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  1. Battle Mountain Band - Te-Moak: Solar Energy Park

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Battle Mountain Band - Te-Moak Chairman Joseph Holley and Vice-chairman Mark Oppenhein, Members Donna Hill, Delbert Holley, Lydia Johnson, and Lydell Oppenhein Solar Energy Park ...

  2. Eolica Cajueiro da Praia Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eolica Cajueiro da Praia Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eolica Cajueiro da Praia Ltda Place: Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil Zip: 60170-251 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy...

  3. Substrate CdTe Efficiency Improvements - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate CdTe Efficiency Improvements National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-28PCT Application as-published (984 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Thin film solar cells have been the focus of many research facilities in recent years that are working to decrease manufacturing costs and increase cell efficiency. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has been well recognized as a promising photovoltaic material for thin film solar cells

  4. Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers You are accessing a document from the ...

  5. Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers In late February of 2002, warming climate along ...

  6. Phonon self-energy and origin of anomalous neutron scattering spectra in SnTe and PbTe thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL] [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL] [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL] [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL] [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The anharmonic lattice dynamics of rock-salt thermoelectric compounds SnTe and PbTe are investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first-principles calculations. The experiments show that, surprisingly, although SnTe is closer to the ferroelectric instability, phonon spectra in PbTe exhibit a more anharmonic character. This behavior is reproduced in first-principles calculations of the temperature-dependent phonon self-energy. Our simulations reveal how the nesting of phonon dispersions induces prominent features in the self-energy, which account for the measured INS spectra and their temperature dependence. We establish that the phase-space for three-phonon scattering processes, rather than just the proximity to the lattice instability, is the mechanism determining the complex spectrum of the transverse-optical ferroelectric mode.

  7. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N u n a v u t O n t a r i o A l b e r t a Te x a s N o r t h w e s t Te r r i t o r i e s M a n i t o b a B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a S a s k a t c h e w a n Y u k o n M o n t a n a U t a h I d a h o C a l i f o r n i a N e v a d a O r e g o n A r i z o n a I o w a K a n s a s C o l o r a d o W y o m i n g S o n o r a N e w M e x i c o M i n n e s o t a N e b r a s k a O h i o C h i h u a h u a I l l i n o i s M i s s o u r i F l o r i d a G e o r g i a O k l a h o m a W a s h i n g t o n S o

  8. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A l a s k a N u n a v u t O n t a r i o A l b e r t a Te x a s N o r t h w e s t Te r r i t o r i e s M a n i t o b a B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a S a s k a t c h e w a n Y u k o n M o n t a n a U t a h I d a h o C a l i f o r n i a N e v a d a O r e g o n A r i z o n a I o w a K a n s a s C o l o r a d o W y o m i n g S o n o r a N e w M e x i c o M i n n e s o t a N e b r a s k a O h i o C h i h u a h u a I l l i n o i s M i s s o u r i F l o r i d a G e o r g i a O k l a h o m a W a s h i n

  9. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    D u N o r d - O u e s t Te r r e - N e u v e - e t - L a b r a d o r Q u é b e c Í l e - d u - P r i n c e - É d o u a r d N o u v e l l e - É c o s s e N o u v e a u - B r u n s w i c k C o l o m b i e - B r i t a n n i q u e B a f f i n I s l a n d Í l e d u B a f f i n E l l e s m e r e I s l a n d Í l e d u E l l e s m e r e V i c t o r i a I s l a n d Í l e d u V i c t o r i a N e w f o u n d l a n d a n d L a b r a d o r Te r r e - N e u v e - e t - L a b r a d o r A l a s k a N u n

  10. Energetica Serra da Prata | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    da Prata Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energetica Serra da Prata Place: Bahia, Brazil Product: SHP developer based in the state of Bahia, Brazil. References: Energetica Serra...

  11. ON THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF GeV/TeV COSMIC RAY LEPTONS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The models rely on either dark matter annihilationdecay or specific nearby astrophysical ... is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. ...

  12. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The models rely on either dark matter annihilationdecay or specific nearby astrophysical ... is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. ...

  13. Biopalma da Amaz nia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    da Amaznia Place: Belem, Para, Brazil Product: Brazilian palm oil plantation for food industry developer company. Coordinates: -1.454426, -48.502537 Show Map Loading...

  14. PVA TePla AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: PVA TePla AG Place: Asslar, Germany Zip: 35614 Product: Supplier of plants and equipment for vacuum systems, crystal-growing systems and plasma systems, some of...

  15. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling[Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses results from TE HVAC project to add detail to a human thermal comfort model and further allow load reduction in the climate control energy through a distributed TE network

  16. CdTe portfolio offers commercial ready high efficiency solar - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search CdTe portfolio offers commercial ready high efficiency solar National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication MktgSummary CdTe.pdf (117 KB) Schematic illustration of a typical CdTe superstrate thin-film PV device. In this design, the layers of the device are deposited onto a glass "superstrate" that allows sunlight to enter. The sunlight passes through the

  17. Jayme da Costa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Product: Electrical goods manufacturer that is developing and building wind, solar and hydro projects in Portugal and wind projects in Spain. Coordinates: 40.875332,...

  18. Development of a Total Energy, Environment and Asset Management (TE2AM tm) Curriculum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Department of Engineering Professional Development (EPD) has completed the sponsored project entitled, Development of a Total Energy, Environment and Asset Management (TE2AM™) Curriculum. The project involved the development of a structured professional development program to improve the knowledge, skills, capabilities, and competencies of engineers and operators of commercial buildings. TE2AM™ advances a radically different approach to commercial building design, operation, maintenance, and end-­‐of-­‐life disposition. By employing asset management principles to the lifecycle of a commercial building, owners and occupants will realize improved building performance, reduced energy consumption and positive environmental impacts. Through our commercialization plan, we intend to offer TE2AM™ courses and certificates to the professional community and continuously improve TE2AM™ course materials. The TE2AM™ project supports the DOE Strategic Theme 1 -­‐ Energy Security; and will further advance the DOE Strategic Goal 1.4 Energy Productivity. Through participation in the TE2AM™ curriculum, engineers and operators of commercial buildings will be eligible for a professional certificate; denoting the completion of a prescribed series of learning activities. The project involved a comprehensive, rigorous approach to curriculum development, and accomplished the following goals: 1. Identify, analyze and prioritize key learning needs of engineers, architects and technical professionals as operators of commercial buildings. 2. Design and develop TE2AM™ curricula and instructional strategies to meet learning needs of the target learning community. 3. Establish partnerships with the sponsor and key stakeholders to enhance the development and delivery of learning programs. 4. Successfully commercialize and sustain the training and certificate programs for a substantial time following the term of the award. The project team was

  19. ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florida Zip: 33605 Sector: Efficiency Product: Tampa-based wireless enterprise automation solutions firm. Elutions provides an Active Energy Management service allowing users...

  20. Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa MARL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa MARL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa (MARL) Place: Lisbon, Portugal Zip: 2660-421 Product: Mercado...

  1. DA (Distribution Automation) (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DA (Distribution Automation) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name DA (Distribution Automation) Country Netherlands Coordinates 52.132633, 5.291266...

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  3. Eletricidade da Amaz nia S A ELETRAM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amaz nia S A ELETRAM Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eletricidade da Amaznia SA (ELETRAM) Place: Cuiaba, Mato Grosso, Brazil Zip: 78040-570 Sector: Hydro Product: Small...

  4. CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells and Modules Tutorial; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, David S.

    2015-06-13

    This is a tutorial presented at the 42nd IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference to cover the introduction, background, and updates on CdTe cell and module technology, including CdTe cell and module structure and fabrication.

  5. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic-Ray Electrons at TeV Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Sahakian, V.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cheesebrough, A.; Dickinson, H. J.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Keogh, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Rulten, C. B.; Spangler, D.; Ward, M.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Borrel, V.; Olive, J-F.

    2008-12-31

    The very large collection area of ground-based {gamma}-ray telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon or satellite based instruments in the detection of very-high-energy (>600 GeV) cosmic-ray electrons. Here we present the electron spectrum derived from data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In this measurement, the first of this type, we are able to extend the measurement of the electron spectrum beyond the range accessible to direct measurements. We find evidence for a substantial steepening in the energy spectrum above 600 GeV compared to lower energies.

  6. Search for Z? events with large missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-10-02

    We present the first search for new phenomena in Z? final states with large missing transverse energy using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb? collected with the D0 experiment in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. This signature is predicted in gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking models, where the lightest neutralino ??? is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and is produced in pairs, possibly through decay from heavier supersymmetric particles. The ??? can decay either to a Z boson or a photon and an associated gravitino that escapes detection. We exclude this model at the 95% C.L. for supersymmetry-breaking scales of ?<87 TeV.

  7. Domingos da Silva Teixeira SA DST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portugal Zip: 4711 911 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: A group that is involved in civil construction and public works as well as project development in the wind and solar...

  8. MHK Projects/Figueira da Foz Portugal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a commercial power project site in Figueira de Foz, Portugal to build a 100 MW offshore wave energy plant. Initially, a 2 MW demonstration plant is planned followed by the...

  9. Temperature scaling in the quantum-Hall-effect regime in a HgTe quantum well with an inverted energy spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Gudina, S. V.; Neverov, V. N.; Podgornykh, S. M.; Popov, M. R. Harus, G. I.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Yakunin, M. V.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-12-15

    The longitudinal and Hall magnetoresistances of HgTe/HgCdTe heterostructures with an inverted energy spectrum (the HgTe quantum well width is d = 20.3 nm) are measured in the quantum-Hall-effect regime at T = 2–50 K in magnetic fields up to B = 9 T. Analysis of the temperature dependences of conductivity in the transition region between the first and second plateaus of the quantum Hall effect shows the feasibility of the scaling regime for a plateau–plateau quantum phase transition in 2D-structures on the basis of mercury telluride.

  10. Search for supersymmetry in pp collisions at 7 TeV in events with jets and missing transverse energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-04-01

    A search for supersymmetry with R-parity conservation in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is performed in events with jets and significant missing transverse energy, characteristic of the decays of heavy, pair-produced squarks and gluinos. The primary background, from standard model multijet production, is reduced by several orders of magnitude to a negligible level by the application of a set of robust kinematic requirements. With this selection, the data are consistent with the standard model backgrounds, namely t t-bar, W + jet and Z + jet production, which are estimated from data control samples. Limits are set on the parameters of the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. These limits extend those set previously by experiments at the Tevatron and LEP colliders.

  11. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by supernova remnants, and evaluates their expected energy spectrum based on a simple kinetic equation describing the propagation of charged particles in the interstellar medium. ...

  12. Ger te und Akkumulatorwerk Zwickau GmbH GAZ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zwickau GmbH (GAZ) Place: Germany Product: GAZ manufactures special nickel-based batteries mainly used in the energy, rail, telecom and UPS sectors. References: Gerte- und...

  13. Physics with linear colliders in the TeV CM energy region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulos, F.; Cook, V.; Hinchliffe, I.; Lane, K.; Pellet, D.; Perl, M.; Seiden, A.; Wiedemann, H.

    1982-07-01

    From a technical point of view a linear collider of high energy and luminosity cannot be operated economically at the present date. A series of R and D efforts in different areas are required to produce the necessary technology for an economically feasible linear collider. No fundamental limits, however, have been found as yet that would prevent us from reaching the goals outlined in this report. Most of the critical component will be tested in a real like situation once the SLC comes into operation. Beyond that much R and D is required in rf-power sources to reduce the power consumption and in high gradient accelerating structures to minimize the required real estate and linear construction costs.

  14. TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography Print Thursday, 22 August 2013 10:50 TE Connectivity is a world leader in connectivity-the $13 billion global company designs and manufactures more than 500,000 different electronic connectivity products for the automotive, energy, industrial, broadband communications, consumer device, healthcare, aerospace, and defense industries. TE Connectivity has a long-standing commitment to innovation and engineering

  15. TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography Print Thursday, 22 August 2013 10:50 TE Connectivity is a world leader in connectivity-the $13 billion global company designs and manufactures more than 500,000 different electronic connectivity products for the automotive, energy, industrial, broadband communications, consumer device, healthcare, aerospace, and defense industries. TE Connectivity has a long-standing commitment to innovation and engineering

  16. Search for Zγ events with large missing transverse energy in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-10-02

    We present the first search for new phenomena in Zγ final states with large missing transverse energy using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 experiment in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV. This signature is predicted in gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking models, where the lightest neutralino χ˜⁰₁ is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and is produced in pairs, possibly through decay from heavier supersymmetric particles. The χ˜⁰₁ can decay either to a Z boson or a photon and an associated gravitino that escapes detection. We exclude this model at the 95% C.L. for supersymmetry-breaking scales of Λ<87more » TeV.« less

  17. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

    2012-08-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  18. Search for Large Extra Dimensions via Single Photons Plus Missing Energy Final States at s^(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrera, Edgar Fernando; /Florida State U.

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents a search for large extra dimensions in the single photon plus missing transverse energy final states. We use a data sample of approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (recorded with the D{sup -} detector) to investigate direct Kaluza Klein graviton production and set limits, at the 95% C.L., on the fundamental mass scale M{sub D} from 970 GeV to 816 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  19. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-08-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H→WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  20. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8*|1. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radiusmoreparameters, R = 0.4 and R = 0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.less

  1. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4more » and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.« less

  2. Search for squark production in events with jets, hadronically decaying tau leptons and missing transverse energy at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-05-01

    A search for supersymmetric partners of quarks is performed in the topology of multijet events accompanied by at least one tau lepton decaying hadronically and large missing transverse energy. Approximately 1 fb-1 of ppbar collision data from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector is analyzed. Results are combined with the previously published D0 inclusive search for squarks and gluinos. No evidence of physics beyond the standard model is found and lower limits on the squark mass up to 410 GeV are derived in the framework of minimal supergravity with tan(beta)=15, A{sub 0}=-2m{sub 0} and mu<0, in the region where decays to tau leptons dominate. Gaugino masses m{sub 1/2} are excluded up to 172 GeV.

  3. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy ?s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 24%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 28%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent protonproton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.

  4. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy √s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2–4%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured withmore » a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2–8%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton–proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.« less

  5. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?|<0.0025 GeV? and |aWC/?|<0.0092 GeV?.

  6. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Helsinki U. of Tech. /Nebraska U. /Saclay

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum p{sub T} in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet p{sub T} resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet p{sub T} resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The inclusive jet cross

  7. Search for supersymmetry in events with a lepton, a photon, and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A search is performed for an excess of events, over the standard model expectations, with a photon, a lepton, and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. Such events are expected in many new physics models, in particular a supersymmetric theory that is broken via a gauge-mediated mechanism, when the lightest charged and neutral gauginos are mass degenerate. The data sample used in this search corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. No evidence of such an excess above the standard model backgrounds, dominated by W-gamma production, is found. The results are presented as 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section for a benchmark gauge-mediated scenario, and are then converted into exclusion limits on the squark, gluino, and wino masses.

  8. Search for Dark Matter in Events with One Jet and Missing Transverse Energy in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-05-23

    We present the results of a search for dark matter production in the monojet signature. We analyze a sample of Tevatron pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ recorded by the CDF II detector. In events with large missing transverse energy and one energetic jet, we find good agreement between the standard model prediction and the observed data. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the dark matter production rate. The limits are translated into bounds on nucleon-dark matter scattering rates which are competitive with current direct detection bounds on spin-independent interaction belowmore » a dark matter candidate mass of 5 GeV/c², and on spin-dependent interactions up to masses of 200 GeV/c².« less

  9. Search for Dark Matter in Events with One Jet and Missing Transverse Energy in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bai, Y.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fox, P. J.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harnik, R.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for dark matter production in the monojet signature. We analyze a sample of Tevatron pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb? recorded by the CDF II detector. In events with large missing transverse energy and one energetic jet, we find good agreement between the standard model prediction and the observed data. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the dark matter production rate. The limits are translated into bounds on nucleon-dark matter scattering rates which are competitive with current direct detection bounds on spin-independent interaction below a dark matter candidate mass of 5 GeV/c, and on spin-dependent interactions up to masses of 200 GeV/c.

