogeneous Algorithm for Hyperspectral Image Analysis Using HeteroMPI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    -based networks such as ATMs, as well as distributed service and support, especially for large file systems and objects in the air, land and water on the basis of the unique reflectance patterns that result from of this technology require timely responses for swift decisions which depend upon high computing performance

  19. DATA REDUCTION OF HYPERSPECTRAL RADIO-ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES FOR GALAXY CLUSTER SEGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coordinates as x and y axis and the radial velocity as z axis, i.e., wavelength bands. This general few lines (spectral rays e.g. CO or HI emissions) which are shifted ac- cording to the radial velocity of the observed gas (Doppler effect). The standard method for the study of data cubes is the creation of moment

  20. Mapping microphytobenthos biomass by non-linear inversion of visible-infrared hyperspectral images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Jean-Philippe

    . Microphytobenthos is a microalgae forming a biofilm on the mudflat. Its spatial distribution is heterogeneous so in the case of Bourgneuf Bay, a macrotidal shellfish ecosystem with a large mudflat, where microphytobenthos

  1. Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy-Bowdoin, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlteration JumpDixieHyper2010)

  2. Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Nash & D., 1997) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlteration

  3. Hyperspectral Imaging At Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlterationAl., 2004) |

  4. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long| Open Energy Information

  5. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  6. activation analysis technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  7. activation analysis techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  8. advanced imaging catheter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

  9. angiographic image segmentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

  10. automatic image segmentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

  11. Multi- and Hyper-Spectral Sensing for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Navigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOGLER, ROBERT J.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic vehicles that navigate autonomously are hindered by unnecessary avoidance of soft obstacles, and entrapment by potentially avoidable obstacles. Existing sensing technologies fail to reliably distinguish hard obstacles from soft obstacles, as well as impassable thickets and other sources of entrapment. Automated materials classification through advanced sensing methods may provide a means to identify such obstacles, and from their identity, to determine whether they must be avoided. Multi- and hyper-spectral electro-optic sensors are used in remote sensing applications to classify both man-made and naturally occurring materials on the earth's surface by their reflectance spectra. The applicability of this sensing technology to obstacle identification for autonomous ground vehicle navigation is the focus of this report. The analysis is restricted to system concepts in which the multi- or hyper-spectral sensor is on-board the ground vehicle, facing forward to detect and classify obstacles ahead of the vehicle. Obstacles of interest include various types of vegetation, rocks, soils, minerals, and selected man-made materials such as paving asphalt and concrete.

  12. Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuch, Wolfgang

    Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

  13. Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L; Saunders, Alexander; Sossong, Michael James; Schultz, Larry Joe; Green, J. Andrew; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Smith, Richard A; Colthart, James M; Klugh, David C; Scoggins, Gary E; Vineyard, David C

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons for imaging applications. Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data.

  14. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

  15. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  16. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  17. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion BeamScanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the...

  18. Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: A ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-30-72T23:59:59.000Z

    The two types of images are then compared; the regions where there are significant ... techniques at various stages in the production of the magnitude images.

  19. Minimally invasive diagnostic imaging using high resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herz, Paul Richard, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in medical imaging have given researchers unprecedented capabilities to visualize, characterize and understand biological systems. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high speed, high resolution imaging technique ...

  20. Infrared near-field imaging and spectroscopy based on thermal or synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peragut, Florian; De Wilde, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.dewilde@espci.fr [ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, CNRS, Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005, Paris (France); Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale [Société Civile Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, St-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the coupling of a scattering near-field scanning optical microscope combined with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The set-up operates using either the near-field thermal emission from the sample itself, which is proportional to the electromagnetic local density of states, or with an external infrared synchrotron source, which is broadband and highly brilliant. We perform imaging and spectroscopy measurements with sub-wavelength spatial resolution in the mid-infrared range on surfaces made of silicon carbide and gold and demonstrate the capabilities of the two configurations for super-resolved near-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging and that the simple use of a properly chosen bandpass filter on the detector allows one to image the spatial distribution of materials with sub-wavelength resolution by studying the contrast in the near-field images.

  1. A laser speckle based position sensing technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilpiekandula, Vijay, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and development of a novel laser-speckle-based position sensing technique. In our prototype implementation, a He-Ne laser beam is directed at the surface of an air-bearing spindle. An imaging ...

  2. advanced integration technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Advanced Microslice Technologies for Hyperspectral Imaging We present the design for a novel snapshot hyperspectral imager based on the use of advanced micro-optics...

  3. ADAPTIVE AND ROBUST TECHNIQUES (ART) FOR THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yao

    ADAPTIVE AND ROBUST TECHNIQUES (ART) FOR THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY By YAO XIE A DISSERTATION.1 Thermoacoustic Tomography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Image Reconstruction Algorithms for TAT

  4. Image fusion for a nighttime driving display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrington, William Frederick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

  5. Master Thesis Proposal Eddy Current Imaging of Electrically Conducting Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Master Thesis Proposal Eddy Current Imaging of Electrically Conducting Media Domenico Lahaye and optimization techniques en- abling the eddy current imaging of electrically conducting media. Examples: · perform a literature study into topics such as eddy current imaging, inverse problems including

  6. Model-based reconstruction of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatnuntawech, Itthi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that is used to obtain images of soft tissue throughout the body. Since its development in the 1970s, MRI has gained tremendous importance in clinical practice ...

  7. Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described. 22 figs.

  8. Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described.

  9. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  10. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  11. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Registration & Rectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 5 Image Registration & Rectification #12;Remote Sensing: Resampling techniques. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Registration #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F be integrated/fused. Object Space Left Image Right Image Image Registration: Objective #12;Remote Sensing Ayman

  12. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Registration & Rectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 5 Image Registration & Rectification Remote Sensing Ayman: Resampling techniques. #12;2 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Registration Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib be integrated/fused. Object Space Left Image Right Image Image Registration: Objective #12;3 Remote Sensing

  13. Image Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recognition Image Analysis and Recognition Snapshot1498121slicesqResedison Fibers permeating imaged material (Courtesy: Bale, Loring, Perciano and Ushizima) Imagery coming from...

  14. Image texture analysis of elastograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Fasahat

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, co-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, fractal analysis and granulomeay are used to extract a number of features from each image. The inclusions...-RESOLUTION FRACTAL ANALYSIS . . . . . . E. GRANULOMETRIC FEATURES . . F. DATA NORMALIZATION . G. SEPARABILITY MEASURE 13 13 . . . . . 14 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 29 33 36 36 IV TEXTURE ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED ELASTOGRAMS. . . . . . . . . . . 38 A. SIMULATION...

  15. FORWARD MODELING AND ATMOSPHERIC COMPENSATION IN HYPERSPECTRAL DATA: EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS FROM A TARGET DETECTION PERSPECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    a Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy b Center for Imaging Science-based approaches to atmospheric radiative transfer modeling are considered here: Atmosphe- ric Compensation (AC

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 32, NO. 7, JULY 2013 1 Deformable Medical Image Registration: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    recent advances in the domain. Additional emphasis has been given to techniques applied to medical imagesIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 32, NO. 7, JULY 2013 1 Deformable Medical Image Paragios, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Deformable image registration is a fundamental task in medical image

  17. Phase-space representation of digital holographic and light field imaging with application to two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, two computational imaging techniques used for underwater research, in particular, two-phase flows measurements, are presented. The techniques under study, digital holographic imaging and light field imaging, ...

  18. 3D-FFT for Signature Detection in LWIR Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvick, Patricia A.; Lind, Michael A.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Nuffer, Lisa L.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in analysis detection exploitation are possible by applying whitened matched filtering within the Fourier domain to hyperspectral data cubes. We describe an implementation of a Three Dimensional Fast Fourier Transform Whitened Matched Filter (3DFFTMF) approach and, using several example sets of Long Wave Infra Red (LWIR) data cubes, compare the results with those from standard Whitened Matched Filter (WMF) techniques. Since the variability in shape of gaseous plumes precludes the use of spatial conformation in the matched filtering, the 3DFFTMF results were similar to those of two other WMF methods. Including a spatial low-pass filter within the Fourier space can improve signal to noise ratios and therefore improve detection limit by facilitating the mitigation of high frequency clutter. The improvement only occurs if the low-pass filter diameter is smaller than the plume diameter.

  19. Image Compression by Back Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    CHAPTER 9 Image Compression by Back Propagation: An Example of Extensional Programming* GARRISON W the case with the computatiolls associated with basic cognitive pro- cesses such as vision and audition techniques. The technique we employ is known as back propagation. developed by l1umelhart, Hinton

  20. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  1. A Hyperspectral Method for Remotely Sensing the Grain Size of Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , and instrument noise. MOTIVATION AND SIGNIFICANCE BACKGROUND Imaging spectrometry is a powerful tool that offers for calculating experiments, Hyva¨rinen and Lammasniemi (1987) related the snowpack's absorption of solar and Management, University of California A combination of remote sensing innovations and an Address

  2. Technique for ship/wake detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels is unmasked when a threshold number of localized pixels surrounding the given pixel are not masked by the cloud and land mask. A spatial variability image is generated based on spatial derivatives of the reflectance values of the pixels which remain unmasked by the cloud and land mask. The spatial variability image is thresholded to identify one or more regions within the image as possible ship detection regions.

  3. People Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

  4. Image alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  5. Image processing applications in NDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) can be defined as a technique or collection of techniques that permits one to determine some property of a material or object without damaging the object. There are a large number of such techniques and most of them use visual imaging in one form or another. They vary from holographic interferometry where displacements under stress are measured to the visual inspection of an objects surface to detect cracks after penetrant has been applied. The use of image processing techniques on the images produced by NDE is relatively new and can be divided into three general categories: classical image enhancement; mensuration techniques; and quantitative sensitometry. An example is discussed of how image processing techniques are used to nondestructively and destructively test the product throughout its life cycle. The product that will be followed is the microballoon target used in the laser fusion program. The laser target is a small (50 to 100 ..mu..m - dia) glass sphere with typical wall thickness of 0.5 to 6 ..mu..m. The sphere may be used as is or may be given a number of coatings of any number of materials. The beads are mass produced by the millions and the first nondestructive test is to separate the obviously bad beads (broken or incomplete) from the good ones. After this has been done, the good beads must be inspected for spherocity and wall thickness uniformity. The microradiography of the glass, uncoated bead is performed on a specially designed low-energy x-ray machine. The beads are mounted in a special jig and placed on a Kodak high resolution plate in a vacuum chamber that contains the x-ray source. The x-ray image is made with an energy less that 2 keV and the resulting images are then inspected at a magnification of 500 to 1000X. Some typical results are presented.

  6. Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    of the algorithm is a stepwise linear regression technique that only includes a basis vector in the model such as atmospheric compensation, gas absorption and emission, background modeling, and fitting a linear regression to a non-linear radiance model were addressed in order to generate the matrix of basis vectors. Synthetic

  7. High throughput 3D optical microscopy : from image cytometry to endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Heejin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microscopy is an imaging technique that allows morphological mapping of intracellular structures with submicron resolution. More importantly, optical microscopy is a technique that can readily provide images with ...

  8. Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis by Jessica Renee Crawford Crouch Analysis. (Under the direction of Stephen M. Pizer.) Finite element analysis provides a principled method the simulation of tissue deformation. The drawback to using finite element analysis for imaging problems

  9. SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miga, Michael I.

    CT and SPECT (GE Hawkeye) SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 28 CT/PET System Combined CT and PET (Siemens Medical Imaging 2006 10 Computed Tomography (CT) 3D Tomography from multiple projections #12;6 SPIE: Scintillation Camera SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 26 PET and SPECT PET = Positron Emission Tomography SPECT

  10. Deep Illumination Angular Domain Imaging within Highly Scattering Media Enhanced by Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    tissue damage and increasing cancer risks proportionate to the cumulative dose of radiation applied [2 techniques to enhance the spatial image resolution and image contrast and to reduce noise. Keywords: Optical tomography, Angular Domain Imaging, Deep Illumination, Lasers, Tissue Optics, angular filter, Silicon

  11. Impact of seismic resolution on geostatistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Rio, P.; Mavko, G.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic measurements are often incorporated in geostatistical techniques for estimation and simulation of petrophysical properties such as porosity. The good correlation between seismic and rock properties provides a basis for these techniques. Seismic data have a wide spatial coverage not available in log or core data. However, each seismic measurement has a characteristic response function determined by the source-receiver geometry and signal bandwidth. The image response of the seismic measurement gives a filtered version of the true velocity image. Therefore the seismic image we obtain cannot reflect exactly the true seismic velocity at all scales of spatial heterogeneities present in the earth. The seismic response function can be conveniently approximated in the spatial spectral domain using a Born approximation. Our goal is to study how the seismic image response affects the estimation of variograms and spatial scales, and its impact on geostatistical results. Limitations of view angles and signal bandwidth not only smoothes the seismic image, increasing the variogram range, but can also introduce anisotropic spatial structures in the image. We can add value to the seismic data by better characterizing an quantifying these attributes. As an exercise we present example of seismically assisted cosimulation of porosity between wells.

  12. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zhang, Song

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  13. Simultaneous PET/fMRI for imaging neuroreceptor dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Christin Y. (Christin Yen-Ming)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole-brain neuroimaging is a key technique for studying brain function and connectivity. Recent advances in combining two imaging modalities - magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) - into ...

