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1

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Germany 51 254 700 ... June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 18

2

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources: An Assessment of 137 Shale Formations in 41 Countries Outside the United States June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 1 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

3

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas and billion barrels (Bbbl) of shale oil for each major shale formation. Risked Recoverable Gas and Oil, reported in trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of shale gas and

4

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

proved natural gas reserves (3) 2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR,

5

Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: United States Geological Survey, "Economics of Undiscovered Oil in the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge," 1998. Return to 2.

6

Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil at 95 Percent, Mean, and 5 Percent Probabilities for Given Oil Prices as a Percentage of Technically Recoverable Oil for the ANWR 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope...

7

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: Proved Reserves: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 2010 (August 2012).

8

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Proved Reserves, Crude Oil," "Proved Reserves, Lease Condensate," and "Proved Reserves, Natural Gas" in Glossary. 7 Includes Federal offshore and State ...

9

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Methodology to Determine both the Technically Recoverable Resource and the Economically Recoverable Resource in an Unconventional Gas Play  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past decade, the worldwide demand for energy has continued to increase at a rapid rate. Natural gas has emerged as a primary source of US energy. The technically recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have increased from approximately 1,400 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) to approximately 2,100 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2010. The recent declines in gas prices have created short-term uncertainties and increased the risk of developing natural gas fields, rendering a substantial portion of this resource uneconomical at current gas prices. This research quantifies the impact of changes in finding and development costs (FandDC), lease operating expenses (LOE), and gas prices, in the estimation of the economically recoverable gas for unconventional plays. To develop our methodology, we have performed an extensive economic analysis using data from the Barnett Shale, as a representative case study. We have used the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the values of the Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for all the wells in a given gas play, to determine the values of the P10 (10th percentile), P50 (50th percentile), and P90 (90th percentile) from the CDF. We then use these probability values to calculate the technically recoverable resource (TRR) for the play, and determine the economically recoverable resource (ERR) as a function of FandDC, LOE, and gas price. Our selected investment hurdle for a development project is a 20 percent rate of return and a payout of 5 years or less. Using our methodology, we have developed software to solve the problem. For the Barnett Shale data, at a FandDC of 3 Million dollars, we have found that 90 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 46 dollars/Mcf, 50 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 9.2 dollars/Mcf, and 10 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 5.2 dollars/Mcf. The developed methodology and software can be used to analyze other unconventional gas plays to reduce short-term uncertainties and determine the values of FandDC and gas prices that are required to recover economically a certain percentage of TRR.

Almadani, Husameddin Saleh A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the natural gas potential of the Devonian Age shales of West Virginia. For this, the study: (1) compiles the latest geological and reservoir data to establish the gas in-place; (2) analyzes and models the dominant gas production mechanisms; and (3) examines alternative well stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering the in-place gas. The major findings of the study include the following: (1) The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Huron, Rhinestreet, and Marcellus intervals) in West Virginia is estimated to range from 11 to 44 trillion cubic feet. (2) The Devonian shales in this state entail great geological diversity; the highly fractured, permeable shales in the southwest respond well to traditional development practices while the deep, tight shales in the eastern and northern parts of the state will require new, larger scale well stimulation technology. (3) Beyond the currently developed Huron and Rhinestreet shale intervals, the Marcellus shale offers a third attractive gas zone, particularly in the north central portion of the state. 21 references, 53 figures, 27 tables.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermal conversion of oil shale into recoverable hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrocarbons is accomplished by pyrolysis of oil shale with controlled removal of the resulting layer of spent oil-shale residue. A procedure is described for the in situ thermal conversion of oil shale wherein fluidized abrasive particles are employed to foster improved hydrocarbon production, in amount and kind, by a controlled partial removal of the layer of spent oil shale which results from application of flowing fluids to heat exposed surfaces of the oil shale to release hydrocarbons. (5 claims)

Slusser, M.L.; Bramhall, W.E.

1969-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Table 4. Crude oil production and resources (million barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved shale oil technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved oil TRR, including reserve growth

16

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

so as to include NGPL. 7 Totals might not equal the sum of the components due to independent rounding. 8 Total of regions. June 2013

17

Oil shale technical data handbook  

SciTech Connect

This is a reference book to provide information for the evaluation of appropriate technology for shale oil development. The oil resource is defined, and the properties of shale and the oil and gas derived from it are listed. Recovery technologies compatible with the particular resource are also described. Discussion of various aspects of shale oil development, such as mining, materials handling, beneficiation, upgrading, waste-water treatment, and spent shale disposal, are also presented. Available design information dealing with maximum module size, operating conditions, yields, utility requirements, etc. is documented. (BLM)

Nowacki, P. (ed.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

19

Enhanced oil recovery data base and simplified process models  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, the U.S. Department of Energy Bartlesville Energy Technology Center initiated a program to estimate the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential in the continental U.S. The prime objectives for this program are to estimate the technically recoverable oil through utilization of current EOR technologies, to estimate the economically recoverable oil for those technologies, and to estimate the risks associated with the various EOR recovery techniques. These estimates provide the basis for studies to measure the effects of improving technologies, improved economic scenarios, reduction of risks on future levels of EOR production, and aid in determining research needs. The interaction between the databases and models is discussed. Because this database contains comprehensive information on active EOR projects nationwide, it is used as a calibration source for the models. The reservoir database, used as the data source for estimates of technically and economically recoverable oil, contains basic information on reservoirs located throughout the U.S.

Wesson, T.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Table 15. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 15. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Underground - Minable Coal Surface - Minable Coal Total Coal-Resource State Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Technical progress report, April--June 1994  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of horizontal wells are being drilled each year in the U.S.A. and around the world. Horizontal wells have increased oil and gas production rates 3 to 8 times those of vertical wells in many areas and have converted non-economic oil reserves to economic reserves. However, the use of horizontal technology in various formation types and applications has not always yielded anticipated success. The primary objective of this project is to examine factors affecting technical and economic success of horizontal well applications. The project`s goals will be accomplished through six tasks designed to evaluate the technical and economic success of horizontal drilling, highlight current limitations, and outline technical needs to overcome these limitations. Data describing operators` experiences throughout the domestic oil and gas industry will be gathered and organized. Canadian horizontal technology will also be documented with an emphasis on lessons the US industry can learn from Canada`s experience. MEI databases containing detailed horizontal case histories will also be used. All these data will be categorized and analyzed to assess the status of horizontal well technology and estimate the impact of horizontal wells on present and future domestic oil recovery and reserves.

McDonald, W.J.

1993-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

23

Quantitative analysis of the economically recoverable resource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to obtain estimates of the economically recoverable gas in the Appalachian Basin. The estimates were obtained in terms of a probability distribution, which quantifies the inherent uncertainty associated with estimates where geologic and production uncertainties prevail. It is established that well productivity on a county and regional basis is lognormally distributed, and the total recoverable gas is Normally distributed. The expected (mean), total economically recoverable gas is 20.2 trillion cubic feet (TCF) with a standard deviation of 1.6 TCF, conditional on the use of shooting technology on 160-acre well-spacing. From properties of the Normal distribution, it is seen that a 95 percent probability exists for the total recoverable gas to lie between 17.06 and 23.34 TCF. The estimates are sensitive to well spacings and the technology applied to a particular geologic environment. It is observed that with smaller well spacings - for example, at 80 acres - the estimate is substantially increased, and that advanced technology, such as foam fracturing, has the potential of significantly increasing gas recovery. However, the threshold and optimum conditions governing advanced exploitation technology, based on well spacing and other parameters, were not analyzed in this study. Their technological impact on gas recovery is mentioned in the text where relevant; and on the basis of a rough projection an additional 10 TCF could be expected with the use of foam fracturing on wells with initial open flows lower than 300 MCFD. From the exploration point of view, the lognormal distribution of well productivity suggests that even in smaller areas, such as a county basis, intense exploration might be appropriate. This is evident from the small tail probabilities of the lognormal distribution, which represent the small number of wells with relatively very high productivity.

Pulle, C.V.; Seskus, A.P.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

NETL: News Release - New Report Indicates More Recoverable Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2003 New Report Indicates More Recoverable Natural Gas in Wyoming Basins Than Previously Reported More Evidence that Technology Development Could Radically Enhance...

25

ALASKA NORTH SLOPE OIL AND GAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

additions to Northern Alaska economically recoverable oil and gas resources from exploration during 2005 to 2050 interval. (Current cumulative production, ERR, and...

26

Technical constraints limiting application of enhanced oil recovery techniques to petroleum production in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical examination of the potential and the technical constraint that inhibit the application of enhanced oil recovery techniques in the United States has been initiated and is expected to continue. The examination is based on the results of extensive laboratory and field applications now underway under various forms of Department of Energy support. This interim report will be amplified as data become available and as progress is made toward resolving technical constraints. Comments on the approach and substance of the information contained herein are welcome.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Technical constraints limiting application of enhanced oil recovery techniques to petroleum production in the United States  

SciTech Connect

In the interval since the publication in September 1980 of the technical constraints that inhibit the application of enhanced oil recovery techniques in the United States, there has been a large number of successful field trials of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. The Department of Energy has shared the costs of 28 field demonstrations of EOR with industry, and the results have been made available to the public through DOE documents, symposiums and the technical literature. This report reexamines the constraints listed in 1980, evaluates the state-of-the-art and outlines the areas where more research is needed. Comparison of the 1980 constraints with the present state-of-the-art indicates that most of the constraints have remained the same; however, the constraints have become more specific. 26 references, 6 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects 00516 North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study North Dakota Refining Capacity Study DE-FE0000516 Goal The objective of the North Dakota Refining Capacity study is to assess the feasibility of increasing the oil refinery capacity in North Dakota, and, if possible, determine the scale of such an expansion, the slate of refined product(s) that would produce the most economic benefit, and the preferred ownership model, i.e., private, public or private-public. Performer North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) Corval Group, partnered with Purvin & Gertz and Mustang Engineering Background The genesis of this study came from an April 2008 report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) asserting that North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. This assessment shows a 25-fold increase in the amount of recoverable oil compared to the USGS 1995 estimate of 151 million barrels of oil. The Bakken Formation estimate is larger than all other current USGS oil assessments of the lower 48 states and is the largest "continuous" oil accumulation ever assessed by the USGS. The new report points out that the new geologic models applied to the Bakken Formation, advances in drilling and production technologies, and recent oil discoveries have resulted in these substantially larger technically recoverable oil volumes. About 105 million barrels of oil were produced from the Bakken Formation by the end of 2007. In 2008, the formation produced another 27.2 million barrels of oil, which represented 43% of the stateÂ’s annual oil production of some 62.3 million barrels. Even though oil prices have dropped significantly in recent months, it appears that oil production from this formation will continue strong for decades to come. Most recently, a major production find has occurred in the Three Forks formation underlying the Bakken. This find is still undergoing significant testing, but early evidence suggests it represents another significant recoverable pool of oil in western North Dakota.

30

A recoverable versatile photo-polymerization initiator catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A photo-polymerization initiator based on an imidazolium and an oxometalate, viz., (BMIm)2(DMIm) PW12O40 (where, BMIm = 1-butyl-3-methylimizodium, DMIm = 3,3'-Dimethyl-1,1'-Diimidazolium) is reported. It polymerizes several industrially important monomers and is recoverable hence can be reused. The Mn and PDI are controlled and a reaction pathway is proposed.

Chen, Dianyu; Roy, Soumyajit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

33

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Resources Table 46. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources Alaskan Natural Gas The outlook for natural gas production from the North Slope of Alaska is affected...

34

Assessment of oil-shale technology in Brazil. Final technical report, October 27, 1980-July 27, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The development of an oil shale industry in the United States will require the solution of a variety of technical, economic, environmental, and health and safety problems. This assessment investigates whether US oil shale developers might benefit from the experience gained by the Brazilians in the operation of their Usina Prototipo do Irati oil shale demonstration plant at Sao Mateus do Sul, and from the data generated from their oil shale research and development programs. A chapter providing background information on Brazil and the Brazilian oil shale deposits is followed by an examination of the potential recovery processes applicable to Brazilian oil shale. The evolution of the Brazilian retorting system is reviewed and compared with the mining and retorting proposed for US shales. Factors impacting on the economics of shale oil production in Brazil are reviewed and compared to economic analyses of oil shale production in the US. Chapters examining the consequences of shale development in terms of impact on the physical environment and the oil shale worker complete the report. Throughout the report, where data permits, similarities and differences are drawn between the oil shale programs underway in Brazil and the US. In addition, research areas in which technology or information transfer could benefit either or both countries' oil shale programs are identified.

1981-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate oojective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. This report presents a summary of technical progress of the well log analysis of Kuparuk Field, Northslope, Alaska.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas A large new resource of recoverable oil has been identified in the San Andres dolomite Formation. Residual Oil Zones, ROZs, up to 300 ’ thick containing 20-40 % oil in pores of the dolomitic reservoir are present both below and between presently productive fields. The oil in the ROZs is residual, i.e., not recoverable by primary production methods or water flooding, but oil is recoverable using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods such as CO2 EOR. Although preliminary at this stage, the estimated oil in place in the ROZ’s

Basin Of New Mexico; West Texas; West Texas; Dr. Robert Trentham; L. Steven Melzer; David Vance; Arcadis U. S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

A survey of current technologies for production of oil from oil shale by in-situ retorting processes; their technical and economic readiness and requirements for further developments  

SciTech Connect

Four in-situ oil shale processes; Vertical Modified In-Situ (VMIS), Horizontal Modified In-Situ (HMIS), Geokinetics, and Equity have been reviewed with respect to their developmental histories, major advantages and disadvantages, present activities, major technical problems, and present states of development. The various processes are described in detail, and up-to-date experimental data has been summarized. The preliminary designs for commercialization have been developed in order to estimate capital and operating costs. Required selling prices and sensitivities have been determined as they relate to various parameters, such as oil yields, capital costs, operating costs, and economic incentives. The technologies for the various processes have been analyzed for the purpose of identifying areas of further required research and development. Programs of technological development have been suggested for each in-situ process. The results of various process evaluations have been compared, and the best near-term solutions have been determined for producing oil from oil shale using in-situ methods.

Cha, C.Y.; Chazin, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced information technology infrastructure to better support resource development and resource conservation. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells. The broad goal of this grant is to increase domestic production from Alaska's known producing fields through the implementation of preferred upstream management practices. (PUMP). Internet publication of extensive and detailed geotechnical data is the first task, improving the permitting process is the second task, and building an advanced geographical information system to offer continuing support and public access of the first two goals is the third task. Excellent progress has been made on all three tasks; the technical objectives as defined by the approved grant sub-tasks have been met. The end date for the grant was March 31, 2006.

Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

42

State heating oil and propane program, 1994--1995 heating season. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Propane prices and No. 2 fuel prices during the 1994-1995 heating season are tabulated for the state of Ohio. Nineteen companies were included in the telephone survey of propane prices, and twenty two companies for the fuel oil prices. A bar graph is also presented for average residential prices of No. 2 heating oil.

NONE

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

Oil shale: acceleration of its development. Technical report. [Evaluation of proposal  

SciTech Connect

Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Paraho Development Corporation, has submitted a proposal to the Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves of the Department of the Navy for the acceleration of oil shale development. The proposal was prepared after a series of meetings and discussions with various representatives of the Department of Interior and the Department of the Navy who are associated with oil shale development and/or the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR). The general thrust of the proposal is the expansion and extension of an existing oil shale research project utilizing the Paraho oil shale retort process. The project is being conducted under a lease arrangement with the Department of the Interior which includes the use of oil shale from the NOSR. This evaluation will discuss the DEI proposal in terms of the justification, the feasibility, required implementation action, and several special considerations for the Department of the Navy.' The discussion is based on the substance of DEI's proposal and independent investigations in several areas associated with the proposed effort. (GRA)

Trabandt, C.A.

1974-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes hydropower, solar, wind, ... Energy Resources; 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates,

46

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Resources Figure 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate, Total Technically Dry Natural Gas, Total...

47

Application of hydropyrolysis to the hydroconversion of Eastern oil shale. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two major objectives of the project were: (1) testing, data reduction, and chemical analysis to determine the performance of Eastern oil shale in a hydropyrolysis reactor; and (2) selection of an operating point suited to high yields of shale oil and performance of a preliminary process analysis and economic assessment of the process. Six tests were conducted in the 1-TPH process development unit (PDU) at 1100 and 1400/sup 0/F, nominal reactor residence times of 75 and 200 ms, and a reactor pressure of 1000 psig. A blend of Cleveland Member of the Ohio shale, pulverized to 70% through 200 mesh, was used as feedstock. Excellent material balances were obtained for the test series, which had an average test duration of 68 min and an average shale throughput of 1688 lb. Total carbon conversions as high as 70.0% and carbon conversions to liquids as high as 55.5% were found. Production of raw shale oil ranged from approximately 13.5 to 19.0 gal/ton of shale fed compared with a Fischer assay of approximately 13 gal/ton. Nitrogen and sulfur concentrations in the untreated whole oil were approximately 2.2 and 1.6 wt. %, respectively, and very low hydrogen consumption in the reactor was observed. Excellent data correlation was obtained as a function of reactor severity, expressed as carbon conversion to methane. Based on a selected operating point, a conceptual design was developed for a commercial-scale plant producing 50,000 bbl/day of partially hydrotreated shale oil, suitable as refinery feedstock. Product oil yield is approximately 21 gal/ton of dry shale. Input to the plant consists of 4150 TPH of dry shale and imported methane. The estimated plant investment is approximately $2 billion in first-quarter 1983 dollars, including a 15% project contingency. The calculated average product selling price is $35.20/bbl.