  10. Search for New Physics with a Dijet plus Missing Transverse Energy Signature in p-pbar Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    We present results of a signature-based search for new physics using a dijet plus missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) data sample collected in 2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe no significant event excess with respect to the standard model prediction and extract a 95% C.L. upper limit on the cross section times acceptance for a potential contribution from a non-standard model process. Based on this limit the mass of a potential first or second generation scalar leptoquark is constrained to be above 187 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the (W/Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive (POMPYT) and non-diffractive (PYTHIA) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 +/- 9.3 (stat.) +/- 5.2 (syst.))%.

  12. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Jet energy measurement and its systematic uncertainty in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-15

    The jet energy scale (JES) and its systematic uncertainty are determined for jets measured with the ATLAS detector using proton–proton collision data with a centre-of-mass energy of \\(\\sqrt{s}=7\\) TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(4.7\\) \\(\\,\\,\\text{ fb }^{-1}\\). Jets are reconstructed from energy deposits forming topological clusters of calorimeter cells using the anti-\\(k_{t}\\) algorithm with distance parameters \\(R=0.4\\) or \\(R=0.6\\), and are calibrated using MC simulations. A residual JES correction is applied to account for differences between data and MC simulations. This correction and its systematic uncertainty are estimated using a combination of in situ techniques exploiting the transversemore » momentum balance between a jet and a reference object such as a photon or a \\(Z\\) boson, for \\({20} \\le p_{\\mathrm {T}}^\\mathrm {jet}<{1000}\\, ~\\mathrm{GeV }\\) and pseudorapidities \\(|\\eta |<{4.5}\\). The effect of multiple proton–proton interactions is corrected for, and an uncertainty is evaluated using in situ techniques. The smallest JES uncertainty of less than 1 % is found in the central calorimeter region (\\(|\\eta |<{1.2}\\)) for jets with \\({55} \\le p_{\\mathrm {T}}^\\mathrm {jet}<{500}\\, ~\\mathrm{GeV }\\). For central jets at lower \\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}\\), the uncertainty is about 3 %. A consistent JES estimate is found using measurements of the calorimeter response of single hadrons in proton–proton collisions and test-beam data, which also provide the estimate for \\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}^\\mathrm {jet}> 1\\) TeV. The calibration of forward jets is derived from dijet \\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}\\) balance measurements. The resulting uncertainty reaches its largest value of 6 % for low-\\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}\\) jets at \\(|\\eta |=4.5\\). In addition, JES uncertainties due to specific event topologies, such as close-by jets or selections of event samples with an enhanced content of jets originating from light

  14. Jet energy measurement and its systematic uncertainty in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-15

    The jet energy scale (JES) and its systematic uncertainty are determined for jets measured with the ATLAS detector using proton–proton collision data with a centre-of-mass energy of \\(\\sqrt{s}=7\\) TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(4.7\\) \\(\\,\\,\\text{ fb }^{-1}\\). Jets are reconstructed from energy deposits forming topological clusters of calorimeter cells using the anti-\\(k_{t}\\) algorithm with distance parameters \\(R=0.4\\) or \\(R=0.6\\), and are calibrated using MC simulations. A residual JES correction is applied to account for differences between data and MC simulations. This correction and its systematic uncertainty are estimated using a combination of in situ techniques exploiting the transverse momentum balance between a jet and a reference object such as a photon or a \\(Z\\) boson, for \\({20} \\le p_{\\mathrm {T}}^\\mathrm {jet}<{1000}\\, ~\\mathrm{GeV }\\) and pseudorapidities \\(|\\eta |<{4.5}\\). The effect of multiple proton–proton interactions is corrected for, and an uncertainty is evaluated using in situ techniques. The smallest JES uncertainty of less than 1 % is found in the central calorimeter region (\\(|\\eta |<{1.2}\\)) for jets with \\({55} \\le p_{\\mathrm {T}}^\\mathrm {jet}<{500}\\, ~\\mathrm{GeV }\\). For central jets at lower \\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}\\), the uncertainty is about 3 %. A consistent JES estimate is found using measurements of the calorimeter response of single hadrons in proton–proton collisions and test-beam data, which also provide the estimate for \\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}^\\mathrm {jet}> 1\\) TeV. The calibration of forward jets is derived from dijet \\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}\\) balance measurements. The resulting uncertainty reaches its largest value of 6 % for low-\\(p_{\\mathrm {T}}\\) jets at \\(|\\eta |=4.5\\). In addition, JES uncertainties due to specific event topologies, such as close-by jets or selections of event samples with an enhanced content of jets originating from light quarks or

  15. Search for Supersymmetry Using Diphoton Events in p anti-p Collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eun Sin; /Texas A-M

    2010-05-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a search for supersymmetry in proton-antiproton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV studied with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Our strategy is to select collisions with two photons in the final state that have the properties of being the decays of very massive supersymmetric particles. This includes looking for large total energy from the decayed particles as well as for the presence of particles that leave the detector without interacting. We find no events using 2.6 fb{sup -1} of data collected during the 2004-2008 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron which is consistent with the background estimate of 1.4 {+-} 0.4 events. Since there is no evidence of new particles we set cross section limits in a gauge-mediated supersymmetry model with {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{tilde G}, where the {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} and {tilde G} are the lightest neutralino and the gravitino (the lightest supersymmetric particle), respectively. We set limits on models as a function of the {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} mass and lifetime, producing the world's most sensitive search for {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} by excluding masses up to 149 GeV/c{sup 2} for {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} lifetimes much less than 1 ns.

  16. Search for a dijet resonance in events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.,

    2013-11-01

    We report on a search for a dijet resonance in events with only two or three jets and large imbalance in the total event transverse momentum. This search is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a W or Z boson, where the boson decays leptonically with one or more neutrinos in the final state. We use the full data set collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider at a proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb^{-1}. We study the invariant mass distribution of the two jets with highest transverse energy. We find good agreement between data and standard model background expectations and measure the combined cross section for WW, WZ, and ZZ production to be 13.8^{+3.0}_{-2.7} pb. No significant anomalies are observed in the mass spectrum and 95% credibility level upper limits are set on the production rates of a potential new particle in association with a W or Z boson.

  17. Search for Scalar Bottom Quarks from Gluino Decays in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at a Center-of-Mass Energy of 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rott, Carsten

    2004-12-01

    The authors have performed a search for the scalar bottom quark ({tilde b}{sub 1}) from gluino ({tilde g}) decays in an R-parity conserving SUSY scenario with m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde b}{sub 1}}, by investigating a final state of large missing transverse energy, with three or more jets, and some of them from the hadronization of b-quarks. A data sample of 156 pb{sup -1} collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV was used. For the final selection, jets containing secondary displaced vertices were required. This analysis has been performed ''blind'', in that the inspection of the signal region was only made after the Standard Model prediction was finalized. Comparing data with SUSY predictions, they can exclude masses of the gluino and sbottom of up to 280 and 240 GeV/c{sup 2} respectively.

  18. 125Te NMR chemical-shift trends in PbTeGeTe and PbTeSnTe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Njegic, Bosiljka; Levin, Evgenii M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-10-08

    Complex tellurides, such as doped PbTe, GeTe, and their alloys, are among the best thermoelectric materials. Knowledge of the change in 125Te NMR chemical shift due to bonding to dopant or solute atoms is useful for determination of phase composition, peak assignment, and analysis of local bonding. We have measured the 125Te NMR chemical shifts in PbTe-based alloys, Pb1?xGexTe and Pb1?xSnxTe, which have a rocksalt-like structure, and analyzed their trends. For low x, several peaks are resolved in the 22-kHz MAS 125Te NMR spectra. A simple linear trend in chemical shifts with the number of Pb neighbors is observed. No evidence of a proposed ferroelectric displacement of Ge atoms in a cubic PbTe matrix is detected at low Ge concentrations. The observed chemical shift trends are compared with the results of DFT calculations, which confirm the linear dependence on the composition of the first-neighbor shell. The data enable determination of the composition of various phases in multiphase telluride materials. They also provide estimates of the 125Te chemical shifts of GeTe and SnTe (+970 and +400150 ppm, respectively, from PbTe), which are otherwise difficult to access due to Knight shifts of many hundreds of ppm in neat GeTe and SnTe.

  19. The tin impurity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 alloys | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Systems: Measurement of Reaction Rates at Elevated Temperatures | Department of Energy The Viability of Sustainable, Self-Propping Shear Zones in Ehanced Geothermal Systems: Measurement of Reaction Rates at Elevated Temperatures presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. carroll_shear_zones_peer2013.pdf (1.44 MB) More Documents & Publications Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon

  20. Search for single top quark production in pbar p collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in the missing transverse energy plus jets topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for single top quark production with the CDF II detector using 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data selected consist of events characterized by large energy imbalance in the transverse plane and hadronic jets, and no identified electrons and muons, so the sample is enriched in W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays. In order to suppress backgrounds, additional kinematic and topological requirements are imposed through a neural network, and at least one of the jets must be identified as a b quark jet. We measure an excess of signal-like events in agreement with the standard model prediction, but inconsistent with a model without single top quark production by 2.1 standard deviations ({sigma}), with a median expected sensitivity of 1.4 {sigma}. Assuming a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2} and ascribing the excess to single top quark production, the cross section is measured to be 4.9{sub -2.2}{sup +2.5} (stat+syst) pb, consistent with measurements performed in independent datasets and with the standard model prediction.

  1. Properties of jets measured from tracks in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-09-20

    Jets are identified and their properties studied in center-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider using charged particles measured by the ATLAS inner detector. Events are selected using a minimum bias trigger, allowing jets at very low transverse momentum to be observed and their characteristics in the transition to high-momentum fully perturbative jets to be studied. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm applied to charged particles with two radius parameter choices, 0.4 and 0.6. An inclusive charged jet transverse momentum cross section measurement from 4 GeV to 100 GeV is shown for four ranges inmore » rapidity extending to 1.9 and corrected to charged particle-level truth jets. The transverse momenta and longitudinal momentum fractions of charged particles within jets are measured, along with the charged particle multiplicity and the particle density as a function of radial distance from the jet axis. Comparison of the data with the theoretical models implemented in existing tunings of Monte Carlo event generators indicates reasonable overall agreement between data and Monte Carlo. These comparisons are sensitive to Monte Carlo parton showering, hadronization, and soft physics models.« less

  2. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at $${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data samplemore » corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.« less

  3. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.

  4. Search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy in 6.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto

    2010-08-01

    We report a search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and correspond to 6.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the standard model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the standard model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale {Lambda} is excluded for {Lambda} < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius R{sub c} is excluded for R{sub c}{sup -1} < 477 GeV.

  5. Search for a heavy gauge boson $W$ ' in the final state with an electron and large missing transverse energy in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A search for a heavy gauge boson W' has been conducted by the CMS experiment at the LHC in the decay channel with an electron and large transverse energy imbalance, using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. No excess above standard model expectations is seen in the transverse mass distribution of the electron-(missing E_T) system. Assuming standard-model-like couplings and decay branching fractions, a W' boson with a mass less than 1.36 TeV/c^2 is excluded at 95% confidence level.

  6. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fbmore » $$^{-1}$$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.« less

  7. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$^{\\prime}$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$^{\\prime}$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.

  8. High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric materials with embedded particles are evaluated shakouri.pdf (2.3 MB) More Documents & Publications High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High Performance Zintl Phase TE Materials with Embedded Particles Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery System Based on Zintl Phase Materials with Embedded Nanoparticles

  9. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4 and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.

  10. Solar-energy conversion by combined photovoltaic converters with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} base layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrypunov, G. S. Sokol, E. I.; Yakimenko, Yu. I.; Meriuts, A. V.; Ivashuk, A. V.; Shelest, T. N.

    2014-12-15

    The possibility of the combined use of bifacial thin-film solar cells based on CdTe and frontal solar cells with a CuInSe{sub 2} base layer in tandem structures is experimentally confirmed. It is found that, for the use of bifacial solar cells based on cadmium telluride in a tandem structure, the optimal thickness of their base layer should be 1 μm. The gain in the efficiency of the tandem structure, compared with an individual CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cell, is 1.8% in the case of series-connected solar cells and 1.3%, for parallel-connected.

  11. Search for anomalous quartic WWγγ couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WWγγ in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp̄ collisions at s√=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with Λcutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore » limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/Λ²|<0.0025 GeV⁻² and |aWC/Λ²|<0.0092 GeV⁻².« less

  12. Search for Higgs boson production in dilepton and missing energy final states with 5.4 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) =1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2010-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is presented using events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy selected from 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess of events above background predictions is found, and observed (expected) upper limits at 95% confidence level on the rate of Higgs boson production are derived that are a factor of 1.55 (1.36) above the predicted standard model cross section at m{sub H} = 165 GeV.

  13. Dependence on pseudorapidity and centrality of charged hadron production in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-08-01

    A measurement is presented of the charged hadron multiplicity in hadronic PbPb collisions, as a function of pseudorapidity and centrality, at a collision energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair. The data sample is collected using the CMS detector and a minimum-bias trigger, with the CMS solenoid off. The number of charged hadrons is measured both by counting the number of reconstructed particle hits and by forming hit doublets of pairs of layers in the pixel detector. The two methods give consistent results. The charged hadron multiplicity density dN(ch)/d eta, evaluated at eta=0 for head-on collisions, is found to be 1612 +/- 55, where the uncertainty is dominated by systematic effects. Comparisons of these results to previous measurements and to various models are also presented.

  14. A Search for dark matter in events with one jet and missing transverse energy in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a search for dark matter production in the monojet signature. We analyze a sample of Tevatron pp collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb{sup -1} recorded by the CDF II detector. In events with large missing transverse energy and one energetic jet, we find good agreement between the standard model prediction and the observed data. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the dark matter production rate. The limits are translated into bounds on nucleon-dark matter scattering rates which are competitive with current direct detection bounds on spin-independent interaction below a dark matter candidate mass of 5 GeV/c{sup 2}, and on spin-dependent interactions up to masses of 200 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Search for physics beyond the standard model in events with a Z boson, jets, and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2012-09-01

    A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model (BSM) in events with a Z boson, jets, and missing transverse energy (MET). This signature is motivated by BSM physics scenarios, including supersymmetry. The study is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 inverse femtobarns. The contributions from the dominant standard model backgrounds are estimated from data using two complementary strategies, the jet-Z balance technique and a method based on modeling MET with data control samples. In the absence of evidence for BSM physics, we set limits on the non-standard-model contributions to event yields in the signal regions and interpret the results in the context of simplified model spectra. Additional information is provided to facilitate tests of other BSM physics models.

  16. Search for supersymmetry in hadronic final states with missing transverse energy using the variables α T and b-quark multiplicity in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8\\ \\mathrm{TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Kuotb Awad, A. M.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F. -P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Radics, B.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Saxena, P.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Maron, G.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Ventura, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Dell’Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Grigelionis, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bendavid, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y. -J.; Lourenço, C.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R. -S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Günaydin, Y. O.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; John, J. St.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Caulfield, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Nelson, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D’Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Lacroix, F.; O’Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny Iii, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2013-09-01

    An inclusive search for supersymmetric processes that produce final states with jets and missing transverse energy is performed in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 11.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. In this search, a dimensionless kinematic variable, α T, is used to discriminate between events with genuine and misreconstructed missing transverse energy. The search is based on an examination of the number of reconstructed jets per event, the scalar sum of transverse energies of these jets, and the number of these jets identified as originating from bottom quarks. No significant excess of events over the standard model expectation is found. Exclusion limits are set in the parameter space of simplified models, with a special emphasis on both compressed-spectrum scenarios and direct or gluino-induced production of third-generation squarks. For the case of gluino-mediated squark production, gluino masses up to 950–1125 GeV are excluded depending on the assumed model. Finally, for the direct pair-production of squarks, masses up to 450 GeV are excluded for a single light first- or second-generation squark, increasing to 600 GeV for bottom squarks.