  14. Applications of Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a micrometer-resolution imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of sample microstructure by measuring the amplitude and echo time delay of backscattered light. OCT imaging ...

  15. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, James C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  16. Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    teleseismic events. Using array-processing techniques, we mitigate the effects of near surface scattered energy. Mini-arrays of seismometers allow for imaging of small-scale...

  17. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity and Productivity in Enhanced...

  18. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  19. advanced x-ray techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain...

  20. RF Pulse Design for Parallel Excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yinan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel excitation is an emerging technique to improve or accelerate multi-dimensional spatially selective excitations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using multi-channel transmit arrays. The technique has potential in many applications...

  1. Fluorescence Imaging for Nuclear Arms Control Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feener, Jessica S

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    treaties. Specifically, this technique uses fluorescence imaging to determine fissile material attributes in verifying, during the dismantlement process, an uncanned nuclear warhead or warhead component without revealing sensitive information. This could...

  2. Efficient implementation schemes for image enhancement filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Khadem Mahmud

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized median filtering techniques that have appeared in previous literature suffer from some severe disadvantages. They are not only hardware intensive and time consuming but also tend to smear image edges. These shortcomings can be overcome...

  3. Efficient implementation schemes for image enhancement filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Khadem Mahmud

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized median filtering techniques that have appeared in previous literature suffer from some severe disadvantages. They are not only hardware intensive and time consuming but also tend to smear image edges. These shortcomings can be overcome...

  4. Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

  5. Application of a nudging technique to thermoacoustic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Application of a nudging technique to thermoacoustic tomography Xavier Bonnefond and Sébastien Marinesque December 3, 2011 Abstract ThermoAcoustic Tomography (TAT) is a promising, non invasive, medical inversion method. 1 Introduction ThermoAcoustic Tomography (TAT) is a hybrid imaging technique that uses

  6. Efficient and Robust Non-Rigid Least-Squares Rectification of Medical Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orchard, Jeffery J.

    imaging, robust statistics, least-squares. 1 Introduction Advances in medical imaging techniques haveEfficient and Robust Non-Rigid Least-Squares Rectification of Medical Images A. Wong Department of the major problems facing medical imaging is the presence of geometric distortions inherent in an imaging

  7. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  8. Integrated nuclear techniques to detect illicit materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the problem of detecting explosives in the context of an object being transported for illicit purposes. The author emphasizes that technologies developed for this particular application have payoffs in many related problem areas. The author discusses nuclear techniques which can be applied to this detection problem. These include: x-ray imaging; neutronic interrogation; inelastic neutron scattering; fieldable neutron generators. He discusses work which has been done on the applications of these technologies, including results for detection of narcotics. He also discusses efforts to integrate these techniques into complementary systems which offer improved performance.

  9. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  10. Modeling, Pattern Analysis and Feature-Based Retrieval on Retinal Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying, Huajun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling techniques on the rotational contrast transform (RCT) of image pixels, we do a quantified reasoning of the transitional Figure 1: Proposed analytical framework on retinal image. 3 properties of vessel pixels from center-line vessel... visualization technique called daisy graph representation developed in our previous work [71] to approach the physical property of image pixel. Daisy graph representation results from the technique of rotational contrast transform (RCT) [71] of 21 image...

  11. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  12. Image Scanning Microscopy Claus B. Muller and Jorg Enderlein*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Image Scanning Microscopy Claus B. Mu¨ller and Jo¨rg Enderlein* III. Institute of Physics, Georg microscopy technique is introduced, image scanning microscopy (ISM), which combines conventional confocal-laser scanning microscopy with fast wide-field CCD detection. The technique allows for doubling the lateral

  13. Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Xiaojun

    Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images Xiaojun Qi Computer Science present prediction-based image compression techniques take advantage of either intra- or inter function. The prediction-based compression technique has been applied on some magnetic resonance (MR) brain

  14. LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Baoquan

    LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen1 SUNY at Stony Brook J. Edward present a new rendering technique, termed LOD-sprite render- ing, which uses a combination of a level-of-detail (LOD) represen- tation of the scene together with reusing image sprites (previously rendered images

  15. Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic ...

  16. Vertebrate heart development: Lessons learnt from live imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Vertebrate heart development: Lessons learnt from live imaging California Institute of Technology employing different imaging techniques. Sub resolution imaging of beating zebrafish heart has however remained a challenge owing Embryonic heart is a 100 moving quasi-periodically at few Hertz frequency, over

  17. Video and Image Processing in Multimedia Systems (Video Processing)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furht, Borko

    COT 6930 Video and Image Processing in Multimedia Systems (Video Processing) Instructor: Borko. Content-based image and video indexing and retrieval. Video processing using compressed data. Course concepts and structures 4. Classification of compression techniques 5. Image and video compression

  18. Identification of Fissionable Materials Using the Tagged Neutron Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.P. Keegan, J.P. Hurley, J.R. Tinsley, R. Trainham

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary describes experiments to detect and identify fissionable materials using the tagged neutron technique. The objective of this work is to enhance homeland security capability to find fissionable material that may be smuggled inside shipping boxes, containers, or vehicles. The technique distinguishes depleted uranium from lead, steel, and tungsten. Future work involves optimizing the technique to increase the count rate by many orders of magnitude and to build in the additional capability to image hidden fissionable materials. The tagged neutron approach is very different to other techniques based on neutron die-away or photo-fission. This work builds on the development of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) [1]. Similar investigations have been performed by teams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia, and by the EURITRACK collaboration in the European Union [2,3,4].

  19. Interactive image processing console A6471

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, V.; Rebel, B.; Wilhelmi, W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many system designs and implementations of image processors have been published and discussed to which the authors add another one promising a good compromise between speed, flexibility, and costs. Its main components are programmable semiconductor image refresh memories and a fast parallel processor both acting at TV scan velocity. They are embedded in a 16-bit microcomputer system which interfaces them to the user and the programmer. Special features are the possibility to share the image memories between some systems and a crossconnection between image processor and graphic data. A glance onto the programming techniques is given. Prototypes of such a system are operating in remote sensing and biomedical applications. 6 references.

  20. MEASURING THERMOMECHANICAL DISPLACEMENTS OF SOLAR CELLS IN LAMINATES USING DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is necessary in the usual process of module manufacturing. DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION TECHNIQUE The methodMEASURING THERMOMECHANICAL DISPLACEMENTS OF SOLAR CELLS IN LAMINATES USING DIGITAL IMAGE and the polymers. We demonstrate that the digital image correlation technique (DIC) is capable of measuring

  1. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling. In this research, infrared cameras have been used to visualize liquefied natural gas (LNG) plumes from LNG spills on water. The analyses of the thermograms showed that the apparent temperatures were different from the thermocouple measurement...

  2. Phase-based cell imaging techniques for microbeam irradiations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Randers­Pehrson, C.C. Peng, D.J. Brenner Columbia University, Radiological Research Accelerator Facility UniversityÕs Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is incorporating two new methods The microbeam facility at Columbia University is expanding current protocols for single-particle, single

  3. Microcomposition of Human Urinary Calculi Using Advanced Imaging Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -XANES XAS microfocused XAS XRD microfocused XRD XRF microfocused XRF CT computerized tomography FTIR Fourier XRD x-ray diffraction XRF x-ray fluorescence Accepted for publication September 18, 2012. Supported

  4. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, X.

    Ju,X. Nebel,J.C. Siebert,J.P. Photonics Asia 2004, Proceedings of SPIE, Vol. 5640-46, 8-12 November 2004, Beijing, China pp 5640-46 Society of photo optical instrumentation engineers

  5. Nonlinear optical Fourier filtering technique for medical image processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    for a 442 nm probe beam with a 568 nm control beam and vice versa is experimentally studied in detail causes of mortality in women.1 Early detection of the cancer is extremely important for successful

  6. Application of Data Mining Techniques for Medical Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaiane, Osmar R.

    are necessary to assist the medical staff to achieve high efficiency and effectiveness. 1In the United States of cancer deaths in women today and it is the most common type of cancer in women. This paper presents some in cancer treatment and allows reaching a high survival rate. Mammography is considered the most reliable

  7. Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, IssueSciTech ConnectDetection

  8. New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011RNew Visible toNew appNew generation

  9. Thermal Imaging Technique for Measuring Mixing of Fluids - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in theTheoretical Study onThermal Hydraulic

  10. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  11. Imaging of semiconductors using a flying laser spot scanning system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in silicon p-n junctions was a direct result of this research. Verification of the experimental findings include analysis using other characterization techniques such as X-ray topo- graphy, electrical testing and preferential chemical etching... Image (I. R. Radiation) . . 22 Flying Spot Scanner Photo Image (Visible Radiation) . 23 15 Photo Image Showing Crystal Defects 24 16 Sirtl Etch Photomicrograph of Lattice Crystal Defects 25 17 Photo Image Showing Laser Induced Lifetime Changes 26...

  12. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  13. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  14. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  15. Galaxy Redshifts: Improved Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens

    1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of random noise in determining errors and confidence levels for galaxy redshifts obtained by cross-correlation techniques. The main finding is that confidence levels have previously been overestimated, and errors inaccurately calculated in certain applications. New formul\\ae\\ are presented.

  16. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  17. GARDIENNAGE Help Desk technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    --> Relais vers Garde GTPW ASCENSEURS 1ère impulsion Dispatching UCL (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) Dispatching UCL --> SECURITAS LEW ALARMES CDC (Système EBI -Enterprise Building Integrator -Honeywell GTPW téléphonique ) TECHNIQUES CDC (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) GTPW (Heures ouvrables) CDC (En dehors des heures

  18. Image Hashes as Templates for Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janik, Tadeusz; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Seifert, Allen; McDonald, Benjamin S.; White, Timothy A.

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging systems can provide measurements that confidently assess characteristics of nuclear weapons and dismantled weapon components, and such assessment will be needed in future verification for arms control. Yet imaging is often viewed as too intrusive, raising concern about the ability to protect sensitive information. In particular, the prospect of using image-based templates for verifying the presence or absence of a warhead, or of the declared configuration of fissile material in storage, may be rejected out-of-hand as being too vulnerable to violation of information barrier (IB) principles. Development of a rigorous approach for generating and comparing reduced-information templates from images, and assessing the security, sensitivity, and robustness of verification using such templates, are needed to address these concerns. We discuss our efforts to develop such a rigorous approach based on a combination of image-feature extraction and encryption-utilizing hash functions to confirm proffered declarations, providing strong classified data security while maintaining high confidence for verification. The proposed work is focused on developing secure, robust, tamper-sensitive and automatic techniques that may enable the comparison of non-sensitive hashed image data outside an IB. It is rooted in research on so-called perceptual hash functions for image comparison, at the interface of signal/image processing, pattern recognition, cryptography, and information theory. Such perceptual or robust image hashing—which, strictly speaking, is not truly cryptographic hashing—has extensive application in content authentication and information retrieval, database search, and security assurance. Applying and extending the principles of perceptual hashing to imaging for arms control, we propose techniques that are sensitive to altering, forging and tampering of the imaged object yet robust and tolerant to content-preserving image distortions and noise. Ensuring that the information contained in the hashed image data (available out-of-IB) cannot be used to extract sensitive information about the imaged object is of primary concern. Thus the techniques are characterized by high unpredictability to guarantee security. We will present an assessment of the performance of our techniques with respect to security, sensitivity and robustness on the basis of a methodical and mathematically precise framework.

  19. Glacier flow monitoring by digital camera and space-borne SAR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Glacier flow monitoring by digital camera and space-borne SAR images Flavien Vernier1, Renaud glaciers and to measure their surface velocity by different techniques. However, the image size) images the motion of Alpine glaciers. The optical images are acquired by a digital camera installed near

  20. Autofluorescence detection and imaging of bladder cancer realized through a cystoscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros G. (Livermore, CA); deVere White, Ralph W. (Sacramento, CA)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence and utilizing interior examination techniques and equipment are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and/or tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  1. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  2. One dimensional electron spin imaging for single spin detection and manipulation using a gradient field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Chang-Seok

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    magnetic field gradients. These fabricated devices are used to demonstrate this subwavelength imaging technique by imaging single electron spins of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond. In this demonstration, multiple NV defects, unresolved in a...

  3. Multi-scale texture analysis of remote sensing images using gabor filter banks and wavelet transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, Rahul

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to texture information extraction and utilization. This research focuses on the use of multi-scale image texture analysis techniques using Gabor filter banks and Wavelet transformations. Gabor filter banks model texture as irradiance patterns in an image over...

  4. One dimensional electron spin imaging for single spin detection and manipulation using a gradient field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Chang-Seok

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    magnetic field gradients. These fabricated devices are used to demonstrate this subwavelength imaging technique by imaging single electron spins of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond. In this demonstration, multiple NV defects, unresolved in a...

  5. Efficient Algorithms for Parallel Excitation and Parallel Imaging with Large Arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Shuo

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    RF signals using phased arrays are called parallel excitation (pTx) and parallel imaging (PI), respectively. These two techniques lead to shorter transmit pulses for higher imaging quality and faster data acquisition correspondingly...

  6. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  7. Lensless imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearningLensless4 Lensless Imaging of

  8. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  9. Innovative Technologies and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samano, R.; Swinford, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2014 Innovative Technologies and Techniques ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 What’s New in Energy Efficient Cooling Systems? ? Director of Energy Management ? Moving Away From... Refrigerants ? LEED ? Reducing the Carbon Footprint ? Improving Indoor Air Quality - IAQ ? High Efficiency Fans and Motors ? Economizers ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Outside Air Management Experts...