Falk, A.Y.; Garey, M.P.; Rosemary, J.K.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development of the 1002 Area is up to Congress and has not been approved to date. Also included in the Coastal Plain are State lands to the 3-mile offshore limit and Native Inupiat land near the village of Kaktovik. The USGS estimated: a 95 percent probability that at least 5.7 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain,

50

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

Sharma, G.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

Sharma, G.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization-determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis-source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. Results are discussed.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Accelerated oil shale in-situ research: a national program  

SciTech Connect

Development of a viable in-situ technology offers the potential of both significant environmental advantages and an increase in the amount of recoverable resources. The program described in this report is directed specifically toward research needed to overcome the technical obstacles that have retarded the development of in-situ processes. The program goal is to develop, by 1980, several commercially viable technologies for the in-situ production of shale oil. National in scope, the program is expected to be undertaken with private funds in part with joint Federal/private financing and, where neither is feasible, wholly with Federal funds. The Federal Government would provide overall program management to ensure that all parts of this highly interrelated program move forward harmoniously. Although emphasis is directed toward the oil shales of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, research would also be initiated on the oil shale deposits that underlie much of the Eastern United States. A number of feasible in-situ technologies would be tested in various oil shale resource types.

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technical evaluation of the waste-to-oil process development facility at Albany, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The broad objective of ERDA's solar energy program at Albany, Oregon, is to develop biomass-to-synfuel technology in the Albany process development facility, which is now nearing completion. In the study reported here, the process development plant design was reevaluated, and a number of modifications and additions are recommended to facilitate and accelerate development of biomass conversion processes. Sketches of the recommended modifications and estimates of costs and installation time schedules have been provided. It has been found expedient to implement some of these modifications before construction is completed. Biomass-to-synfuel processes under development or under consideration elsewhere have been reviewed, and some have been identified that are appropriate for further development at Albany. Potential environmental impacts associated with the operation of the Albany, Oregon, facility were reviewed to identify the magnitude of the impacts and the effects of any resultant operational constraints. Two discrete environmental impact categories have been identified with respect to process development operation. These are (1) production, storage, and disposal of product oil and residual solid, liquid, and gaseous waste; and (2) disturbances to the local community. An assessment has been made of unit process waste discharges and mitigation procedures, environmental setting and community considerations, possible operational constraints, and monitoring programs.

Houle, E.H.; Ciriello, S.F.; Ergun, S.; Basuino, D.J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geology and potential uses of the geopressure resources of the Gulf Coast. [6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy, 200 Tcf of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US ERDA has supported efforts to evaluate the potential contribution to the national energy supply of geopressured geothermal resources in the Gulf Coast. Efforts include a program of resource assessment and programs to examine utilization of the resource for the production of electricity and as a source of industrial-process heat. Work on resource assessment has suggested the presence of perhaps as much as 6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy and of 200 Tcf of methane. This program has emphasized finding significantly large sand bodies within the geopressured stratigraphic section in addition to defining the distribution of abnormal fluid pressures and formation temperatures. Regional sand facies analyses conducted thus far indicate five locations in the Frio formation of Central and South Texas where adequately large geopressured geothermal resources may be present. Engineering studies of energy-conversion systems based on total-flow, flashed-steam, and binary-cycle concepts show that development of electric power from the Gulf Coast geopressure resource is technically feasible. Study of use of the resource as process heat in pulp and paper mills and new sugar refineries has shown that these uses also are technically sound. The thermal content of a barrel of geothermal brine can cost as little as 9 mills when credited for recoverable hydraulic energy and methane. The value of heat approaches 50 mills per bbl for certain applications. All programs have pointed out clearly the need for better specific understanding of the resource, especially its dissolved methane content and its ability to produce for tens of years.

Howard, J.H.; House, P.A.; Johnson, P.M.; Towse, D.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.; Hornburg, C.D.; Morin, O.J.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

oil supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil supply oil supply Dataset Summary Description CIA: World Factbook assessment of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Estimated as of January 1st, 2010. Source CIA Date Released January 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords crude oil energy energy data international oil oil supply Data text/csv icon 2010 Proved Oil Reserves (csv, 4.6 KiB) text/plain icon Original Text Format (txt, 6.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

59

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to develop plausible scenarios for Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area includes 1.5 million acres in the ANWR 1002 Area, 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands and State of Alaska offshore lands out to the 3-mile limit which are expected to be explored and developed if and when ANWR is developed. (Figure ES1) About 26 percent of the technically recoverable oil resources are in the Native and State lands.

60

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Getty mines oil sands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large deposit of oil-laden diatomaceous earth in the McKittrick oil field 40 miles west of Bakersfield, California, has resisted all efforts at production by standard means. Getty Oil Co. is in the pilot phase of a project to recover the Diatomite's oil by an open pit mining operation. It also could have significant implications for other California oil fields, possibly setting the stage for the mining of oil sands in shallow fields like Kern River, S. Belridge, and Lost Hills to maximize oil recovery. A report on the project is summarized. The Diatomite is estimated to have 500 million bbl of oil in reserves, of which 380 million bbl are recoverable. The estimated amount of recoverable oil exceeds the McKittrick field's cumulative production of 240 million bbl. A pilot plant was built to test solvent extraction method of recovering heavy oil. The multistep process involves a series of 6 extractors. The Lurgi retorting plant employs a 2-step heating process to separate hydrocarbons from crushed ore.

Rintoul, B.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Reproducing MEES Is Strictly Prohibited MEES 47:11 15 March 2004 The Value Of Extra-Heavy Crude Oil From The Orinoco Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be recoverable. (This figure, to give us an idea of its magnitude, is equal to the proven crude oil reserves, with the exception of a few deposits in the Machete area, the type of crude found in the Orinoco Oil Belt is mobile essentially contains extra-heavy crude: crude oil of less than 10º API (in other words crude that is heavier

O'Donnell, Tom

64

State heating oil and propane program: Final technical report, 1991-92 heating season, Minnesota Department of Public Service  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the survey approach and results of the Department of Public Service`s survey of retail fuel oil and propane prices during the 1991-92 heating season. The semi-monthly phone surveys were conducted in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Energy`s State Fuel Oil and Propane Program, which coordinated surveys of heating fuel, prices by 25 eastern and midwest states. This federal/state program serves as a method for fast collection, analysis, and dissemination of information on current residential prices. No other information source meets needs for timely retail, price information over the course of the heating season.

1992-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

Umekwe, Pascal, E-mail: wpascals@gmail.com [Baker Hughes (United States)] [Baker Hughes (United States); Mongrain, Joanna, E-mail: Joanna.Mongrain@shell.com [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States)] [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States); Ahmadi, Mohabbat, E-mail: mahmadi@alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States); Hanks, Catherine, E-mail: chanks@gi.alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 2. Engineering evaluation report. Final technical report. [Oil-fired boiler to solvent-refined coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 of this report gives the results of an engineering evaluation study and economic analysis of converting an existing 560-MW residual (No. 6) oil-fired unit to burn solvent refined coal (SRC) fuel forms. Volume 1 represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Three SRC forms (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) were examined. The scope of modifications necessary to convert the unit to each of the three SRC fuel forms was identified and a capital cost of the necessary modifications estimated. A fuel conversion feasibility study of the boiler was performed wherein boiler modifications and performance effects of each fuel on the boiler were identified. An economic analysis of the capital and operating fuel expenses of conversion of the unit was performed. It was determined that conversion of the unit to any one of the three SRC fuel forms was feasible where appropriate modifications were made. It also was determined that the conversion of the unit can be economically attractive if SRC fuel forms can be manufactured and sold at prices discounted somewhat from the price of No. 16 Fuel Oil. As expected, greater discounts are required for the pulverized SRC and the slurry than for the solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Comments on new technical and economic data available for EPA`s proposed offshore oil and gas discharge guidelines and standards  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide comments on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Notice in the Federal Register entitled, ``Oil and Gas Extraction Point Source Category, Offshore Subcategory; Effluent Limitations Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards; New Information and Request or Comments`` (53 FR 41356; October 21, 1988). This Notice announces the availability of new technical, economic and environmental assessment information relating to the development of Best Available Technology economically achievable (BAT and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) regulations under the Clean Water Act governing the discharge of drilling fluids (muds) and drill cuttings from offshore oil and gas facilities. The Notice is part of a rulemaking process which formally began with the initial release of rules in August 1985 and which incorporates numerous comments and additional data received subsequent to the release of the 1985 rules. The comments in this paper will concentrate on the following five issues: Estimated project impacts are misrepresented by assuming weighted-average incremental costs of regulation. Economic impacts are inaccurate, since annual compliance costs will likely affect the number of wells drilled, by the effect of compliance costs on project economics and the reduction in industry cash flows on capital available for drilling. Initial well productivity assumptions for various scenarios do not vary with field size. The assumed lease costs, which are based on historical data, do not accurately reflect the future value of leases. The experimental decline rates assumed for the Pacific are too high.

1989-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT process. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to fully demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the HYTORT process concept as it applies to both Eocene and Devonian shales. Achievement of this objective will significantly widen the nation's synthetic fuels resource base by adding a new resource - Devonian shale - to the list of possible feedstocks for a synthetic fuels industry. It will also establish a high-efficiency alternative to conventional retorting of Western oil shales. Research at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has led to the development of the HYTORT process concept, which can be applied to the resources of Devonian shales of the Eastern United States as well as to Western shales, to produce oil or combustible gas at costs competitive with or less than those for retorting of Colorado shales. The HYTORT process concept has been successfully scaled up through small-scale laboratory equipment, a bench-scale unit capable of processing 100 pounds of shale per hour, and a Process Development Unit (PDU) with a shale capacity of 1 ton/hr. In addition, preliminary process design and economic analysis work shows that the HYTORT process exhibits attractive efficiency and economics.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS. Information from recent offset drilling, offsetting discoveries, and new geologic and geophysical data were used to update the oil and gas resource potential. An evaluation was made of each of 10 petroleum plays (similar geologic settings). For each play, USGS constructed statistical distributions of the number and size of potential accumulations based on a probabilistic range of geologic attributes. Minimum accumulation size was 500 million barrels. The resulting distributions were subjected to three risk parameters. Risk was assigned for the occurrence of adequate generation and migration of petroleum to meet the minimum size requirements, for the occurrence of reservoir rock to contain the minimum volume, and for the occurrence of a trapping mechanism to seal the petroleum in the reservoir. USGS analysts applied an appropriate recovery factor to the estimated oil in place that was calculated for each play to obtain an estimate of technically recoverable petroleum resources. The combined recovery factor for the entire study area averages approximately 37 percent of the initial oil in place. It is likely that the actual recovery factor of potential large fields would exceed 37 percent, because the nearby giant Prudhoe Bay field recovery factor will exceed 50 percent.

70

Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Figure 3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Rates for the 95 Percent Probability of Recovering 5.7 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska:

73

igure 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the Statistical Mean of Recovering 10.3 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR ...

74

Figure 5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 5 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Rates for the 5 Percent Probability of Recovering 16.0 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska

75

Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North ...

76

Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1-December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. During 1996, three highly successful FDD workshops involving 6 producing formations (4 plays) were completed: (1) Layton and Osage-Layton April 17 (2) Prue and Skinner June 19 and 26 (3) Cleveland October 17 (4) Peru October 17 (combined with Cleveland play). Each play was presented individually using the adopted protocol of stratigraphic interpretations, a regional overview, and two or more detailed field studies. The project goal was to have one field study from each play selected for waterflood simulation in order to demonstrate enhanced recovery technologies that can be used to recovery secondary oil. In this effort, software utilized for reservoir simulation included Eclipse and Boast 111. In some cases, because of poor production records and inadequate geologic data, field studies completed in some plays were not suitable for modeling. All of the workshops included regional sandstone trend analysis, updated field boundary identification, a detailed bibliography and author reference map, and detailed field studies. Discussion of general FDD depositional concepts was also given. In addition to the main workshop agenda, the workshops provided computer mapping demonstrations and rock cores with lithologic and facies interpretations. In addition to the workshops, other elements of FDD program were improved during 1996. Most significant was the refinement of NRIS MAPS - a user-friendly computer program designed to access NRIS data and interface with mapping software such as Arc View in order to produce various types of information maps. Most commonly used are well base maps for field studies, lease production maps, and regional maps showing well production codes, formation show codes, well spud dates, and well status codes. These regional maps are valuable in identifying areas of by-passed oil production, field trends, and time periods of development for the various FDD plays in Oklahoma. Besides maps, NRIS MAPS provides data in table format which can be used to generate production decline curves and estimates of cumulative hydrocarbon production for leases and fields. Additionally, many computer-related services were provided by support staff concerning technical training, private consultation, computer mapping, and data acquisition.

Banken, M.K.; Andrews, R.

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana AAPG 2012 Annual Convention and Exhibition Ariel Esposito and Chad Augustine April 24, 2012 NREL/PR-6A20-54999 2 * Geopressured Geothermal o Reservoirs characterized by pore fluids under high confining pressures and high temperatures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane o Soft geopressure: Hydrostatic to 15.83 kPa/m o Hard geopressure: 15.83- 22.61 kPa/m (lithostatic pressure gradient) * Common Geopressured Geothermal Reservoir Structure o Upper thick low permeability shale o Thin sandstone layer o Lower thick low permeability shale * Three Potential Sources of Energy o Thermal energy (Temperature > 100°C - geothermal electricity generation)

78

SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. [Quarterly technical progress report], April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task I is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

Sharma, G.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document presents brief descriptions of research programs concerned with enhanced oil recovery.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Quarterly technical progress report, Fourth quarter 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principle objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process, coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc`s. (TEPI) mid-term plans are to implement a full-scale miscible CO{sub 2} project in the CVU. TEPI has concluded all of the Tasks associated with the First Budget Period. The DOE approved the TEPI continuation application. Budget Period No. 2 is now in progress. Initial injection of CO{sub 2} began in November, and after a short shut-in period for the soak, the well was returned to production in late December, 1995.

Wehner, S.; Prieditis, J.

1996-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1993--March 24, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report, adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland (LW) was shown to be weak. On the other hand, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters (4), onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and CR(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Studies on the dynamics of uptake of phenol and NA by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were initiated and preliminary results indicated that both phenol and NA were sorbed onto components of LWs. A mass balance model has been developed to quantify the fate of phenol in LWs. The model is based on the postulate that the fate of phenol in LWs can be attributed to a combination of (1) evaporation of solute and solvent, (2) adsorption of phenol onto various components of LW and (3) its biodegradation, both in solution and at solid-liquid interface. As an initial approximation, the latter two processes have been lumped together and incorporated into the model as an unit operation. Both zero order and first order kinetics for the disappearance of phenol have been considered. Evaporative losses of water and phenol have also been taken into account and this model is presented and discussed in this quarterly report.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1993-August 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland was shown to be weak. Secondly, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and Cr(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Uptake of NA by the soil component of the laboratory-type wetland was monitored as a function of pH. This quarterly report presents results from studies on the uptake of phenol and {beta}-naphthoic acid by laboratory-type wetlands designed and built during the earlier phases of this study. The uptake of phenol by the wetlands is quite rapid, and nearly complete in 50 hours, but it was also found that evaporative losses of phenol from the supernatant water during the same time period was considerable. On the other hand, {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) is sorbed quite slowly and there was no indication of evaporative losses in the case on NA.

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1992--February 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

During the first quarter of the above contract, all the elements of Task 1 were completed. The first quarterly report presented an overview of a wetland and its increasing use in industrial wastewater treatment. An idealized, reaction engineering description of wetlands was presented to demonstrate how the various processes that occur in a wetland can be modeled. Previous work on the use of wetlands to remove BOD, TSS, Phosphorus and Nitrogen was reviewed. Recent literature on the application of wetland technology to the treatment of petroleum-related wastewater was critically evaluated and an outline of the research plans for the first year was delineated. Further, our literature search (nominally completed under Task 1) unearthed more recent studies (some unpublished) and a summary was included in the second quarterly report. In the second quarterly report, results of our efforts on the construction of a laboratory-type wetland were also reported. Initial studies on the use of wetland amendments such as modified-clays and algae cells were presented and discussed. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+} and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland built as a part of this contract has been undertaken and these results are presented and discussed in this quarterly report. A number of studies on the design and preparation of modified-clays for the adsorption of Cr(VI) and {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) has been carried out during this quarter and these are also described and discussed in this report. The choice of {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) as an ionogenic organic compound was made on the basis of a recent personal communication to the Project Director that NA is a major contaminant in many oil and gas well wastewaters.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

5/20/09 9:14 AMPhysics in the oil sands of Alberta -Physics Today March 2009 Page 1 of 4http://ptonline.aip.org/journals/doc/PHTOAD-ft/vol_62/iss_3/31_1.shtml?type=PTFAVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations-theSchmoker, J.W., 1999, U.S. Geological Survey assessment model for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations-the ""FORESPANFORESPANTechnically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbon resourceshydrocarbon resources ­­ oil, natural gas, natural gas

Podgornik, Rudolf

88

Technical Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TECHNICAL INFORMATION. ... Technical comments: nsrl@nist.gov. Website comments: web897@nist.gov. Technical Papers. ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Technical Standards, Fiscal Year 2007 Agency Report - February...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

research, energy efficency, oil storage, hydroelectric power, accelerator operations, nuclear facility decommissioning, and fusion experiments. Technical Standards, Fiscal Year...