  17. Local composition and carrier concentration in Pb0.7Ge0.3Te and Pb0.5Ge0.5Te alloys from 125Te NMR and microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, E M; Kramer, M J; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-11-01

    Pb0.7Ge0.3Te and Pb0.5Ge0.5Te alloys, (i) quenched from 923 K or (ii) quenched and annealed at 573 K for 2 h, have been studied by 125Te NMR, X-ray diffraction, electron and optical microscopy, as well as energy dispersive spectroscopy. Depending on the composition and thermal treatment history, 125Te NMR spectra exhibit different resonance frequencies and spin-lattice relaxation times, which can be assigned to different phases in the alloy. Quenched and annealed Pb0.7Ge0.3Te alloys can be considered as solid solutions but are shown by NMR to have components with various carrier concentrations. Quenched and annealed Pb0.5Ge0.5Te alloys contain GeTe- and PbTe-based phases with different compositions and charge carrier concentrations. Based on the analysis of non-exponential 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation, the fractions and carrier concentrations of the various phases have been estimated. Our data show that alloying of PbTe with Ge results in the formation of chemically and electronically inhomogeneous systems. 125Te NMR can be used as an efficient probe to detect the local composition in equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium states, and to determine the local carrier concentrations in complex multiphase tellurides.

  18. Search for New Physics in the Exclusive $\\gamma_{Delayed}$ + Missing Transverse Energy Channel in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asaadi, Jonathan Abraham

    2012-08-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a search in the exclusive photon plus missing transverse energy ( γ + E T) finnal state in proton antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment. The strategy used here is to search for delayed photons coming from gauge mediated supersymmetric events with the exclusive production of X~01 → γG~. In these models the ~ 01 is the lightest neutralino and has nanosecond lifetime before decaying to a photon ( γ) and gravitino (~G) which exits the detector unrecorded. In order to search for this process we select collisions that have a single photon plus missing transverse energy and little other activity in the detector and examine the arrival time of the photon. This arrival time is then compared against expectations from a data driven background of the standard model sources. In the data collected from the Fermilab Tevatron collider from December 2004 to June 2010, representing 6.3 fb-1 of data, we observe 322 events in the photon arrival timing region from 2 nanoseconds to 7 nanoseconds with a data driven background prediction of 257 ± 35. An excess of 65 events is observed, equivalent to a standard deviation (N σ) of 1.65 from the null hypothesis.

  19. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.

  20. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  1. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-12-24

    Our measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 4.5 fb₋1 of proton-proton collisions data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb₋1 at √s=8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The number of observed Higgs boson decays to diphotons divided by the corresponding Standard Model prediction, called the signal strength, is found to be μ=1.17±0.27 at the value of the Higgs boson mass measured by ATLAS, mH=125.4 GeV. The analysis is optimized to measure the signal strengths for individual Higgs boson production processes at thismore » value of mH. They are found to be μggF=1.32±0.38, μVBF=0.8±0.7, μWH=1.0±1.6, μZH=0.1+3.7₋0.1, and μtt¯H=1.6+2.7₋1.8, for Higgs boson production through gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, and in association with a W or Z boson or a top-quark pair, respectively. In conclusion, compared with the previously published ATLAS analysis, the results reported here also benefit from a new energy calibration procedure for photons and the subsequent reduction of the systematic uncertainty on the diphoton mass resolution. We found no significant deviations from the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  2. Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes and Jet Substructure in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7.0 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David Wilkins

    2012-03-20

    This thesis presents the first measurement of 6 hadronic event shapes in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results are presented at the particle-level, permitting comparisons to multiple Monte Carlo event generator tools. Numerous tools and techniques that enable detailed analysis of the hadronic final state at high luminosity are described. The approaches presented utilize the dual strengths of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems to provide high resolution and robust measurements of the hadronic jets that constitute both a background and a signal throughout ATLAS physics analyses. The study of the hadronic final state is then extended to jet substructure, where the energy flow and topology within individual jets is studied at the detector level and techniques for estimating systematic uncertainties for such measurements are commissioned in the first data. These first substructure measurements in ATLAS include the jet mass and sub-jet multiplicity as well as those concerned with multi-body hadronic decays and color flow within jets. Finally, the first boosted hadronic object observed at the LHC - the decay of the top quark to a single jet - is presented.

  3. Electrochemically deposited BiTe-based nanowires for thermoelectric applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Inn-Khuan; Kok, Kuan-Ying; Rahman, Che Zuraini Che Ab; Saidin, Nur Ubaidah; Ilias, Suhaila Hani; Choo, Thye-Foo

    2014-02-12

    Nanostructured materials systems such as thin-films and nanowires (NWs) are promising for thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration compared to traditional counterparts in bulk, due to their enhanced thermoelectric figures-of-merit. BiTe and its derivative compounds, in particular, are well-known for their near-room temperature thermoelectric performance. In this work, both the binary and ternary BiTe-based nanowires namely, BiTe and BiSbTe, were synthesized using template-assisted electrodeposition. Diameters of the nanowires were controlled by the pore sizes of the anodised alumina (AAO) templates used. Systematic study on the compositional change as a function of applied potential was carried out via Linear Sweep Voltanmetry (LSV). Chemical compositions of the nanowires were studied using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDXS) and their microstructures evaluated using diffraction and imaging techniques. Results from chemical analysis on the nanowires indicated that while the Sb content in BiSbTe nanowires increased with more negative deposition potentials, the formation of Te{sup 0} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were favorable at more positive potentials.

  4. Modeling Copper Diffusion in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Guo, Da; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christain

    2014-06-06

    It is well known that Cu plays an important role in CdTe solar cell performance as a dopant. In this work, a finite-difference method is developed and used to simulate Cu diffusion in CdTe solar cells. In the simulations, which are done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain, the CdTe is assumed to be polycrystalline, with the individual grains separated by grain boundaries. When used to fit experimental Cu concentration data, bulk and grain boundary diffusion coefficients and activation energies for CdTe can be extracted. In the past, diffusion coefficients have been typically obtained by fitting data to simple functional forms of limited validity. By doing full simulations, the simplifying assumptions used in those analytical models are avoided and diffusion parameters can thus be determined more accurately

  5. Extracting Cu Diffusion Parameters in Polycrystalline CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Guo, Da; Dragica, Vasileska; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-06-13

    It is well known that Cu plays an important role in CdTe solar cell performance as a dopant. In this work, a finite-difference method is developed and used to simulate Cu diffusion in CdTe solar cells. In the simulations, which are done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain, the CdTe is assumed to be polycrystal-line, with the individual grains separated by grain boundaries. When used to fit experimental Cu concentration data, bulk and grain boundary diffusion coefficients and activation energies for CdTe can be extracted. In the past, diffusion coefficients have been typically obtained by fitting data to simple functional forms of limited validity. By doing full simulations, the simplifying assumptions used in those analytical models are avoided and diffusion parameters can thus be determined more accurately.

  6. TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography Print Thursday, 22 August 2013 10:50 TE Connectivity is a world leader in connectivity-the...

  7. NREL Collaboration Boosts Potential for CdTe Solar Cells - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL NREL Collaboration Boosts Potential for CdTe Solar Cells February 29, 2016 A critical milestone has been reached in cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cell technology, helping pave the way for solar energy to directly compete with electricity generated by conventional energy sources. Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated with researchers at Washington State University and the University of Tennessee to improve the maximum voltage

  8. Search for events with leptonic jets and missing transverse energy in $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present the first search for pair production of isolated jets of charged leptons in association with a large imbalance in transverse energy in p{bar p} collisions using 5.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No excess is observed above Standard Model background, and the result is used to set upper limits on the production cross section of pairs of supersymmetric chargino and neutralino particles as a function of 'dark-photon' mass, where the dark photon is produced in the decay of the lightest supersymmetric particle.

  9. Search for WZ + ZZ productions with missing transverse energy + jets with b enhancement at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 1.96\\) TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-06

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for eventsmore » with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section Σ(pp¯ → WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.« less

  10. Optical phonons in PbTe/CdTe multilayer heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikova, N. N.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Kucherenko, I. V.; Karczewski, G.; Aleshchenko, Yu. A.; Muratov, A. V.; Zavaritskaya, T. N.; Melnik, N. N.

    2015-05-15

    The infrared reflection spectra of PbTe/CdTe multilayer nanostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy are measured in the frequency range of 20–5000 cm{sup −1} at room temperature. The thicknesses and high-frequency dielectric constants of the PbTe and CdTe layers and the frequencies of the transverse optical (TO) phonons in these structures are determined from dispersion analysis of the spectra. It is found that the samples under study are characterized by two TO phonon frequencies, equal to 28 and 47 cm{sup −1}. The first frequency is close to that of TO phonons in bulk PbTe, and the second is assigned to the optical mode in structurally distorted interface layers. The Raman-scattering spectra upon excitation with the radiation of an Ar{sup +} laser at 514.5 nm are measured at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures. The weak line at 106 cm{sup −1} observed in these spectra is attributed to longitudinal optical phonons in the interface layers.

  11. Te Mihi Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  12. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group II-VI semiconductors. We use the Stillinger-Weber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group II-VI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1° deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization tomore » find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.« less

  13. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group II-VI semiconductors. We use the Stillinger-Weber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group II-VI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1° deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization to find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.

  14. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group IIVI semiconductors. We use the StillingerWeber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group IIVI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1 deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization to find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.

  15. Sonochemical and hydrothermal synthesis of PbTe nanostructures with the aid of a novel capping agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fard-Fini, Shahla Ahmadian; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Mohandes, Fatemeh

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PbTe nanostructures were prepared with the aid of Schiff-base compound. • Sonochemical and hydrothermal methods were employed to fabricate PbTe nanostrucrues. • The effect of preparation parameters on the morphology of PbTe was investigated. - Abstract: In this work, a new Schiff-base compound derived from 1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde marked as (2-HyNa)-(DaDo) was synthesized, characterized, and then used as capping agent for the preparation of PbTe nanostructures. To fabricate PbTe nanostructures, two different synthesis methods; hydrothermal and sonochemical routes, were applied. To further investigate, the effect of preparation parameters like reaction time and temperature in hydrothermal synthesis and sonication time in the presence of ultrasound irradiation on the morphology and purity of the final products was tested. The products were analyzed with the aid of SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR, and EDS. Based on the obtained results, it was found that pure cubic phased PbTe nanostructures have been obtained by hydrothermal and sonochemical approaches. Besides, SEM images showed that cubic-like and rod-like PbTe nanostructures have been formed by hydrothermal and sonochemical methods, respectively. Sonochemical synthesis of PbTe nanostructures was favorable, because the synthesis time of sonochemical method was shorter than that of hydrothermal method.

  16. Growth of CdTe thin films on graphene by close-spaced sublimation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Younghun; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Jihyun, E-mail: hyunhyun7@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Seungju; Kim, Donghwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-02

    CdTe thin films grown on bi-layer graphene were demonstrated by using the close-spaced sublimation method, where CdTe was selectively grown on the graphene. The density of the CdTe domains was increased with increasing the number of the defective sites in the graphene, which was controlled by the duration of UV exposure. The CdTe growth rate on the bi-layer graphene electrodes was 400?nm/min with a bandgap energy of 1.451.49?eV. Scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, micro-photoluminescence, and X-ray diffraction technique were used to confirm the high quality of the CdTe thin films grown on the graphene electrodes.

  17. Energy Conversion, an Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director's Letter .................. 2 Research ............................. 3 Seminar Series ................. 11 Awards .............................. 12 S p r I N g 2 0 1 1 Intermediate Band Solar Energy Conversion in ZnTe:O and ZnTe/ZnSe Affordable photovoltaic solar cells are highly desirable for achieving a sustainable and renewable energy source. In order for solar energy to become cost-competitive with fossil fuels, technological breakthroughs are needed to both improve solar cell

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric performance in Cu-intercalated BiTeI by compensation weakening induced mobility improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Lihua; Yang, Jiong; Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Shanyu; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Yang, Jihui

    2015-09-23

    The low weighted carrier mobility has long been considered to be the key challenge for improvement of thermoelectric (TE) performance in BiTeI. The Rashba-effect-induced two-dimensional density of states in this bulk semiconductor is beneficial for thermopower enhancement, which makes it a prospective compound for TE applications. In this report, we show that intercalation of minor Cu-dopants can substantially alter the equilibria of defect reactions, selectively mediate the donor-acceptor compensation, and tune the defect concentration in the carrier conductive network. Consequently, the potential fluctuations responsible for electron scattering are reduced and the carrier mobility in BiTeI can be enhanced by a factor of two to three between 10 K and 300 K. The carrier concentration can also be optimized by tuning the Te/I composition ratio, leading to higher thermopower in this Rashba system. Cu-intercalation in BiTeI gives rise to higher power factor, slightly lower lattice thermal conductivity, and consequently improved figure of merit. Compared with pristine BiTe0.98I1.02, the TE performance in Cu0.05BiTeI reveals a 150% and 20% enhancement at 300 and 520 K, respectively. Ultimately, these results demonstrate that defect equilibria mediated by selective doping in complex TE and energy materials could be an effective approach to carrier mobility and performance optimization.

  19. Enhanced thermoelectric performance in Cu-intercalated BiTeI by compensation weakening induced mobility improvement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Lihua; Yang, Jiong; Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Shanyu; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Yang, Jihui

    2015-09-23

    The low weighted carrier mobility has long been considered to be the key challenge for improvement of thermoelectric (TE) performance in BiTeI. The Rashba-effect-induced two-dimensional density of states in this bulk semiconductor is beneficial for thermopower enhancement, which makes it a prospective compound for TE applications. In this report, we show that intercalation of minor Cu-dopants can substantially alter the equilibria of defect reactions, selectively mediate the donor-acceptor compensation, and tune the defect concentration in the carrier conductive network. Consequently, the potential fluctuations responsible for electron scattering are reduced and the carrier mobility in BiTeI can be enhanced by amore » factor of two to three between 10 K and 300 K. The carrier concentration can also be optimized by tuning the Te/I composition ratio, leading to higher thermopower in this Rashba system. Cu-intercalation in BiTeI gives rise to higher power factor, slightly lower lattice thermal conductivity, and consequently improved figure of merit. Compared with pristine BiTe0.98I1.02, the TE performance in Cu0.05BiTeI reveals a 150% and 20% enhancement at 300 and 520 K, respectively. Ultimately, these results demonstrate that defect equilibria mediated by selective doping in complex TE and energy materials could be an effective approach to carrier mobility and performance optimization.« less

  20. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2004-03-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-E{sub T} jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 {+-} 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  1. NuTeV Anomaly Helps Shed Light on Physics of the Nucleus | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuTeV Anomaly Helps Shed Light on Physics of the Nucleus NuTeV Anomaly Helps Shed Light on Physics of the Nucleus NEWPORT NEWS, VA, June 29, 2009 - A new calculation clarifies the complicated relationship between protons and neutrons in the atomic nucleus and offers a fascinating resolution of the famous NuTeV Anomaly. The calculation, published in the journal Physical Review Letters on June 26, was carried out by a collaboration of researchers from the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson

  2. Chapter 1.19: Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaic Thin Film: CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews the history, development, and present processes used to fabricate thin-film, CdTe-based photovoltaic (PV) devices. It is intended for readers who are generally familiar with the operation and material aspects of PV devices but desire a deeper understanding of the process sequences used in CdTe PV technology. The discussion identifies why certain processes may have commercial production advantages and how the various process steps can interact with each other to affect device performance and reliability. The chapter concludes with a discussion of considerations of large-area CdTe PV deployment including issues related to material availability and energy-payback time.