  10. forensics.uts.edu.au research themes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    of instrumentation including hyperspectral infrared imaging, laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometers, accurate mass quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and advanced separation techniques undergraduate studies in the United Kingdom came to UTS to undertake a PhD in latent fingermark detection. Using

  11. Shortwave infrared hyperspectral laboratory and airborne measurements as tool for local mapping of swelling soils, Loiret (France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures spectra in the field and laboratory. In order to produce high precision map of expansive soils, the BRGM of swelling soils, Loiret (France) Abstract submitted to "8th SIG Imaging Spectroscopy Workshop" Grégory

  12. Processing Visual Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litke, Alan (UC Santa Cruz) [UC Santa Cruz

    2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The back of the eye is lined by an extraordinary biological pixel detector, the retina. This neural network is able to extract vital information about the external visual world, and transmit this information in a timely manner to the brain. In this talk, Professor Litke will describe a system that has been implemented to study how the retina processes and encodes dynamic visual images. Based on techniques and expertise acquired in the development of silicon microstrip detectors for high energy physics experiments, this system can simultaneously record the extracellular electrical activity of hundreds of retinal output neurons. After presenting first results obtained with this system, Professor Litke will describe additional applications of this incredible technology.

  13. Developing novel polymer architectures for applications In magnetic resonance imaging and self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCombs, Jessica R. (Jessica Rose)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macromolecular scaffolds for drug delivery, self-assembly, and imaging applications have attracted significant attention over the last several decades. As polymerization techniques become more sophisticated, it becomes ...

  14. An investigation into the design of an image reconstruction algorithm for continuous wave tomosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douyon, Pierre-Guy Felix

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous wave (CW) tomosynthesis provides many theoretical advantages over traditional breast imaging techniques, like mammography. These theoretical advantages include improved spatial resolution, better information ...

  15. Jet finding techniques at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet finding techniques at hadron colliders, including pile-up removal tricks, jet deconstruction, etc

  16. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    11 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 1 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2 #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 3July 29, 2013 Data Mining

  17. Associated particle imaging (API)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associated Particle Imaging (API) is an active neutron probe technique that provides a 3-D image with elemental composition of the material under interrogation, and so occupies a unique niche in the interrogation of unknown objects. The highly penetrating nature of neutrons enables API to provide detailed information about targets of interest that are hidden from view. Due to the isotropic nature of the induced reactions, radiation detectors can be set on the same side of the object as the neutron source, so that the object can be interrogated from a single side. At the heat of the system is a small generator that produces a continuous, monoenergetic flux of neutrons. By measuring the trajectory of coincident alpha particles that are produced as part of the process, the trajectory of the neutron can be inferred. Interactions between a neutron and the material in its path often produce a gamma ray whose energy is characteristic of that material. When the gamma ray is detected, its energy is measured and combined with the trajectory information to produce a 3-D image of the composition of the object being interrogated. During the course of API development, a number of improvements have been made. A new, more rugged sealed Tube Neutron Generator (STNG) has been designed and fabricated that is less susceptible to radiation damage and better able to withstand the rigors of fielding than earlier designs. A specialized high-voltage power supply for the STNG has also been designed and built. A complete package of software has been written for the tasks of system calibration, diagnostics and data acquisition and analysis. A portable system has been built and field tested, proving that API can be taken out of the lab and into real-world situations, and that its performance in the field is equal to that in the lab.

  18. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  19. Polarized Helium to Image the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leduc, M; Leduc, Mich\\`{e}le; Nacher, Pierre-Jean

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main findings of the european PHIL project (Polarised Helium to Image the Lung) are reported. State of the art optical pumping techniques for polarising ^3He gas are described. MRI methodological improvements allow dynamical ventilation images with a good resolution, ultimately limited by gas diffusion. Diffusion imaging appears as a robust method of lung diagnosis. A discussion of the potential advantage of low field MRI is presented. Selected PHIL results for emphysema are given, with the perspectives that this joint work opens up for the future of respiratory medicine.

  20. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Masuda, Koji [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Perry, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  1. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  2. Method for large and rapid terahertz imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Neil, George R.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of large-scale active THz imaging using a combination of a compact high power THz source (>1 watt), an optional optical system, and a camera for the detection of reflected or transmitted THz radiation, without the need for the burdensome power source or detector cooling systems required by similar prior art such devices. With such a system, one is able to image, for example, a whole person in seconds or less, whereas at present, using low power sources and scanning techniques, it takes several minutes or even hours to image even a 1 cm.times.1 cm area of skin.

  3. Functional lung imaging in humans using Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layfield, Dominick, 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deals with a method of functional lung imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this technique, a radioactive tracer, nitrogen-13, is dissolved in saline solution, and injected into a peripheral ...

  4. An Investigation of Preservation Techniques for Creating a Full Compartment Phantom 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Alice

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is an investigation of the viability of preservation techniques for use in developing phantoms for use in Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) and Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. Two rats were preserved in PEG (polyethylene glycol...

  5. Femtosecond Transient Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirmani, Ahmed (Ghulam Ahmed)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a novel framework called transient imaging for image formation and scene understanding through impulse illumination and time images. Using time-of-flight cameras and multi-path analysis of global light ...

  6. Temperature profile of the infrared image Heat exchange between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    T Temperature profile of the infrared image Heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean References coefficient of heat in water determine the heat transfer velocity: *t Infrared images of the water surface: a-Karls-Universität Heidelberg www.uni-heidelberg.de Active controlled flux technique (ACFT) Continuous heat flux Periodic heat

  7. Model-based Enhancement of Lighting Conditions in Image Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisert, Peter

    under different lighting conditions which complicates the comparison severely [1­3]. Similarly, 3-DModel-based Enhancement of Lighting Conditions in Image Sequences Peter Eisert and Bernd Girod model-based technique for estimating and manipulating the lighting in an image sequence. The current

  8. PET/NIR Imaging DOI: 10.1002/ange.201205271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    PET/NIR Imaging DOI: 10.1002/ange.201205271 Aptamer-Functionalized, Ultra-Small, Monodisperse (PET), and ultrasound and photoacoustic imag- ing.[4b,5b,6] However, each technique has its drawbacks, and none is sufficient to provide all the necessary information for LN assessment.[4b] PET is the most

  9. Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    - mentation techniques are less accurate than k-means clustering with multiple clusters. Segmentation accuracy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUSComparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1

  10. Geoacoustic characterization by the image source method: a sensitivity study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geoacoustic characterization by the image source method: a sensitivity study S. Pinsona , L in the localization of the image sources. 1 Introduction Most of the present techniques to characterize the seafloor. The configuration is a broadband source and a vertical or an horizontal array. The method con- siders geological

  11. MARS TERRAIN IMAGE CLASSIFICATION USING CARTESIAN GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    MARS TERRAIN IMAGE CLASSIFICATION USING CARTESIAN GENETIC PROGRAMMING J. Leitner, S. Harding, A. F to human designed approaches, a great deal of progress has been made using machine learning techniques to perform classification from images. In this work, we demonstrate the first known use of Cartesian Genetic

  12. ccsd00004040, Polarized Helium to Image the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00004040, version 1 ­ 24 Jan 2005 Polarized Helium to Image the Lung Mich#18;ele Leduc the Lung) are reported. State of the art optical pumping techniques for polarising 3 He gas are described limited by gas di#11;usion. Di#11;usion imaging appears as a robust method of lung diagnosis. A discussion

  13. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G. Jackson, E-mail: williams270@llnl.gov; Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kojima, Sadaoki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka, 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Millecchia, Matthew [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  14. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 16, NO. 2, APRIL 1997 137 Motion Correction of PET Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chris

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 16, NO. 2, APRIL 1997 137 Motion Correction of PET--Positron emission tomography (PET) is a relatively lengthy brain imaging method. Because it is difficult. The technique associates the incoming data with the real-space position of the head. During the PET scan

  16. High resolution photoelectron images and D{sup +} photofragment images following 532-nm photolysis of D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W.; Neyer, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Heck, A.J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-resonant ionization and dissociation of D{sub 2} by intense 532-nm laser light is studied by a variation of the ``Ion Imaging`` technique called ``Velocity Mapping``. Images of the both the photoelectrons and D{sup +} photofragments are obtained and analyzed at two different laser intensities. Results are compared to previous studies and several differences are discussed.

  17. IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson, Mike Brookes and Pier Luigi Dragotti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson London Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ, London, United Kingdom. ABSTRACT Image based rendering is a technique of traditional color images with depth images. This combination promises to improve the rendering quality

  18. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE GEOSCIENCES For this lab, you will practice editing image files in Adobe Photoshop and construct a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    "Save Target As" (PCs) or "Save Image As" (Macs). Save the file to your Lab3 folder on \\\\geobase a different editing technique and save to a different file type (ex., .jpg, .ps, .tiff, .pdf,) . Image 1 it to the appropriate location. · Save your image as a jPEG file. Go to File Save As. Name your file Image_1

  19. SU-E-J-256: Dual Energy Planar Image Based Localization in the Absence of On-Board CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadagopan, R; Yang, J; Li, H [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tool enabling soft tissue based image guidance using dual energy radiographs for cases when on-board CT is not available. Method: Dual energy planar radiographs can be applied to image guidance for targeting lung lesions because the bone based alignment only may not be sufficient as the lesions move. We acquired images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom at 120 and 60 KVp respectively. Using a weighted logarithmic subtraction of these dual energy images, a soft tissue enhanced and a bone enhanced image were generated and they could be used for the image guidance purpose. Similar processing was also applied to a dual energy image set acquired for a patient undergoing a proton therapy. Results: The soft tissue enhanced images suppressed bones (ribs and scapula) overlying on lung, thus enabling a better visualization of soft tissue and lesion, while the bone enhanced image suppressed the soft tissue. These enhanced effects were visually apparent without further processing for display enhancements, such as using histogram or edge enhancement technique. Conclusions: The phantom image processing was encouraging. The initial test on the patient image set showed that other post processing might still be able to add value in visualizing soft tissues in addition to the dual energy soft tissue enhancement. More evaluations are needed to determine the potential benefit of this technique in the clinic.

  20. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  1. Design of a near-field coded aperture cameras for high-resolution medical and industrial gamma-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accorsi, Roberto, 1971-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coded Aperture Imaging is a technique originally developed for X-ray astronomy, where typical imaging problems are characterized by far-field geometry and an object made of point sources distributed over a mainly dark ...

  2. High-throughput snapshot spectral imaging in two dimensions Andrew R Harvey and David W Fletcher-Holmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andy

    to be the first technique able to spectrally image in snapshot mode with modest resolution and without the need spectral imaging with modest spectral resolution and modest field of view. The second, biologically

  3. Layered 3D: tomographic image synthesis for attenuation-based light field and high dynamic range displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzstein, Gordon

    We develop tomographic techniques for image synthesis on displays composed of compact volumes of light-attenuating material. Such volumetric attenuators recreate a 4D light field or high-contrast 2D image when illuminated ...

  4. One-Step Fabrication of High-Performance All-SWNT Field-Effect Transistors by Patterned Growth Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    transfer characteristics, fabricated by modifying our SAM-based patterning technique [4]. With an improved pattering technique of SAM film, metal catalysts are dip-coated in SAM removed area. By ACCVD technique). Fig. 1. (a) SEM images of the fabricated all-SWNT FET. The electrode-shape films consisted

  5. Intra--modality Image Registration using Gradients Mutawarra Hussain and Ela Claridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, Ela

    Intra--modality Image Registration using Gradients Mutawarra Hussain and Ela Claridge School--subject volumetric images has been achieved by using the variance of gradient ratios (VGR) technique. This technique intensity provides functional information on the metabolism of the region to be studied. The temporal

  6. Tracking Elevated Pollution Layers with a Newly Developed Hyperspectral Sun/Sky Spectrometer (4STAR): Results from the TCAP 2012 and 2013 Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Johnson, Roy R.; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Wilson, Jacqueline M.

    2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Total columnar amounts of water vapor, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) are derived from a newly developed, hyperspectral airborne sun-sky spectrometer (4STAR) for the first time during the two intensive phases of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in summer 2012 and winter 2013 aboard the DOE G-1 aircraft. We compare results with coincident measurements. We find 0.045 g/cm2 (4.2%) negative bias and 0.28 g/cm2 (26.3%) root-mean-square (RMS) difference in water vapor layer comparison with in-situ hygrometer, and an overall RMS difference of 1.28 g/m3 (38%) water vapor amount in profile by profile comparisons, with differences distributed evenly around zero in most cases. The RMS differences for O3 values average to 3%, with a 1% negative bias for 4STAR compared with the spaceborne Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) along the aircraft flight-track for 14 flights during both TCAP phases. Ground-based comparisons with the Pandora spectrometer system at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland showed excellent agreement between the instruments for both O3 and NO2, further emphasizing 4STAR’s new capabilities. During the summer phase, we have succeeded in identifying variations in elevated pollution layers corresponding to urban pollution outflow and transported biomass burning. This was done using clustering analysis of the retrieved products (e.g. Ångstrom exponent, NO2 and columnar water vapor), and was confirmed by aerosol type identification by HSRL2 aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft. These newly demonstrated 4STAR capabilities are expected to be instrumental in improving our understanding of atmospheric composition variability and aerosol-trace-gas interactions; they open new horizons and opportunities in airborne sunphotometry.