90

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 DE-FC26-02NT15133 Goal The primary goal of this study is to increase recovery of oil reserves from existing reservoirs and from new discoveries by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. The overall objectives of this study are to: 1) increase recoverable oil from existing reservoirs, 2) add new discoveries, 3) prevent premature abandonment of numerous small fields, 4) increase deliverability through identifying the latest drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques, and 5) reduce development costs and risk. Performer Utah Geological Survey (UGS), Salt Lake City, UT

91

Dominant Middle East oil reserves critically important to world supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the location production, and transportation of the 60 million bbl of oil consumed in the world each day is of vital importance to relations between nations, as well as to their economic wellbeing. Oil has frequently been a decisive factor in the determination of foreign policy. The war in the Persian Gulf, while a dramatic example of the critical importance of oil, is just the latest of a long line of oil-influenced diplomatic/military incidents, which may be expected to continue. Assuming that the world's remaining oil was evenly distributed and demand did not grow, if exploration and development proceeded as efficiently as they have in the U.S., world oil production could be sustained at around current levels to about the middle of the next century. It then would begin a long decline in response to a depleting resource base. However, the world's remaining oil is very unevenly distributed. It is located primarily in the Eastern Hemisphere, mostly in the Persian Gulf, and much is controlled by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Scientific resource assessments indicate that about half of the world's remaining conventionally recoverable crude oil resource occurs in the Persian Gulf area. In terms of proved reserves (known recoverable oil), the Persian Gulf portion increase to almost two-thirds.

Riva, J.P. Jr. (Library of Congress, Washington, DC (United States). Congressional Research Service)

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards for Universal Waste Management 40 CFR 279 Standards for the Management of Used Oil 40 CFR 280 Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and...

93

Pollution control technical manual: modified 'in situ' oil shale retorting combined with Lurgi surface retorting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The oil shale PCTM for Modified In Situ Oil Shale Retorting combined with Lurgi Surface Retorting addresses the application of this combination of technologies to the development of oil shale resources in the western United States. This manual describes the combined plant using Lurgi surface retorting technology (developed by Lurgi Kohle and Mineralotechnik GmbH, West Germany) and the Modified In Situ process (developed by Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.) proposed by Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. and Tenneco Shale Oil Company for use in the development of their Federal oil shale lease Tract C-b in western Colorado. Since details regarding waste streams and control technologies for the Lurgi process are presented in a separate PCTM, this document focuses principally on the Modified In Situ process.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The twentieth oil shale symposium proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: The technical contributions of John Ward Smith in oil shale research; Oil shale rubble fires: ignition and extinguishment; Fragmentation of eastern oil shale for in situ recovery; A study of thermal properties of Chinese oil shale; and Natural invasion of native plants on retorted oil shale.

Gary, J.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Heading off the permanent oil crisis  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

MacKenzie, J.J. [World Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

REVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, oil pipelines, industrial systems of water cooling, systems of water preparation for pump- ing specific problem such as microbial contamination of stored crude oil and petroleum products. The Russian lubricants (technical vaselines, rope and gun oil) made of petroleum HCs are readily affected by fungi

Appanna, Vasu

99

NETL: News Release - DOE Oil Recovery Project Extends Success through  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 , 2007 5 , 2007 DOE Oil Recovery Project Extends Success through Technology Transfer New Technologies & Techniques Boost U.S. Proved Oil Reserves, Travel the Globe WASHINGTON, DC - A groundbreaking oil-recovery project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is coming to a close, but its success will continue to be felt throughout the United States and the world. MORE INFO Read 03.10.06 Techline: DOE-Funded Project Revives Aging California Oilfield The project, titled "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterizations and Thermal Production Technologies," began in 1995 with the goal of increasing recoverable heavy oil reserves in those sections of the Wilmington oilfield operated by Long

100

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five areas of research is described briefly. The subtask in oil shale research is on oil shale process studies. For tar sand the subtask reported is on process development. Coal research includes the following subtasks: Coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes the following: Advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sup 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residua; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process;NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of Mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are briefly described for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale and tar sand researches cover processing studies. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology covers: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydroprocessing of heavy oils for the production of fuel-cell quality fuels. Final technical report, September 30, 1977-September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on a program to establish whether heavy oils such as No. 4 or No. 6 fuel oil can be hydrogasified or hydrotreated to produce a steam-reforming feed suitable for use in an integrated fuel cell power generation facility. Hydrogasification data show that methane is the major gas product, along with a certain amount of coke formation. The liquid product was similar to the feed oil indicating that the oil did not fully enter the reaction. The hydrotreating apparatus was fully tested and proved to be operational. A trial run on No. 4 fuel oil using a Ni/MoO/sub 3/ hydrodesulfurization finishing catalyst showed very good sulfur removal to the gas phase, along with substantial reduction of specific gravity in the liquid product over the feed oil. Whereas the coke formation during hydrogasification is a clear disadvantage, further testing is required of the hydrotreating catalysts to determine quantitatively how efficient the sulfur removal can be and how amenable steam reforming the hydrotreated oil will be.

Jarvi, G.A.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.; Lee, A.L.; Vasil, D.R.; Oberle, R.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. J. and Cecchine, G. Oil shale development in the Unitedresources of some world oil-shale deposits. Technical Reportfor CO2 evolved from oil shale. Fuel Processing Technology,

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT Process. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reported are: laboratory program (thermobalance tests of shales, calorimetric studies), bench-scale program (reactor tests, hydrogen production, shale oil upgrading), process development unit tests, environmental assessment, and process design/economics. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

RMOTC - Library - Technical Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Papers & Presentations Technical Papers & Presentations General presentations What is RMOTC? A general overview of RMOTC's capabilities and facilities including the production, drilling, energy assurance, produced water management, carbon management, enhanced oil recovery, and alternative energy programs. RMOTC's renewable partnerships Renewable projects past, present, and future RMOTC: America's premier field testing facility An overview of RMOTC's unique capabilities History Of Teapot Dome A look back at Teapot Dome's rich history Fossil & renewable energy partnership opportunities Exploring renewable energy use in the oil field GPS & GIS - Managing Spatial Data Risk associated with current practice in managing spatial data RMOTC White Papers Oil & gas reservoirs in U.S. like the producing formations at NPR-3

107

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says July 20, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Billions of barrels of oil that could increase domestic supply, help reduce imports, and increase U.S. energy security may be potentially recoverable from residual oil zones, according to initial findings from a study supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The recently completed study, conducted by researchers at the University of Texas-Permian Basin (UTPB), is one of several FE-supported research projects providing insight that will help tap this valuable-but-overlooked resource. Residual oil zones, called ROZs, are areas of immobile oil found below the oil-water contact of a reservoir. ROZs are similar to reservoirs in the

110

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding. Technical progress report, January 1, 1997--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This project is a field demonstration of the ability of in-situ indigenous microorganisms in the North Blowhorn Creek Oil Field to reduce the flow of injection water in the more permeable zones of the reservoir, thereby diverting flow to other areas thus increasing the efficiency of the waterflood. The project is divided into three phases: Planning and Analysis (9 months), Implementation (45 months), and Technology Transfer (12 months). This report covers the fourth year of work on the project. Twenty-two months after the injection of nutrients into the reservoir began, three wells were drilled and cores taken therefrom were analyzed. Oil production volumes and water:oil ratios (WOR) of produced fluids have shown clearly that the MEOR treatment being demonstrated in this project is improving oil recovery. Of the 15 producer wells in the test patterns, seven have responded positively to the injection of microbial nutrients into the reservoir, while all eight of the producer wells only in control patterns have continued their natural decline in oil production, although one well did have some improvement in oil production due to increased water injection into a nearby injector well. In light of these positive findings and with DOE`s approval, the scope of the field demonstration was expanded in July 1997 to include six new injector wells. Of interest has been the performance of two wells in what was formerly a control pattern. Since the injector in this pattern (formerly Control Pattern 2) began receiving nutrients, two of the wells in the pattern have shown improved oil production for the last three months. While it would be premature to definitely characterize these two wells as yielding a positive response, these early results are certainly encouraging.

Stephens, J.O.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fracture mechanics investigation of oil shale to aid in understanding the explosive fragmentation process. Final technical report, January 1983-July 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes goals and findings achieved in developing technologies to improve the overall efficiency of oil shale recovery processes. The objectives are to (a) develop theoretical fracture mechanics tools that are applicable to transversely isotropic materials such as sedimentary rock, more particularly oil shale; and (b) develop a fracture mechanics test procedure that can be conveniently used for rock specimens. Such a test procedure would: utilize the geometry of a typical rock core for the test; require a minimum amount of specimen machining; and provide meaningful, reproducible data that corresponds well to test data obtained from conventional fracture mechanics tests. Critical review of the state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics on layered rocks has been completed. Recommendations are made for innovative and promising methods for oil shale fracture mechanics. Numerical and analytical studies of mixed mode fracture mechanics are investigated. Transversely isotropic properties of oil shale are input using isoparametric finite elements with singular elements at the crack tip. The model is a plate with an edge crack whose angle with the edge varies to study the effect of mixed mode fracture under various conditions. The three-dimensional plate is in tension, and stress, energy methods are used in the fracture analysis. Precracked disks of oil shale cored perpendicular to bedding planes are analyzed numerically. Stress intensity factors are determined by (i) strain energy method, and (ii) elliptic simulation method. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Chong, K.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The role of active and ancient geothermal processes in the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil in the basin and Range Province, western USA. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The Basin and Range (B&R) physiographic province of the western USA is famous not only for its geothermal and precious-metal wealth, but also for its thirteen oil fields, small but in some cases highly productive. The Grant Canyon field in Railroad Valley, for example, for years boasted production of more than 6000 barrels of oil (BO) per day from just two wells; aggregate current production from the Blackburn field in Pine Valley commonly exceeds 1000 BO per day. These two and several other Nevada oil fields are unusually hot at reservoir depth--up to 130{degrees}C at depths as shallow as 1.1 km, up to three times the value expected from the prevailing regional geothermal gradient.

Hulen, J.B.; Collister, J.W.; Curtiss, D.K. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Role of spent shale in oil shale processing and the management of environmental residues. Final technical report, January 1979-May 1980  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on retorted oil shale was studied at 10, 25, and 60/sup 0/C using a packed bed method. Equilibrium isotherms were calculated from the adsorption data and were modeled by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Polanyi equations. The isosteric heat of adsorption was calculated at three adsorbent loadings and was found to increase with increased loading. A calculated heat of adsorption less than the heat of condensation indicated that the adsorption was primarily due to Van der Waals' forces. Adsorption capacities were also found as a function of oil shale retorting temperature with the maximum uptake occurring on shale that was retorted at 750/sup 0/C.

Hines, A.L.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling & production of oil & gas in wetland areas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, incorporating milestone schedule/status, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress report on a planned program falling under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During this period, task 5, subscale tests, and task 7, environmental impacts, were completed. Work was continued on task 10, technology transfer, and the preparation of the final report as part of task 11.

Eggington, W.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate, Total Technically Dry Natural Gas, Total Technically Recoverable Resources Recoverable Resources Crude Oil and Lease Condensate by Type Dry Natural Gas by Type 88 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 58% 25% 18% 48 States¹ Onshore 48 States¹ Offshore Alaska 20% 13% 13% 54% 48 States¹ Onshore 48 States¹ Offshore Gas Alaska Tight Gas, Shale Gas, and Coalbed Methane Total 220 billion barrels Reserves Resources Technically Recoverable Resources Total 2,203 trillion cubic feet 22 198 220 Proved Unproved Total 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Barrels 273 1,931 2,203 Proved Unproved Total 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Trillion Cubic Feet Reserves Technically Recoverable Resources

116

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery-technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, G.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma have engaged in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Grasmick, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery. The elements of the technology transfer program include developing and publishing play portfolios, holding workshops to release play analyses and identify opportunities in each of the plays, and establishing a computer laboratory that is available for industry users.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1994-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

120

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I Oil). Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, C.J.; Banken, M.K.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

Crude oil and alternate energy production forecasts for the twenty-first century: The end of the hydrocarbon era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of production rates and ultimate recovery of crude oil are needed for intelligent planning and timely action to ensure the continuous flow of energy required by the world`s increasing population and expanding economies. Crude oil will be able to supply increasing demand until peak world production is reached. The energy gap caused by declining conventional oil production must then be filled by expanding production of coal, heavy oil and oil shales, nuclear and hydroelectric power, and renewable energy sources (solar, wind, and geothermal). Declining oil production forecasts are based on current estimated ultimate recoverable conventional crude oil resources of 329 billion barrels for the United States and close to 3 trillion barrels for the world. Peak world crude oil production is forecast to occur in 2020 at 90 million barrels per day. Conventional crude oil production in the United States is forecast to terminate by about 2090, and world production will be close to exhaustion by 2100.

Edwards, J.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT Process. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the HYTORT process for both Eocene and Devonian shales. The program is divided into five major task areas: laboratory program, bench-scale program, process development unit tests, process environmental assessment, and process design and economics. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. To date, the lead geologists have defined the initial geographic extents of Oklahoma`s FDD plays, and compiled known information about those plays. Nine plays have been defined, all of them Pennsylvanian in age and most from the Cherokee Group. A bibliographic database has been developed to record the literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. The project team is working with the Oklahoma Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association to update oil field boundary definitions in the project area. Also, team members are working with several private companies to develop demonstration reservoirs for the reservoir characterization and simulation activities. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional origins; collect, organize and analyze all available data conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs. Activities were focused primarily on technology transfer elements of the project. This included regional play analysis and mapping, geologic field studies, and reservoir modeling for secondary water flood simulations as used in publication folios and workshops. The computer laboratory was fully operational for operator use. Computer systems design and database development activities were ongoing.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1992--February 15, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Office of Oil and Natural Gas Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The domestic oil resource recovery potential outlined in this report is based on six basin-oriented assessments released by the Department of Energy (DOE) in April 2005. These estimates do not include the additional oil resource potential outlined in the ten basin-oriented assessments or recoverable resources from residual oil zones, as discussed in related reports issued by DOE in February 2006. Accounting for these, the future recovery potential from domestic undeveloped oil resources by applying EOR technology is 240 billion barrels, boosting potentially recoverable resources to 430 billion barrels. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Energy.

Prepared For; Vello A. Kuuskraa; George J. Koperna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Office of Oil and Natural Gas Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the analysis in this report was performed in late 2005. The domestic oil resource recovery potential outlined in the report is based on six basin-oriented assessments released by the United States Department of Energy in April 2005. These estimates do not include the additional oil resource potential outlined in the ten basin-oriented assessments or recoverable resources from residual oil zones, as discussed in related reports issued by Department of Energy in February 2006. Accounting for these, the future recovery potential from domestic undeveloped oil resources by applying EOR technology is 240 billion barrels, boosting potentially recoverable resources to 430 billion barrels. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily

L. Stephen Melzer; Prepared For; L. Stephen Melzer; Melzer Consulting

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Recoverable Robust Knapsacks: ?-Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

width capacity to be partitioned among the users in the area covered by the antenna. ..... instances were generated for 51 antennas with 15 to 221 traffic nodes ( ...

133

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Technical analysis. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the detailed results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report examines the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NEHRP - Technical Briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Library. Design & Construction Technical Briefs. Technical Briefs. Also ... Clearinghouse. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. ...

135

Symposium on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Second Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 5 to 8, 1981. Forty-four technical papers were presented which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery. Field tests, laboratory investigations, and mathematical analyses of tertiary recovery methods such as microemulsion flooding, carbon dioxide injection, in-situ combustion, steam injection, and gas injection are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. Exhaustive literature searches are being conducted for these plays, both through published sources and through unpublished theses from regional universities. A bibliographic database has been developed to record these literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. Thus far, the initial demonstration for one has been completed, and second is nearly completed. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1994-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, Second quarter, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the second quarter of 1993 was focussed on completion of Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. Also during the report period, Task 6, Ground Support, was completed and a report containing the results was submitted to DOE. This task addressed the complete H.1 Cyclocraft system, i.e. it included the need personnel, facilities and equipment to support cyclocraft operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Third quarterly technical progress report, First quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the report period was focussed on Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. The preliminary design work was based on the results of the three preceding tasks. A report was initiated that contains descriptions of the H.1 Cyclocraft and its subsystems; options available for the final aircraft design process; performance, geometry, weights and power data; logistics and considerations relating to cyclocraft operations in wetlands.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. In 1992, Task 1, Environmental Considerations, and Task 2, Transport Requirements, were completed. In the first two quarters of 1993, Task 3, Parametric Analysis, Task 4, Preliminary Design, and Task 6, Ground Support, were completed. Individual reports containing results obtained from each of these tasks were submitted to DOE. In addition, through June 30, 1993, a Subscale Test Plan was prepared under Task 5, Subscale Tests, and work was initiated on Task 7, Environmental Impacts, Task 8, Development Plan, Task 9, Operating Costs, and Task 10, Technology Transfer.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near - term. Technical progress report, June 17, 1994--June 17, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas, and was operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. and is now operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains, Quarterly technical report, 1/1/97--3/31/97  

SciTech Connect

This Class 11 field project has demonstrated that economic quantities of hydrocarbons can be produced from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The site selected for the demonstration horizontal well was Crystal Field, a nearly abandoned Dundee oil field in Montcalm County, Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well, the TOW 1-3, drilled as a field demonstration pilot was successful, producing at rate of 100 bbls of oil per day with a zero water cut. Although the well is capable of producing at a rate of 500+ bbls/day, the production rate is being kept low deliberately to try to prevent premature water coning. Cumulative production exceeded 50,000 bbls of oil by the end of April, 1997 and lead to the permitting and licensing of several dozen Dundee wells by project end. Twelve of these permits were for continued development of Crystal Field. Two subsequent wells, the Frost 5-3 and the Happy Holidays 6-3, have not been as successful. Both are currently producing 10 BOPD with 90% water cut. Efforts are underway to determine why these wells are performing so poorly and to see if the situation can be remedied. The reasons for these poor performances of the new wells are not clear at this time. It is possible that the wells entered the Dundee too low and missed pay higher in the section. When the TOW 1-3 was drilled, a vertical probe well was also drilled and cored. That probe well penetrated the pay zone and helped guide the horizontal well. The important lesson may be that vertical probe wells are a crucial step in producing these old fields and should not be eliminated simply to save what amounts to a small incremental cost. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The addition of several horizontal wells will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Additional project work involved the characterization of 28 other Dundee fields in Michigan to aid in determining appropriate additional candidates for development through horizontal drilling. Further quantification of reservoir parameters such as importance of fracturing, fracture density, and irregularity of the dolomitized surface at the top of the reservoir will help in designing the optimal strategy for horizontal drilling. The project was a cooperative venture involving the US Department of Energy, Michigan Technological University (MTU), Western Michigan University (WMU), and Terra Energy (now Cronus Development Co.) in Traverse City, MI.