  3. Longyan Energy Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Longyan Energy Technology Place: Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Product: A chinese CdTe thin-film PV cells developer with a total...

  4. Lisbon, Portugal: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Companies in Lisbon, Portugal EDP Renovaveis Martifer Renewables Formerly Eviva Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa MARL Solar Plus SA References http:...

  5. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy

  6. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goozner, Robert E.; Long, Mark O.; Drinkard, Jr., William F.

    1999-01-01

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate and electrolyzing the leachate to separate Cd from Te, wherein the Te is deposits onto a cathode while the Cd remains in solution.

  7. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating ...

  8. TE Connectivity Finds Answers in Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    healthcare, aerospace, and defense industries. TE Connectivity has a long-standing commitment to innovation and engineering excellence. Their products help address challenges...

  9. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  10. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  11. Surfactant-Free Synthesis of Bi?Te?-Te Micro-Nano Heterostructure with Enhanced Thermoelectric Figure of Merit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yichi; Wang, Heng; Kraemer, Stephan; Shi, Yifeng; Zhang, Fan; Snedaker, Matt; Ding, Kunlun; Moskovits, Martin; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Stucky, Galen D.

    2011-01-01

    An ideal thermoelectric material would be a semiconductor with high electrical conductivity and relatively low thermal conductivity: an electron crystal, phonon glass. Introducing nanoscale heterostructures into the bulk TE matrix is one way of achieving this intuitively anomalous electron/phonon transport behavior. The heterostructured interfaces are expected to play a significant role in phonon scattering to reduce thermal conductivity and in the energy-dependent scattering of electrical carriers to improve the Seebeck coefficient. A nanoparticle building block assembly approach is plausible to fabricate three-dimensional heterostructured materials on a bulk commercial scale. However, a key problem in applying this strategy is the possible negative impact on TE performance of organic residue from the nanoparticle capping ligands. Herein, we report a wet chemical, surfactant-free, low-temperature, and easily up-scalable strategy for the synthesis of nanoscale heterophase Bi?Te?-Te via a galvanic replacement reaction. The micro-nano heterostructured material is fabricated bottom-up, by mixing the heterophase with commercial Bi?Te?. This unique structure shows an enhanced zT value of ~0.4 at room temperature. This heterostructure has one of the highest figures of merit among bismuth telluride systems yet achieved by a wet chemical bottom-up assembly. In addition, it shows a 40% enhancement of the figure of merit over our lab-made material without nanoscale heterostructures. This enhancement is mainly due to the decrease in the thermal conductivity while maintaining the power factor. Overall, this cost-efficient and room-temperature synthesis methodology provides the potential for further improvement and large-scale thermoelectric applications.

  12. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Refineras Refineries Refinera Raffinerie Asphalt ... Usine de valorisation United States Estados Unidos ... Ltd 71 Marathon Petroleum Co LP 106 Silver Eagle ...

  13. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 3 2 1 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 10°W 20°W 30°W 40°W 50°W 60°W 70°W 70°W 80°W 80°W 90°W 90°W 100°W 100°W 110°W 110°W 120°W 120°W 130°W 130°W 140°W 140°W 150°W 150°W 160°W 170°W 180° 170°E 160°E 150°E 140°E 70°N 70°N 60°N 60°N 50°N 50°N 40°N 40°N 30°N 30°N 20°N 20°N 10°N 10°N 0 250 500 750 1,000 125 Miles / Millas / Milles 1:12 000 000 Border Crossings of Liquids Pipelines, North America Cruces Fronterizos de Ductos de

  14. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 15 14 13 12 11 10 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 10°W 20°W 30°W 40°W 50°W 60°W 70°W 70°W 80°W 80°W 90°W 90°W 100°W 100°W 110°W 110°W 120°W 120°W 130°W 130°W 140°W 140°W 150°W 150°W 160°W 170°W 180° 170°E 160°E 150°E 140°E 70°N 70°N 60°N 60°N 50°N 50°N 40°N 40°N 30°N 30°N 20°N 20°N 10°N 10°N Border Crossings of Natural Gas Pipelines, North America Cruces Fronterizos de Ductos de Gas Natural,

  15. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10°W 20°W 30°W 40°W 50°W 60°W 70°W 70°W 80°W 80°W 90°W 90°W 100°W 100°W 110°W 110°W 120°W 120°W 130°W 130°W 140°W 140°W 150°W 150°W 160°W 170°W 180° 170°E 160°E 150°E 140°E 70°N 70°N 60°N 60°N 50°N 50°N 40°N 40°N 30°N 30°N 20°N 20°N 10°N 10°N 0 250 500 750 1,000 125 Miles / Millas / Milles 1:12 000 000 Coal Carbón Charbon Petroleum Petrolíferos Pétrole Geothermal Geotérmica Géothermie Hydroelectric Hidroeléctrica Hydroélectrique Natural Gas Gas

  16. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

         + + 2 )  3 " /  $ "     ( % * !  6      / , * " ! & ,   + 2 )    ( % * ! <       , 6" + + "   + + 2" ))"     ( % * '/   , ) /   " 0, 2/ " 0      & / " 1   , / *  )

  17. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

         - - 4 +   5 $ 1 & $     * ' , # 8       1. , $ # (.   - 4 +     * ' , # >      . 8 $ - - $   - - 4 $ + + $     * ' , )1  . + 1  $ 2. 4 1" $ 2      + . ! +   . 1(9 . - 3 +   11 # ( - " $   $ " 4 12.   . + 1  

  18. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0&1; &27; , )&30; & " 0&6; &1; &25; &27; &23;&1; &19; + 0, )" & ))" * " + 1 &1; &24; , * &30; )&1; &18; & " 1 &5; O c a n P a c i f i q u e P a c i f i c O c e a n O c a n o P a c f i c o O c a n A t l ...

  19. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    &29; . + (1 2&6; &1; &27; &29; &25;&1; &19; - 2. + (+ + , - 3 &1; &21; . 1(9 . - 3 + &1; &20; + . + &5; O c a n P a c i f i q u e P a c i f i c O c e a n O c a n o P a c f i c o O c a n A t l ...

  20. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " ' & ( &1; &25; 6 &26; &24; ( & &30; &24; &30; ( 2&3; &1; 2& &30; % ) &26; &1; &25; ) &1; &19; & &25; O c a n P a c i f i q u e P a c i f i c O c e a n O c a n o P a c f i c o O c a n A t l a n t i q u ...

  1. Data:Ea824b4e-a3bf-4763-a763-da0599d9d760 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  2. Data:Ed681d16-9c5b-4ae3-a097-4da62829c05b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  3. Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone: Battle Mountain Colony- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Feasibility Study for the Battle Mountain Renewable Energy Park project ("Feasibility Study") will assess the feasibility, benefits, and impacts of a 5-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system (the "Solar Project" or "Energy Park") on the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada Battle Mountain Colony in Battle Mountain, Nevada.

  4. Project Reports for Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone: Battle Mountain Colony- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Feasibility Study for the Battle Mountain Renewable Energy Park project ("Feasibility Study") will assess the feasibility, benefits, and impacts of a 5-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system (the "Solar Project" or "Energy Park") on the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada Battle Mountain Colony in Battle Mountain, Nevada.

  5. Ion-beam treatment to prepare surfaces of p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A.

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a low-resistance electrical contact between a p-CdTe layer and outer contact layers by ion beam processing comprising: a) placing a CdS/CdTe device into a chamber and evacuating the chamber; b) orienting the p-CdTe side of the CdS/CdTe layer so that it faces apparatus capable of generating Ar atoms and ions of preferred energy and directionality; c) introducing Ar and igniting the area of apparatus capable of generating Ar atoms and ions of preferred energy and directionality in a manner so that during ion exposure, the source-to-substrate distance is maintained such that it is less than the mean-free path or diffusion length of the Ar atoms and ions at the vacuum pressure; d) allowing exposure of the p-CdTe side of the device to said ion beam for a period less than about 5 minutes; and e) imparting movement to the substrate to control the real uniformity of the ion-beam exposure on the p-CdTe side of the device.

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and te... Eligibility: Schools Savings Category: Geothermal Heat Pumps, Lighting,...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    was created in May 2008 to provide grants and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and te... Eligibility: Schools...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    grants and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and te... Eligibility: Schools Savings Category: Geothermal Heat...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and te... Eligibility: Schools Savings Category: Geothermal Heat Pumps, Lighting, Lighting...

  10. CdTe devices and method of manufacturing same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Noufi, Rommel; Dhere, Ramesh G.; Albin, David S.; Barnes, Teresa; Burst, James; Duenow, Joel N.; Reese, Matthew

    2015-09-29

    A method of producing polycrystalline CdTe materials and devices that incorporate the polycrystalline CdTe materials are provided. In particular, a method of producing polycrystalline p-doped CdTe thin films for use in CdTe solar cells in which the CdTe thin films possess enhanced acceptor densities and minority carrier lifetimes, resulting in enhanced efficiency of the solar cells containing the CdTe material are provided.

  11. Energy Efficient Schools Initiative- Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) was created in May 2008 to provide grants and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and te...

  12. Thermodynamic properties of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-02-20

    We report on the thermodynamic properties of binary compound mixtures of model groups II–VI semiconductors. We use the recently introduced Stillinger–Weber Hamiltonian to model binary mixtures of CdTe and CdSe. We use molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the volume and enthalpy of mixing as a function of mole fraction. The lattice parameter of the mixture closely follows Vegard's law: a linear relation. This implies that the excess volume is a cubic function of mole fraction. A connection is made with hard sphere models of mixed fcc and zincblende structures. We found that the potential energy exhibits a positive deviation frommore » ideal soluton behaviour; the excess enthalpy is nearly independent of temperatures studied (300 and 533 K) and is well described by a simple cubic function of the mole fraction. Using a regular solution approach (combining non-ideal behaviour for the enthalpy with ideal solution behaviour for the entropy of mixing), we arrive at the Gibbs free energy of the mixture. The Gibbs free energy results indicate that the CdTe and CdSe mixtures exhibit phase separation. The upper consolute temperature is found to be 335 K. Finally, we provide the surface energy as a function of composition. Moreover, it roughly follows ideal solution theory, but with a negative deviation (negative excess surface energy). This indicates that alloying increases the stability, even for nano-particles.« less

  13. High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric ...

  14. Effect of hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial strain on the electronic structure of Pb1-xSnxTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geilhufe, Matthias; Nayak, Sanjeev K.; Thomas, Stefan; Dane, Markus; Tripathi, Gouri S.; Entel, Peter; Hergert, Wolfram; Ernst, Arthur

    2015-12-09

    The electronic structure of Pb1–xSnxTe is studied by using the relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method in the framework of density functional theory. For all concentrations x, Pb1–xSnxTe is a direct semiconductor with a narrow band gap. In contrast to pure lead telluride, tin telluride shows an inverted band characteristic close to the Fermi energy. It will be shown that this particular property can be tuned, first, by alloying PbTe and SnTe and, second, by applying hydrostatic pressure or uniaxial strain. Furthermore, the magnitude of strain needed to switch between the regular and inverted band gap can be tuned by themore » alloy composition. In conclusion, there is a range of potential usage of Pb1–xSnxTe for spintronic applications.« less

  15. Passivation of an isoelectronic impurity by atomic hydrogen: The case of ZnTe:O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felici, Marco; Polimeni, Antonio; Capizzi, Mario; Nabetani, Y.; Okuno, T.; Aoki, K.; Kato, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Hirai, T.

    2006-03-06

    We investigated the optical properties of ZnTe:O/GaAs before and after atomic hydrogen irradiation. Oxygen incorporation gives rise to energy levels associated with single O atoms, O-O pairs, and O clusters, and to a blueshift of the energy gap of the material with respect to that of pure ZnTe/GaAs. All of these effects disappear progressively after irradiation with H, which also leads to an increase in the tensile strain of the epilayer. These observations provide experimental evidence of H-induced passivation of an isoelectronic impurity in II-VI alloys.

  16. Intergalactic magnetic fields and gamma-ray observations of extreme TeV blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arlen, Timothy C.; Vassilev, Vladimir V.; Weisgarber, Thomas; Wakely, Scott P.; Shafi, S. Yusef

    2014-11-20

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in cosmic voids can be indirectly probed through its effect on electromagnetic cascades initiated by a source of teraelectronvolt (TeV) gamma-rays, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). AGNs that are sufficiently luminous at TeV energies, 'extreme TeV blazars', can produce detectable levels of secondary radiation from inverse Compton scattering of the electrons in the cascade, provided that the IGMF is not too large. We review recent work in the literature that utilizes this idea to derive constraints on the IGMF for three TeV-detected blazars, 1ES 0229+200, 1ES 1218+304, and RGB J0710+591, and we also investigate four other hard-spectrum TeV blazars in the same framework. Through a recently developed, detailed, three-dimensional particle-tracking Monte Carlo code, incorporating all major effects of QED and cosmological expansion, we research the effects of major uncertainties, such as the spectral properties of the source, uncertainty in the ultraviolet and far-infrared extragalactic background light, undersampled very high energy (energy ≥100 GeV) coverage, past history of gamma-ray emission, source versus observer geometry, and the jet AGN Doppler factor. The implications of these effects on the recently reported lower limits of the IGMF are thoroughly examined to conclude that the presently available data are compatible with a zero-IGMF hypothesis.

  17. Connecting thermoelectric performance and topological-insulator behavior: Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te2Se from first principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Hongliang; Parker, David S.; Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J.

    2015-01-20

    Thermoelectric performance is of interest for numerous applications such as waste-heat recovery and solid-state energy conversion and will be seen to be closely connected to topological-insulator behavior. In this paper, we here report first-principles transport and defect calculations for Bi2Te2Se in relation to Bi2Te3. The two compounds are found to contain remarkably different electronic structures in spite of being isostructural and isoelectronic. We also discuss these results in terms of the topological-insulator characteristics of these compounds.

  18. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T decaying to a top quark via T = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp = TT= tt+XX=bqqbqq + XX. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The data aremore » consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of TT = tt =+ XX, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T at 95% confidence level up to mT = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ≤ 70 GeV/c2.« less

  19. Search for the Higgs boson in events with missing transverse energy and b quark jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    We search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with an electroweak vector boson in events with no identified charged leptons, large imbalance in transverse momentum, and two jets where at least one contains a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of b hadrons. We use {approx}1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron. We find 268 (16) single (double) b-tagged candidate events, where 248 {+-} 43 (14.4 {+-} 2.7) are expected from standard model background processes. We place 95% confidence level upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section for several Higgs boson masses ranging from 110 GeV/c{sup 2} to 140 GeV/c{sup 2}. For a mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 20.4 (14.2) times the standard model prediction.

  20. DEGREE-SCALE GeV 'JETS' FROM ACTIVE AND DEAD TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Elyiv, A.

    2010-08-20

    We show that images of TeV blazars in the GeV energy band should contain, along with point-like sources, degree-scale jet-like extensions. These GeV extensions are the result of electromagnetic cascades initiated by TeV {gamma}-rays interacting with extragalactic background light and the deflection of the cascade electrons/positrons in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs). Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the spectral and timing properties of the degree-scale extensions in simulated GeV band images of TeV blazars. We show that the brightness profile of such degree-scale extensions can be used to infer the light curve of the primary TeV {gamma}-ray source over the past 10{sup 7} yr, i.e., over a time scale comparable to the lifetime of the parent active galactic nucleus. This implies that the degree-scale jet-like GeV emission could be detected not only near known active TeV blazars, but also from 'TeV blazar remnants', whose central engines were switched off up to 10 million years ago. Since the brightness profile of the GeV 'jets' depends on the strength and the structure of the EGMF, their observation provides additional information about the EGMF.