  7. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  8. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  9. Lucky exposures: diffraction limited astronomical imaging through the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tubbs, Robert Nigel

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    brightness are circled in red in d). In panels a)—c) the blurring effect of the PSFs re-distributes the flux from the point sources over a wider area of the image leading to a substantial reduction in the peak pixel values in the images. can be improved... to this method as the Lucky Exposures technique. A number of other authors have published results using very similar methods, particularly 1.3. Performance of ground-based high resolution imaging techniques 11 for solar and planetary observations. Observations...

  10. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  11. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K[sub a]-band system.

  12. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K{sub a}-band system.

  13. Infrared cloud imaging in support of Earth-space optical communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Infrared cloud imaging in support of Earth- space optical communication Paul W. Nugent,1 Joseph A ground-station sites. A technique is described that uses a ground-based thermal infrared imager sensing and sensors; (010.1615) clouds; (110.3080) infrared imaging; (060.4510) optical communications

  14. CORTICAL BRAIN SURFACE MAPPING FOR STUDYING PARTIAL VOLUME EFFECTS IN BRAIN FDG PET IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    CORTICAL BRAIN SURFACE MAPPING FOR STUDYING PARTIAL VOLUME EFFECTS IN BRAIN FDG PET IMAGES Hillary PET images is confounded by tissue atrophy and partial volume effects, especially in patients-based cortical brain surface mapping technique to account for partial volume effects on brain FDG PET images

  15. IBRAC: Image-Based Rendering Acceleration and Compression Ilmi Yoon and Ulrich Neumann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    IBRAC: Image-Based Rendering Acceleration and Compression Ilmi Yoon and Ulrich Neumann Computer ABSTRACT This paper presents an image-based rendering technique that has several benefits to remote or web-based rendering sys- tems. It adapts an image-based rendering acceleration method to the direct rendering

  16. Computer-aided evaluation of protein expression in pathological tissue images Elisa Ficarra, Enrico Macii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    by pathologists via visual inspection of tissue sam- ples images. Our techniques streamlines this errorComputer-aided evaluation of protein expression in pathological tissue images Elisa Ficarra, Enrico in pathological tissues by using, for example, images of the tissue where the localization of pro- teins, as well

  17. Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society of North America. Luminance ratio limits; ch. 11,range photography as a luminance mapping Technique. Lawrenceusing High Resolution Luminance Images Kyle Konis Lawrence

  18. Recent advances in wavefront shaping techniques for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, KyoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, KyungDuk; Lee, Shinwha; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the highly inhomogeneous distributions of refractive indexes, light propagation in complex media such as biological tissue experiences multiple light scattering events. The suppression and control of multiple light scattering events are investigated because they offer the possibility of optical focusing and imaging through biological tissues, and they may open new avenues for diagnosis and treatment of several human diseases. In order to provide insight into how new optical techniques can address the issues of multiple light scattering in biomedical applications, the recent progress in optical wavefront-shaping techniques is summarized.

  19. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  20. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  1. The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  2. A Multiresolution Image Cache for Volume Rendering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the techniques and implementation details of the shared-memory image caching system for volume visualization and iso-surface rendering. One of the goals of the system is to decouple image generation from image display. This is done by maintaining a set of impostors for interactive display while the production of the impostor imagery is performed by a set of parallel, background processes. The system introduces a caching basis that is free of the gap/overlap artifacts of earlier caching techniques. instead of placing impostors at fixed, pre-defined positions in world space, the technique is to adaptively place impostors relative to the camera viewpoint. The positions translate with the camera but stay aligned to the data; i.e., the positions translate, but do not rotate, with the camera. The viewing transformation is factored into a translation transformation and a rotation transformation. The impostor imagery is generated using just the translation transformation and visible impostors are displayed using just the rotation transformation. Displayed image quality is improved by increasing the number of impostors and the frequency that impostors are re-rendering is improved by decreasing the number of impostors.

  3. Preliminary study of an angiographic and angio-tomographic technique based on K-edge filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golosio, Bruno; Brunetti, Antonio [Dipartimento POLCOMING, Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy) [Dipartimento POLCOMING, Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy) [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Luca Masala, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Meloni, Francesco [Unità operativa di Diagnostica per immagini Asl n. 1, Ospedale Civile SS Annunziata, 07100 Sassari (Italy)] [Unità operativa di Diagnostica per immagini Asl n. 1, Ospedale Civile SS Annunziata, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Battista Meloni, Giovanni [Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy)] [Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital Subtraction Angiography is commonly affected by artifacts due to the patient movements during the acquisition of the images without and with the contrast medium. This paper presents a preliminary study on an angiographic and angio-tomographic technique based on the quasi-simultaneous acquisition of two images, obtained using two different filters at the exit of an X-ray tube. One of the two filters (K-edge filter) contains the same chemical element used as a contrast agent (gadolinium in this study). This filter absorbs more radiation with energy just above the so called K-edge energy of gadolinium than the radiation with energy just below it. The other filter (an aluminium filter in this study) is simply used to suppress the low-energy contribution to the spectrum. Using proper calibration curves, the two images are combined to obtain an image of the contrast agent distribution. In the angio-tomographic application of the proposed technique two images, corresponding to the two filter types, are acquired for each viewing angle of the tomographic scan. From the two tomographic reconstructions, it is possible to obtain a three-dimensional map of the contrast agent distribution. The technique was tested on a sample consisting of a rat skull placed inside a container filled with water. Six small cylinders with 4.7 mm internal diameter containing the contrast medium at different concentrations were placed inside the skull. In the plain angiographic application of the technique, five out of six cylinders were visible, with gadolinium concentration down to 0.96%. In the angio-tomographic application, all six cylinders were visible, with gadolinium concentration down to 0.49%. This preliminary study shows that the proposed technique can provide images of the contrast medium at low concentration without most of the artifacts that are present in images produced by conventional techniques. The results encourage further investigation on the feasibility of a clinical implementation of the technique.

  4. Radar transponder apparatus and signal processing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Axline, Jr., Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Sloan, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active, phase-coded, time-grating transponder and a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) and signal processor means, in combination, allow the recognition and location of the transponder (tag) in the SAR image and allow communication of information messages from the transponder to the SAR. The SAR is an illuminating radar having special processing modifications in an image-formation processor to receive an echo from a remote transponder, after the transponder receives and retransmits the SAR illuminations, and to enhance the transponder's echo relative to surrounding ground clutter by recognizing special transponder modulations from phase-shifted from the transponder retransmissions. The remote radio-frequency tag also transmits information to the SAR through a single antenna that also serves to receive the SAR illuminations. Unique tag-modulation and SAR signal processing techniques, in combination, allow the detection and precise geographical location of the tag through the reduction of interfering signals from ground clutter, and allow communication of environmental and status information from said tag to be communicated to said SAR.

  5. Method for image reconstruction of moving radionuclide source distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolin, Alexander V.; McKisson, John E.; Lee, Seung Joon; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for image reconstruction of moving radionuclide distributions. Its particular embodiment is for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of awake animals, though its techniques are general enough to be applied to other moving radionuclide distributions as well. The invention eliminates motion and blurring artifacts for image reconstructions of moving source distributions. This opens new avenues in the area of small animal brain imaging with radiotracers, which can now be performed without the perturbing influences of anesthesia or physical restraint on the biological system.

  6. Feasibility of an image planning system for kilovoltage image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thapa, Bishnu B.; Molloy, Janelle A. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536-0293 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Image guidance has become a standard of care for many treatment scenarios in radiation therapy. This is most typically accomplished by use of kV x-ray devices mounted onto the linear accelerator (Linac) gantry that yield planar, fluoroscopic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Image acquisition parameters are chosen via preset techniques that rely on broad categorizations in patient anatomy and imaging goal. However, the optimal imaging technique results in detectability of the features of interest while exposing the patient to minimum dose. Herein, the authors present an investigation into the feasibility of developing an image planning system (IPS) for radiotherapy.Methods: In this first phase, the authors focused on developing an algorithm to predict tissue contrast produced by a common radiotherapy planar imaging chain. Input parameters include a CT dataset and simulated planar imaging technique settings that include kV and mAs. Energy-specific attenuation through each voxel of the CT dataset was calculated in the algorithm to derive a net transmitted intensity. The response of the flat panel detector was integrated into the image simulation algorithm. Verification was conducted by comparing simulated and measured images using four phantoms. Comparisons were made in both high and low contrast settings, as well as changes in the geometric appearance due to image saturation. Results: The authors studied a lung nodule test object to assess the planning system's ability to predict object contrast and detectability. Verification demonstrated that the slope of the pixel intensities is similar, the presence of the nodule is evident, and image saturation at high mAs values is evident in both images. The appearance of the lung nodule is a function of the image detector saturation. The authors assessed the dimensions of the lung nodule in measured and simulated images. Good quantitative agreement affirmed the algorithm's predictive capabilities. The invariance of contrast with kVp and mAs prior to saturation was predicted, as well as the gradual loss of object detectability as saturation was approached. Small changes in soft tissue density were studied using a mammography step wedge phantom. Data were acquired at beam qualities of 80 and 120 kVp and over exposure values ranging from 0.04 to 500 mAs. The data showed good agreement in terms of the absolute value of pixel intensities predicted, as well as small variations across the step wedge pattern. The saturation pixel intensity was consistent between the two beam qualities studied. Boney tissue contrast was assessed using two abdominal phantoms. Measured and calculated values agree in terms of predicting the mAs value at which detector saturation, and subsequent loss of contrast occurs. The lack of variation in contrast over mAs values lower than 10 suggests that there is wide latitude for minimizing patient dose. Conclusions: The authors developed and tested an algorithm that can be used to assist in kV imaging technique selection during localization for radiotherapy. Phantom testing demonstrated the algorithm's predictive accuracy for both low and high contrast imaging scenarios. Detector saturation with subsequent loss of imaging detail, both in terms of object size and contrast were accurately predicted by the algorithm.

  7. Proceedings IEEE Visualization '99, pages 291298, cIEEE Computer Society Press, 1999. LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan II, J. Edward

    -Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen½ SUNY at Stony Brook J. Edward Swan II¾ Naval rendering technique, termed LOD-sprite render- ing, which uses a combination of a level-of-detail (LOD) represen- tation of the scene together with reusing image sprites (previously rendered images). Our primary

  8. Data Driven Discovery in Imaging and Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajan, Krishna [Iowa State University

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk will outline a process called "materials informatics," which permits one to survey complex, multiscale information in a high-throughput, statistically robust, and yet physically meaningful manner. Examples will be provided in a number of different applications of imaging and spectroscopy including neutron diffraction, EELS images, and other microanalysis techniques. The integrations of informatics with spectroscopy data in combinatorial experiments will be shown as a means of signficantly accelerating the interpretation of complex data from high-throughput experiments. The talk will conclude with a discussion on the value of including a materials informatics component for addressing the challenges of data deluge from large-scale scattering sources.

  9. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giger, Maryellen L. (Elmhurst, IL); Chen, Chin-Tu (Lisle, IL); Armato, Samuel (Chicago, IL); Doi, Kunio (Willowbrook, IL)

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  10. User Science Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Image: OBrianImageBig.png | png | 5 MB SlavaFull.png FES: Small Scale Experimental Plasma Research October 21, 2010 | Author(s): Vyacheslav Lukin (NRL) | Category: Fusion Energy |...

  11. Imaging in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The text contains details of recording media, image quality, sensitometry, processing and equipment used in radiotherapy for imaging. It reflects part of the syllabus for the College of Radiographers.

  12. Fundamentals and Techniques of Nonimaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Gallagher, J. J.; Winston, R.

    2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report describing a long term basic research program in nonimaging optics that has led to major advances in important areas, including solar energy, fiber optics, illumination techniques, light detectors, and a great many other applications. The term ''nonimaging optics'' refers to the optics of extended sources in systems for which image forming is not important, but effective and efficient collection, concentration, transport, and distribution of light energy is. Although some of the most widely known developments of the early concepts have been in the field of solar energy, a broad variety of other uses have emerged. Most important, under the auspices of this program in fundamental research in nonimaging optics established at the University of Chicago with support from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences at the Department of Energy, the field has become very dynamic, with new ideas and concepts continuing to develop, while applications of the early concepts continue to be pursued. While the subject began as part of classical geometrical optics, it has been extended subsequently to the wave optics domain. Particularly relevant to potential new research directions are recent developments in the formalism of statistical and wave optics, which may be important in understanding energy transport on the nanoscale. Nonimaging optics permits the design of optical systems that achieve the maximum possible concentration allowed by physical conservation laws. The earliest designs were constructed by optimizing the collection of the extreme rays from a source to the desired target: the so-called ''edge-ray'' principle. Later, new concentrator types were generated by placing reflectors along the flow lines of the ''vector flux'' emanating from lambertian emitters in various geometries. A few years ago, a new development occurred with the discovery that making the design edge-ray a functional of some other system parameter permits the construction of whole new classes of devices with greatly expanded capabilities compared to conventional approaches. These ''tailored edge-ray'' designs have dramatically broadened the range of geometries in which nonimaging optics can provide a significant performance improvement. Considerable progress continues to be made in furthering the incorporation of nonimaging secondaries into practical high concentration and ultra-high concentration solar collector systems. In parallel with the continuing development of nonimaging geometrical optics, our group has been working to develop an understanding of certain fundamental physical optics concepts in the same context. In particular, our study of the behavior of classical radiance in nonimaging systems, has revealed some fundamentally important new understandings that we have pursued both theoretically and experimentally. The field is still relatively new and is rapidly gaining widespread recognition because it fuels many industrial applications. Because of this, during the final years of the project, our group at Chicago has been working more closely with a team of industrial scientists from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) at first informally, and later more formally, beginning in 1998, under a formal program initiated by the Department of Energy and incrementally funded through this existing grant. This collaboration has been very fruitful and has led to new conceptual breakthroughs which have provided the foundation for further exciting growth. Many of these concepts are described in some detail in the report.