NONE

1997-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Resource Directory helps members maintain technical excellence in their professions. Technical Resources Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemi

144

Technical Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Technical Guidance, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops and issues Government-wide and Department-wide technical guidance to ensure that classified nuclear...

145

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: shale oil recovery application  

SciTech Connect

The US has large shale oil energy resources, and many companies have undertaken considerable effort to develop economical means to extract this oil within environmental constraints. The recoverable shale oil reserves in the US amount to 160 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 3/ (1000 x 10/sup 9/ bbl) and are second in quantity only to coal. This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to a shale oil recovery process. Since the highest potential shale oil reserves lie in th Piceance Basin of Western Colorado, the study centers on exploiting shale oil in this region.

Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil March 3, 2006 - 11:40am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) released today reports indicating that state-of-the-art enhanced oil recovery techniques could significantly increase recoverable oil resources of the United States in the future. According to the findings, 89 billion barrels or more could eventually be added to the current U.S. proven reserves of 21.4 billion barrels. "These promising new technologies could further help us reduce our reliance on foreign sources of oil," Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman said. "By using the proven technique of carbon sequestration, we get the double

147

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

148

Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993  

SciTech Connect

Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

Peng, F.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the ninth quarter, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

A main portion of this reporting period has been consumed in the following tasks to establish the base line for hydrocarbon oil encapsulated bubble flotation: (1) to measure the residence time distribution and formulate the axial dispersion model of 1-in. I.D. flotation column, (2) to obtain the optimum operating conditions using three phase experiment design approach followed the fractional factorial design, (3) to develop the column scale-up procedure and formulate recovery predicting model for flotation column, (4) to apply the models developed to design a 3-in. ID flotation column and predicting the cleaning results, (5) to test the collector gasification system installed on the 3-in. I.D. flotation column for hydrocarbon-oil capsulated bubble flotation of fine coal. Column flotation of minus 47 {mu}m (-400 US sieve) Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal was carried out to study the column scale-up procedure using one-inch column. The dispersion model of nonideal flow was applied to describe the hydrodynamic state within the column. This model may be used to predict the collection zone recovery of column flotation in scale-up procedure if the column flotation is a first-order rate process. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) data of the column flotation were measured to determine the parameters of the model. It was found that an empirical distribution, logarithmic normal distribution can describe the RTD curve well. The effects of operating variables and column geometry on the Peclet number, Pe, which measure the extent of axial dispersion were studied and an empirical expression of Pe was obtained. Using the dispersion model, the column flotation of fine coal recovery can be predicted.

Peng, F.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives are listed and technical progress is summarized for contracts for field projects and supporting research on: chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, extraction technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Forecast Technical Document Technical Glossary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Technical Glossary A document defining some of the terms used in the 2011 Production Forecast technical documentation. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley in the Forecast documentation. In some cases, the terms and the descriptions are "industry standard", in others

153

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal using 3-in. ID flotation column. Technical progress report for the eleventh quarter, April 1--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are four modes of the collector dispersion techniques. They are (1) direct liquid additions and stirring, (2) ultrasonic energy collector dispersion, (3) atomized collector dispersion, and (4) gasified collector transported in air stream. Among those collector dispersion techniques, the technique using the gasified collector transported in air phase can be used to enhance the flotation performance with substantial reduction in collector usage and selectivity, compared to the flotation using direct liquid addition (and mechanical agitation) technique. In this phase of study, two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. The 1-in. ID flotation column was used to scale-up to 3-in. ID flotation column. The initial starting point to operate the 3-in ID flotation column were determined using both 1-in. and 3-in. flotation columns based on the three phases of work plans and experiment design. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal.

Peng, F.F.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop  

SciTech Connect

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose in providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The following topics were discussed, groundwater protection; temporarily abandoned and idle wells; effluent discharges; storm water runoff; monitoring and compliance; wetlands; naturally occurring radioactive materials; RCRA reauthorization and oil pollution prevention regulation. At the conclusion, all of the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire which critiqued the day activities. A discussion of each of the issues is made a part of this report as is a summary of the critique questionnaire which were received.

Not Available

1991-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

156

Solar retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of technical and economic factors solar retorting of oil shale shows that such a process should be technically feasible and, depending on the grade of the shale, should improve the fuel yield from the oil shale by 10 to 40%, compared to one of the best competing surface ay for the incremental processes. The improved oil yield should more than pay for the incremental cost associated with adding the solar collection system. An experiment is described in which solar energy is used to retort oil shale, and the experimental results show that yields of better than 110% Fischer Assay are achievable. An advanced design for a solar oil-shale retort is also discussed.

Gregg, D.W.; Grens, J.Z.; Taylor, R.W.; Aiman, W.R.

1980-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

Alaska Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Alaska...

158

Refining of shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The refining of shale oil is reviewed to assess the current state-of-the-art, especially as to the avaiability of technology suitable for operation on a commercial scale. Oil shale retorting processes as they affect the quality of the crude shale oil for refining, exploratory research on the character and refining of shale oil, and other published refining background leading to the present status are discussed. The initial refining of shale oil requires the removal of a large concentration of nitrogen, an added step not required for typical petroleum crude oils, and recently published estimates show that the total cost of refining will be high. Specific technoloy is reported by industry to be technically proven and available for commercial-scale refining. Although the refining will be more costly than that of petroleum, the viability of a shale oil industry will also be affected greatly by the technology and costs of producing the crude shale oil, environmental costs, and future price and tax treatment, and these are outside the scope of this study of refining.

Lanning, W.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil, fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir. Third quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1992--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Texaco`s objective on this project has been to utilize all available technologies, and to develop new ones, to design a CO{sub 2} flood process which is cost effective and can be applied to many other reservoirs throughout the United States. This project will determine the recovery efficiency of CO{sub 2} floods in waterflooded and partial waterdrive reservoirs. A PC-based CO{sub 2} screening model will be developed and a database will be generated to show the utility of this technology throughout the US. After Pre-award costs were approved on September 15, 1992, Texaco proceeded with the implementation phase of the project so that new data could be gathered and necessary steps required to initiate CO{sub 2} injection could be accomplished. An expenditure of $7,080,191 has put Texaco in a position where CO{sub 2} injection can begin by September 1, 1993. The following tasks have been accomplished: (1) 10 workovers (4 injection, 6 producers) are complete. Production has increased from 78 BOPD to 183 BOPD. (2) Reservoir pressure has been increased from 1850 psi-to 2700 psi by injecting saltwater. (3) Compressors, a CO{sub 2} injection pump, and separators have been installed on a floating barge, and is being transported to the field by a tug boat. (4) 3 miles of the 4.5 mile CO{sub 2} pipeline has been installed. (5) A residual oil saturation of 30% to 35% has been measured from a new conventional core. A set of relative permeability curves have been developed.

Not Available

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2008 ... The Effect of DSP Structure on Removal of Impurities from Refinery ..... world's proven oil reserves and approximately 40% of the gas reserves.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2007 ... Alumina and Bauxite: Alumina Refinery Design and Development . ...... fluid and Royco 787 turbine lubricating oil The combinations were ...

162

TECHNICAL PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 1999 ... In the RUHR OEL refinery in Horst, Germany, heavy residues are ... ence of crude oil properties, coker feedstock properties, coker feed mix.

163

Figure 6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig6.jpg (41132...

164

Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig7.jpg (43335 bytes) Source...

165

igure 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the Statistical Mean of Recovering 10.3 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska...

166

Figure 3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 95 Percent Probability of Recovering 5.7 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

167

Figure 5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 5 Percent Probability of Recovering 16.0 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

168

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

169

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

89 89 Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Region Proved Reserves 1 Unproved Resources Total Technically Recoverable Resources 2 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate (billion barrels) 48 States 3 Onshore ........................................................................... 14.2 112.6 126.7 48 States 3 Offshore ........................................................................... 4.6 50.3 54.8 Alaska ................................................................................................. 3.6 35.0 38.6 Total U.S. ........................................................................................... 22.3 197.9 220.2

170

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... technically recoverable resources and economically recoverable resources that has been already discussed at some length, ... economic to transport ...

171

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2010 ... for dislocation hardening and static/dynamic recovery processes. ... Waspaloy for aerospace and oil and gas applications. The achieved results regarding ... to solubility-enhanced formation of interface Mo-rich borides. Both.

173

TMS Technical Divisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS BOARD OF DIRECTORS · TMS TECHNICAL DIVISIONS · COMMITTEE HOME PAGES. TOOLS AND RESOURCES. TECHNICAL COMMITTEE TOOLKIT.

174

Chemically enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yet when conducted according to present state of the art, chemical flooding (i.e., micellar/polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, surfactant flooding) can mobilize more residual crude oil than any other method of enhanced oil recovery. It also is one of the most expensive methods of enhanced oil recovery. This contribution will describe some of the technology that comprises the state of the art technology that must be adhered to if a chemical flood is to be successful. Although some of the efforts to reduce cost and other points are discussed, the principle focus is on technical considerations in designing a good chemical flooding system. The term chemical flooding is restricted here to methods of enhanced oil recovery that employs a surfactant, either injected into the oil reservoir or generated in situ, primarily to reduce oil-water interfacial tension. Hence, polymer-water floods for mobility or profile control, steam foams, and carbon dioxide foams are excluded. Some polymer considerations are mentioned because they apply to providing mobility control for chemical flooding systems.

Nelson, R.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

Solar retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First, in an overview, we outline and discuss the potential applications of solar energy to the production of fuels. We show that, starting from a fossil feedstock, there are four areas in which solar energy can have a major impact in the production of fuels: in solar retorting of oil shale, in solar coal gasification, in solar steam flooding of oil fields, and in solar steam-reforming of methane. We performed a detailed technical and economic analysis of solar retorting of oil shale. The analysis shows that this solar process not only should be technically feasible but also should improve the fuel yield from the oil-shale feedstock by 10 to 40%, depending on the grade of the shale, compared to the most efficient competing (nonsolar) process. The improved oil yield should more than pay for the incremental cost associated with adding the solar collection system (field of focusing heliostats). The results from an experiment in which solar energy was used to retort oil shale show that yields of better than 110% Fischer Assay are achievable. An advanced design for a solar oil-shale retort is also presented.

Gregg, D.W.; Taylor, R.W.; Grens, J.Z.; Aiman, W.R.; Marsh, L.E.

1980-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, "Technical Activities 1999" - NISTIR 6438. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999. This report summarizes ...

178

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR NISTIR 6268. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998. ...

179

Oil-shale utilization at Morgantown, WV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully aware of the nation's need to develop high-risk and long-term research in eastern oil-shale and low-grade oil-shale utilization in general, the US DOE/METC initiated an eastern oil-shale characterization program. In less than 3 months, METC produced shale oil from a selected eastern-US oil shale with a Fischer assay of 8.0 gallons/ton. In view of the relatively low oil yield from this particular oil shale, efforts were directed to determine the process conditions which give the highest oil yield. A 2-inch-diameter electrically heated fluidized-bed retort was constructed, and Celina oil shale from Tennessee was selected to be used as a representative eastern oil shale. After more than 50 runs, the retorting data were analyzed and reviewed and the best oil-yield operating condition was determined. In addition, while conducting the oil-shale retorting experiments, a number of technical problems were identified, addressed, and overcome. Owing to the inherent high rates of heat and mass transfers inside the fluidized bed, the fluidized-bed combustor and retorting appear to be a desirable process technology for an effective and efficient means for oil-shale utilization. The fluidized-bed operation is a time-tested, process-proven, high-throughput, solid-processing operation which may contribute to the efficient utilization of oil-shale energy.

Shang, J.Y.; Notestein, J.E.; Mei, J.S.; Romanosky, R.R.; King, J.A.; Zeng, L.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 17, 2001 ... New Hartford, NY 13413-5317 USA; Alec Mitchell, University of ... Uses of Alloy 718 in the Oil and Gas Industry: Rashmi Bhavsar1;. Anthony Collins2 .... 9:50 AM. Production of Large-Scale Microcrystalline Forgings for Roll-.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Hydrogen Production Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable

182

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery and to transfer this technology to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced technologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elswhere in the US oil and gas industry. This is the first quarterly progress report on the project; results to date are summarized.

NONE

1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

APS Technical Update Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Updates Technical Updates are notices that share beamline technical and operations developments with APS users. For additional information contact the APS User Technical Interface....

184

Office of Technical Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Director's Perspective Welcome to the Office of Technical Guidance Edith A. Chalk, Director Welcome to the Office of Technical Guidance. The Office of Technical Guidance...

185

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ii iiiFOREWARD The Depleted Uranium Technical Brief is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this material. It addresses relative questions regarding the chemical and radiological health concerns involved with depleted uranium in the environment. This technical brief was developed to address the common misconception that depleted uranium represents only a radiological health hazard. It provides accepted data and references to additional sources for both the radiological and chemical characteristics, health risk as well as references for both the monitoring and measurement and applicable treatment techniques for depleted uranium. Please Note: This document has been changed from the original publication dated

Depleted Uranium; Brian Littleton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Defining the Limits of Oil  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Defining the Limits of Oil Production Defining the Limits of Oil Production Preparing mid-term projections of oil production requires an assessment of the availability of resources to meet production requirements, particularly for the later years of the 2005-2030 projection period in IEO2008. The IEO2008 oil production projections were limited by three factors: the estimated quantity of petroleum in place before production begins (“petroleum-initially-in-place” or IIP), the percentage of IIP extracted over the life of a field (ultimate recovery factor), and the amount of oil that can be produced from a field in a single year as a function of its remaining reserves. Total IIP resources are the quantities of petroleum—both conventional and unconventional—estimated to exist originally in naturally occurring accumulations.a IIP resources are those quantities of petroleum which are estimated, on a given date, to be contained in known accumulations, plus those quantities already produced, as well as those estimated quantities in accumulations yet to be discovered. The estimate of IIP resources includes both recoverable and unrecoverable resources.

189

Energy supply strategy: getting technology commercialized, shale oil and enhanced oil recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose is to identify factors inhibiting the near-term investment of industrial funds for producing oil from shale and through enhanced oil recovery, and to estimate the investment and production which would result if these deterrents were removed and suitable incentives provided. The barriers are discussed under the following categories: economic, environmental, institutional/regulatory, and technical. (DLC)

Steger, J.E.; Sullo, P.; Michaelis, M.; Nason, H.K.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Chapter 5. Technical Notes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures. Table of Contents, Chapter 5. Technical Notes, OOF home. ... Chapter 5. Technical Notes. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

NCSL International Technical Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NCSL International Technical Exchange. Purpose: The NCSL International ... Charleston, SC 29418. Technical Contact: Val Miller (301) 975-3602.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

192

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NIST Physics Laboratory: Technical Activities 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, Technical Activities 2000 - NISTIR 6590. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 2000. ... Most Recent Technical Activities ...

194

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

195

Oil shale combustion/retorting  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted a number of feasibility studies on the combustion and retorting of five oil shales: Celina (Tennessee), Colorado, Israeli, Moroccan, and Sunbury (Kentucky). These studies generated technical data primarily on (1) the effects of retorting conditions, (2) the combustion characteristics applicable to developing an optimum process design technology, and (3) establishing a data base applicable to oil shales worldwide. During the research program, METC applied the versatile fluidized-bed process to combustion and retorting of various low-grade oil shales. Based on METC's research findings and other published information, fluidized-bed processes were found to offer highly attractive methods to maximize the heat recovery and yield of quality oil from oil shale. The principal reasons are the fluidized-bed's capacity for (1) high in-bed heat transfer rates, (2) large solid throughput, and (3) selectivity in aromatic-hydrocarbon formation. The METC research program showed that shale-oil yields were affected by the process parameters of retorting temperature, residence time, shale particle size, fluidization gas velocity, and gas composition. (Preferred values of yields, of course, may differ among major oil shales.) 12 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Argonne TDC: Technical Services Agreemens  

Technical Services Agreements with Industrial Partners . Argonne researchers provide short-term technical assistance to companies with technical problems requiring ...

197

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

COSTS OF U.S. OIL DEPENDENCE: 2005 UPDATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.A. and M.C.Lynch. 1997. "Fixed View of Resource Limits Creates Undue Pessimism," Oil & Gas Journal, April 7, pp. 56-59. Alazard, N. 1996. "Technical Scientific Progress in...

199

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Tenth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-05-00381 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Tenth Quarterly Report January-March 2005 TECHNICAL...