  1. Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Centre Address: Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place: Lisboa Zip: 1000-201 Region: Portugal Sector: Marine...

  2. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goozner, R.E.; Long, M.O.; Drinkard, W.F. Jr.

    1999-04-27

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the metals in dilute nitric acid, leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate, adding a calcium containing base to the leachate to precipitate Cd and Te, separating the precipitated Cd and Te from the leachate, and recovering the calcium-containing base. 3 figs.

  3. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goozner, Robert E.; Long, Mark O.; Drinkard, Jr., William F.

    1999-04-27

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the metals in dilute nitric acid, leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate, adding a calcium containing base to the leachate to precipitate Cd and Te, separating the precipitated Cd and Te from the leachate, and recovering the calcium-containing base.

  4. Topological crystalline insulator Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) with tunable Fermi levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Hua; Liu, Jun-Wei; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Rui; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Duan, Wen-Hui; Chen, Xi Xue, Qi-Kun; Yan, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Wang, Li-Li; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun

    2014-05-01

    In this letter, we report a systematic study of topological crystalline insulator Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te (0 < x < 1) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO{sub 3}(001). Two domains of Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films with intersecting angle of ? ? 45 were confirmed by reflection high energy diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). ARPES study of Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films demonstrated that the Fermi level of PbTe could be tuned by altering the temperature of substrate whereas SnTe cannot. An M-shaped valance band structure was observed only in SnTe but PbTe is in a topological trivial state with a large gap. In addition, co-evaporation of SnTe and PbTe results in an equivalent variation of Pb concentration as well as the Fermi level of Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films.

  5. Electronic tuning of the transport properties of off-stoichiometric Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1−x}Te thermoelectric alloys by Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttmann, Gilad M.; Dadon, David; Gelbstein, Yaniv

    2015-08-14

    The recent energy demands affected by the dilution of conventional energy resources and the growing awareness of environmental considerations had motivated many researchers to seek for novel renewable energy conversion methods. Thermoelectric direct conversion of thermal into electrical energies is such a method, in which common compositions include IV-VI semiconducting compounds (e.g., PbTe and SnTe) and their alloys. For approaching practical thermoelectric devices, the current research is focused on electronic optimization of off-stoichiometric p-type Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1−x}Te alloys by tuning of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} doping and/or SnTe alloying levels, while avoiding the less mechanically favorable Na dopant. It was shown that upon such doping/alloying, higher ZTs, compared to those of previously reported undoped Pb{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5}Te alloy, were obtained at temperatures lower than 210–340 °C, depending of the exact doping/alloying level. It was demonstrated that upon optimal grading of the carrier concentration, a maximal thermoelectric efficiency enhancement of ∼38%, compared to that of an undoped material, is expected.

  6. Nonlinear terahertz response of HgTe/CdTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qinjun; Sanderson, Matthew; Zhang, Chao

    2015-08-24

    Without breaking the topological order, HgTe/CdTe quantum wells can have two types of bulk band structure: direct gap type (type I) and indirect gap type (type II). We report that the strong nonlinear optical responses exist in both types of bulk states under a moderate electric field in the terahertz regime. Interestingly, for the type II band structure, the third order conductivity changes sign when chemical potentials lies below 10 meV due to the significant response of the hole excitation close to the bottom of conduction band. Negative nonlinear conductivities suggest that HgTe/CdTe quantum wells can find application in the gain medium of a laser for terahertz radiation. The thermal influences on nonlinear optical responses of HgTe/CdTe quantum wells are also studied.

  7. Scandium resonant impurity level in PbTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skipetrov, E. P. Skipetrova, L. A.; Knotko, A. V.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2014-04-07

    We synthesize a scandium-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase and the elemental composition as well as galvanomagnetic properties of Pb{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}Te alloys in weak magnetic fields (4.2?K???T???300?K, B???0.07?T) upon varying the scandium content (y???0.02). We find that all investigated samples are single-phase and n-type. The distribution of scandium impurities along the axis of the ingot is estimated to be exponential. An increase of scandium impurity content leads to a monotonous growth of the free electron concentration by four orders of magnitude (approximately from 10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?3} to 10{sup 20}?cm{sup ?3}). In heavily doped alloys (y?>?0.01), the free electron concentration at the liquid-helium temperature tends to saturation, indicating the pinning of the Fermi energy by the scandium resonant impurity level located on the background of the conduction band. Using the two-band Kane and six-band Dimmock dispersion relations for IV-VI semiconductors, dependences of the Fermi energy measured from the bottom of the conduction band E{sub c} on the scandium impurity content are calculated and the energy of the resonant scandium level is estimated to be E{sub Sc}???E{sub c}?+?280?meV. Diagrams of electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}Te alloys upon doping are proposed.

  8. Search for New Phenomena in Dijet Angular Distributions in Proton-Proton Collisions at s = 8 TeV Measured with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-06-04

    A search for new phenomena in LHC proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV was performed with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb⁻¹. The angular distributions are studied in events with at least two jets; the highest dijet mass observed is 5.5 TeV. All angular distributions are consistent with the predictions of the standard model. In a benchmark model of quark contact interactions, a compositeness scale below 8.1 TeV in a destructive interference scenario and 12.0 TeV in a constructive interference scenario is excluded at 95% C.L.; median expected limits are 8.9 TeV formore » the destructive interference scenario and 14.1 TeV for the constructive interference scenario.« less

  9. Search for contact interactions in dimuon events from pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-07-01

    A search for contact interactions has been performed using dimuon events recorded with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 42 pb?. No significant deviation from the standard model is observed in the dimuon mass spectrum, allowing the following 95% C.L. limits to be set on the energy scale of contact interactions: ?>4.9 TeV (4.5 TeV) for constructive (destructive) interference in the left-left isoscalar compositeness model. These limits are the most stringent to date for ??qq contact interactions.

  10. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Was te Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Was te Bureau Depa rtment of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 NOV 0 5 2013 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East. Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Panel 6 Closure and Final Waste Emplacement Notifications Dear Mr. Kieling : The purpose of this leiter is 1 0 notify th e New Mexico Environment Department (NMEO) that the Permittees intend to commence closure of Hazardous Waste Disposa

  11. Radiative leptogenesis at the TeV scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Mahajan, Namit; Patra, Sudhanwa; Sarkar, Utpal E-mail: nmahajan@prl.res.in E-mail: utpal@prl.res.in

    2012-04-01

    We construct an explicit model implementing leptogenesis proceeding via the radiative decay of heavy right handed neutrino. In a simple extension of the Standard Model, a discrete symmetry forbids the usual decays of the right-handed neutrinos, while allowing for an effective coupling between the left-handed and right-handed neutrinos through the dipole moment operator. This generates correct leptogenesis with resonant enhancement and also the required neutrino mass via a TeV scale seesaw mechanism. The model is consistent with low energy phenomenology and would have distinct signals in the next generation colliders, and, perhaps even the LHC.

  12. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of YTe3, LaTe3 and CeTe3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru, N.

    2011-08-19

    Measurements of heat capacity, susceptibility, and electrical resistivity are presented for single crystals of the charge density wave compounds YTe{sub 3}, LaTe{sub 3}, and CeTe{sub 3}. The materials are metallic to low temperatures, but have a small density of states due to the charge density wave gapping large portions of the Fermi surface. CeTe{sub 3} is found to be a weak Kondo lattice, with an antiferromagnetic ground state and T{sub N} = 2.8 K. The electrical resistivity of all three compounds is highly anisotropic, confirming the weak dispersion perpendicular to Te planes predicted by band structure calculations.

  13. ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Department of ENERGY Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review-2015 Framing Document http:energy.govqtr 2015-01-13 Page 2 The United States faces serious ...

  14. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Burger, Arnold; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  15. Higgs Coupling Measurements at a 1 TeV Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklow, T

    2003-12-18

    Methods for extracting Higgs boson signals at a 1 TeV center-of-mass energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider are described. In addition, estimates are given for the accuracy with which branching fractions can be measured for Higgs boson decays to b{bar b} WW, gg, and {gamma}{gamma}.

  16. Strong anisotropy and magnetostriction in the two-dimensional Stoner ferromagnet Fe3GeTe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Kent, P. R. C.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2016-04-06

    Comore » mputationally characterizing magnetic properies of novel two-dimensional (2D) materials serves as an important first step of exploring possible applications. Using density-functional theory, we show that single-layer Fe3GeTe2 is a potential 2D material with sufficiently low formation energy to be synthesized by mechanical exfoliation from the bulk phase with a van der Waals layered structure. In addition, we calculated the phonon dispersion demonstrating that single-layer Fe3GeTe2is dynamically stable. Furthermore, we find that similar to the bulk phase, 2D Fe3GeTe2 exhibits amagnetic moment that originates from a Stoner instability. In contrast to other 2D materials, we find that single-layer Fe3GeTe2 exhibits a significant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of 920μ eV per Fe atom originating from spin-orbit coupling. In conclusion, we show that applying biaxial tensile strains enhances the anisotropy energy, which reveals strong magnetostriction in single-layer Fe3GeTe2 with a sizable magneostrictive coefficient. Our results indicate that single-layer Fe3GeTe2 is potentially useful for magnetic storage applications.« less

  17. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Energy National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Energy Overview Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 0:50 Director McMillan on energy security With energy use increasing across the nation and the world, Los Alamos National Laboratory is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance

  18. Efficiency, Cost and Weight Trade-off in TE Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TE Materials with Embedded Particles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles

  19. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Thermal Comfort Modeling Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC

  20. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing ...

  1. Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe sub 2 photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sites, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The polycrystalline nature of thin-film CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells continues to be a major factor in several individual losses that limit overall cell efficiency. This report describes progress in the quantitative separation of these losses, including both measurement and analysis procedures. It also applies these techniques to several individual cells to help document the overall progress with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} cells. Notably, CdTe cells from Photon Energy have reduced window photocurrent losses to 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; those from the University of South Florida have achieved a maximum power voltage of 693 mV; and CuInSe{sub 2} cells from International Solar Electric Technology have shown a hole density as high as 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, implying a significant reduction in compensation. 9 refs.

  2. Experimental Realization of a Three-Dimensional Topological Insulator, Bi 2Te3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemons, W.

    2010-02-24

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are a new state of quantum matter with a bulk gap and odd number of relativistic Dirac fermions on the surface. By investigating the surface state of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the surface state consists of a single nondegenerate Dirac cone. Furthermore, with appropriate hole doping, the Fermi level can be tuned to intersect only the surface states, indicating a full energy gap for the bulk states. Our results establish that Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is a simple model system for the three-dimensional topological insulator with a single Dirac cone on the surface. The large bulk gap of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} also points to promising potential for high-temperature spintronics applications.

  3. Impact of annealing on the chemical structure and morphology of the thin-film CdTe/ZnO interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horsley, K. Hanks, D. A.; Weir, M. G.; Beal, R. J.; Wilks, R. G.; Blum, M.; Häming, M.; Hofmann, T.; Weinhardt, L.; and others

    2014-07-14

    To enable an understanding and optimization of the optoelectronic behavior of CdTe-ZnO nanocomposites, the morphological and chemical properties of annealed CdTe/ZnO interface structures were studied. For that purpose, CdTe layers of varying thickness (4–24 nm) were sputter-deposited on 100 nm-thick ZnO films on surface-oxidized Si(100) substrates. The morphological and chemical effects of annealing at 525 °C were investigated using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray-excited Auger electron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We find a decrease of the Cd and Te surface concentration after annealing, parallel to an increase in Zn and O signals. While the as-deposited film surfaces show small grains (100 nm diameter) of CdTe on the ZnO surface, annealing induces a significant growth of these grains and separation into islands (with diameters as large as 1 μm). The compositional change at the surface is more pronounced for Cd than for Te, as evidenced using component peak fitting of the Cd and Te 3d XPS peaks. The modified Auger parameters of Cd and Te are also calculated to further elucidate the local chemical environment before and after annealing. Together, these results suggest the formation of tellurium and cadmium oxide species at the CdTe/ZnO interface upon annealing, which can create a barrier for charge carrier transport, and might allow for a deliberate modification of interface properties with suitably chosen thermal treatment parameters.

  4. Multiwavelength study of the northeastern outskirts of the extended TeV source HESS J1809193

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangelov, Blagoy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Hare, Jeremy; Volkov, Igor; Posselt, Bettina; Pavlov, George G.

    2014-11-20

    HESS J1809193 is an extended TeV ?-ray source in the Galactic plane. Multiwavelength observations of the HESS J1809193 field reveal a complex picture. We present results from three Chandra X-Ray Observatory and two Suzaku observations of a region in the northeastern outskirts of HESS J1809-193, where enhanced TeV emission has been reported. Our analysis also includes GeV ?-ray and radio data. One of the X-ray sources in the field is the X-ray binary XTE J1810-189, for which we present the outburst history from multiple observatories and confirm that XTE J1810-189 is a strongly variable type I X-ray burster, which can hardly produce TeV emission. We investigate whether there is any connection between the possible TeV extension of HESS J1809193 and the sources seen at lower energies. We find that another X-ray binary candidate, Suzaku J1811-1900, and a radio supernova remnant, SNR G11.40.1, can hardly be responsible for the putative TeV emission. Our multiwavelength classification of fainter X-ray point sources also does not produce a plausible candidate. We conclude that the northeast extension of HESS J1809193, if confirmed by deeper observations, can be considered a dark acceleratora TeV source without a visible counterpart at lower energies.

  5. Polarization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film in a floating-gate capacitor structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Hui E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu; Li, Haitao; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Kai; Baumgart, Helmut; Bonevich, John E.; Richter, Curt A.; Li, Qiliang E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu

    2014-12-08

    Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film sandwiched and embedded inside the oxide layer have been fabricated and studied. The capacitors exhibit ferroelectric-like hysteresis which is a result of the robust, reversible polarization of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film while the gate voltage sweeps. The temperature-dependent capacitance measurement indicates that the activation energy is about 0.33?eV for separating the electron and hole pairs in the bulk of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, and driving them to either the top or bottom surface of the thin film. Because of the fast polarization speed, potentially excellent endurance, and the complementary metaloxidesemiconductor compatibility, the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} embedded MOS structures are very interesting for memory application.

  6. The effects of deep level traps on the electrical properties of semi-insulating CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zha, Gangqiang; Yang, Jian; Xu, Lingyan; Feng, Tao; Wang, Ning; Jie, Wanqi

    2014-01-28

    Deep level traps have considerable effects on the electrical properties and radiation detection performance of high resistivity CdZnTe. A deep-trap model for high resistivity CdZnTe was proposed in this paper. The high resistivity mechanism and the electrical properties were analyzed based on this model. High resistivity CdZnTe with high trap ionization energy E{sub t} can withstand high bias voltages. The leakage current is dependent on both the deep traps and the shallow impurities. The performance of a CdZnTe radiation detector will deteriorate at low temperatures, and the way in which sub-bandgap light excitation could improve the low temperature performance can be explained using the deep trap model.