  13. Consumers' Image of Broilers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtenay, Henry V.; Branson, Robert E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which they feel the product possesses. This research was designed to determine consumers' favorable and unfavorable images as to broilers, both in making purchases in stores and in serving them as a meat dish. These images, summarized briefly here... count. The Preparation and Cooking Image: The h0u.l wife's image of broilers focuses on one metliotl- frying. The major deterrent to preparing othci dishes was that these are either too difficult or canno* be prepared satisfactorily...

  14. Review : integration of EMI technique with global vibration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Suteng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, the development of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been skyrocketing because of the serious consequences that come with structural failure. Traditional damage detection techniques, also known as ...

  15. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  16. Near-electrode imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  17. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

  18. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

  19. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  20. Automation in image cytometry : continuous HCS and kinetic image cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlot, David J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automation in Image Cytometry:xiv Abstract of Dissertation Automation in Image Cytometry:

  1. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology March...

  2. Towards wide-field high-resolution retinal imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive optical correction is an efficient technique to obtain high-resolution images of the retinal surface. A main limitation of adaptive optical correction, however, is the small size of the corrected image. For medical purposes it is important to increase the size of the corrected images. This can be done through composite imaging, but a major difficulty is then the introduction of reconstruction artifacts. Another approach is multi-conjugate adaptive optics. MCAO comes in two flavors. The star- oriented approach has been demonstrated on the eye and allows to increase the diameter of the corrected image by a factor of approximately 2-3. Difficulties in the tomographic reconstruction precludes the correction of larger fields. Here we have investigate the possibility to apply a layer-oriented MCAO approach to retinal imaging.

  3. Investigating the aggregation of ?-amyloid peptide (A???) and its interactions with lipid bilayers using advanced microscopy techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mari, Meropi

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    that there are various different methods, such as AFM, CARS microscopy and Raman spectroscopy as well as neutron scattering that are capable of fast imaging. Overall, all these techniques contributed in a complementary study of A??? aggregation states under extreme...

  4. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 19, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2010 1341 Encapsulation of Capacitive Micromachined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    -time imaging conditions. Index Terms--Fourier spectrometer, hyperspectral imaging, microelectromechanical-systems]­[6]. Espe- cially the progress in optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has initiated

  5. Acoustic techniques for localizing holdup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vnuk, D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material that does not come out of a process as product or waste is called holdup. When this is fissile material, its location and quantity must be determined to improve safeguards and security as well as safety at the facility. The most common method for detecting and measuring holdup is with radiation based techniques. When using them, one must consider equipment geometry, geometry of holdup, and effects of background radiation when converting the radiation measurement into a fissile material quantity. We are developing complementary techniques that use tiny acoustic transducers, which are unaffected by background radiation, to improve holdup measurements by aiding in determining the above conversion factors for holdup measurements. Thus far, we have applied three techniques, Acoustic Interferometry, Pulse Echo, and bending Wave Propagation, of which the latter appears most effective. This paper will describe each of these techniques and show how they may ultimately reduce costs and personnel radiation exposure while increasing confidence I and accuracy of holdup measurements.

  6. Experimental techniques and measurement accuracies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.; DiIorio, G.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief description of the experimental tools available for fusion neutronics experiments is given. Attention is paid to error estimates mainly for the measurement of tritium breeding ratio in simulated blankets using various techniques.

  7. A multi-frame, megahertz CCD imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Jacob A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balzer, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watson, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-efficiency, high-speed imager has been fabricated capable of framing rates of 2 MHz. This device utilizes a 512 x 512 pixel charge coupled device (CCD) with a 25cmZ active area, and incorporates an electronic shutter technology designed for back-illuminated CCD's, making this the largest and fastest back-illuminated CCD in the world. Characterizing an imager capable of this frame rate presents unique challenges. High speed LED drivers and intense radioactive sources are needed to perform basic measurements. We investigate properties normally associated with single-frame CCD's such as read noise, gain, full-well capacity, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, and linearity. In addition, we investigate several properties associated with the imager's multi-frame operation such as transient frame response and frame-to-frame isolation while contrasting our measurement techniques and results with more conventional devices.

  8. A multi-frame, megahertz CCd imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Jacob [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balzer, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watson, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reich, Robert [MIT-LL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To record high-speed, explosively driven, events, a high efficiency, high speed, imager has been fabricated which is capable of framing rates of 2 MHz. This device utilizes a 512 x 512 pixel charge coupled device (CCD) with a 25cm{sup 2} active area, and incorporates an electronic shutter technology designed for back-illuminated CCD's, making this the largest and fastest back-illuminated CCD in the world. Characterizing an imager capable of this frame rate presents unique challenges. High speed LED drivers and intense radioactive sources are needed to perform the most basic measurements. We investigate properties normally associated with single-frame CCD's such as read noise, full-well capacity, sensitivity, signal to noise ratio, linearity and dynamic range. In addition, we investigate several properties associated with the imager's multi-frame operation such as transient frame response and frame-to-frame isolation while contrasting our measurement techniques and results with more conventional devices.

  9. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  10. Impact of the cracks lost in the imaging process on computing linear elastic properties from 3D microtomographic images of Berea sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    With the current developments in imaging/computational techniques and resources, computational rock physics has been emerging as a new field of study. Properties of rocks are examined by carrying out extensive numerical ...

  11. Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; White, Timothy A.; Pitts, W. Karl; Misner, Alex C.; Seifert, Allen

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the second year of this project is described by the series of technical reports and manuscripts that make up the content of this report. These documents summarize successes in our goals to develop our robust image-hash templating and material-discrimination techniques and apply them to test image data.

  12. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Mascaro, Anna Letizia Allegra; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput um-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multimodal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2'-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy...

  13. Review of uranium bioassay techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

  14. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  15. Analyzing the thickness of a TEM sample using EELSAnalyzing the thickness of a TEM sample using EELS and integration techniquesand integration techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    EELS and integration techniquesand integration techniques Antonio Buddington Imaging and Analysis film sample? Analyzing the thickness of a TEM sample using EELS and integration techniques #12;Method Analyzing the thickness of a TEM sample using EELS and integration techniques Specimen examined under

  16. Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

    1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

  17. Erasure Techniques in MRD codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; R. Sujatha; R. S. Raja Durai

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is organized into six chapters. The first chapter introduces the basic algebraic structures essential to make this book a self contained one. Algebraic linear codes and their basic properties are discussed in chapter two. In chapter three the authors study the basic properties of erasure decoding in maximum rank distance codes. Some decoding techniques about MRD codes are described and discussed in chapter four of this book. Rank distance codes with complementary duals and MRD codes with complementary duals are introduced and their applications are discussed. Chapter five introduces the notion of integer rank distance codes. The final chapter introduces some concatenation techniques.

  18. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  19. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  20. BNL | ICS Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    due to the phase-contrast effect. This method will be useful for quantitative computed tomography applications of Thomson sources. High-resolution radiographic image of a wasp...

  1. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  2. The fuzzy Hough Transform-feature extraction in medical images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, K.P.; Dove, E.L.; Stanford, W.; Chandran, K.B. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); McPherson, D.D.; Gotteiner, N.L. (Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of anatomical features is a necessary step for medical image analysis. Automatic methods for feature identification using conventional pattern recognition techniques typically classify an object as a member of a predefined class of objects, but do not attempt to recover the exact or approximate shape of that object. For this reason, such techniques are usually not sufficient to identify the borders of organs when individual geometry varies in local detail, even though the general geometrical shape is similar. The authors present an algorithm that detects features in an image based on approximate geometrical models. The algorithm is based on the traditional and generalized Hough Transforms but includes notions from fuzzy set theory. The authors use the new algorithm to roughly estimate the actual locations of boundaries of an internal organ, and from this estimate, to determine a region of interest around the organ. Based on this rough estimate of the border location, and the derived region of interest, the authors find the final estimate of the true borders with other image processing techniques. The authors present results that demonstrate that the algorithm was successfully used to estimate the approximate location of the chest wall in humans, and of the left ventricular contours of a dog heart obtained from cine-computed tomographic images. The authors use this fuzzy Hough Transform algorithm as part of a larger procedures to automatically identify the myocardial contours of the heart. This algorithm may also allow for more rapid image processing and clinical decision making in other medical imaging applications.

  3. To appear in IEEE Workshop on MultiView Modeling and Analysis of Visual Scenes, 1999. IlluminationBased Image Synthesis: Creating Novel Images of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriegman, David J.

    , but from a fixed viewpoint. Unlike multi­view based image syn­ thesis, our method does not require of images gathered from multiple viewpoints and apply techniques akin to structure from motion [16, 28, 6 of an object from novel viewpoints by taking 2 \\Gamma D slices of the 4 \\Gamma D light field at the appropriate

  4. Cine EPID evaluation of two non-commercial techniques for DIBH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Christopher; Urribarri, Jaime; Cail, Daniel; Rottmann, Joerg; Mishra, Pankaj; Lingos, Tatiana; Niedermayr, Thomas; Berbeco, Ross, E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of two noncommercial techniques for deep inspiration breathhold (DIBH) treatment of left-sided breast cancer (LSBC) usingcine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Methods: 23?875 EPID images of 65 patients treated for LSBC at two different cancer treatment centers were retrieved. At the Milford Regional Cancer Center, DIBH stability was maintained by visual alignment of inroom lasers and patient skin tattoos (TAT). At the South Shore Hospital, a distance-measuring laser device (RTSSD) was implemented. For both centers,cine EPID images were acquired at least once per week during beam-on. Chest wall position relative to image boundary was measured and tracked over the course of treatment for every patient and treatment fraction for which data were acquired. Results: Median intrabeam chest motion was 0.31 mm for the TAT method and 0.37 mm for the RTSSD method. The maximum excursions exceeded our treatment protocol threshold of 3 mm in 0.3% of cases (TAT) and 1.2% of cases (RTSSD). The authors did not observe a clinically significant difference between the two datasets. Conclusions: Both noncommercial techniques for monitoring the DIBH location provided DIBH stability within the predetermined treatment protocol parameters (<3 mm). The intreatment imaging offered by the EPID operating incine mode facilitates retrospective analysis and validation of both techniques.

  5. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

  6. Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering Ilmi Yoon and Ulrich Neumann information from previously rendered images. Images predicted from prior images are combined with a residual-based rendering tech- nique provides accurate motion prediction and accelerates rendering at the same time

  7. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    1 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 3 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;2013/08/12 2 #12;33 Chapter 3: Data Preprocessing n Data Preprocessing: An Overview n Data Quality n Major Tasks in Data Preprocessing n Data Cleaning n Data Integration n Data

  8. INFRARED IMAGING OF CARBON AND CERAMIC COMPOSITES: DATA REPRODUCIBILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, B.; Howard, D. R.; Ringermacher, H. I. [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States); Hudson, L. D. [NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards AFB, CA (United States)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared NDE techniques have proven to be superior for imaging of flaws in ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and carbon silicon carbide composites (C/SiC). Not only can one obtain accurate depth gauging of flaws such as delaminations and layered porosity in complex-shaped components such as airfoils and other aeronautical components, but also excellent reproducibility of image data is obtainable using the STTOF (Synthetic Thermal Time-of-Flight) methodology. The imaging of large complex shapes is fast and reliable. This methodology as applied to large C/SiC flight components at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will be described.

  9. Imaging detectors and electronics - A view of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging sensors and readout electronics have made tremendous strides in the past two decades. The application of modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and the introduction of customized monolithic integrated circuits have made large scale imaging systems routine in high energy physics. This technology is now finding its way into other areas, such as space missions, synchrotron light sources, and medical imaging. I review current developments and discuss the promise and limits of new technologies. Several detector systems are described as examples of future trends. The discussion emphasizes semiconductor detector systems, but I also include recent developments for large-scale superconducting detector arrays.

  10. Image analysis of ocular fundus for retinopathy characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Cuadros, Jorge

    2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated analysis of ocular fundus images is a common procedure in countries as England, including both nonemergency examination and retinal screening of patients with diabetes mellitus. This involves digital image capture and transmission of the images to a digital reading center for evaluation and treatment referral. In collaboration with the Optometry Department, University of California, Berkeley, we have tested computer vision algorithms to segment vessels and lesions in ground-truth data (DRIVE database) and hundreds of images of non-macular centric and nonuniform illumination views of the eye fundus from EyePACS program. Methods under investigation involve mathematical morphology (Figure 1) for image enhancement and pattern matching. Recently, we have focused in more efficient techniques to model the ocular fundus vasculature (Figure 2), using deformable contours. Preliminary results show accurate segmentation of vessels and high level of true-positive microaneurysms.