200

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Ninth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-05-00040 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report October-December 2004 TECHNICAL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SEMI-ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach Final Scientific/ Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: 8/21/2006 Reporting Period End Date: 3/30/2011 Principal Author: Amy M. Childers July 25, 2011 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42937 Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission P.O. Box 53127 Oklahoma City, OK 53127-3127 This page left blank intentionally 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an accounting of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

202

Oil Shale Development from the Perspective of NETL's Unconventional Oil Resource Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of oil shale development was examined by gathering relevant research literature for an Unconventional Oil Resource Repository. This repository contains over 17,000 entries from over 1,000 different sources. The development of oil shale has been hindered by a number of factors. These technical, political, and economic factors have brought about R&D boom-bust cycles. It is not surprising that these cycles are strongly correlated to market crude oil prices. However, it may be possible to influence some of the other factors through a sustained, yet measured, approach to R&D in both the public and private sectors.

Smith, M.W. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV); Shadle, L.J.; Hill, D. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

EMC 2007: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Program Overview. Technical sessions commence with the plenary session on Wednesday, June 20 at 8:20 a.m., in the Leighton Concert Hall of the  ...

204

The Geopolitics of Oil, Gas, and Ecology in the Caucasus and Caspian Sea Basin. 1998 Caucasus Conference Report.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. OIL AND ECOLOGY Azerbaijan International OperatingCommitment to the Environment. Baku, Azerbaijan. 1996. ¾¾¾ .Export Pipeline. Baku, Azerbaijan. 1996. ¾¾¾ . Technical

Garcelon, Marc; Walker, Edward W.; Patten-Wood, Alexandra; Radovich, Aleksandra

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmental control costs for oil shale processes  

SciTech Connect

The studies reported herein are intended to provide more certainty regarding estimates of the costs of controlling environmental residuals from oil shale technologies being readied for commercial application. The need for this study was evident from earlier work conducted by the Office of Environment for the Department of Energy Oil Shale Commercialization Planning, Environmental Readiness Assessment in mid-1978. At that time there was little reliable information on the costs for controlling residuals and for safe handling of wastes from oil shale processes. The uncertainties in estimating costs of complying with yet-to-be-defined environmental standards and regulations for oil shale facilities are a critical element that will affect the decision on proceeding with shale oil production. Until the regulatory requirements are fully clarified and processes and controls are investigated and tested in units of larger size, it will not be possible to provide definitive answers to the cost question. Thus, the objective of this work was to establish ranges of possible control costs per barrel of shale oil produced, reflecting various regulatory, technical, and financing assumptions. Two separate reports make up the bulk of this document. One report, prepared by the Denver Research Institute, is a relatively rigorous engineering treatment of the subject, based on regulatory assumptions and technical judgements as to best available control technologies and practices. The other report examines the incremental cost effect of more conservative technical and financing alternatives. An overview section is included that synthesizes the products of the separate studies and addresses two variations to the assumptions.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

207

"Future of oil supplies"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil is so important that publishing reserve (even production) data has become a political act. Most of the dispute between the so-called pessimists (mainly retired geologists) and the optimists (mainly economists) is due to their using different sources of information and different definitions. The pessimists use technical (confidential) data, whereas the optimists use the political (published) data. OPEC quotas are based on the reserves, explaining why its members raised their reserves from 1986 to 1990, adding about 300 Gb of oil reserves when only about 10 Gb was actually discovered during this period. There is consensus on neither the reserve numbers, nor the definition of terms, such as oil, gas, conventional, unconventional, reserves. The latter term may variously refer to current proven values or backdated mean values. The US practice is completely different from that in the rest of the world, being conservative to satisfy bankers and the stockmarket. By contrast, the FSU practice was over-optimistic being based on the maximum theoretical recovery, free of technological or economic constraints. All published data have to be re-worked to be able to compare like with like. Unfortunately confidentiality and politics make it difficult to obtain valid data.

Jean Laherrère; Les Pres Haut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Import policy effects on the optimal oil price  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A steady increase in oil imports leaves oil importing countries increasingly vulnerable tofuture oil price shocks. Using a variation of the U.S. EIA`s oil market simulation model, equilibria displaying multiple price shocks is derived endogenously as a result of optimizing behavior on the part of OPEC. Here we investigate the effects that an oil import tariff and a petroleum stock release policy may have on an OPEC optimal price path. It is shown that while both policies can reduce the magnitude of future price shocks neither may be politically or technically feasible. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Suranovic, S.M. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

210

Oil shale technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative project with industrial participants studied oil shale retorting through an integrated program of fundamental research, mathematical model development and operation of a 4-tonne-per-day solid recirculation oil shale test unit. Quarterly, project personnel presented progress and findings to a Project Guidance Committee consisting of company representatives and DOE program management. We successfully operated the test unit, developed the oil shale process (OSP) mathematical model, evaluated technical plans for process scale up and determined economics for a successful small scale commercial deployment, producing premium motor fuel, specility chemicals along with electricity co-production. In budget negotiations, DOE funding for this three year CRADA was terminated, 17 months prematurely, as of October 1993. Funds to restore the project and continue the partnership have not been secured.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

212

EXPLORER: A Natural Language Processing System for Oil Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPLORER: A Natural Language Processing System for Oil Exploration Wendy G. Lehnert Department", whereas the second time "show" is used it has a technical meaning (i.e., an indicator of oil or gas Steven P. Shwartz Cognitive Systems Inc. 234 Church Street New Haven, Ct. 06510 EXPLORER (Lehnert

213

FRVT 2002: Technical Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Technical Appendices Sponsors and Supporters: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Department of ...

214

Business and Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business and Technical Resources. Small Business Administration. The SBA provides information on programs for starting ...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Technical Guidelines Development Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (TGDC). The TGDC has been chartered by the US Election Assistance ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Membrane Technologies for Lifelong Oil Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work to date on a novel technique to extend the life of power transformers. A hollow fiber unit is used to remove moisture and oxygen continuously from the oil of an operational transformer. Moisture and oxygen are two key aging factors of oil and paper in a power transformer. Thus it is imperative to keep these low at all times. By maintaining moisture and oxygen at low levels at all times, the aging of both oil and paper will be retarded.To date work has ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop  

SciTech Connect

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose of providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The IOGCC and DOE staff worked with key state and industry representatives to develop a list of appropriate regulatory and industry representatives to be invited to participate. These same industry and regulatory representatives also provided a prioritized list of topics to be discussed at this workshop. After the topic leader set out the issue, views of those present were solicited. In almost every case, both the industry representatives and the regulatory personnel spoke with candor in discussing the problems. Common points of discussion for each topic were: (1) conflicting state and federal regulations; (2) conflicting regulations or permit requirements established by different state agencies; (3) increasing compliance costs; and (4) regulatory constraints that will result in ``no net growth`` in California oil and gas production and more likely a net decrease. This report contains a copy of the written presentation for each topic as well as a summary of the participants discussion.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Recent trends in oil shale. I. History, nature, and reserves  

SciTech Connect

To understand the current level of oil shale development and to anticipate some of the problems that will govern the growth rate of the domestic shale oil industry, this bulletin will discuss these issues in three parts. In this MIB, the nature of oil shale is discussed and a brief history of oil shale development is presented. The worldwide and domestic oil shale resources are described, with emphasis on recent geologic exploration of the Green River formation. Part II will cover oil shale mining and fuel extraction while Part III will discuss technical problems of shale oil refining and some economic and social problems of oil shale development. An extensive bibliography is provided. (MCW)

Sladek, T.A.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Oil and gas field code master list, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Research and information needs for management of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information and analysis to assist BLM in clarifying oil shale research needs. It provides technical guidance on research needs in support of their regulatory responsibilities for onshore mineral activities involving oil shale. It provides an assessment of research needed to support the regulatory and managerial role of the BLM as well as others involved in the development of oil shale resources on public and Indian lands in the western United States.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

222

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

223

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

224

Prediction of movement direction in crude oil prices based on semi-supervised learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil price prediction has long been an important determinant in the management of most sectors of industry across the world, and has therefore consistently required detailed research. However, existing approaches to oil price prediction have sometimes ... Keywords: Feature extraction (PCA/NLPCA), Machine learning, Oil price prediction, Semi-supervised learning (SSL), Technical indicators

Hyunjung Shin, Tianya Hou, Kanghee Park, Chan-Kyoo Park, Sunghee Choi

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

226

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

FAR Card: Technical specifiers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

specifiers specifiers Technical specifiers You've been told: You've been told: "I can't get you that product." "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers Technical specifiers You've been told: You've been told: "I can't get you that product." "I can't get you that product."

228

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

229

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

230

Senior Technical Safety Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Program Technical Program Manager Qualification Standard DOE-STD-1178-2004 May 2013 Reference Guide The Functional Area Qualification Standard References Guides are developed to assist operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff in the acquisition of technical competence and qualification within the Technical Qualification Program. Please direct your questions or comments related to this document to the Office of Leadership and Career Manager, Technical Qualification Program (TQP), Albuquerque Complex. This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ....................................................................................................................................... ii TABLES ......................................................................................................................................... ii

231

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

232

Fluvial-deltaic heavy oil reservoir, San Joaquin basin  

SciTech Connect

Unconsolidated arkosic sands deposited in a fluvial-deltaic geologic setting comprise the heavy oil (13/degree/ API gravity) reservoir at South Belridge field. The field is located along the western side of the San Joaquin basin in Kern County, California. More than 6000 closely spaced and shallow wells are the key to producing the estimated 1 billion bbl of ultimate recoverable oil production. Thousands of layered and laterally discontinuous reservoir sands produce from the Pleistocene Tulare Formation. The small scale of reservoir geometries is exploited by a high well density, required for optimal heavy oil production. Wells are typically spaced 200-500 ft (66-164 m) apart and drilled to 1000 ft (328 m) deep in the 14-mi/sup 2/ (36-km/sup 2/) producing area. Successful in-situ combustion, cyclic steaming, and steamflood projects have benefited from the shallow-depth, thick, layered sands, which exhibit excellent reservoir quality. The fundamental criterion for finding another South Belridge field is to realize the extraordinary development potential of shallow, heavy oil reservoirs, even when an unspectacular discovery well is drilled. The trap is a combination of structural and stratigraphic mechanisms plus influence from unconventional fluid-level and tar-seal traps. The depositional model is interpreted as a braid delta sequence that prograded from the nearby basin-margin highlands. A detailed fluvial-deltaic sedimentologic model establishes close correlation between depositional lithofacies, reservoir geometries, reservoir quality, and heavy oil producibility. Typical porosity is 35% and permeability is 3000 md.

Miller, D.D.; McPherson, J.G.; Covington, T.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Annual resources report. [Glossary on technical terms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is separated into the following sections: acknowledgments; a table of contents; a list of tables and figures; a glossary; an introduction; an overview of the role of energy resources in New Mexico; separate sections on oil and gas, coal, electrical generation, uranium, and geothermal energy; a section on the geologic setting of oil and gas, coal, and uranium; an appendix of additional tables pertaining to oil and gas development; and a listing of selected references. The glossary is a brief listing of technical terms used in the report with simplified definitions for the reader's use. The overview contains highlights of data found in the report as well as comparisons of New Mexico's resources with those of other states and the nation. In general, each section covering a resource area describes reserves, production, prices, consumption, transportation, employment, and revenue statistics over the past ten or more years and projections to the year 2000.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Energy Storage Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies - BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to

235

Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Pathway Integration Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies - BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable

236

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

237

Technical Information Officers | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Information Officers Technical Information Officers Print page Print page Email page Email page Technical Information Officers (TIO) serve as the principal DOE or NNSA office point of contact and assistant to, and liaison with, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) that serves as the Department's office charged with the Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP). The TIOs are to be familiar with the STI Programs within their Office they represent (given they have contracting financial assistance and/or acquisition activities) and for their major site/facility management contractor(s) STI Program to discern compliance with the DOE O 241.1B. They must maintain an up-to-date knowledge-base of the STI Program activities and provide timely feedback on issues as they emerge. While

238

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 26, quarter ending March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Objectives and technical progress are summarized for field projects and supporting research in chemical flooding, CO/sub 2/ injection, thermal/heavy oil recovery, resource assessment, extraction technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and improved drilling technology. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Technical Value Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identifies opportunities to increase awareness and utilization of AOCS Technical Services activities and products. Technical Value Center AOCS History and Governance about us aocs committees contact us division council fats governing board history

240

FAR Card: Technical specifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

specifiers Technical specifiers You've been told: You've been told: "I can't get you that product." "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Lewan (2002) concluded that much of the thermogenic gas produced in this basin is the result of cracking of oil to gas in deeply buried reservoirs. The efficiency of expulsion, migration and trapping has been estimated to range from 0.5 to 10 percent for certain basins (Schmoker, 1994: Zimmerman, 1999). The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin is 910 billion barrels using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated is 1,540 billion barrels using the Platte River software application. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 3,130 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 4,050 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Claypool and Mancini (1989) report that the conversion of oil to gas in reservoirs is a significant source of thermogenic gas in this basin. The Manila and Conecuh Subbasins are oil-prone. Although these subbasins are thermally mature for oil generation and expulsion, they are not thermally mature for secondary, non-associated gas generation and expulsion. The gas produced from the highly productive gas condensate fields (Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton fields) in these subbasins has been interpreted to be, in part, a product of the cracking of oil to gas and thermochemical reduction of evaporite sulfate in the reservoirs (Claypool and Mancini, 1989). The areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior Salt Basins with high potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs (>15,000 ft) have been identified. In the North Louisiana Salt Basin, these potential reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies, especially the Smackover, Cotton Valley, Hosston, and Sligo units. The estimate of the secondary, non-associated gas generated from cracking of oil in the source rock from depths below 12,000 feet in this basin is 4,800 TCF. Assuming an expul

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 674  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 674 Page 2. NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS The National Bureau of Standards ...

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

NIST Technical Note XXXX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Technical Note 1621 Optical Radiation Measurements Based on Detector Standards George P. Eppeldauer, Editor Page 2. ...

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technical Committee Member - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. Technical Committee Member. Online Training Module.

245

Legend Technical Services, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legend Technical Services, Inc. NVLAP Lab Code: 102081-0. Address and Contact Information: 88 Empire Drive St. Paul ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

Johns Manville Technical Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Johns Manville Technical Center. NVLAP Lab Code: 100425-0. Address and Contact Information: 10100 West Ute Avenue ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

248

Technical Information Officers | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Information Officers Technical Information Officers Print page Print page Email page Email page Technical Information Officers: Serve as the DOE element representatives to STIP and ensure that STI objectives and requirements are incorporated into strategic planning, management information plans, life-cycle procedures from project initiation to close-out, and contract language as appropriate. Coordinate with contractor STI managers and have adequate familiarity with STI activities to discern contractor compliance with the CRD portion of this directive. Coordinate the implementation of appropriate review and release procedures by DOE elements, DOE contractors, and financial assistance recipients as appropriate. Serve as Releasing Officials or coordinate designation and official

249

Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil, fluvial - dominated deltaic reservoirs. Technical progress report, 4th quarter, fiscal year 1994, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production from the Port Neches project has reached a new high of 500 BOPD, as shown. Production from several wells has improved after changing WAGer and CO{sub 2} injection patterns. The WAG process appears to be effective in FDD reservoirs. The WAT process has improved the oil production rates and simultaneously decreased the CO{sub 2} production rates from wells with high GOR. Material balance calculations indicate that the reservoir pressure remained relatively flat, and a new BHP will be taken this month to verify the calculations. Total CO{sub 2} injection is averaging about 9.5 MMCFD, including 3.9 MMCFD purchased from Cardox, as shown, and the balance is recycled from the producing wells. Over 50% of the gas was produced from one well, Khun No. 33. A CO{sub 2} injection line was installed to huff-puff well Khun No. 6 that did not respond yet to CO{sub 2} injection in well Khun No. 17. After injecting a limited CO{sub 2} volume in well Khun No. 6, this will be followed by a short shut-in period, then the well will be placed on production.

Not Available

1994-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

251

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

252

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank...

253

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Education and Training Energy Resource Library Funding Opportunities Military Initiative Newsletter Roundtables START Program...

254

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

255

Assessment of oil shale retort wastewater treatment and control technology: phases I and II. Final report, May 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale retorting is a synthetic fuel production technology on the verge of commercialization in the United States. In order to ensure that the emerging oil shale industry will have minimal adverse effects upon surface and/or groundwater where recoverable reserves of oil shale are found, demonstrated technologies to upgrade oil shale wastewaters must be available to developers. To this end, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has contracted with Monsanto Research Corporation to conduct a three-year, five-phase study to: (1) summarize known information concerning oil shale retort wastewater sources and characteristics; (2) identify potentially applicable control technologies capable of treating the identified wastewater streams; and (3) design, construct, and operate pilot-plant facilities to evaluate the selected technologies. This report presents results of Phases I and II, in which literature and other information sources were surveyed to obtain relevant data about oil shale retorting technologies, wastewater sources and characteristics, potential wastewater uses, and potentially applicable treatment technologies. As a result of the study, data gaps were identified, and recommendations for bench-scale treatability studies were made.

Klieve, J.R.; Rawlinss, G.D.; Hoeflein, J.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Oil shale up-date  

SciTech Connect

The development of large domestic oil shale resources in an environmentally acceptable manner is technically feasible. Such development is approaching economic attractiveness. It is an essential step in attacking the major national problem: increasing oil imports. Several things have been impeding oil shale development. First, until recently there has been a lack of viable technology. Second, environmental regulations are becoming increasingly restrictive. These have become so unrealistic that the bare undeveloped ground in oil shale country fails to comply. Most of this area is now classified as a nonattainment area. The third reason is economic uncertainty. This relates to price and other governmental controls which make it impossible to predict future conditions with enough confidence to justify private investments. In an effort to overcome this uncertainty, while retaining the impeding controls, all types of governmental incentives and supports are being proposed by the Administration, the Congress, and the industry. This study highlights the current status of the more prominent technologies. It suggest that the next logical step in their advancement is the construction and operation of single full-size retorts or modules.