  7. Determination of CdTe bulk carrier lifetime and interface recombination velocity of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin-Hao; Campbell, Calli M.; DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2014-12-22

    The bulk Shockley-Read-Hall carrier lifetime of CdTe and interface recombination velocity at the CdTe/Mg{sub 0.24}Cd{sub 0.76}Te heterointerface are estimated to be around 0.5??s and (4.7??0.4)??10{sup 2?}cm/s, respectively, using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Four CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) with varying CdTe layer thicknesses were grown on nearly lattice-matched InSb (001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The longest lifetime of 179?ns is observed in the DH with a 2??m thick CdTe layer. It is also shown that the photon recycling effect has a strong influence on the bulk radiative lifetime, and the reabsorption process affects the measured PL spectrum shape and intensity.

  8. Data:B485777c-c4fb-42b3-8d2a-3da95f7c7c10 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a-3da95f7c7c10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  9. Disorder-induced anomalously signed Hall effect in crystalline GeTe/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} superlattice-like materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, H.; Yu, N. N.; Yang, Z.; Cheng, X. M.; Miao, X. S.

    2015-08-21

    Opposite to the almost persistent p-type conductivity of the crystalline chalcogenides along the GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} tie line, n-type Hall mobility is observed in crystalline GeTe/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} superlattice-like material (SLL) with a short period length. We suggest that this unusual carrier characteristic originates from the structural disorder introduced by the lattice strain and dangling bonds at the SLL interfaces, which makes the crystalline SLLs behave like the amorphous chalcogenides. Detailed structural disorder in crystalline SLL has been studied by Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as Variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy measurements. First-principles calculations results show that this structural disorder gives rise to three-site junctions that dominate the charge transport as the period length decreases and result in the anomalously signed Hall effect in the crystalline SLL. Our findings indicate a similar tetrahedral structure in the amorphous and crystalline states of SLLs, which can significantly reduce the entropy difference. Due to the reduced entropy loss and increased resistivity of crystalline phase introduced by disorder, it is not surprising that the SLLs exhibit extremely lower RESET current and power consumption.

  10. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security imperative. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Pajarito Powder, LLC, a fuel-cell-catalyst company based in Albuquerque, is one of the voucher recipients that will partner with Los Alamos. Fuel-cell technology companies win small-business aid Pajarito Powder, LLC, (Albuquerque), NanoSonic (Pembroke, Va.)

  11. Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ..) ".. _,; ,' . ' , ,; Depar?.me.nt ,of.' Energy Washington; DC 20585 : . ' , - $$ o"\ ' ~' ,' DEC ?;$ ;y4,,, ~ ' .~ The Honorable John Kalwitz , 200 E. Wells Street Milwaukee, W~isconsin 53202, . . i :. Dear,Mayor 'Kalwitz: " . " Secretary of Energy Hazel' O'Leary has announceha new,approach 'to,openness in " the Department of Ene~rgy (DOE) and its communications with'the public. In -. support of~this initiative, we areipleased to forward the enclosed information

  12. Extending Higgs inflation with TeV scale new physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Hong-Jian; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2014-10-10

    Higgs inflation is among the most economical and predictive inflation models, although the original Higgs inflation requires tuning the Higgs or top mass away from its current experimental value by more than 2σ deviations, and generally gives a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio r∼10{sup −3} (if away from the vicinity of critical point). In this work, we construct a minimal extension of Higgs inflation, by adding only two new weak-singlet particles at TeV scale, a vector-quark T and a real scalar S . The presence of singlets (T, S) significantly impact the renormalization group running of the Higgs boson self-coupling. With this, our model provides a wider range of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r=O(0.1)−O(10{sup −3}) , consistent with the favored r values by either BICEP2 or Planck data, while keeping the successful prediction of the spectral index n{sub s}≃0.96 . It allows the Higgs and top masses to fully fit the collider measurements. We also discuss implications for searching the predicted TeV-scale vector-quark T and scalar S at the LHC and future high energy pp colliders.

  13. Extending Higgs inflation with TeV scale new physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Hong-Jian; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi E-mail: xianyuzhongzhi@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    Higgs inflation is among the most economical and predictive inflation models, although the original Higgs inflation requires tuning the Higgs or top mass away from its current experimental value by more than 2? deviations, and generally gives a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio r?10{sup -3} (if away from the vicinity of critical point). In this work, we construct a minimal extension of Higgs inflation, by adding only two new weak-singlet particles at TeV scale, a vector-quark T and a real scalar S. The presence of singlets (T,S) significantly impact the renormalization group running of the Higgs boson self-coupling. With this, our model provides a wider range of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r=O(0.1)-O(10{sup -3}), consistent with the favored r values by either BICEP2 or Planck data, while keeping the successful prediction of the spectral index n{sub s}?0.96. It allows the Higgs and top masses to fully fit the collider measurements. We also discuss implications for searching the predicted TeV-scale vector-quark T and scalar S at the LHC and future high energy pp colliders.

  14. Effect of hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial strain on the electronic structure of Pb1-xSnxTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geilhufe, Matthias; Nayak, Sanjeev K.; Thomas, Stefan; Dane, Markus; Tripathi, Gouri S.; Entel, Peter; Hergert, Wolfram; Ernst, Arthur

    2015-12-09

    The electronic structure of Pb1–xSnxTe is studied by using the relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method in the framework of density functional theory. For all concentrations x, Pb1–xSnxTe is a direct semiconductor with a narrow band gap. In contrast to pure lead telluride, tin telluride shows an inverted band characteristic close to the Fermi energy. It will be shown that this particular property can be tuned, first, by alloying PbTe and SnTe and, second, by applying hydrostatic pressure or uniaxial strain. Furthermore, the magnitude of strain needed to switch between the regular and inverted band gap can be tuned by the alloy composition. In conclusion, there is a range of potential usage of Pb1–xSnxTe for spintronic applications.

  15. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals for Room-temperature Nuclear ...

  16. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature gradient, we observed the migration of Te inclusions from a low-temperature ... These results show that the migration, diffusion, and reaction of Te with Cd in the matrix ...

  17. Microstructures, magnetic and electric properties of diluted magnetic semiconductors InTe{sub 1?x} Fe{sub x} (Co{sub x})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Sayed, Karimat; Sedeek, K.; Heiba, Z.K.; Hantour, H.H.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? The prepared InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} was found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature and can be characterized as diluted magnetic semiconductors. ? The presence of staking faults, various types of defects, strained lattice, grain boundaries and the impurity of minor non-magnetic phase were suggested to participate in high temperature ferromagnetism. - Abstract: InTe compound doped by 10% of Fe or Co respectively was synthesized. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Kiethley electrometer were used for characterizing the prepared samples. XRD show the presence of InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} or InTe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1} together with minor In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} phase. InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} is ferromagnetic with high Curie and high blocking temperature, while InTe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1} is antiferromagnetic with two high Neels temperatures. ?RT of InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} and InTe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1} are greater than those of InTe. The higher conductivity is due to the higher carrier's density obtained from the interaction of the sp-d orbitals, of the electric and magnetic system. The presence of In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} minor phase and different kinds of defects are taking major roles in the formation of high Tc ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism.

  18. Magneto-infrared study of electron-hole system in strained semimetallic HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyev, Yu. B.; Greshnov, A. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Suchalkin, S. D.; Tung, L.-C.; Smirnov, D.; Gouider, F.; Nachtwei, G.

    2013-12-04

    Magneto infrared absorption measurements have been performed on HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells with different thicknesses grown on (013) GaAs substrate. Cyclotron resonance effective masses, inter-Landau-level transition energies and their dependence on magnetic field are measured. The measured intersubband energies are in good agreement with the theoretically calculated values. Strong spin-orbit interaction is responsible for cyclotron resonance splitting in asymmetric quantum wells. We demonstrate that the increase of the quantum well thickness leads to a semimetallic state, allowing for simultaneous observation of holes and electron transitions.

  19. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhenbin

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5~\\text{fb}^{-1} of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator \\textsc{powheg} is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include {s}-channel, {t}-channel, and {Wt}-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53}$ (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.}) pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\pm 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.78 at the 95\\% credibility level.

  20. Energy

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    M onthly Energy Re< view Ila A a m 0 II 8 IIIW *g U In this issue: New data on nuclear electricity in Eastern Europe (Table 10.4) 9'Ij a - Ordering Information This publication...

  1. Effect and optimization of CdS/CdTe interdiffusion on CdTe electrical properties and CdS/CdTe cell performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, W.; Mao, D.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T.R.; Trefny, J.V.; Levi, D.H.; Johnston, S. McCandless, B.E.

    1999-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of the CdS/CdTe interdiffusion on the properties of the CdTe films and the CdS/CdTe cell performance. Sulfur (S) diffusion into the CdTe films leads to a decreased defect density in the films, improvement of cell performance, and possibly to the increase of the carrier lifetime in the films. Cell performance is improved with the increase of the amount of S in the CdTe films. S diffusion into CdTe also deteriorates the uniformity of the CdS window layers, resulting in worse cell performance. Based on this study, we propose a processing method to improve cell performance. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Energy Conversion |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Conversion Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Energy Conversion 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 2004_deer_majumdar.pdf (1.3 MB) More Documents & Publications High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI

  3. Characterizing multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation via internal symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caballar, Roland Cristopher F.; Ocampo, Leonard R.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2010-06-15

    Internal symmetries can be used to classify multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation (TE-CCR). The dynamical behavior of solutions to the TE-CCR possessing particular internal symmetries involving time reversal differ significantly from solutions to the TE-CCR without those particular symmetries, implying a connection between the internal symmetries of a quantum system, its internal unitary dynamics, and the TE-CCR.

  4. Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of CdZn Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms. Surface effects are important in the performance of CdZnTe room-temperature radiation detectors used as spectrometers since the dark current is often dominated by surface leakage. A process using high-kinetic-energy, neutral oxygen atoms (.about.3 eV) to treat the surface of CdZnTe detectors at or near ambient temperatures is described. Improvements in detector performance include significantly reduced leakage current which results in lower detector noise and greater energy resolution for radiation measurements of gamma- and X-rays, thereby increasing the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements of radionuclides having complex gamma-ray spectra, including special nuclear materials.

  5. Modification of electron states in CdTe absorber due to a buffer layer in CdTe/CdS solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorenko, Y. G. Major, J. D.; Pressman, A.; Phillips, L. J.; Durose, K.

    2015-10-28

    By application of the ac admittance spectroscopy method, the defect state energy distributions were determined in CdTe incorporated in thin film solar cell structures concluded on ZnO, ZnSe, and ZnS buffer layers. Together with the Mott-Schottky analysis, the results revealed a strong modification of the defect density of states and the concentration of the uncompensated acceptors as influenced by the choice of the buffer layer. In the solar cells formed on ZnSe and ZnS, the Fermi level and the energy position of the dominant deep trap levels were observed to shift closer to the midgap of CdTe, suggesting the mid-gap states may act as recombination centers and impact the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor of the solar cells. For the deeper states, the broadening parameter was observed to increase, indicating fluctuations of the charge on a microscopic scale. Such changes can be attributed to the grain-boundary strain and the modification of the charge trapped at the grain-boundary interface states in polycrystalline CdTe.

  6. High efficiency thin film CdTe and a-Si based solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A. D.; Deng, X.; Bohn, R. G.

    2000-01-04

    This report describes work done by the University of Toledo during the first year of this subcontract. During this time, the CdTe group constructed a second dual magnetron sputter deposition facility; optimized reactive sputtering for ZnTe:N films to achieve 10 ohm-cm resistivity and {approximately}9% efficiency cells with a copper-free ZnTe:N/Ni contact; identified Cu-related photoluminescence features and studied their correlation with cell performance including their dependence on temperature and E-fields; studied band-tail absorption in CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1{minus}x} films at 10 K and 300 K; collaborated with the National CdTe PV Team on (1) studies of high-resistivity tin oxide (HRT) layers from ITN Energy Systems, (2) fabrication of cells on the HRT layers with 0, 300, and 800-nm CdS, and (3) preparation of ZnTe:N-based contacts on First Solar materials for stress testing; and collaborated with Brooklyn College for ellipsometry studies of CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1{minus}x} alloy films, and with the University of Buffalo/Brookhaven NSLS for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of interdiffusion in CdS/CdTe bilayers. The a-Si group established a baseline for fabricating a-Si-based solar cells with single, tandem, and triple-junction structures; fabricated a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe triple-junction solar cells with an initial efficiency of 9.7% during the second quarter, and 10.6% during the fourth quarter (after 1166 hours of light-soaking under 1-sun light intensity at 50 C, the 10.6% solar cells stabilized at about 9%); fabricated wide-bandgap a-Si top cells, the highest Voc achieved for the single-junction top cell was 1.02 V, and top cells with high FF (up to 74%) were fabricated routinely; fabricated high-quality narrow-bandgap a-SiGe solar cells with 8.3% efficiency; found that bandgap-graded buffer layers improve the performance (Voc and FF) of the narrow-bandgap a-SiGe bottom cells; and found that a small amount of oxygen partial pressure ({approximately}2 {times} 10

  7. Quantifying electron-phonon coupling in CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} nanocrystals via coherent phonon manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spann, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2014-08-25

    We employ ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with temporal pulse shaping to manipulate coherent phonon excitation and quantify the strength of electron-phonon coupling in CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} nanocrystals (NCs). Raman active CdSe and CdTe longitudinal optical phonon (LO) modes are excited and probed in the time domain. By temporally controlling pump pulse pairs to coherently excite and cancel coherent phonons in the CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} NCs, we estimate the relative amount of optical energy that is coupled to the coherent CdSe LO mode.

  8. New chalcogenide glasses in the CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassem, M.; Le Coq, D.; Boidin, R.; Bychkov, E.; ULCO, LPCA, EA 4493, F-59140 Dunkerque

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the total conductivity of CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between the selenide and telluride equivalent systems. -- Abstract: Chalcogenide glasses in the pseudo-ternary CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system were synthesized and the glass-forming range was determined. The maximum content of CdTe in this glass system was found to be equal to 15 mol.%. The macroscopic characterizations of samples have consisted in Differential Scanning Calorimetry, density, and X-ray diffraction measurements. The cadmium telluride addition does not generate any significant change in the glass transition temperature but the resistance of binary AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses towards crystallisation is estimated to be decreasing on the base of {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g} parameter. The total electrical conductivity {sigma} was measured by complex impedance spectroscopy. First, the CdTe additions in the (AgI){sub 0.5}(As{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 0.5} host glass, (CdTe){sub x}(AgI){sub 0.5-x/2}(As{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 0.5-x/2} lead to a conductivity decrease at x {<=} 0.05. Then, the behaviour is reversed at 0.05 {<=} x {<=} 0.15. The obtained results are discussed by comparison with the equivalent selenide system.

  9. Computational discovery of ferromagnetic semiconducting single-layer CrSnTe3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Xie, Yu; Kent, P. R. C.; Ganesh, P.

    2015-07-06

    Despite many single-layer materials being reported in the past decade, few of them exhibit magnetism. Here we perform first-principles calculations using accurate hybrid density functional methods (HSE06) to predict that single-layer CrSnTe3 (CST) is a ferromagnetic semiconductor, with band gaps of 0.9 and 1.2 eV for the majority and minority spin channels, respectively. We determine the Curie temperature as 170 K, significantly higher than that of single-layer CrSiTe3 (90K) and CrGeTe3 (130 K). This is due to the enhanced ionicity of the Sn-Te bond, which in turn increases the superexchange coupling between the magnetic Cr atoms. We further explore themore » mechanical and dynamical stability and strain response of this single-layer material for possible epitaxial growth. Lastly, our study provides an intuitive approach to understand and design novel single-layer magnetic semiconductors for a wide range of spintronics and energy applications.« less

  10. Resonance photoelectron spectroscopy of TiX{sub 2} (X = S, Se, Te) titanium dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkvarin, A. S. Yarmoshenko, Yu. M.; Skorikov, N. A.; Yablonskikh, M. V.; Merentsov, A. I.; Shkvarina, E. G.; Titov, A. N.