  11. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  12. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  13. Scandinavian Workshop on Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Barcode Imaging of Chocolate Milk Quan.fica.on of Microstructures in Freeze.on of Fat Content in Raw Beef Cut Meat Evalua.on by RGB-to-spectrum Imaging.on to Visualizing Meat Products Characteriza.on of Commercial Danish Apple Cul.var Using Novel

  14. Heart imaging method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Gribble, R. Parks (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Littleton, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  15. DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

  16. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  17. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  18. Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration...

  19. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  20. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  1. Coil performance evaluation based on electrodynamics : tools for hardware design and validation in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel MRI techniques allow acceleration of MR imaging beyond traditional speed limits. In parallel MRI, radiofrequency (RF) detector coil arrays are used to perform some degree of spatial encoding which complements ...

  2. Joint anisotropy characterization and image formation in wide-angle synthetic aperture radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Kush R. (Kush Raj)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagery formed from wide-angle synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements has fine cross-range resolution in principle. However, conventional SAR image formation techniques assume isotropic scattering, which is not valid ...

  3. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  4. Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Beatrice Smith

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

  5. Segmentation of Spin-Echo MRI brain images: a comparison study of Crisp and Fuzzy algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Maranatha

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a scheme for segmenting Spin-Echo MRI brain images based on Fuzzy C-Mean (FCM) clustering techniques. This scheme consists of feature extraction, feature conditioning or evaluation, and thresholded FCM clustering. Feature...

  6. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  7. Non-linear inversion modeling for Ultrasound Computer Tomography: transition from soft to hard tissues imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Non-linear inversion modeling for Ultrasound Computer Tomography: transition from soft to hard Marseille cedex 20, France ABSTRACT Ultrasound Computer Tomography (UCT) is an imaging technique which has experiments. Keyword: Ultrasound Computer Tomography, Inverse Born Approximation, Elliptical Projection

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: CSP Images & Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images & Videos CSP Images & Videos Image Gallery Videos Concentrating Solar Power Image Gallery A picture says a thousand words, especially on the World Wide Web. Both Sandia...

  9. Graph partitioning advance clustering technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhulatha, T Soni

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering is a common technique for statistical data analysis, Clustering is the process of grouping the data into classes or clusters so that objects within a cluster have high similarity in comparison to one another, but are very dissimilar to objects in other clusters. Dissimilarities are assessed based on the attribute values describing the objects. Often, distance measures are used. Clustering is an unsupervised learning technique, where interesting patterns and structures can be found directly from very large data sets with little or none of the background knowledge. This paper also considers the partitioning of m-dimensional lattice graphs using Fiedler's approach, which requires the determination of the eigenvector belonging to the second smallest Eigenvalue of the Laplacian with K-means partitioning algorithm.

  10. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  11. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  12. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Chung (Richland, WA); Whitney, Paul (Richland, WA); Thomas, Jim (Richland, WA)

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.

  13. Recent Advances in Hyperspectral Signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    , rare minerals in geology, special species in agriculture and ecology, waste in environmental monitoring on endmember extraction, Chapter 4 on unsupervised classification, Chapter 5 on background suppression Chapters 2- 5, 7). Chapter 2: Pixel Purity Index-Based Algorithms for Endmember Extraction from Hyper

  14. Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

  15. SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1 Introduction In this paper we consider the range of security security has been exerted. However, the techniques described are of general applicability by a security technique; in doing so we will distinguish between security features and security techniques (or

  16. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, John S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  17. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  18. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes in Thickness and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes: To date, detailed studies of the thickness of coatings using surface plasmon resonance have been limited a significant improvement to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) that allows this sensitive technique

  19. M-FISH IMAGE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION Yu-Ping Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poirazi, Yiota

    M-FISH IMAGE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION Yu-Ping Wang School of Computing and Engineering hybridization (M-FISH) imaging is a recently developed cytogenetic technique for cancer diagnosis and research on genetic disorders. By simultaneously viewing the multiple-labeled specimens in different color channels, M-FISH

  20. Blind deconvolution of human brain SPECT images using a distribution mixture estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    radioactive isotopes injected in the human body. Contrary to other medical imaging techniques, such as X­ray the human brain, by measuring and visualizing the level of blood flow. This study of regional Cerebral Blood of the imaging system. A body of theoretical and experimental work has led to approximate this transfer function

  1. A structural basis for developmental dyslexia: Evidence from diffusion tensor imaging Russell A. Poldrack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poldrack, Russ

    A structural basis for developmental dyslexia: Evidence from diffusion tensor imaging Russell A: 617-726-7422 Email: poldrack@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu #12;Poldrack ­ DTI and dyslexia 2 Abstract Studies of developmental dyslexia using functional imaging techniques have found disrupted activation of the left angular

  2. THREE-DIMENSIONAL LONGWAVE INFRARED (LWIR) SYNTHETIC IMAGE GENERATION INCORPORATING ANGULAR EMJSSWITY EFFECTS USING RAY-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    . These routines require a sequence of images to evaluate tracking algorithms. The evaluation of sensor performanceTHREE-DIMENSIONAL LONGWAVE INFRARED (LWIR) SYNTHETIC IMAGE GENERATION INCORPORATING ANGULAR Memorial Drive Rochester, New York 14623-0887 ABSTRAO A technique for longwave infrared (LWIR) synthetic

  3. ON RE-SAMPLING OF SOLAR IMAGES C. E. DeFOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Craig

    ON RE-SAMPLING OF SOLAR IMAGES C. E. DeFOREST Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO, U.S.A. (e-mail: deforest@boulder.swri.edu) (Received 14 August; accepted 18 September 2003) Abstract. Digital image data, such as super-radial expansion of a coronal hole (DeForest et al., 1997). While the theory and techniques

  4. Optimization of X-ray Radiographic Imaging Birsen Yazici, Il-Young Son, An Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazici, Birsen

    while minimizing the patient dose. Digital phantoms are generated using the virtual photographic Synopsis This chapter presents x-ray image quality optimization techniques using digital phantom images quality analysis. Absorbed doses in organs and tissues of the segmented VIP-Man phantom are obtained from

  5. Learning Methods for Lung Tumor Markerless Gating in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dy, Jennifer G.

    Learning Methods for Lung Tumor Markerless Gating in Image-Guided Radiotherapy Ying Cui Dept. For gated lung cancer radiotherapy, it is difficult to generate ac- curate gating signals due to the large techniques, we apply them on five sequences of fluoroscopic images from five lung cancer patients against

  6. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  7. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  8. Reflection type of terahertz imaging system using a high-T{sub c} superconducting oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, T.; Minami, H.; Kadowaki, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Division of Materials Science, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Nakade, K.; Saiwai, Y.; Kitamura, T.; Watanabe, C.; Ishida, K.; Sekimoto, S.; Asanuma, K.; Yasui, T.; Shibano, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Markovi?, B.; Mirkovi?, J. [Faculty of Sciences, University of Montenegro, George Washington Str., 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro); Tsujimoto, M. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Wide Bandgap Materials Group, Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, Environment and Energy Materials Division, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection type of imaging system is shown at sub-terahertz frequencies generated from high-T{sub c} superconducting intrinsic Josephson junction mesa structures fabricated by single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+?} to demonstrate how the sub-terahertz imaging technique using monochromatic radiation is powerful and unique for the variety of practical applications. Several examples are discussed in detail and are compared to other terahertz imaging systems.

  9. RECOVERY ACT: MULTIMODAL IMAGING FOR SOLAR CELL MICROCRACK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janice Hudgings; Lawrence Domash

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Undetected microcracks in solar cells are a principal cause of failure in service due to subsequent weather exposure, mechanical flexing or diurnal temperature cycles. Existing methods have not been able to detect cracks early enough in the production cycle to prevent inadvertent shipment to customers. This program, sponsored under the DOE Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies program, studied the feasibility of quantifying surface micro-discontinuities by use of a novel technique, thermoreflectance imaging, to detect surface temperature gradients with very high spatial resolution, in combination with a suite of conventional imaging methods such as electroluminescence. The project carried out laboratory tests together with computational image analyses using sample solar cells with known defects supplied by industry sources or DOE National Labs. Quantitative comparisons between the effectiveness of the new technique and conventional methods were determined in terms of the smallest detectable crack. Also the robustness of the new technique for reliable microcrack detection was determined at various stages of processing such as before and after antireflectance treatments. An overall assessment is that the new technique compares favorably with existing methods such as lock-in thermography or ultrasonics. The project was 100% completed in Sept, 2010. A detailed report of key findings from this program was published as: Q.Zhou, X.Hu, K.Al-Hemyari, K.McCarthy, L.Domash and J.Hudgings, High spatial resolution characterization of silicon solar cells using thermoreflectance imaging, J. Appl. Phys, 110, 053108 (2011).

  10. Stylized Rendering Using Samples of a Painted Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Stylized Rendering Using Samples of a Painted Image Chung-Ren Yan, Ming-Te Chi, Tong-Yee Lee painterly art maps (PAMs) for 3D nonphotorealistic rendering. Our technique can automatically transfer complicated ones with significant variations in stroke characteristics. During the rendering or animation

  11. 3.4 Wavelet Denoising for Image Enhancement SBC Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajashekar, Umesh

    3.4 Wavelet Denoising for Image Enhancement Dong Wei SBC Laboratories Austin, TX 78759 Umesh. Recently, wavelet-based denoising techniques have been recognized as powerful tools for denois- ing. Different from those filtering-based classical methods, wavelet-based methods can be viewed as transform

  12. Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

  13. BEaST: Brain Extraction based on nonlocal Segmentation Technique Simon F. Eskildsena,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BEaST: Brain Extraction based on nonlocal Segmentation Technique Simon F. Eskildsena,b, , PierrickConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, 3801 University Street Research Centre (DRC), UCL Institute of Neurology, Queens Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK Abstract ­ Brain

  14. A practical post-processing technique for real-time block-based coding system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Chris Y. H.

    1 A practical post-processing technique for real-time block-based coding system Yuk-Hee Chan, Sung to restore the images encoded with block-based compression standards such as JPEG. This method classi es with the reported post-processing methods. Keywords| I. Introduction THE Joint Photographic Experts Group JPEG im

  15. MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES TO DIAGNOSE BREAST CANCER FROM IMAGEPROCESSED NUCLEAR FEATURES OF FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Nick

    1 MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES TO DIAGNOSE BREAST CANCER FROM IMAGE­PROCESSED NUCLEAR FEATURES.91 +/­ 0.07 and the mean specificity was 0.87 +/­ 0.18. The relatively high standard deviations indicate and Hermans [9] emphasized the need for developing individual performance characteristics for persons doing

  16. Instruments and Methods Glacier velocities from time-lapse photos: technique development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Instruments and Methods Glacier velocities from time-lapse photos: technique development and first West Greenland marine-terminating glaciers as part of the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS). EIS cameras began imaging the lowest 4 km2 of the glacier at hourly intervals throughout sunlit periods of the year

  17. A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography for a digital mammography system and demonstrate the potential for dose reduction in comparison Nicole T. Rangera Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University

  18. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  19. Overview of Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, R.B.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on Rn is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

  20. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  1. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Endres, Christopher [Johns Hopkins University; Foss, Catherine [Johns Hopkins University; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins University; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins University; Goddard Jr, James Samuel [ORNL; Lee, Seung Joon [Jefferson Lab; McKisson, John [Jefferson Lab; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Stolin, Alexander [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Jefferson Lab; Pomper, Martin [Johns Hopkins University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Endres, Christopher J. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Foss, Catherine A. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Goddard, James S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; McKisson, John [JLAB; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland; Stolin, Alexander V. [West Virginia University; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Pomper, Martin G. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  3. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhensheng; Zhang He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2320 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  4. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Alshede Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems,uk,pto,lkh@imm.dtu.dk Abstract In this paper we present a Bayesian method to enhance functional 3D PET images using apriori as a true PET­MR result, and further more show how to obtain the desired information from the MR images. 1

  5. Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:Drill CoreTechniques

  6. Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric PowerTechniques Jump

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 24, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2005 199 Half-Time Image Reconstruction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Reconstruction in Thermoacoustic Tomography Mark A. Anastasio*, Jin Zhang, Xiaochuan Pan, Yu Zou, Geng Ku, and Lihong V. Wang Abstract--Thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is an emerging imaging technique with great, reflectivity tomography, spherical Radon transform, thermoacoustic tomography. I. INTRODUCTION THERMOACOUSTIC

  8. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  9. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  10. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  11. Blind Date: Using proper motions to determine the ages of historical images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan T. Barron; David W. Hogg; Dustin Lang; Sam Roweis

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrometric calibration is based on patterns of cataloged stars and therefore effectively assumes a particular epoch, which can be substantially incorrect for historical images. With the known proper motions of stars we can "run back the clock" to an approximation of the night sky in any given year, and in principle the year that best fits stellar patterns in any given image is an estimate of the year in which that image was taken. In this paper we use 47 scanned photographic images of M44 spanning years 1910-1975 to demonstrate this technique. We use only the pixel information in the images; we use no prior information or meta-data about image pointing, scale, orientation, or date. Blind Date returns date meta-data for the input images. It also improves the astrometric calibration of the image because the final astrometric calibration is performed at the appropriate epoch. The accuracy and reliability of Blind Date are functions of image size, pointing, angular resolution, and depth; performance is related to the sum of proper-motion signal-to-noise ratios for catalog stars measured in the input image. All of the science-quality images and 85 percent of the low-quality images in our sample of photographic plate images of M44 have their dates reliably determined to within a decade, many to within months.