Pforzheimer, H.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM |  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil Spill by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM | Investigations into the gulf oil disaster are multiplying. The National Academy of Engineering (NAE and industry engineers to take a technical look into the causes of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion and oil

Southern California, University of

258

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Preliminary Technical Program (PDF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 21, 2009 ... The push to access domestically-available, unconventional sources of energy, such as ultra-deep oil and methane hydrates, will require.

260

Technical Review Panel Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Evaluation and Identification of future R&D on eight Advanced Reactor Concepts, conducted April - September 2012 December 2012 Public release version 2 Public release version 3 Table of Contents Summary ................................................................................................................................... 4 1. Overview of the Technical Review Panel Process ............................................................... 5 2. Technical Review Panel Criteria ......................................................................................... 6 3. Concept Summaries ........................................................................................................... 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EMC 2011 Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each technical area is being organized by a committee. Visit the organizers page for a list of the organizers' names. Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

262

Web Survey Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glisson,W.B. Welland,R.C. DCS Technical Report Series pp 27 Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

Glisson, W.B.; Welland, R.C.

263

EMC 2010 Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical program commences with the plenary session on Wednesday, June 23 at 8:30 a.m. The plenary session will be held in Jordan Auditorium, ...

264

TMS 2011: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS 2011: Technical Program: Materials and Society: Energy and ... by utilizing all available energy sources including solar and stored energy in the form of ...

265

Superalloys 2012: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr. 2012: Authors Notified of Oral/Interactive Status ... on Sunday evening, followed by technical sessions and presentations of both oral and interactive posters ...

266

TECHNICAL NOTE A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNICAL NOTE A novel FRET approach for in situ investigation of cellulase-cellulose interaction Liqun Wang & Yiqing Wang & Arthur J. Ragauskas Received: 15 May 2010 Revised: 9...

267

EMC 2006: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Program Overview. Electronic materials relate to, are produced, or are operated by the controlled flow of electrons through a semiconductor, a gas, ...

268

ICME 2011: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ICME 2011: Technical Program July 10-14, 2011 • Seven Springs Mountain Resort • Seven Springs, PA. All presentations will be held in the Exhibit Hall.

269

TMS 2012: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS 2012: Technical Program: High Performance Materials March 11-15, 2012 • Orlando, FL. Among the myriad challenges to be explored in this track of the ...

270

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

273

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

276

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the residual quantity of oil that never gets produced.order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil at a price P tD t Q t Q t+1 Quantity Figure 5. Monthly oil production for

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an important oil source for China, yet unlike itsthe United States as a major oil source outside the volatileto be a critical source of oil, and one that is almost

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Beginning of an oil shale industry in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how preparations are being made for the construction and operation of a semi commercial plant to process Australian oil shale. This plant is primarily designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processing these shales at low cost. Nevertheless it is expected to generate modest profits even at this demonstration level. This will be the first step in a three staged development of one of the major Australian oil shale deposits which may ultimately provide nearly 10% of Australia's anticipated oil requirements by the end of the century. In turn this development should provide the basis for a full scale oil shale industry in Australia based upon the advantageously disposed oil shale deposits there. New sources of oil are becoming critical since Australian production is declining rapidly while consumption is accelerating.

Wright, B. (Southern Pacific Petroleum NL, 143 Macquarie Street, Sydney (AU))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hydrogen production by fluid-bed retorting of oil shale. [Shale oil/partial oxidation; steam-oxygen gasifier; CO/sub 2/ acceptor gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oil produced from retorting of oil shales requires hydrogen treatment to improve its characteristics and make it suitable for refining into marketable products. Hydrogen requirements can be met by partial oxidation of a fraction of the shale oil produced or by direct processing of oil shale in a fluid bed. This report examines the economics and engineering feasibility of using fluid bed systems to produce hydrogen. Fluid bed processing of oil shale to produce hydrogen might be technically and economically competitive with a more conventional shale retorting/partial oxidation method. A major development program would be required to demonstrate the feasibility of the fluid bed approach.

Barnes, J.W.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases 5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases Reference Resource Average Range Low Oil and Gas Resource High Oil and Gas Resource Shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) Shale gas (billion cubic feet per well) 1.04 0.01-11.32 50% lower 100% higher Tight gas (billion cubic feet per well) 0.5 0.01-11.02 50% lower 100% higher Tight oil (thousand barrels per well) 135 1-778 50% lower 100% higher Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- (522) 1,044 Crude oil (billion barrels) -- -- (29) 58 Well spacing (acres) 100 20-406 No change 20-40 Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- No change 3,601

284

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases 5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases Reference Resource Average Range Low Oil and Gas Resource High Oil and Gas Resource Shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) Shale gas (billion cubic feet per well) 1.04 0.01-11.32 50% lower 100% higher Tight gas (billion cubic feet per well) 0.5 0.01-11.02 50% lower 100% higher Tight oil (thousand barrels per well) 135 1-778 50% lower 100% higher Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- (522) 1,044 Crude oil (billion barrels) -- -- (29) 58 Well spacing (acres) 100 20-406 No change 20-40 Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- No change 3,601

285

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

288

Oil-Fired Combustion Turbine SCR NOx Control Testing and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a Tailored Collaboration project to determine the technical feasibility and cost of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) as applied to 0.4%-sulfur fuel oil-fired combustion turbines.

1997-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The evolution prospects of the post-OPA90 Alaskan Oil Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the grounding of the Exxon Valdez on March 24, 1989, the United States Congress enacted the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, a series of regulations requiring technical and operational changes in tank vessels ...

Fox, Matthew Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

James Spillane

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solar technology applications to enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

One possible near-term application for solar thermal technologies is the production of steam which could be pumped underground to increase the amount of petroleum which could be recovered from an oil field. This work compares 2 types of solar thermal technologies - solar troughs and central receivers - with conventional means of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) to determine, first, if solar technologies offer a viable EOR option and, second, how they compare with other steam-drive EOR alternatives. It analyzes these options from the technical, economic, institutional, and environmental perspectives. The work concludes that solar EOR is not an economically attractive alternative, largely due to existing technical uncertainties; possible environmental benefits do not appear to be a driving consideration; finally, tax incentives rather than government demonstration programs would seem to be the most effective means of encouraging solar EOR technology. 44 references.

Deleon, P.; Brown, K.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Safety and Technical Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Technical Services Safety and Technical Services Minimize The Safety and Technical Services (STS) organization is a component of the Office of Science's (SC's) Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center. The mission of STS is to provide excellent environmental, safety, health, quality, and engineering support to SC laboratories and other U.S. Department of Energy program offices. STS maintains a full range of technically qualified Subject Matter Experts, all of whom are associated with the Technical Qualifications Program. Examples of the services that we provide include: Integrated Safety Management Quality Assurance Planning and Metrics Document Review Tracking and trending analysis and reporting Assessments, Reviews, Surveillances and Inspections Safety Basis Support SharePoint/Dashboard Development for Safety Programs

296

Transformer Life Extension: Membrane Technologies for Lifelong Oil Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and oxygen are two key factors aging oil and paper in a power transformer; therefore, they must be kept low. An on-line system using a hollow fiber membrane unit removes moisture and oxygen continuously from the oil of an operational transformer. This technical update describes previous work using hollow fiber membranes and vacuum, and details novel techniques applied to extend power transformer life.The project team designed, built, commissioned, and partially aged two models ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Past DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Technical Standards Procedures Past DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures Past DOE Technical Standards Program...

298

Approved DOE Technical Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards Approved DOE Technical Standards DOE Technical Standards Program August 16, 2013 Technical Standards, DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 Change Notice 2 (July 2013)...

299

DOE Technical Standards Program: Recently Approved DOE Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recently Approved DOE Technical Standards Office of Nuclear Safety This page lists DOE technical standards that have been approved and added to the distribution. If they are...

300

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Proceedings of the 1998 oil heat technology conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference was held on April 7--8 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under sponsorship by the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, State and Community Programs (DOE/BTS). The meeting was held in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America (PMAA). Fourteen technical presentations was made during the two-day program, all related to oil-heat technology and equipment, these will cover a range of research, developmental, and demonstration activities being conducted within the United States and Canada, including: integrated oil heat appliance system development in Canada; a miniature heat-actuated air conditioner for distributed space conditioning; high-flow fan atomized oil burner (HFAB) development; progress in the development of self tuning oil burners; application of HFAB technology to the development of a 500 watt; thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power system; field tests of the Heat Wise Pioneer oil burner and Insight Technologies AFQI; expanded use of residential oil burners to reduce ambient ozone and particulate levels by conversion of electric heated homes to oilheat; PMAA`s Oil Heat Technician`s Manual (third edition); direct venting concept development; evolution of the chimney; combating fuel related problems; the effects of red dye and metal contamination on fuel oil stability; new standard for above ground and basement residential fuel oil storage; plastic and steel composite secondary contained tanks; and money left on the table: an economic analysis of tank cleaning.

McDonald, R.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Perestroika, Soviet oil, and joint ventures  

SciTech Connect

Glaznost, the freedom of expression in both the public and private sectors of the Soviet Union, has rapidly transformed the country form a largely isolated and closed society to one that is rapidly becoming more cosmopolitan and open to the West. Now that the Soviet Union is moving toward a free-market economy, a number of new laws are being generated to create a favorable environment for Western investment, especially joint ventures. First, crude oil sales have provided over 75% of much-needed hard currency, and oil has been the principal barter for manufactured goods produced in eastern Europe. Second, joint oil ventures with Western companies can reverse declining production levels and provide sufficient stimulus to turn around the economic recession. The Soviet Union has a very large inventory of discovered but undeveloped oil and gas fields. Most of these fields are difficult for the Soviets to produce technically, financially, and environmentally safely, and they are actively seeking appropriate Western partners. From an exploration point of view, the Soviet Union has probably the largest number of undrilled and highly prospective oil basins, which may replenish declining reserves in the West. Finally, the Soviet Union represents in the long term a large unsaturated market eager to absorb the surplus of goods and services in the Western world. Again, joint oil ventures could provide the convertible currency to increase East-West trade.

Churkin, M. Jr.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from July 1 through September, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, work focused on completing project tasks in the area of multiphase flow and rock properties. The area of interest is the production mechanisms of oil from porous media at high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on oil recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. Work continued to delineate how the wettability of reservoir rock shifts from mixed and intermediate wet conditions to more water-wet conditions as temperature increases. One mechanism for the shift toward water-wet conditions is the release of fines coated with oil-wet material from pore walls. New experiments and theory illustrate the role of temperature on fines release.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from January 1 through March 31, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history matching techniques. During this period, previous analysis of experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation was verified by comparison among analytic, dual-porosity simulation, and fine-grid simulation. We continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured porous media at high pressure and high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. A new experiment was conducted on diatomite core. Significantly, we show that elevated temperature induces fines release in sandstone cores and this behavior may be linked to wettability. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Eco Oil 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Subject is oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The article reviews the current financial, legislative and regulatory problems of oil shale development. 2 refs.

Due, M.J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE Technical Standards Program: Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Technical Standards Archives Office of Nuclear Safety Number Title Status TSPP-00 Technical Standards Program Topical Committees (TSPP-00) PDF TSPP-00 TSPP-01...

309

OpenEI - Technical Reference  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm8710 en Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode927...

310

OpenEI - Technical Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm8720 en Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode927...

311

Ocean Technical | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Technical Community of Practice Through a variety of...

312

WebMetrics: Technical Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VUG Home Page NIST Web Metrics Technical Overview. Technical Overview. NIST Logo. Good usability is critical to the success of a website. ...

313

Argonne TDC: Technical Services Agreemens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Agreements with Industrial Partners Argonne researchers provide short-term technical assistance to companies with technical problems requiring expertise that is not...

314

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

315

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Constraints on the commercialization of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems and prospects for the commercialization of oil shale from surface retorting are examined. Commercialization refers to the process of private sector adoption of a technology for general use after most of the technological uncertainties have been resolved. Three categories of constraints and uncertainties can be identified: technical constraints relating to the performance characteristics of the technology; economic constraints on the ability of the technology to yield an acceptable rate of return to investors; and institutional constraints that arise from the organizational and political context in which commercialization takes place. Because surface retorting involves relatively well understood technologies, this study deals almost exclusively with economic and institutional constraints. At the present time, a government commercialization effort for oil shale surface retorting would not be likely to result in a viable industry in this century. Alternative oil shale technologies such as modified in situ processes offer prospects of lower shale oil costs, but are less well developed. Data on modified in situ processes are not abundant enough as yet to permit serious estimates of commercial-scale costs. Consequently, government decisions regarding the commercialization of modified in situ technologies should await the completion of further technical tests and an independent definitive plant design.

Merrow, E.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

319

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

320

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

322

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

323

External Technical Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Technical Review Report External Technical Review Report March 2010 U U . . S S . . D D e e p p a a r r t t m m e e n n t t o o f f E E n n e e r r g g y y O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t External Technical Review (ETR) Process Guide September 2008 U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management September 2008 External Technical Review Process Guide Page 2 of 37 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 Purpose of Process ............................................................................................................ 3 1.2 Background .........................................................................................................................

324

EV Technical Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 2001 AQMD CONTRACT 00192 Project Number: TC-00-0101 Report Number: TC-00-0101-TR03 Electric Vehicle Technical Center Prepared by: Michel Wehrey Juan C. Argueta Julie M....

325

Technical Report Technologically Enhanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's National Hard Rock Mining Team and Abandoned Mine Lands Team, who are employees of the following EPA ..............................................................................1-16 Uranium Associations with Other Metal MiningTechnical Report on Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials from Uranium

326

External Technical Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams who will be involved in External Technical Reviews (ETR) of U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM)...

327

technical committee toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 12, 2013 ... A resource which includes information guidelines and templates for committee meetings and other ... Committee Bylaws & Policies. ? Technical ... The following documents outline the procedure for proposing and selecting a ...

328

NFRC Technical Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

importance of NFRCs rating systems to DOEs energy efficiency goals, LBNL provides technical support to the NFRC in a number of ways as outlined below. As unbiased sources of...

329

Technical Talks Timing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Talks Timing The technical talks should last a maximum of 15 minutes with 5 minutes for set-up and 5 minutes for Q&A. No teamgroup presentations are allowed. The objective of...

330

EMC 2008: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical program begins at 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, June 25. All sessions are held on the campus of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

331

Technical Reference OVERVIEW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Page 1 Parking and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR...

332

Transportation Rule Technical Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI initiated this project as part of an industry effort to seek regulatory relief for two low-level waste (LLW) transportation container rules that the industry perceived as overly conservative. This report presents the technical arguments for regulatory change developed by the EPRI project team. EPRI, through the cooperation of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), is in the process of bringing these two technical arguments forward to the various regulatory agencies.

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Environmental considerations for oil shale development. Final report, Jan--May 1974  

SciTech Connect

An overview is provided of the anticipated oil shale industry, including the magnitude of the resources available and the likely technical environmental problems to be encountered. Specific technologies likely to be employed in the mining, oil extraction, and on-site upgrading processes are also identified. The status of development of these technologies and their potential economic, resource, and environmental impacts upon the oil shale resource regions and the nation as a whole are also described. (GRA)

Conkle, N.; Ellzey, V.; Murthy, K.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Boiler MACT Technical Assistance (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the changes to Environmental Protection Act process standards. The DOE will offer technical assistance to ensure that major sources burning coal and oil have information on cost-effective, clean energy strategies for compliance, and to promote cleaner, more efficient boiler burning to cut harmful pollution and reduce operational costs. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to finalize the reconsideration process for its Clean Air Act pollution standards National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters (known as Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT)), in Spring 2012. This rule applies to large and small boilers in a wide range of industrial facilities and institutions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will offer technical assistance to ensure that major sources burning coal or oil have information on cost-effective clean energy strategies for compliance, including combined heat and power, and to promote cleaner, more efficient boilers to cut harmful pollution and reduce operational costs.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity July 26, 2006 - 4:34pm Addthis Energy Leaders sign MOU to further promote electricity cooperation WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today hosted Iraq's Minister of Oil Hussein al-Shahristani and Minster of Electricity Karim Wahid Hasan to discuss the rehabilitation and expansion of Iraq's energy infrastructure. The Ministers' visit to the Department follows up on Secretary Bodman's invitation to them to come to the United States to talk to professionals in electricity generation, transmission and distribution, and oil sector development. "The U.S. government is committed to providing scientific and technical assistance to help the Iraqi people expand their energy sector," Secretary

337

Underground oil shale retorting. [Basic principles are outlined  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic principles involved in combustion processing of oil shale are outlined. The manual is designed to serve as an introduction to the subject for the support personnel of the LLL Oil Shale Project. The material is presented in a simple two page format with one page devoted to a figure or table and the facing page contains a brief description of that material. Thus, it can serve as a self-study guide. Following a brief description of oil shale, how it was formed, and the extent of the resource, an overview of the concepts and major technical problems of Modified In-Situ (MIS) Oil Shale Retorting is presented. Finally, the liquid product, shale oil, is compared with typical petroleum crudes.

Campbell, J.H.; Raley, J.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fuel Oil Use in Manufacturing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and residual fuel oils. Distillate fuel oil, the lighter product, is also used for heating of homes and commercial buildings. Residual oil is a much denser, heavier product...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation. ... Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Technical Assistance, National Protocol; ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

c. TECHNICAL DIVISIONS FUNDING POLICY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PROMOTING THE GLOBAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROFESSIONS CONCERNED WITH MINERALS,METALS,AND MATERIALS. TECHNICAL ...