    2012-11-15

    The photoelectron valence band spectra of TiS{sub 2}, TiSe{sub 2}, and TiTe{sub 2} dichalcogenides are investigated in the Ti 2p-3d resonance regime. Resonance bands in the vicinity of the Fermi energy are found for TiS{sub 2} and TiTe{sub 2}. The nature of these bands is analyzed based on model calculations of the density of electronic states in TiS{sub 2}, TiSe{sub 2}, and TiTe{sub 2} compounds intercalated by titanium atoms. Analysis of experimental data and their comparison with model calculations showed that these bands have different origins. It is found that the resonance enhancement of an additional band observed in TiS{sub 2} is explained by self-intercalation by titanium during the synthesis of this compound. The resonance enhancement in TiTe{sub 2} is caused by occupation of the 3d band in Ti.

  11. Investigation of deep level defects in CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar, H.; Castaldini, A.; Dauksta, E.; Medvid, A.; Cavallini, A.

    2014-02-21

    In the past few years, a large body of work has been dedicated to CdTe thin film semiconductors, as the electronic and optical properties of CdTe nanostructures make them desirable for photovoltaic applications. The performance of semiconductor devices is greatly influenced by the deep levels. Knowledge of parameters of deep levels present in as-grown materials and the identification of their origin is the key factor in the development of photovoltaic device performance. Photo Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy technique (PICTS) has proven to be a very powerful method for the study of deep levels enabling us to identify the type of traps, their activation energy and apparent capture cross section. In the present work, we report the effect of growth parameters and LASER irradiation intensity on the photo-electric and transport properties of CdTe thin films prepared by Close-Space Sublimation method using SiC electrical heating element. CdTe thin films were grown at three different source temperatures (630, 650 and 700 C). The grown films were irradiated with Nd:YAG LASER and characterized by Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy, Photocurrent measurementand Current Voltage measurements. The defect levels are found to be significantly influenced by the growth temperature.

  12. Relic neutralino surface at a 100 TeV collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Martin, Adam; Ostdiek, Bryan; Plehn, Tilman; Schell, Torben; Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2015-03-11

    We map the parameter space for minimal supersymmetric Standard Model neutralino dark matter which freezes out to the observed relic abundance, in the limit that all superpartners except the neutralinos and charginos are decoupled. In this space of relic neutralinos, we show the dominant dark matter annihilation modes, the mass splittings among the electroweakinos, direct detection rates, and collider cross sections. The mass difference between the dark matter and the next-to-lightest neutral and charged states is typically much less than electroweak gauge boson masses. With these small mass differences, the relic neutralino surface is accessible to a future 100 TeV hadron collider, which can discover interneutralino mass splittings down to 1 GeV and thermal relic dark matter neutralino masses up to 1.5 TeV with a few inverse attobarns of luminosity. This coverage is a direct consequence of the increased collider energy: in the Standard Model events with missing transverse momentum in the TeV range have mostly hard electroweak radiation, distinct from the soft radiation shed in compressed electroweakino decays. As a result, we exploit this kinematic feature in final states including photons and leptons, tailored to the 100 TeV collider environment.

  13. Rashba effect in single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Xu, Haixuan; Ganesh, P.; Hennig, Richard G.; Kent, P. R. C.

    2015-09-04

    Exploring spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in single-layer materials is important for potential spintronics applications. In this paper, using first-principles calculations, we show that single-layer antimony telluroiodide SbTeI behaves as a two-dimensional semiconductor exhibiting a G0W0 band gap of 1.82 eV. More importantly, we observe the Rashba spin splitting in the SOC band structure of single-layer SbTeI with a sizable Rashba coupling parameter of 1.39 eV Å, which is significantly larger than that of a number of two-dimensional systems including surfaces and interfaces. The low formation energy and real phonon modes of single-layer SbTeI imply that it is stable. Finally, our studymore » suggests that single-layer SbTeI is a candidate single-layer material for applications in spintronics devices.« less

  14. Relic neutralino surface at a 100 TeV collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Martin, Adam; Ostdiek, Bryan; Plehn, Tilman; Schell, Torben; Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2015-03-11

    We map the parameter space for minimal supersymmetric Standard Model neutralino dark matter which freezes out to the observed relic abundance, in the limit that all superpartners except the neutralinos and charginos are decoupled. In this space of relic neutralinos, we show the dominant dark matter annihilation modes, the mass splittings among the electroweakinos, direct detection rates, and collider cross sections. The mass difference between the dark matter and the next-to-lightest neutral and charged states is typically much less than electroweak gauge boson masses. With these small mass differences, the relic neutralino surface is accessible to a future 100 TeVmore » hadron collider, which can discover interneutralino mass splittings down to 1 GeV and thermal relic dark matter neutralino masses up to 1.5 TeV with a few inverse attobarns of luminosity. This coverage is a direct consequence of the increased collider energy: in the Standard Model events with missing transverse momentum in the TeV range have mostly hard electroweak radiation, distinct from the soft radiation shed in compressed electroweakino decays. As a result, we exploit this kinematic feature in final states including photons and leptons, tailored to the 100 TeV collider environment.« less

  15. Beauty production cross section measurements at E(cm) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Onofrio, Monica; /Geneva U.

    2005-05-01

    The RunII physics program at the Tevatron started in spring 2001 with protons and antiprotons colliding at an energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and it is carrying on with more than 500 pb{sup -1} of data as collected by both the CDF and D0 experiments. Recent results on beauty production cross section measurements are here reported.

  16. New acceptor centers of the background impurities in p-CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plyatsko, S. V. Rashkovetskyi, L. V.

    2013-07-15

    Low-temperature photoluminescence data are used to study the redistribution of the background impurities and host components of p-CdZnTe single crystals with a resistivity of 1-50 {Omega} cm upon their interaction with infrared laser radiation. The effect of widening of the band gap and the formation of new acceptor centers in response to laser-stimulated changes in the system of intrinsic defects are established. The activation energy of the new acceptor centers is determined.

  17. Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Centuries-old Tradition ItWe often associate renewable energy as future, forward-thinking technology. However, just as in the case of da Vinci's curved mirror - many of...

  18. MHK Projects/TE4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  19. Connecting thermoelectric performance and topological-insulator behavior: Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te2Se from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Hongliang; Parker, David S.; Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J.

    2015-01-20

    Thermoelectric performance is of interest for numerous applications such as waste-heat recovery and solid-state energy conversion and will be seen to be closely connected to topological-insulator behavior. In this paper, we here report first-principles transport and defect calculations for Bi2Te2Se in relation to Bi2Te3. The two compounds are found to contain remarkably different electronic structures in spite of being isostructural and isoelectronic. We also discuss these results in terms of the topological-insulator characteristics of these compounds.

  20. Surveying The TeV Sky With Milagro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, G. P.

    2006-11-17

    A wide field of view, high duty factor TeV gamma-ray observatory is essential for studying TeV astrophysical sources, because most of these sources are either highly variable or are extended. Milagro is such a TeV detector and has performed the deepest survey of the Northern Hemisphere sky. In addition to detecting the Crab Nebula and Mrk 421, which are known TeV sources, Milagro has made the first detection of diffuse TeV emission from the Galactic plane. The Milagro data has been searched for unknown point sources and extended sources. A new extended TeV source is seen and is coincident with an EGRET unidentified source. Based on the success of Milagro, a second generation water Cherenkov gamma-ray observatory is planned which will give an increase in sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude.

  1. Florida's 11th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formerly TeCom EarthFirst Technologies Inc Ecowind Freedom Wind Energy LLC Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS) Invenergy Services LLC Jabil Circuit Inc Renewable Energy...

  2. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. ...

  3. Astrophysics and Cosmology with TeV Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharonian, Felix

    2005-07-13

    I will discuss the astrophysical and cosmological implications of recent exciting discoveries of TeV gamma-rays from objects representing several Galactic and Extragalactic source populations.

  4. Luminosity goals for a 100-TeV pp collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hinchliffe, Ian; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Quigg, Chris; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-20

    We consider diverse examples of science goals that provide a framework to assess luminosity goals for a future 100-TeV proton-proton collider.

  5. High Performance Zintl Phase TE Materials with Embedded Particles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presents results from embedding nanoparticles in magnesium silicide alloy matrix ... Zintl Phase Materials with Embedded Nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE ...

  6. Luminosity goals for a 100-TeV pp collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchliffe, Ian; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Quigg, Chris; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-04-23

    We consider diverse examples of science goals that provide a framework to assess luminosity goals for a future 100-TeV proton-proton collider.

  7. Gamesa Services Brasil Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gamesa Services Brasil Ltda Place: Simes Filho, Estado da Bahia, Brazil Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm developer and independent...

  8. CPL Participacoes Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Participacoes Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: CPL Participacoes Ltda Place: Salvador, Estado da Bahia, Brazil Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm developer and...

  9. Search for Quark Compositeness with the Dijet Centrality Ratio in $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-12-01

    A search for quark compositeness in the form of quark contact interactions, based on hadronic jet pairs (dijets) produced in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, is described. The data sample of the study corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The dijet centrality ratio, which quantifies the angular distribution of the dijets, is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the dijet system and is found to agree with the predictions of the Standard Model. A statistical analysis of the data provides a lower limit on the energy scale of quark contact interactions. The sensitivity of the analysis is such that the expected limit is 2.9 TeV; because the observed value of the centrality ratio at high invariant mass is below the expectation, the observed limit is 4.0 TeV at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Pressure dependence of the charge-density-wave and superconducting states in GdTe3, TbTe3, and DyTe3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zocco, D. A.; Hamlin, J. J.; Grube, K.; Chu, J. -H.; Kuo, H. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-05-14

    Here, we present electrical resistivity and ac-susceptibility measurements of GdTe3, TbTe3 and DyTe3 performed under pressure. An upper charge-density-wave (CDW) is suppressed at a rate of dTCW,1/dP~ –85K/GPa. For TbTe3 and DyTe3, a second CDW below TCDW,2 increases with pressure until it reaches the TCDW,1(P) line. For GdTe3, the lower CDW emerges as pressure is increased above ~1GPa. As these two CDW states are suppressed with pressure, superconductivity (SC) appears in the three compounds at lower temperatures. Ac-susceptibility experiments performed on TbTe3 provide compelling evidence for bulk SC in the low-pressure region of the phase diagram. We provide measurements ofmore » superconducting critical fields and discuss the origin of a high-pressure superconducting phase occurring above 5 GPa.« less

  11. High Resolution Dopant Profiles Revealed by Atom Probe Tomography and STEM-EBIC for CdTe Based Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; Guo, Wei; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Segregated elements and their diffusion profiles within grain boundaries and interfaces resulting from post deposition heat treatments are revealed using atom probe tomography (APT), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques. The results demonstrate how these techniques complement each other to provide conclusive evidence for locations of space charge regions and mechanisms that create them at the nanoscale. Most importantly, a Cl dopant profile that extends ~5 nm into CdTe grains interfacing the CdS is shown using APT and STEM synergy, which has been shown to push the pn-junction into the CdTe layer indicative ofmore » a homojunction (revealed by STEM EBIC). In addition, Cu and Cl concentrations within grain boundaries within several nms and µms from the CdS/CdTe interface are compared, Na segregation of <0.1% is detected, and S variations of ~1–3% are witnessed between CdTe grains close to the CdS/CdTe interface. The segregation and diffusion of these elements directly impacts on the material properties, such as band gap energy and n/p type properties. Optimization of the interfacial and grain boundary doping will lead to higher efficiency solar cells.« less

  12. High Resolution Dopant Profiles Revealed by Atom Probe Tomography and STEM-EBIC for CdTe Based Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; Guo, Wei; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Segregated elements and their diffusion profiles within grain boundaries and interfaces resulting from post deposition heat treatments are revealed using atom probe tomography (APT), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques. The results demonstrate how these techniques complement each other to provide conclusive evidence for locations of space charge regions and mechanisms that create them at the nanoscale. Most importantly, a Cl dopant profile that extends ~5 nm into CdTe grains interfacing the CdS is shown using APT and STEM synergy, which has been shown to push the pn-junction into the CdTe layer indicative of a homojunction (revealed by STEM EBIC). In addition, Cu and Cl concentrations within grain boundaries within several nms and µms from the CdS/CdTe interface are compared, Na segregation of <0.1% is detected, and S variations of ~1–3% are witnessed between CdTe grains close to the CdS/CdTe interface. The segregation and diffusion of these elements directly impacts on the material properties, such as band gap energy and n/p type properties. Optimization of the interfacial and grain boundary doping will lead to higher efficiency solar cells.

  13. Fabrication and Spark plasma sintering of nanostructured bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleemi, Mohsin; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Li, Shanghua; Johnsson, Mats; Muhammed, Mamoun

    2012-06-26

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices can harvest residual low-grade waste heat energy. Bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) and its alloys are mostly used TE materials in the bulk form for making TE modules. We report a simple, fast and very high yield synthetic process for the bulk Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanopowders with hexagonal plate like morphology. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) process has been optimized in order to preserve nanostructure while achieving a high compaction density of the pellets. Electron microscopy analysis was used to determine the effect of SPS parameters during compaction on the grain growth. Optimal conditions for the fabricated nanopowder was determined as 673 K, 70 MPa pressure with no holding time, which resulted in average lateral grain size in the range of 165-190 nm for a compact density of 98%. About 50% reduction of thermal conductivity was observed as compared to its bulk counterparts, revealing the feasibility of suggested route in the preservation of nanostructure and enhanced phonon scattering.

  14. Copper migration in CdTe heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, H.C.; Rohatgi, A.; Jokerst, N.M.; Thomas, E.W.; Kamra, S.

    1996-07-01

    CdTe solar cells were fabricated by depositing a Au/Cu contact with Cu thickness in the range of 50 to 150A on polycrystalline CdTe/CdS/SnO{sub 2} glass structures. The increase in Cu thickness improves ohmic contact and reduces series resistance (R{sub s}), but the excess Cu tends to diffuse into CdTe and lower shunt resistance (R{sub sh}) and cell performance. Light I-V and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements were performed to understand the correlations between the Cu contact thickness, the extent of Cu incorporation in the CdTe cells, and its impact on the cell performance. The CdTe/CdS/SnO{sub 2} glass, CdTe/CdS/GaAs, and CdTe/GaAs structures were prepared in an attempt to achieve CdTe films with different degrees of crystallinity and grain size. A large grain polycrystalline CdTe thin film solar cell was obtained for the first time by selective etching the GaAs substrate coupled with the film transfer onto a glass substrate. SIMS measurement showed that poor crystallinity and smaller grain size of the CdTe film promotes Cu diffusion and decreases the cell performance. Therefore, grain boundaries are the main conduits for Cu migration and larger CdTe grain size or alternate method of contact formation can mitigate the adverse effect of Cu and improve the cell performance. 15 refs., 1 fig.,6 tabs.

  15. TeV-scale gauged B-L symmetry with inverse seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2010-10-01

    We propose a modified version of the TeV-scale B-L extension of the standard model, where neutrino masses are generated through the inverse seesaw mechanism. We show that heavy neutrinos in this model can be accessible via clean signals at the LHC. The search for the extra gauge boson Z{sub B-L}{sup '} through the decay into dileptons or two dileptons plus missing energy is studied. We also show that the B-L extra Higgs boson can be directly probed at the LHC via a clean dilepton and missing energy signal.