  12. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  13. Model building techniques for analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.

  14. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  15. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  16. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M. [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI 5234 (Switzerland); Mechanical Engineering Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland); Dangendorf, V. [Ion and Neutron Radiation Department, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig 38116 (Germany); Zboray, R. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  17. Identification and Analysis of Distinct Features in Imaging Thin-Film Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaunbrecher, K. N.; Johnston, S. W.; Sites, J. R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroluminescence and photoluminescence (EL and PL) are two imaging techniques employed at NREL that are used to qualitatively evaluate solar cells. In this work, imaging lab-scale CdTe and CIGS devices provides information about small-area PV response, which will aid in determining the effects of non-uniformities on cell performance. EL, PL, and dark lock-in thermography signatures are first catalogued. Their responses to varying conditions are then studied. Further analysis includes acquiring spectral data, making microscopy measurements, and correlating luminescence to device performance. The goal of this work is to quantitatively determine non-uniformity effects on cell performance using rapid imaging techniques.

  18. BAYESIAN ENSEMBLE LEARNING FOR MEDICAL IMAGE DENOISING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Hyuntaek

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Medical images are often affected by random noise because of both image acquisition from the medical modalities and image transmission from modalities to workspace in the main computer. Medical image denoising removes noise from the CT or MR images...

  19. Neutron Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin; Schillinger, Burkhard [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Munchen; Schulz, Michael [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Munchen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents nondestructive neutron computed tomography (nCT) measurements of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) as a method to measure ash and soot loading in the filters. Uncatalyzed and unwashcoated 200cpsi cordierite DPFs exposed to 100% biodiesel (B100) exhaust and conventional ultra low sulfur 2007 certification diesel (ULSD) exhaust at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP) are compared to a brand new (never exposed) filter. Precise structural information about the substrate as well as an attempt to quantify soot and ash loading in the channel of the DPF illustrates the potential strength of the neutron imaging technique.

  20. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom)] [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia)] [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom)] [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland) [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution recovery image reconstruction. The benefits are expected to be more substantial for more energetic positron emitting isotopes such as Oxygen-15 and Rubidium-82.

  1. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  2. Subranging technique using superconducting technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Deepnarayan (Hawthorne, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subranging techniques using "digital SQUIDs" are used to design systems with large dynamic range, high resolution and large bandwidth. Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) embodying the invention include a first SQUID based "coarse" resolution circuit and a second SQUID based "fine" resolution circuit to convert an analog input signal into "coarse" and "fine" digital signals for subsequent processing. In one embodiment, an ADC includes circuitry for supplying an analog input signal to an input coil having at least a first inductive section and a second inductive section. A first superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is coupled to the first inductive section and a second SQUID is coupled to the second inductive section. The first SQUID is designed to produce "coarse" (large amplitude, low resolution) output signals and the second SQUID is designed to produce "fine" (low amplitude, high resolution) output signals in response to the analog input signals.

  3. Calibrated Ultra Fast Image Simulations for the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruderer, Claudio; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Berge, Joel; Gamper, Lukas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak lensing by large-scale structure is a powerful technique to probe the dark components of the universe. To understand the measurement process of weak lensing and the associated systematic effects, image simulations are becoming increasingly important. For this purpose we present a first implementation of the $\\textit{Monte Carlo Control Loops}$ ($\\textit{MCCL}$; Refregier & Amara 2014), a coherent framework for studying systematic effects in weak lensing. It allows us to model and calibrate the shear measurement process using image simulations from the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig; Berge et al. 2013). We apply this framework to a subset of the data taken during the Science Verification period (SV) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We calibrate the UFig simulations to be statistically consistent with DES images. We then perform tolerance analyses by perturbing the simulation parameters and study their impact on the shear measurement at the one-point level. This allows us to determine the relative im...

  4. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  5. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Thibault, P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Beetz, T. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Elser, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Jacobsen, C. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Kirz, J. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Lima, E. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Miao, H. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Neiman, A. M. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sayre, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  6. Fast imaging applications in the Nuclear Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lear, R.

    1983-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of fast imaging employ both streak cameras and fast framing techniques. Image intensifier tubes are gated to provide fast two-dimensional shutters of 2 to 3 ns duration with shatter ratios of greater than 10/sup 6/ and resolution greater than 10/sup 4/ pixels. Shutters of less than 1 ns have been achieved with experimental tubes. Characterization data demonstrate the importance of tube and pulser design. Streak cameras are used to simultaneously record temporal and intensity information from up to 200 spatial points. Streak cameras are combined with remote readout for downhole uses and are coupled to fiber optic cables for uphole uses. Optical wavelength multiplexing is being studied as a means of compressing additional image data onto optical fibers. Performance data demonstrate trade-offs between image resolution and system sensitivity.

  7. Biological Imaging by Soft X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro,D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; et al.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  8. The FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Onyshczak, R.J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Hopper, T. [Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  9. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Radiolucent Foreign Body from an EVAR Device by Combining Different Image Modalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbiero, Giulio, E-mail: giuliobarbiero@katamail.co [St. Bassiano Hospital, Department of Radiology (Italy); Cognolato, Diego [St. Bassiano Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Polverosi, Roberta; Guarise, Alessandro [St. Bassiano Hospital, Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Percutaneous extraction techniques are an established method for removing endovascular foreign bodies. Generally, the foreign body to be removed is radiopaque (i.e., catheter and guidewire fragments, vena cava filters, embolization coils, endovascular stents). We propose an application of these techniques to remove a radiolucent foreign body (i.e., pigtail cover) by means of a combination of different imaging techniques (fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, ultrasound, and computed axial tomography).

  10. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  11. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

  12. Optimization Online - Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugurel Ionut Andreica

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 23, 2008 ... Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several Multidimensional Geometric Data Management and Analysis Problems. Mugurel Ionut ...

  13. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  14. Variable waveband infrared imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  15. Multi-Image or Lap-Dissolve Slide Techniques and Visual Images in the Large Lecture Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodner, George M.

    which he visited,the author was told that manv of the students bad to brine field elassesin order to see

  16. Anniversary Paper: Image processing and manipulation through the pages of Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armato, Samuel G. III; Ginneken, Bram van [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Room Q0S.459, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The language of radiology has gradually evolved from ''the film'' (the foundation of radiology since Wilhelm Roentgen's 1895 discovery of x-rays) to ''the image,'' an electronic manifestation of a radiologic examination that exists within the bits and bytes of a computer. Rather than simply storing and displaying radiologic images in a static manner, the computational power of the computer may be used to enhance a radiologist's ability to visually extract information from the image through image processing and image manipulation algorithms. Image processing tools provide a broad spectrum of opportunities for image enhancement. Gray-level manipulations such as histogram equalization, spatial alterations such as geometric distortion correction, preprocessing operations such as edge enhancement, and enhanced radiography techniques such as temporal subtraction provide powerful methods to improve the diagnostic quality of an image or to enhance structures of interest within an image. Furthermore, these image processing algorithms provide the building blocks of more advanced computer vision methods. The prominent role of medical physicists and the AAPM in the advancement of medical image processing methods, and in the establishment of the ''image'' as the fundamental entity in radiology and radiation oncology, has been captured in 35 volumes of Medical Physics.

  17. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hyperspectral imaging for the discovery of blind geothermal resources * Coiled-tube drilling - Demonstrate coiled tube drilling in a geothermal environment 5 | US DOE Geothermal...

  18. Alum Innovative Exploration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hyperspectral imaging for the discovery of blind geothermal resources * Coiled-tube drilling - Demonstrate coiled tube drilling in a geothermal environment 5 | US DOE Geothermal...

  19. Resonant-cavity-enhanced multispectral infrared photodetectors for monolithic integration on silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianfei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multispectral infrared (IR) detection has been widely employed for numerous applications including hyperspectral imaging, IR spectroscopy, and target identification. Traditional multispectral detection technology is based ...

  20. Optimization Online - A Block Coordinate Descent Method for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangyang Xu

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 10, 2012 ... The algorithms were tested on synthetic data, hyperspectral data, as well as image sets from the ... Visitors, Authors, More about us, Links.

  1. arXiv:1302.4385v1 [stat.ML] 18 Feb 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 18, 2013 ... Page 1 ... separability means that, for each topic, there exists a word associated only with that topic; see [2, 3]. • In hyperspectral imaging, where ...

  2. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  3. Nuclear imaging of the breast: Translating achievements in instrumentation into clinical use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hruska, Carrie B.; O'Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Approaches to imaging the breast with nuclear medicine and/or molecular imaging methods have been under investigation since the late 1980s when a technique called scintimammography was first introduced. This review charts the progress of nuclear imaging of the breast over the last 20 years, covering the development of newer techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging, molecular breast imaging, and positron emission mammography. Key issues critical to the adoption of these technologies in the clinical environment are discussed, including the current status of clinical studies, the efforts at reducing the radiation dose from procedures associated with these technologies, and the relevant radiopharmaceuticals that are available or under development. The necessary steps required to move these technologies from bench to bedside are also discussed.

  4. Combined 3D PET and Optical Projection Tomography Techniques for Plant Root Phenotyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qiang; Mathews, Aswin J; Li, Ke; Topp, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New imaging techniques are in great demand for investigating underground plant roots systems which play an important role in crop production. Compared with other non-destructive imaging modalities, PET can image plant roots in natural soil and produce dynamic 3D functional images which reveal the temporal dynamics of plant-environment interactions. In this study, we combined PET with optical projection tomography (OPT) to evaluate its potential for plant root phenotyping. We used a dedicated high resolution plant PET imager that has a 14 cm transaxial and 10 cm axial field of views, and multi-bed imaging capability. The image resolution is around 1.25 mm using ML-EM reconstruction algorithm. B73 inbred maize seeds were germinated and then grown in a sealed jar with transparent gel-based media. PET scanning started on the day when the first green leaf appeared, and was carried out once a day for 5 days. Each morning, around 10 mCi of 11CO2 was administrated into a custom built plant labeling chamber. After 10 ...

  5. ARPEFS as an analytic technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two modifications to the ARPEFS technique are introduced. These are studied using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) as a model system. The first modification is the obtaining of ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves at temperatures as low as our equipment will permit. While adding to the difficulty of the experiment, this modification is shown to almost double the signal-to-noise ratio of normal emission p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) {chi}(k) curves. This is shown by visual comparison of the raw data and by the improved precision of the extracted structural parameters. The second change is the replacement of manual fitting of the Fourier filtered {chi}(k) curves by the use of the simplex algorithm for parameter determination. Again using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) data, this is shown to result in better agreement between experimental {chi}(k) curves and curves calculated based on model structures. The improved ARPEFS is then applied to p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) and ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) R30{degree}S/Ni(111). For p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) we find a S-Cu bond length of 2.26 {Angstrom}, with the S adatom 1.31 {Angstrom} above the fourfold hollow site. The second Cu layer appears to be corrugated. Analysis of the p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) data indicates that the S adatom adatom adsorbs onto the FCC threefold hollow site 1.53 {Angstrom} above the Ni surface. The S-Ni bond length is determined to be 2.13 {Angstrom}, indicating an outwards shift of the first layer Ni atoms. We are unable to assign a unique structure to ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3)R30{degree}S/Ni(111). An analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of ARPEFS as an experimental and analytic technique is presented, along with a summary of problems still to be addressed.

  6. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Philips Technologie GmbH, Roentgenstrasse 24, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Pathology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Institute of Pathology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Interdisciplinary Breast Center Baden, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404 Baden (Switzerland); Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Switzerland and Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  7. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  8. Chemical imaging of thermoplastic olefin (TPO) surface architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, H.R. [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). School of Pharmacy] [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). School of Pharmacy; Turner, J.F. II [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Center for Light Microscope Imaging and Biotechnology] [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Center for Light Microscope Imaging and Biotechnology; Munro, B.; Ryntz, R.A. [Visteon Automotive Systems, Dearborn, MI (United States)] [Visteon Automotive Systems, Dearborn, MI (United States); Treado, P.J. [ChemIcon Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [ChemIcon Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the automotive industry, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) is mixed with polypropylene (PP) to form a thermoplastic olefin (TPO) for use as car bumpers and fascia. An adhesion promoting primer, chlorinated polyolefin (CPO), is spray coated onto the TPO surface to increase adhesion of the base and clear coat paints to the low surface free energy TPO substrate. The surface morphology of rubber domains within the CPO-coated TPO substrate contributes strongly to the material characteristics, including impact resistance and adhesion properties. However, elastomer-phase analysis is challenging using traditional microanalysis imaging techniques. The authors employ fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging to characterize the TPO architecture in order to better understand the surface properties of coated TPO. Fluorescence imaging makes use of Nile red (NR), a fluorescent solvatochromic dye, solvated in the primer, which is effective in differentiating rubber from polypropylene on the basis of large variations in the fluorescence quantum efficiency. Confocal fluorescence chemical imaging performed on T PO coated with NR-doped CPO shows a thin (2--3 {micro}m) layer of elastomer that has migrated to the TPO surface. Raman chemical imaging is in direct agreement with the fluorescence experiments by measuring the intrinsic vibrational signatures of CPO, EPR, and PP without the need for dyes or stains. Raman contrast is enhanced using cosine correlation analysis, a novel multivariate processing technique that provides chemical contrast on the basis of differences in spectral shape.