343

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 18022 Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 18022 The U.S. Department of Energy offers technical assistance supporting energy efficiency and renewable energy. This technical assistance can include direct advice on issues or goals, tools and maps, and training. Some select technical assistance offerings are listed below. For States and Communities The State and Local Solution Center provides states and communities with resources addressing strategic energy planning, policy, financing, data management, and technologies to help them implement successful energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center provides

344

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

American Samoa Initial Technical Assessment Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is an initial energy assessment for American Samoa, the first of many steps in developing a comprehensive energy strategy. On March 1, 2010, Assistant Secretary of the Interior Tony Babauta invited governors and their staff from the Interior Insular Areas to meet with senior principals at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Meeting discussions focused on ways to improve energy efficiency and increase the deployment of renewable energy technologies in the U.S. Pacific Territories. In attendance were Governors Felix Camacho (Guam), Benigno Fitial (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands), and Togiola Tulafono, (American Samoa). This meeting brought together major stakeholders to learn and understand the importance of developing a comprehensive strategic plan for implementing energy efficiency measures and renewable energy technologies. For several decades, dependence on fossil fuels and the burden of high oil prices have been a major concern but never more at the forefront as today. With unstable oil prices, the volatility of fuel supply and the economic instability in American Samoa, energy issues are a high priority. In short, energy security is critical to American Samoa's future economic development and sustainability. Under an interagency agreement, funded by the Department of Interior's Office of Insular Affairs, NREL was tasked to deliver technical assistance to the islands of American Samoa. Technical assistance included conducting an initial technical assessment to define energy consumption and production data, establish an energy consumption baseline, and assist with the development of a strategic plan. The assessment and strategic plan will be used to assist with the transition to a cleaner energy economy. NREL provided an interdisciplinary team to cover each relevant technical area for the initial energy assessments. Experts in the following disciplines traveled to American Samoa for on-island site assessments: (1) Energy Efficiency and Building Technologies; (2) Integrated Wind-Diesel Generation; (3) Transmission and Distribution; (4) Solar Technologies; and (5) Biomass and Waste-to-Energy. In addition to these core disciplines, team capabilities also included expertise in program analysis, project financing, energy policy and energy planning. The intent of the technical assessment was to provide American Samoa with a baseline energy assessment. From the baseline, various scenarios and approaches for deploying cost effective energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies could be created to meet American Samoa's objectives. The information provided in this energy assessment will be used as input in the development of a draft strategic plan and the development of scenarios and strategies for deploying cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable products.

Busche, S.; Conrad, M.; Funk, K.; Kandt, A.; McNutt, P.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

American Samoa Initial Technical Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is an initial energy assessment for American Samoa, the first of many steps in developing a comprehensive energy strategy. On March 1, 2010, Assistant Secretary of the Interior Tony Babauta invited governors and their staff from the Interior Insular Areas to meet with senior principals at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Meeting discussions focused on ways to improve energy efficiency and increase the deployment of renewable energy technologies in the U.S. Pacific Territories. In attendance were Governors Felix Camacho (Guam), Benigno Fitial (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands), and Togiola Tulafono, (American Samoa). This meeting brought together major stakeholders to learn and understand the importance of developing a comprehensive strategic plan for implementing energy efficiency measures and renewable energy technologies. For several decades, dependence on fossil fuels and the burden of high oil prices have been a major concern but never more at the forefront as today. With unstable oil prices, the volatility of fuel supply and the economic instability in American Samoa, energy issues are a high priority. In short, energy security is critical to American Samoa's future economic development and sustainability. Under an interagency agreement, funded by the Department of Interior's Office of Insular Affairs, NREL was tasked to deliver technical assistance to the islands of American Samoa. Technical assistance included conducting an initial technical assessment to define energy consumption and production data, establish an energy consumption baseline, and assist with the development of a strategic plan. The assessment and strategic plan will be used to assist with the transition to a cleaner energy economy. NREL provided an interdisciplinary team to cover each relevant technical area for the initial energy assessments. Experts in the following disciplines traveled to American Samoa for on-island site assessments: (1) Energy Efficiency and Building Technologies; (2) Integrated Wind-Diesel Generation; (3) Transmission and Distribution; (4) Solar Technologies; and (5) Biomass and Waste-to-Energy. In addition to these core disciplines, team capabilities also included expertise in program analysis, project financing, energy policy and energy planning. The intent of the technical assessment was to provide American Samoa with a baseline energy assessment. From the baseline, various scenarios and approaches for deploying cost effective energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies could be created to meet American Samoa's objectives. The information provided in this energy assessment will be used as input in the development of a draft strategic plan and the development of scenarios and strategies for deploying cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable products.

Busche, S.; Conrad, M.; Funk, K.; Kandt, A.; McNutt, P.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1 through December 31, 2002 , for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition was analyzed to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation. It is shown that the usual assumption of constant, time-independent shape factors is incorrect. In other work, we continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured media at high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased the apparent wettability and affected water relative permeability of cores used in previous experiments. A phenomenological and mechanistic cause for this behavior is sought. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

Technical Assistance to Developers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

354

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

355

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a 1979 exploratory oil well blew out and leaked oil foraddicted to oil directly causes spills as well as globalmagnitudes of past oil spills. They are well aware of the

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

358

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Palm oil pundit speaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry, director of Godrej International Ltd. in Mumbai, India, spoke about palm oil on March 15, 2010, during the 2010 Annual Convention of the National Institute of Oilseed Products in Palm Springs, California, USA. Palm oil pundit speaks ...

360

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well below unity accounts for the broad trends we see in the share of oil purchases in totalWells. ” Middle panel: percent of U.S. total crude oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Federal Technical Capability Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Home About the FTCP FTCP Topics FTCP Meetings Performance Indicator Reports Guiding Documents Qualifying Official Training Approaches FTCP Plans, Reports & Issue Papers Workforce Analysis & Staffing Site Specific Information Nuclear Executive Leadership Training General Information 2004-1 FTCP Commitments FTCP Correspondence Site Map Contact Us Quick Reference Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Facility Representative Safety System Oversight DOE Integrated Safety Management National Training Center DOE Directives Program DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Phone Book HSS Logo FTCP FTCP Topics DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2006 - 2011) New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen Boardman the FTCP Chairperson.

363

Derived Concentration Technical Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

196-2011 196-2011 April 2011 DOE STANDARD DERIVED CONCENTRATION TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1196-2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Derived Concentration Technical Standard was a collaborative effort sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, with support from Department subject matter experts (SMEs) in the field of radiation protection. This standard, which complements DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, was developed taking

364

Oil Peak or Panic?  

SciTech Connect

In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Quarterly Technical Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has identified all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma; grouped those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional origins; collected, organized, and analyzed all available data; conducted characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each plays; and implemented a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs. By fulfilling these objectives, the FDD project has had the goal of helping to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells and provide incentive for development and exploratory wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mary K. Banken

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Technical Standards Program: Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Office of Nuclear Safety The following procedures should be used to write, revise, or maintain a DOE technical standard. They are also used to convert a DOE technical standard to a non-government standard or to form a topical committee. Table of Contents (TSPP-00) Program Overview and Responsibilities (TSPP-01) Initiating DOE Technical Standards (TSPP-02) Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations (TSPP-03) Developing DOE Technical Standard (TSPP-04) Coordination of Technical Standards (TSPP-05) - Draft In Concurrence Resolution - TSPP-06-2009 is the currently approved TSPP that addresses coordination of DOE Technical Standards. Approving and Issuing DOE Technical Standards (TSPP-06)

369

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and T

370

Approved DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

approved-doe-technical-standards Forrestal Building approved-doe-technical-standards Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 205851.800.dial.DOE en DOE-STD-1150-2013 http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/doe-std-1150-2013 DOE-STD-1150-2013

371

Proposed Technical Specification Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter provides the final revised Technical Specification (TS) pages for the subject proposed TS amendment. In Reference 1 Duke Energy requested an amendment to the Catawba Nuclear Station Facility Operating Licenses and Technical Specifications (TS). The proposed amendment revises various TS that are affected by the revised heatup, cooldown, critically, and inservice test pressure and temperature (P/T) limits for the reactor coolant system (RCS) of each unit. The proposed amendment also revised the TS requirements for the low temperature overpressure protection (LTOP) system for each unit. www. duke-energy. corn

D. M. Jamil; Duke Power

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

DOE Technical Assistance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Collection of Customer Data for Better Buildings Guidelines For Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utility Keith Freischlag and Curtis Framel Southwest Energy Efficiency Project DOE Technical Assistance Program Team 4 - Program & Project Development & Implementation December 16, 2010 Guidelines for Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities Webinar Overview * Technical Assistance Program (TAP) * Discussion of Identifying Utility Stakeholders * Discussion of Procuring Customer Usage Data * Suggestions to Streamline Data Collection Processes * Overview of Data Reporting Requirements * Q&A Guidelines for Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities * Questions and discussion after presentation

373

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing oils for use, application and precautions are discussed.

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a “negative” storage cost for oil in the form of a bene?tin levels. oil for more than your costs, that is, if P t+1 QSaudi oil, and M S the Saudi’s marginal cost of production.

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

378

Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Technical Assistance The Technical Assistance program is managed through the Center for Sustainable Soil and Groundwater Solutions at SRNL. The Technical Assistance program provides teams of nationally recognized experts from across the complex to support both DOE's smaller sites, such as Paducah, Portsmouth, Pinellas, Ashtabula, Fernald, Mound and Kansas City Plant, and larger sites such as Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore and Savannah River. Solutions that reduce technical risk and uncertainty Focus on science and engineering issues and strategic implementation of remedial systems Independent reviews facilitate regulatory and stakeholder acceptance of solutions. Contacts Karen Skubal karen.skubal@em.doe.gov (301) 903-6524 Justin Marble

380

First joint SPE/DOE symposium on enhanced oil recovery, proceedings supplement  

SciTech Connect

The First Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery sponsored by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and the US Department of Energy was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Besides the thirty-three technical papers which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery and were published in the Proceedings, the Symposium included a session on Enhanced Oil Recovery Incentives where ten papers were presented which discussed the status of enhanced oil recovery technology, and included papers on incentive programs of the United States, Canada and Venezuela. These papers are published in this Proceedings Supplement under the following titles: Federal Government Role in enhanced Oil Recovery; Financial Realities of an Adequate Petroleum Supply; Major Technology Constraints in Enhanced Oil Recovery; Decontrol-Opportunities and Dangers; Status of EOR Technology; Impact of Federal Incentives on US Production; Canadian Incentives Program; and Heavy Oil Incentives in Venezuela.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work February 17, 2006 - 11:59am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released a report confirming the technical soundness of infiltration modeling work performed by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees. "The report makes clear that the technical basis developed by the USGS has a strong conceptual foundation and is corroborated by independently-derived scientific conclusions, and provides a solid underpinning for the 2002 site recommendation," said OCRWM's Acting Director Paul Golan. "We are committed to opening Yucca Mountain based only on sound science. The work

382

Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

Not Available

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

Screening criteria for enhanced recovery of Saudi crude oils  

SciTech Connect

This investigation studies and analyzes the screening guides that can be used to select the applicable enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method under Saudi oil field conditions. Based on the analysis of data obtained from 186 Saudi formations, the crude oils are produced from low to intermediate permeability formations in the range of 1-1500 millidarcies. The original reservoirs' pressure and temperature range from 2000 to 5500 psi and from 140 to 240{degrees}F, respectively. The porosity of the formations varies from 10 to 30% and the formations thickness ranges from 10 to 300 feet. The reservoirs of Saudi Arabia are characterized by high formation water salinity, which can be as high as 30% by weight. Saudi oil formations are characterized by connate water in the range of 10-50%. Thus residual oil saturation is expected to be high. The viscosity of most Saudi crude oils ranges from 0.10 to 10 centipoise. The API gravity ranges from 15 to 45. The basic parameters studied include formation permeability, porosity, and thickness; reservoir pressure and temperature; crude oil viscosity and API gravity, formation connate water saturation and its salinity, and formation type and heterogeneity. Based on the screening analysis the most suitable technical methods applicable to Saudi oil fields are the miscible processes using gases.

Sayyouh, M.H.; Al-Blehed (Petroleum Engineering Dept., King Saud Univ., Riyadh (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This Technical Brief specifically addresses DU in an environmental contamination setting and specifically does.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other govern ment sources. DU occurs in a number of different compounds airborne releases of uranium at one DOE facility amounted to 310,000 kg between 1951 and 1988, which

385

Recoverable Robust Knapsack: the Discrete Scenario Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 24, 2011... different customers according to their demands maximizing the profit of ... In this paper, we show that for a fixed number of discrete scenarios ...

386

The recoverable robust tail assignment problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using column generation in the master and subproblems of the Benders ...... described by (36)-(41) is a network flow problem with one source and multiple sink.

387

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Authors: Robert Hunter (ASRC Energy), Scott Digert (BPXA), Tim Collett (USGS), Ray Boswell (USDOE) Venue: AAPG National Meeting Gas Hydrate session, Oral Presentation, San Antonio, TX, April 22, 2008 (http://www.AAPG.org [external site]) Abstract: This BP-DOE collaborative research project is helping determine whether or not gas hydrate can become a technically and economically recoverable gas resource. Reservoir characterization, development modeling, and associated studies indicate that 0-0.34 trillion cubic meters (TCM) gas may be technically recoverable from the estimated 0.92 TCM gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). Reservoir modeling indicates sufficient potential for technical recovery to justify proceeding into field operations to acquire basic reservoir and fluid data from the Mount Elbert gas hydrate prospect in the Milne Point Unit (MPU). Successful drilling and data acquisition in the Mount Elbert-01 stratigraphic test well was completed during February 3-19, 2007. Data was acquired from 131 meters of core (30.5 meters gas hydrate-bearing), extensive wireline logging, and wireline production testing operations using Modular Dynamics Testing (MDT). The stratigraphic test validated the 3D seismic interpretation of the MPU gas hydrate-bearing Mount Elbert prospect. Onsite core sub- sampling preserved samples for later analyses of interstitial water geochemistry, physical properties, thermal properties, organic geochemistry, petrophysics, and mechanical properties. MDT testing was accomplished within two gas hydrate-bearing intervals, and acquired during four long shut-in period tests. Four gas samples and one pre-gas hydrate dissociation formation water sample were collected. MDT analyses are helping to improve understanding of gas hydrate dissociation, gas production, formation cooling, and long-term production potential as well as help calibrate reservoir simulation models.

388

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 22, quarter ending March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains statements of objectives and summaries of technical progress on all DOE contracts pertaining to enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling techniques. Subject categories include chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal recovery of heavy oil; resource assessment; improved drilling technology; residual oil; environmental; petroleum technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery. An index containing the names of the companies and institutions involved is included. Current publications resulting from the DOE contractual program are listed. (DMC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Oil shale commercialization study  

SciTech Connect

Ninety four possible oil shale sections in southern Idaho were located and chemically analyzed. Sixty-two of these shales show good promise of possible oil and probable gas potential. Sixty of the potential oil and gas shales represent the Succor Creek Formation of Miocene age in southwestern Idaho. Two of the shales represent Cretaceous formations in eastern Idaho, which should be further investigated to determine their realistic value and areal extent. Samples of the older Mesozonic and paleozoic sections show promise but have not been chemically analyzed and will need greater attention to determine their potential. Geothermal resources are of high potential in Idaho and are important to oil shale prospects. Geothermal conditions raise the geothermal gradient and act as maturing agents to oil shale. They also might be used in the retorting and refining processes. Oil shales at the surface, which appear to have good oil or gas potential should have much higher potential at depth where the geothermal gradient is high. Samples from deep petroleum exploration wells indicate that the succor Creek shales have undergone considerable maturation with depth of burial and should produce gas and possibly oil. Most of Idaho's shales that have been analyzed have a greater potential for gas than for oil but some oil potential is indicated. The Miocene shales of the Succor Creek Formation should be considered as gas and possibly oil source material for the future when technology has been perfectes. 11 refs.

Warner, M.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures DOE Technical Standards Program The following procedures should be used to...

391

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE * OSTI * Go Mobile Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget...

392

Clean Cities: Clean Cities Technical Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Support to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Clean Cities Technical Support on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Clean Cities Technical Support on Twitter Bookmark...

393

Sandia National Laboratories: Employee & Retiree Resources: Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Library Search Sandia Publications Remote Access Technical Library The Sandia National Laboratories Technical Library provides quality information products and services...

394

2013 AOCS Technical Services Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Technical Services workshop includes educational sessions designed for lab technicians. 2013 AOCS Technical Services Workshop Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control

395

Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL STANDARDS TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM PROCEDURES DOE-TSPP-9 Revision: 5 Date: August 1, 2000 MAINTENANCE OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-9 Maintenance Revision: 5 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1

396

Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013. Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 ...

397

Opportunities to improve oil productivity in unstructured deltaic reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This report contains presentations presented at a technical symposium on oil production. Chapter 1 contains summaries of the presentations given at the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored symposium and key points of the discussions that followed. Chapter 2 characterizes the light oil resource from fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). An analysis of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and advanced secondary recovery (ASR) potential for fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs based on recovery performance and economic modeling as well as the potential resource loss due to well abandonments is presented. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the general reservoir characteristics and properties within deltaic deposits. It is not exhaustive treatise, rather it is intended to provide some basic information about geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of deltaic reservoirs, and the resulting recovery problems.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill May 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis At the request of President Obama, Secretary Chu and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories are providing round-the-clock scientific support to help inform strategies to stop the BP oil spill. Secretary Chu has spent several days in Houston monitoring the top kill attempt, analyzing the data as it comes in and helping to develop strategies to give it the best chances of success. In the days leading up to the "top kill" attempt, the Secretary and his team of scientists provided expert advice and technical support to test the assumptions behind BP's work and to offer analytical rigor. When diagnostic and pressure tests

399

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

400

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Watch April 19, 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil & Gas A large stockbuild in crude oil inventories contributed to blunt crude oil inputs ...

402

Oil Bypass filter technology evaluation final report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-01355 6-01355 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report TECHNICAL REPORT Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding March 2006 Idaho National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-06-01355 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding March 2006 Idaho National Laboratory Transportation Technology Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517

403

Gas, oil, and coal biotechnology I  

SciTech Connect

This papers presented at the First International IGT Symposium on Gas, Oil, and Coal Biotechnology, New Orleans, Louisiana, December 5-7, 1988, are reproduced in this book. This symposium was designed to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas among leading scientists, engineers, managers, and administrators in this rapidly advancing branch of biotechnology. The presentations and discussions by scientists and engineers from the academic, industrial, and government research laboratories, along with technical program managers and administrators, emphasized the biotechnological approaches to interrelated issues of energy utilization, supply, and environment. The symposium papers are organized in this book under topics that reflect the following program sessions. These topics are: (1) An Emerging Industry, and Programs to Encourage its Development; (2) Coal Biotechnology; (3) Gas Biotechnology; (4) Oil Biotechnology; and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Twenty-three papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Akin, C.; Smith, J. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado DE-FG26-02NT15451 Project Goal The project is designed to: Promote development of both discovered and undiscovered oil reserves contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, and Navaho native-controlled lands. Promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American oil exploration corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other tribes. Develop the most cost-effective approach to using non-invasive seismic imaging to reduce the risk in exploration and development of algal mound reservoirs on surrounding Native American lands.

405

Electrical and Electronics Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

33This 33This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Electrical and Electronics Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 HV Battery 120/220 V AC On-Board Battery Charger Bi-directional DC/DC Converter Electric Motor Inverter DC-DC

406

(National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research) quarterly technical report for January 1-March 31, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Technical Report, NIPER-353, covers the period January 1 to March 31, 1988, and reports on the research program outlined in the ''FY87 Annual Research Plan.'' It is submitted in accordance with the provisions of Cooperative Agreement FC22-83FE60149 between the Department of Energy and the IIT Research Institute. Thirty-seven individual projects are described. They involve enhanced oil recovery by several methods, oil mining, oil storage, quantitative analysis of petroleum and petroleum products, additives to improve storage behavior of fuels, and minimization of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes.

Not Available

1988-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Advanced Biobased was created with funding supplied by the Department of Energy to study biobased alternatives to petroleum based materials used in the manufacture of foundry sand binders. The project was successful in developing two new biobased polymers that are based on renewable agricultural materials or abundant naturally occurring organic materials. The technology has the potential of replacing large amounts of chemicals produced from oil with environmentally friendly alternatives.

Thiel, Jerry; Giese, Scott R; Beckermann, Christoph; Combi, Joan; Yavorsky, James; Cannon, Fred

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Technical Highlights - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Highlights for November 2013 Technical Highlights for November 2013 The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) cited in Article Published in Inside Science ORNL's recent achievement in ionic liquid (IL) additives for engine lubrication is featured in an article "Molten Salts Could Improve Fuel Economy," published in Inside Science, http://www.insidescience.org/content/molten-salts-could-improve-fuel-economy/1492. The article is syndicated to subscribers at FOXnews.com, NBCnews.com, LiveScience, and others. Dual-Fuel Combustion with Additives Capability A new capability was added to the multi-cylinder advanced combustion research engine at ORNL allowing dual fuel combustion with gasoline and gasoline doped with additives to increase the reactivity. The new configuration allows precise control over fuel temperature to allow for

409

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop Spring 2009 Technical Workshop in Support of U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Congestion Study Webcast, transcript, and presentations available at: http://www.congestion09.anl.gov/ Crowne Plaza Chicago O'Hare Hotel & Conference Center March 25-26, 2009 Agenda Day 1 - Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:00 a.m. Registration Check-In & Continental Breakfast 10:00 a.m. DOE Welcome/Purpose of Workshop David Meyer, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-OE) 10:15 a.m. Session 1 - Historic Congestion in the Western Interconnection The Western Electric Coordinating Council Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee has conducted an analysis of historic congestion in the Western

410

Active DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active DOE Technical Standards Active DOE Technical Standards Document Number Document Title Responsible SLM DOE-HDBK-1001-96 DOE-HDBK-1002-96 DOE-HDBK-1003-96 DOE-HDBK-1010-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/4-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1015/1-93

411

WHOLE FROG TECHNICAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHOLE FROG TECHNICAL REPORT WHOLE FROG TECHNICAL REPORT WING NIP, CRAIG LOGAN Imaging and Distributed Computing Group Information and Computing Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Publication number: LBL-35331 Credits CONTENT INTRODUCTION MRI DATA PHOTOGRAPH DATA (CRYOTOME) SEGMENTATION VISUALIZATION IN 3D PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED Photographing Lighting Misalignment Digitizing Lighting Segmentation Inconsistent Data Higher Resolution Desire IMPROVEMENT INTRODUCTION The goal of the Whole Frog Project is to be able to represent the anatomy of a frog in a computer in 3D space in such a way that a high school student will find it useful in learning physiology, hopefully developing a sense of interest in using computers at the same time. MRI DATA The original plan is to make use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to

412

Independent technical review, handbook  

SciTech Connect

Purpose Provide an independent engineering review of the major projects being funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The independent engineering review will address questions of whether the engineering practice is sufficiently developed to a point where a major project can be executed without significant technical problems. The independent review will focus on questions related to: (1) Adequacy of development of the technical base of understanding; (2) Status of development and availability of technology among the various alternatives; (3) Status and availability of the industrial infrastructure to support project design, equipment fabrication, facility construction, and process and program/project operation; (4) Adequacy of the design effort to provide a sound foundation to support execution of project; (5) Ability of the organization to fully integrate the system, and direct, manage, and control the execution of a complex major project.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

415

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Technical Assistance The DOE Office of Indian Energy and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program provide federally recognized Indian Tribes, bands, nations, tribal energy resource development organizations, and other organized groups and communities-including Alaska Native villages or regional and village corporations-with technical assistance designed to advance renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. Technical assistance is typically limited to 40 hours and may include, but is not limited to, the following priority areas: Strategic energy planning Grantee support Transmission/interconnection Project development Finance Lease agreements DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Sandia National

416

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Shale oil: process choices  

SciTech Connect

The four broad categories of shale-oil processing are discussed. All of these processes share the basic function of retorting oil-shale rock at high temperature so that the kerogen material in the rocks is thermally decomposed to shale oil and gaseous products. The technologies and the organizations working on their development are: solids-to-solids heating, The Oil Shale Co. (TOSCO) and Lurgi-Rhur; gas-to-solids heating with internal gas combustion, U. S. Bureau of Mines, Development Engineering Inc. and Union Oil of California; gas-to-solid heating with external heat generation, Development Engineering, Union Oil, Petrobas, and Institute of Gas Technology; and in-situ retorting, Occidental Petroleum Corp. The TOSCO II process is considered proven and on the verge of commercialization. (BLM)

1974-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to...

420

Model Based Enterprise / Technical Data Package Summit ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Technical Note 1753 Model Based Enterprise / Technical Data Package Summit Report Joshua Lubell Kenway ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2008 Special Libraries Association Annual Conference Founding Alliance Members * Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) - Canada * VTT Technical...

422

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Process of treating oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process of destructively distilling oil shale is described consisting in subjecting the oil shale containing aluminum to the action of heat and pressure to destructively distill it and separate the light oil constituents. Chlorine gas is simultaneously passed through the hot oil shale countercurrent to the direction of movement of the oil shale.

Egloff, G.

1927-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

424

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

427

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

428

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

430

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

431

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

432

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

433

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

434

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

435

Residual Fuel Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

436

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

439

Oil And The Macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper examines the oil price-macro economy relationship by means of analyzing the impact ofoil price on Industrial production, real effective exchange rate, long… (more)

Al-Ameri, Leyth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

California Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of different quality crudes vary over time based on the value the market places on such quality attributes. A heavy crude oil has more heavy, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Technical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 PART II OVERVIEW1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 II-1 PART II OVERVIEW1 2 Energy, Industry, and Waste Fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) are used primarily for their concentration of chemical energy is identified as emissions from energy and emissions from industrial21 processes.22 23 Emissions by Month and

443

Oil production in the Arctic Natl. Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment responds to U.S. House and Senate committee requests for an examination of technical issues concerning potential development of the Arctic Natl. Wildlife Refuge (ANWAR) in northeastern Alaska. The illustrated report presents the results of an assessment of oilfield technology used to develop the Alaskan North Slope, as an analog for technology at ANWR. The report considers prospects for future North Slope oil production, especially the likelihood that oil flowing through the Trans Alaskan Pipeline System will decline dramatically during the next decade.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues on Aluminum Sheet and Foil by Using Elemental Analysis and Fourier  ...

445

Relaxation studies on oil, pressboard and oil impregnated pressboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a laboratory relaxation study with FDS and RVM was carried out for a period of 3 years with the fabricated oil (OIL),… (more)

Cao, Hongyan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Shale Oil Upgrading Utilizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companies providing oil samples of at least five (5) gallons include Chevron, Oil Shale Exploration Company (OSEC), and Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Background Work performed...

448

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

449

OIL WELL REMEDIATION IN CLAY AND WAYNE COUNTIES, IL  

SciTech Connect

This is the second progress and final technical report of the remediation of abandoned wells in Clay and Wayne Counties in Illinois. The wells will be identified as the Routt No.3 and No.4 and the Bates Hosselton 1 and 2. Both sites have met all legal, financial and environmental requirements to drill and/or pump oil on both leases. We have also obtained all available information about both leases. All steps were taken to improve access roads, dig the necessary pits, and build the necessary firewalls. This progress and final technical report will address the remediation efforts as well as our results and conclusions.

Peter L. Dakuras; Larry Stieber; Dick Young

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

451

Distillate and Crude Oil Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fuel and residential heating oil prices on the East Coast is being driven by higher crude oil prices than last year and higher spreads. Crude oil is projected to average almost...

452

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Oil and Natural Gas Supply > Events Oil and Natural Gas Supply Events The following is a listing of events of interest to the oil and natural gas community....

453

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book highlights various aspects of Australasian edible oils. Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Soft Bound Books Oils and Fats Specialist

455

Technical Approach: DHS needs to establish M&S technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... It is now being enhanced using particle and cell ... Planning, Response, and Recovery challenges ... to telecommunications, water resources, oil and gas ...

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results October 2, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy plans to introduce a new, user-friendly online repository of oil and natural gas research results at the Society of Petroleum Engineers' Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, to be held in New Orleans, La., October 4-7, 2009. By providing easy access to the results of nearly four decades of research supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's Oil and Natural Gas Program, the knowledge management database could ultimately help boost recovery of the nation's oil and gas resources. The database largely evolved from a recommendation made by the Federal

457

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on AddThis.com... Quick Links Solution Center Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center

458

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM C C A A L L E E N N D D A A R R Y Y E E A A R R S S 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 - - 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 B B I I E E N N N N I I A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK FTCP 2011-2012 Biennial Report ~ 2 ~ Table of Contents Section Title Page 1.0 Purpose and Scope .......................................................................................... 3 2.0 2011/2012 Accomplishments.......................................................................... 3

459

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM APPROACH FOR PLAY PORTFOLIOS TO IMPROVE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas have been commercially produced in Illinois for over 100 years. Existing commercial production is from more than fifty-two named pay horizons in Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Middle Ordovician to Pennsylvanian. Over 3.2 billion barrels of oil have been produced. Recent calculations indicate that remaining mobile resources in the Illinois Basin may be on the order of several billion barrels. Thus, large quantities of oil, potentially recoverable using current technology, remain in Illinois oil fields despite a century of development. Many opportunities for increased production may have been missed due to complex development histories, multiple stacked pays, and commingled production which makes thorough exploitation of pays and the application of secondary or improved/enhanced recovery strategies difficult. Access to data, and the techniques required to evaluate and manage large amounts of diverse data are major barriers to increased production of critical reserves in the Illinois Basin. These constraints are being alleviated by the development of a database access system using a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach for evaluation and identification of underdeveloped pays. The Illinois State Geological Survey has developed a methodology that is being used by industry to identify underdeveloped areas (UDAs) in and around petroleum reservoirs in Illinois using a GIS approach. This project utilizes a statewide oil and gas Oracle{reg_sign} database to develop a series of Oil and Gas Base Maps with well location symbols that are color-coded by producing horizon. Producing horizons are displayed as layers and can be selected as separate or combined layers that can be turned on and off. Map views can be customized to serve individual needs and page size maps can be printed. A core analysis database with over 168,000 entries has been compiled and assimilated into the ISGS Enterprise Oracle database. Maps of wells with core data have been generated. Data from over 1,700 Illinois waterflood units and waterflood areas have been entered into an Access{reg_sign} database. The waterflood area data has also been assimilated into the ISGS Oracle database for mapping and dissemination on the ArcIMS website. Formation depths for the Beech Creek Limestone, Ste. Genevieve Limestone and New Albany Shale in all of the oil producing region of Illinois have been calculated and entered into a digital database. Digital contoured structure maps have been constructed, edited and added to the ILoil website as map layers. This technology/methodology addresses the long-standing constraints related to information access and data management in Illinois by significantly simplifying the laborious process that industry presently must use to identify underdeveloped pay zones in Illinois.

Beverly Seyler; John Grube

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technically recoverable oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Oil price analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport has been in the whole history of mankind the basic and determining mover of the human society shape. It determined not only the position of towns, but also their inner design and it was also last but not least the basic element of the economic ... Keywords: GDP, deposit, fuels, history, market equilibrium, oil, oil reserves, price

Zdenek Riha; Viktorie Jirova; Marek Honcu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Edible Oils Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains four (4) titles regarding frying and edible oils. Edible Oils Package Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages 1766A8D5F05863694E128DE1C47D07C3 This Value Package includes: ...

463

Menhaden Fish Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes Menhaden Oil Specific Gravity (SG) 15.5/15.5°C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.912– 0.930 25/25°C Other SG Refractive Index (RI) 25°C 40°C Other RI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (65) 1

464

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Oil and Natural Gas - Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search NETL Oil and Natural Gas Document Information Oil & Natural Gas Document Repository Results will be shown in two categories. "Document Database Results" provides...

466

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

467

oil | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil oil Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

468

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Oil shale: a framework for development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price escalation of petroleum in recent times has removed the economic barrier to shale oil production, or soon will. A technological base for production is available which can be rapidly developed to the size and quality needed. The resource base in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado can support production of 1 to 5 million barrels of oil per day for hundreds of years. Institutional problems are the major remaining impediment to the development of oil shale. The small part of the resource in private hands is economically marginal and cannot support large production rates or the most efficient methods. The best land is owned by the Federal Government and is unavailable under present laws and policies. The lack of an integrated federal policy and an implementation plan prevents the development that is now technically and economically practical. One possible solution is a Piceance Basin Authority chartered by Congress to efficiently manage this resource and coordinate the federal governmental responsibility for oil shale resource development and conservation, water development, environmental control, and land use policy. It should be located in Colorado for an effective interaction with State and local authorities where both have responsibility. Government lands must be made accessible on a scale suitable to the technology and in a way that is acceptable to the public and to industry. Government and industry can then cooperate in a unitized, coordinated development of the resource and the area. With access to the resource and a clear government responsibility for area-wide, non-commercial planning and development, industry can provide the technology and capital for production and marketing of shale oil on an economically competitive basis.

Lewis, A.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Oil to Coal Conversion of Power and Industrial Facilities in the Dominican Republic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Realizing that the use of coal has the potential to offset the effects of world oil prices on the Dominican Republic's economy, the Commission Nacional de Politica Energetica (CNPE) requested Bechtel Power Corporation to study the technical and economic feasibility of converting the nation's largest oil-fired facilities to coal and to develop preliminary designs for the conversions. This paper addresses the methodology used in the study, with special emphasis on the determination of the technical and economic feasibility of converting power plants and cement plants from oil to coal. The summary results and conclusions are presented and include coal conversion capital costs, cost savings, and program overall schedule. The intent of the authors is to provide a reference for the study of converting other islands' oil burning facilities to coal.

Causilla, H.; Acosta, J. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-10 Conversion Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1 2. CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS.................................................................... 1

472

Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to inform readers of various technical activities within the Department, promote exchange of ideas, and give credit to personnel who are achieving the results. The report is presented in two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into seven sections, each of which reports on an engineering division and its specific activities related to nuclear tests, nuclear explosives, weapons, energy systems, engineering sciences, magnetic fusion, and materials fabrication.

Carr, R.B.; Denney, R.M. (eds.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Mechanical Engineering Department. Technical review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to (1) inform the readers of various technical activities within the Department, (2) promote exchange of ideas, and (3) give credit to the personnel who are achieving the results. The report is formatted into two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into eight sections, one for each Division in the Department providing the reader with the names of the personnel and the Division accomplishing the work.

Simecka, W.B.; Condouris, R.A.; Talaber, C. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 APPROVING AND ISSUING DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-8 Approval Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1 2. APPROVING AND ISSUING DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS .................................................... 1