  9. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  10. Wavelets in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H. [Sharda University, SET, Department of Electronics and Communication, Knowledge Park 3rd, Gr. Noida (India); University of Kocaeli, Department of Mathematics, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Istanbul Aydin University, Department of Computer Engineering, 34295 Istanbul (Turkey); Sharda University, SET, Department of Mathematics, 32-34 Knowledge Park 3rd, Greater Noida (India)

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  11. Fundamentals of Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem · The Fourier transform components · Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want to understand

  12. \\NeuroImage" Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Ã?rup

    International Neuroimaging Consortium Introduction Author cocitation analysis describes a scienti#12;c #12;eld on data collected by the Institute of Scien- ti#12;c Information among a limited set of key au- thors within a #12;eld. Here we work on data from a single journal (the journal \\NeuroImage") down- loaded from

  13. VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL SIMULATION TECHNIQUE FOR NATURAL CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on advanced passive cooling techniques. Systems Analysis andand fabrica- tion techniques. Cooling Systems Research. This

  14. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging at ultra-low fields is realized by incorporating the high sensitivities of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with the high polarizations attainable through optica11y pumping {sup 129}Xe gas.

  15. Fuzzy logic approach to supervised segmentation of forest regions infested by Southern Pine Beetle using color airborne images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Kit-Tong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital image processing technique and fuzzy logic approach are used to identify forest areas infested with Southern Pine Beetle, SPB, using normal color airborne imageries in this research. This research will be used as a front end of a larger...

  16. Efficient MR image reconstruction for compressed MR imaging Junzhou Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    to be very powerful for the MR image reconstruction. First, we decompose the original problem into L1 and TV.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in medical. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used in practical MR image

  17. Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

  18. Stratigraphic statistical curvature analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtson, C.A.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCAT applies statistical techniques to dipmeter data to identify patterns of bulk curvature, determine transverse and longitudinal structural directions, and reconstruct cross sections and contour maps. STRAT-SCAT applies the same concepts to geometric interpretation of multistoried unimodal, bimodal, or trough-type cross-bedding and also to seismic stratigraphy-scale stratigraphic structures. Structural dip, which comprises the bulk of dipmeter data, is related to beds that (statistically) were deposited with horizontal attitudes; stratigraphic dip is related to beds that were deposited with preferentially oriented nonhorizontal attitudes or to beds that assumed such attitudes because of differential compaction. Stratigraphic dip generates local zones of departure from structural dip on special SCAT plots. The RMS (root-mean-square) of apparent structural dip is greatest in the (structural) T-direction and least in the perpendicular L-direction; the RMS of stratigraphic dip (measured with respect to structural dip) is greatest in the stratigraphic T*-direction and least in the stratigraphic L*-direction. Multistoried, cross-bedding appears on T*-plots as local zones of either greater scatter or statistically significant departure of stratigraphic median dip from structural dip. In contrast, the L*-plot (except for trough-type cross-bedding) is sensitive to cross-bedding. Seismic stratigraphy-scale depositional sequences are identified on Mercator dip versus azimuth plots and polar tangent plots as secondary cylindrical-fold patterns imposed on global structural patterns. Progradational sequences generate local cycloid-type patterns on T*-plots, and compactional sequences generate local cycloid-type patterns on T*-plots, and compactional sequences generate local half-cusp patterns. Both features, however, show only structural dip on L*-plots.

  19. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  20. Detection and Imaging of He_2 Molecules in Superfluid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Rellergert; S. B. Cahn; A. Garvan; J. C. Hanson; W. H. Lippincott; J. A. Nikkel; D. N. McKinsey

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data that show a cycling transition can be used to detect and image metastable He$_2$ triplet molecules in superfluid helium. We demonstrate that limitations on the cycling efficiency due to the vibrational structure of the molecule can be mitigated by the use of repumping lasers. Images of the molecules obtained using the method are also shown. This technique gives rise to a new kind of ionizing radiation detector. The use of He$_2$ triplet molecules as tracer particles in the superfluid promises to be a powerful tool for visualization of both quantum and classical turbulence in liquid helium.

  1. Ultrafast imaging interferometry at femtosecond-laser-excited surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temnov, Vasily V.; Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Zhou Ping; Linde, Dietrich von der [Experimentelle Physik IIb, Universitaet Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and robust setup for femtosecond time-resolved imaging interferometry of surfaces is described. The apparatus is capable of measuring both very small phase shifts ({approx}3x10{sup -2} rad) and amplitude changes ({approx}1%) with micrometer spatial resolution ({approx}1 {mu}m). Interferograms are processed using a 2D-Fourier transform algorithm. We discuss the image formation and the physical interpretation of the measured interferograms. The technique is applied to measure transient changes of a GaAs surface irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses with fluences near the ablation threshold.

  2. Computational radiology and imaging with the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MCNP, a 3D coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently used in medical applications such as cancer radiation treatment planning, interpretation of diagnostic radiation images, and treatment beam optimization. This paper will discuss MCNP`s current uses and capabilities, as well as envisioned improvements that would further enhance MCNP role in computational medicine. It will be demonstrated that the methodology exists to simulate medical images (e.g. SPECT). Techniques will be discussed that would enable the construction of 3D computational geometry models of individual patients for use in patient-specific studies that would improve the quality of care for patients.

  3. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Fluids & Fractures - time lapse MTCSEM for fluid imaging - joint CSEM-MTseismic imaging ??? - use MEQ focal information with EM Imaging ScientificTechnical Approach...

  4. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  5. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz [Siemens AG Corporate Technology, 80200 Muenchen (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Siemens AG Corporate Technology, 80200 Muenchen (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  6. SIMS imaging of Al-Li alloy welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, K.K.; Levi-Setti, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Shah, S. [Lockheed Martin, Huntsville, AL (United States); Gentz, S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL (United States). Marshall Space Flight Center

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a powerful method for imaging microanalysis of materials. The technique involves bombardment (and consequent slow erosion) of a solid surface with an energetic ion beam, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the ejected secondary ions to determine their quantity and sample origin. This technique enables detection of all elements and isotopes, many of them with excellent sensitivity. An added benefit is the ability to examine bulk samples polished using standard metallographic methods. When SIMS is performed in conjunction with focused ion beams, the result is surface compositional maps having high lateral resolution (35 to 100 nm). This article describes the role of SIMS in understanding the chemical phenomena associated with the formation of complex microstructures in a welded aluminum-lithium alloy. The technique is ideally suited to the study of aluminum-lithium alloys because of its extremely high sensitivity for lithium, in contrast to the virtual insensitivity of other techniques.

  7. Comparative analysis of nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques for breast MRI segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacobs, Michael A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States) and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Visualization of anatomical structures using radiological imaging methods is an important tool in medicine to differentiate normal from pathological tissue and can generate large amounts of data for a radiologist to read. Integrating these large data sets is difficult and time-consuming. A new approach uses both supervised and unsupervised advanced machine learning techniques to visualize and segment radiological data. This study describes the application of a novel hybrid scheme, based on combining wavelet transform and nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods, to breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using three well-established NLDR techniques, namely, ISOMAP, local linear embedding (LLE), and diffusion maps (DfM), to perform a comparative performance analysis. Methods: Twenty-five breast lesion subjects were scanned using a 3T scanner. MRI sequences used were T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging. The hybrid scheme consisted of two steps: preprocessing and postprocessing of the data. The preprocessing step was applied for B{sub 1} inhomogeneity correction, image registration, and wavelet-based image compression to match and denoise the data. In the postprocessing step, MRI parameters were considered data dimensions and the NLDR-based hybrid approach was applied to integrate the MRI parameters into a single image, termed the embedded image. This was achieved by mapping all pixel intensities from the higher dimension to a lower dimensional (embedded) space. For validation, the authors compared the hybrid NLDR with linear methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) using synthetic data. For the clinical application, the authors used breast MRI data, comparison was performed using the postcontrast DCE MRI image and evaluating the congruence of the segmented lesions. Results: The NLDR-based hybrid approach was able to define and segment both synthetic and clinical data. In the synthetic data, the authors demonstrated the performance of the NLDR method compared with conventional linear DR methods. The NLDR approach enabled successful segmentation of the structures, whereas, in most cases, PCA and MDS failed. The NLDR approach was able to segment different breast tissue types with a high accuracy and the embedded image of the breast MRI data demonstrated fuzzy boundaries between the different types of breast tissue, i.e., fatty, glandular, and tissue with lesions (>86%). Conclusions: The proposed hybrid NLDR methods were able to segment clinical breast data with a high accuracy and construct an embedded image that visualized the contribution of different radiological parameters.

  8. Fourier Analysis of Ghost Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honglin Liu; Jing Cheng; Yanfeng Bai; Shensheng Han

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier analysis of ghost imaging (FAGI) is proposed in this paper to analyze the properties of ghost imaging with thermal light sources. This new theory is compatible with the general correlation theory of intensity fluctuation and could explain some amazed phenomena. Furthermore we design a series of experiments to verify the new theory and investigate the inherent properties of ghost imaging.

  9. Automated Very Low Magnification Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the entire available imaging area on the grid. The VLM image can then be used as a reference map of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801. A typical TEM specimen grid provides approximately a 2x2 mm area that is available for imaging. In order to identify and locate suitable targets on the grid

  10. Application of a nudging technique to thermoacoustic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnefond, Xavier

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ThermoAcoustic Tomography (TAT) is a promising, non invasive, medical imaging technique whose inverse problem can be formulated as an initial condition reconstruction. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm originally designed to correct the state of an evolution model, the \\emph{back and forth nudging} (BFN), for the TAT inverse problem. We show that the flexibility of this algorithm enables to consider a quite general framework for TAT. The backward nudging algorithm is studied and a proof of the geometrical convergence rate of the BFN is given. A method based on Conjugate Gradient (CG) is also introduced. Finally, numerical experiments validate the theoretical results with a better BFN convergence rate for more realistic setups and a comparison is established between BFN, CG and a usual inversion method.

  11. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Kye-Si, E-mail: kskwon@sch.ac.kr; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Soonchunhyang University 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Hyun-Seok [Department of Electrical and Robot Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  12. A Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    dual-energy X-ray images for better object classification and threat detection. The fusion stepA Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage-based noise reduction technique which is very efficient in removing background noise from fused X-ray images

  13. IMAGING OF EARLY-STAGE CRACKING ON REAL-SIZE CONCRETE STRUCTURE FROM 4-POINTS BENDING TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMAGING OF EARLY-STAGE CRACKING ON REAL-SIZE CONCRETE STRUCTURE FROM 4-POINTS BENDING TEST Yuxiang difficulty on complexes material such as concrete, which is in part due the use of coherent waves in a very the application of this new technique on a real-size 15 tons concrete structure for imaging early-stage cracking

  14. Application of phase consistency to improve time efficiency and image quality in dual echo black-blood carotid angiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Application of phase consistency to improve time efficiency and image quality in dual echo black-blood significant potential for improving noninvasive imaging of blood vessels and enabling better assessment of the degree and nature of vascular disease. Black-blood MRA techniques [1­8], in which the signal from flowing

  15. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  16. Multimode imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting and locating a source of gamma rays of energies ranging from 10-20 keV to several MeV's includes plural gamma ray detectors arranged in a generally closed extended array so as to provide Compton scattering imaging and coded aperture imaging simultaneously. First detectors are arranged in a spaced manner about a surface defining the closed extended array which may be in the form a circle, a sphere, a square, a pentagon or higher order polygon. Some of the gamma rays are absorbed by the first detectors closest to the gamma source in Compton scattering, while the photons that go unabsorbed by passing through gaps disposed between adjacent first detectors are incident upon second detectors disposed on the side farthest from the gamma ray source, where the first spaced detectors form a coded aperture array for two or three dimensional gamma ray source detection.

  17. Simultaneous imaging/reflectivity measurements to assess diagnostic mirror cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, C. H.; Gentile, C. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Doerner, R. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical methods to clean ITER's diagnostic mirrors and restore reflectivity will be critical to ITER's plasma operations. We describe a technique to assess the efficacy of mirror cleaning techniques and detect any damage to the mirror surface. The method combines microscopic imaging and reflectivity measurements in the red, green, and blue spectral regions and at selected wavelengths. The method has been applied to laser cleaning of single crystal molybdenum mirrors coated with either carbon or beryllium films 150-420 nm thick. It is suitable for hazardous materials such as beryllium as the mirrors remain sealed in a vacuum chamber.

  18. A method for space-variant deblurring with application to adaptive optics imaging in astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Camera, Andrea; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Boccacci, Patrizia; Bertero, Mario; Bellazzini, Michele; Ciliegi, Paolo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Images from adaptive optics systems are generally affected by significant distortions of the point spread function (PSF) across the field of view, depending on the position of natural and artificial guide stars. Image reduction techniques circumventing or mitigating these effects are important tools to take full advantage of the scientific information encoded in AO images. The aim of this paper is to propose a method for the deblurring of the astronomical image, given a set of samples of the space-variant PSF. The method is based on a partitioning of the image domain into regions of isoplanatism and on applying suitable deconvolution methods with boundary effects correction to each region. The effectiveness of the boundary effects correction is proved. Moreover, the criterion for extending the disjoint sections to partially overlapping sections is validated. The method is applied to simulated images of a stellar system characterized by a spatially variable PSF. We obtain good photometric quality, and therefor...

  19. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Upper Gate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process.

  20. Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan, Hao, E-mail: haonan@stanford.edu; Arbabian, Amin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17?dB in SNR is demonstrated.