  16. Structural characterization and novel optical properties of defect chalcopyrite ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, S.S.; Sakr, G.B.; Yahia, I.S.; Basset, D.M. Abdel

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Preparation and characterization of ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} in powder and thin film forms. {yields} Structure properties such as XRD and EDX. {yields} Optical constant of the as-deposited ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} for the first time. {yields} Extraction of the optical parameters of the studied films. -- Abstract: Stoichiometric thin film samples of the ternary ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} defect chalcopyrite compound were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique. The elemental chemical composition of the prepared bulk material as well as of the as-deposited film was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin films were deposited, by conventional thermal evaporation technique onto highly cleaned glass substrates. The X-ray and electron diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited and the annealed ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} films at annealing temperature t{sub a} {<=} 548 K are amorphous, while those annealed at t{sub a} {>=} 573 K (for 1 h), are polycrystalline. The optical properties of the as-deposited films have been investigated for the first time at normal incidence in the spectral range from 500 to 2500 nm. The refractive index dispersion in the transmission and low absorption region is adequately described by the Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model, whereby, the values of the oscillator parameters have been calculated. The analysis of the optical absorption coefficient revealed an in-direct optical transition with energy of 1.33 eV for the as-deposited sample. This work suggested that ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} is a good candidate in solar cell devices as an absorbing layer.

  17. From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials: Current progress for Bi 2 Te 3 and CoSb 3: From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peranio, N.; Eibl, O.; Bäßler, S.; Nielsch, K.; Klobes, B.; Hermann, R. P.; Daniel, M.; Albrecht, M.; Görlitz, H.; Pacheco, V.; et al

    2015-10-29

    We synthesized Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials and their thermoelectric, structural, and vibrational properties analyzed to assess and reduce ZT-limiting mechanisms. The same preparation and/or characterization methods were applied in the different materials systems. Single-crystalline, ternary p-type Bi15Sb29Te56, and n-type Bi38Te55Se7 nanowires with power factors comparable to nanostructured bulkmaterialswere prepared by potential-pulsed electrochemical deposition in a nanostructured Al2O3 matrix. p-type Sb2Te3, n-type Bi2Te3, and n-type CoSb3 thin films were grown at room temperature using molecular beam epitaxy and were subsequently annealed at elevated temperatures. It yielded polycrystalline, single phase thin films with optimized charge carrier densities. In CoSb3 thin filmsmore » the speed of sound could be reduced by filling the cage structure with Yb and alloying with Fe yielded p-type material. Bi2(Te0.91Se0.09)3/SiC and (Bi0.26Sb0.74)2Te3/SiC nanocomposites with low thermal conductivities and ZT values larger than 1 were prepared by spark plasma sintering. Nanostructure, texture, chemical composition, as well as electronic and phononic excitations were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nuclear resonance scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, M ossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, for Bi2Te3 materials, ab-initio calculations together with equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for point defects yielded their formation energies and their effect on lattice thermal conductivity, respectively. Current advances in thermoelectric Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials are summarized. Advanced synthesis and characterization methods and theoreticalmodelingwere combined to assess and reduce ZT-limiting mechanisms in these materials.« less

  18. Higgs mass from compositeness at a multi-TeV scale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Hsin -Chia; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Gu, Jiayin

    2014-08-18

    Within composite Higgs models based on the top seesaw mechanism, we show that the Higgs field can arise as the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of the broken U(3)more » $$_{L}$$ chiral symmetry associated with a vector-like quark and the t-b doublet. As a result, the lightest CP-even neutral state of the composite scalar sector is lighter than the top quark, and can be identified as the newly discovered Higgs boson. As a result, constraints on weak-isospin violation push the chiral symmetry breaking scale above a few TeV, implying that other composite scalars are probably too heavy to be probed at the LHC, but may be within reach at a future hadron collider with center-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV.« less

  19. CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March » CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis WHEN: Mar 02, 2016 8:00 AM - Mar 04, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: Eldorado Hotel 309 W. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, NM CONTACT: Kary Myers (505) 606-1455 CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Join us for the Conference on Data Analysis, highlighting data-driven problems of interest to the Department of Energy. We invite you to present your data-focused work at the poster

  20. ETA-NAC007 - Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) Prepared by Electric Transportation ... of calibration standards and Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used for measuring, ...

  1. ETA-UAC07 - Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE)" Prepared by Electric Transportation ... of calibration standards and Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used for measuring, ...

  2. Thermoelectric device including an alloy of GeTe and AgSbTe as the P-type element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skrabek, Emanuel Andrew; Trimmer, Donald Smith

    1976-01-01

    Improved alloys suitable for thermoelectric applications and having the general formula: (AgSbTe.sub.2).sub.1.sub.-x + (GeTe).sub.x wherein x has a value of about 0.80 and 0.85, have been found to possess unexpectedly high thermoelectric properties such as efficiency index, as well as other improved physical properties.

  3. Search for new physics in the dijet mass distribution using 1 fb⁻¹ of pp collision data at √s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-02-01

    Invariant mass distributions of jet pairs (dijets) produced in LHC proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 7 TeV have been studied using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb⁻¹ recorded in 2011 by ATLAS. Dijet masses up to ~4 TeV are observed in the data, and no evidence of resonance production over background is found. Limits are set at 95% C.L. for several new physics hypotheses: excited quarks are excluded for masses below 299 TeV, axigluons are excluded for masses below 3.32 TeV, and colour octet scalar resonances are excluded for masses below 1.92more » TeV.« less

  4. Multiband Te p Based Superconductivity of Ta4Pd3Te16

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, David J.

    2014-10-06

    We recently discovered that Ta4Pd3Te16 is a superconductor that has been suggested to be an unconventional superconductor near magnetism. Here, we report electronic structure calculations showing that despite the layered crystal structure the material is an anisotropic three-dimensional (3D) metal. The Fermi surface contains prominent one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) features, including nested 1D sheets, a 2D cylindrical section, and a 3D sheet. Moreover, the electronic states that make up the Fermi surface are mostly derived from Te p states with small Ta d and Pd d contributions. This places the compound far from magnetic instabilities. The results are discussedmore » in terms of multiband superconductivity.« less

  5. Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form OHMIC contacts to p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurim-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact.

  6. Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form ohmic contacts to p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, T.A.

    1999-06-01

    A method of is disclosed improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact. 11 figs.

  7. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogler, Laura

    2011-11-03

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2{nu}{beta}{beta}). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO{sub 2} crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of #24;10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with {sup 130}Te and 2 with {sup 128}Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of #24;350 g {sup 130}Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life was measured to be T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = [9.81{+-} #6;0.96(stat){+-} 0.49(syst)]#2;x10{sup 20} y.

  8. In-situ characterization of the optical and electronic properties in GeTe and GaSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velea, A.; Popescu, M.; Galca, A. C.; Socol, G.

    2015-10-07

    GeTe and GaSb thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry at controlled temperatures. The GeTe films were fully amorphous, while the GaSb films were partially crystalized in the as-deposited state. The Tauc-Lorentz model was employed to fit the experimental data. From the temperature study of the optical constants, it was observed the crystallization in the 150–160 °C range of GeTe amorphous films and between 230 and 240 °C of GaSb amorphous phase. A second transition in the resonance energy and the broadening parameter of the Lorentz oscillator was observed due to the crystallization of Sb after 250 °C. The temperatures of 85 °C and 130 °C are noticed as the start of the relaxation of the amorphous GeTe phase and as-deposited GaSb. The peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function red shifted after the phase change, while the variation with temperature of the crystalline phase follows the Varshni law. The electron-phonon coupling constants are 2.88 and 1.64 for c-GeTe and c-GaSb, respectively. An optical contrast up to 60% was obtained for GeTe films and a maximum value of 7.5% is revealed in the case GaSb, which is altered by the partial crystallinity of the as-deposited films.

  9. Surveying the TeV Sky with Milagro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansdell, C. P.

    2006-07-11

    A wide field of view, high duty factor, TeV gamma-ray observatory is essential for studying TeV astrophysical sources, because most of these sources are either highly variable or are extended. Milagro is such a TeV detector and has performed the deepest survey of the Northern Hemisphere sky. In addition to detecting the known TeV sources of the Crab Nebula and Markarian 421, Milagro has made the first detection of diffuse TeV emission from the Galactic plane. The Milagro data has been searched for unknown point sources and extended sources. Evidence for a new extended TeV source is seen and is coincident with an EGRET unidentified source. The Milagro data has also been searched for the predicted TeV emitters of gamma-ray bursts, galaxy clusters, and EGRET unidentified sources. Based on the success of Milagro, a second generation water Cherenkov gamma-ray observatory is planned which will give an increase in sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude.

  10. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of130Te with CUORE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta (0???) decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of neutrino mass. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an upcoming experiment designed to search for 0???decay of130Te using an array of 988 TeO2crystal bolometers operated at 10?mK. The detector will contain 206?kg of130Te and have an average energy resolution of 5?keV; the projected 0???decay half-life sensitivity after five years of livetime is 1.6??1026?y at 1?(9.5??1025?y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana massmorein the range 40100?meV (50130?meV). In this paper, we review the experimental techniques used in CUORE as well as its current status and anticipated physics reach.less

  11. Beam extraction from TeV accelerators using channeling in bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Toohig, T.E.; Tsyganov, E.N.; Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna )

    1989-08-01

    Bent crystal channeling offers an interesting alternative for beam extraction from trans-GeV accelerators. Conventional extraction employs resonant beam blow-up coupled with electromagnetic beam deflecting channels. It is limited by the length of the available accelerator straight section. Channeling crystals require much less space. A five-step approach to applying crystal extraction in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is discussed. Two steps, extraction from the 8 GeV Dubna Synchrophasotron and the 76 GeV Serpukhov accelerator, have occurred. The next possibility is extraction from a multi-hundred GeV superconducting accelerator. In the nineties the program could continue at UNK (3 TeV) and culminate at the TeV SSC. The possibilities and limitations of crystal extraction are reviewed. More information is needed on dechanneling in bent crystals including the effects of dislocations at TeV energies. Long, dislocation-free'' crystals are required. A more thorough understanding of the theory of crystal extraction is also desirable. 12 refs.

  12. Vacancy structures and melting behavior in rock-salt GeSbTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xue -Peng; Shen, Zhen -Ju; Li, Xian -Bin; Wang, Chuan -Shou; Chen, Yong -Jin; Li, Ji -Xue; Zhang, Jin -Xing; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Sheng -Bai; et al

    2016-05-03

    Ge-Sb-Te alloys have been widely used in optical/electrical memory storage. Because of the extremely fast crystalline-amorphous transition, they are also expected to play a vital role in next generation nonvolatile microelectronic memory devices. However, the distribution and structural properties of vacancies have been one of the key issues in determining the speed of melting (or amorphization), phase-stability, and heat-dissipation of rock-salt GeSbTe, which is crucial for its technological breakthrough in memory devices. Using spherical aberration-aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic scale energy-dispersive X-ray mapping, we observe a new rock-salt structure with high-degree vacancy ordering (or layered-like ordering) atmore » an elevated temperature, which is a result of phase transition from the rock-salt phase with randomly distributed vacancies. First-principles calculations reveal that the phase transition is an energetically favored process. Furthermore, molecular dynamics studies suggest that the melting of the cubic rock-salt phases is initiated at the vacancies, which propagate to nearby regions. The observation of multi-rock-salt phases suggests another route for multi-level data storage using GeSbTe.« less

  13. Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of Te130 with CUORE-0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; et al

    2015-09-03

    We report the results of a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in a 9.8 kg yr exposure of 130Te using a bolometric detector array, CUORE-0. The characteristic detector energy resolution and background level in the region of interest are 5:1± 0:3 keV FWHM and 0:058 ± 0:004 (stat) ± 0:002 (syst) counts / (keV kg yr), respectively. The median 90% C.L. lower-limit half-life sensitivity of the experiment is 2:9x1024 yr and surpasses the sensitivity of previous searches. We find no evidence for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te and place a Bayesian lower bound on the decay half-life, T0ν1/2 > 2.7more » x 1024 yr at 90% C.L. Combining CUORE-0 data with the 19.75 kg yr exposure of 130Te from the Cuoricino experiment we obtain T0ν1/2 > 4.0 x 1024 yr at 90% C.L. (Bayesian), the most stringent limit to date on this half-life. Lastly, using a range of nuclear matrix element estimates we interpret this as a limit on the e ective Majorana neutrino mass, mββ < 270 -760 meV.« less

  14. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of 130 Te with CUORE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Neumore » trinoless double-beta (0 ν β β ) decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of neutrino mass. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an upcoming experiment designed to search for 0 ν β β decay of 130 Te using an array of 988 TeO 2 crystal bolometers operated at 10 mK. The detector will contain 206 kg of 130 Te and have an average energy resolution of 5 keV; the projected 0 ν β β decay half-life sensitivity after five years of livetime is 1.6 × 10 26  y at 1 σ (9.5 × 10 25  y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40–100 meV (50–130 meV). In this paper, we review the experimental techniques used in CUORE as well as its current status and anticipated physics reach.« less

  15. Morphology, electrical, and optical properties of heavily doped ZnTe:Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Akkad, Fikry; Abdulraheem, Yaser

    2013-11-14

    We report on a study of the physical properties of ZnTe:Cu films with Cu content up to ∼12 at. % prepared using rf magnetron sputtering. The composition and lateral homogeneities are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Atomic force microscopy measurements on films deposited at different substrate temperatures (up to 325 °C) yielded activation energy of 12 kJ/mole for the grains growth. The results of XPS and electrical and optical measurements provide evidence for the formation of the ternary zinc copper telluride alloy in films containing Cu concentration above ∼4 at. %. The XPS results suggest that copper is incorporated in the alloy with oxidation state Cu{sup 1+} so that the alloy formula can be written Zn{sub 1−y}Cu{sub y} Te with y = 2−x, where x is a parameter measuring the stoichiometry in the Cu site. The formation of this alloy causes appreciable shift in the binding energies of the XPS peaks besides an IR shift in the energy band gap. Detailed analysis of the optical absorption data revealed the presence of two additional transitions, besides the band gap one, originating from the Γ{sub 8} and Γ{sub 7} (spin-orbit) valence bands to a donor level at ∼0.34 eV below the Γ{sub 6} conduction band. This interpretation yields a value for the valence band splitting energy Δ≅ 0.87 eV independent of copper concentration. On the other hand, the mechanism of formation of the alloy is tentatively explained in terms of a point defect reaction in which substitutional Cu defect Cu{sub Zn} is also created. Assuming that substitutional Cu is the dominant acceptor in the Zn rich alloy as in ZnTe, its formation energy was determined to be 1.7 eV close to the theoretical value (1.41 eV) in ZnTe.

  16. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  17. Process Development for High Voc CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferekides, C. S.; Morel, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    This is a cumulative and final report for Phases I, II and III of this NREL funded project (subcontract # XXL-5-44205-10). The main research activities of this project focused on the open-circuit voltage of the CdTe thin film solar cells. Although, thin film CdTe continues to be one of the leading materials for large-scale cost-effective production of photovoltaics, the efficiency of the CdTe solar cells have been stagnant for the last few years. This report describes and summarizes the results for this 3-year research project.

  18. Ba2TeO: A new layered oxytelluride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen, J. B.; Tokumoto, T. D.; McGill, S. A.; Singh, D. J.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-02-01

    For single crystals of the new semiconducting oxytelluride phase, Ba2TeO, we synthesized from barium oxide powder and elemental tellurium in a molten barium metal flux. Ba2TeO crystallizes in tetragonal symmetry with space group P4/nmm (#129), a=5.0337(1) Å, c=9.9437(4) Å, Z=2. The crystals were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction, heat capacity and optical measurements. Moreover, the optical measurements along with electronic band structure calculations indicate semiconductor behavior with a band gap of 2.93 eV. Resistivity measurements show that Ba2TeO is highly insulating.

  19. Fermi level pinning in Fe-doped PbTe under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skipetrov, E. P. Kruleveckaya, O. V.; Skipetrova, L. A.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2014-07-14

    We synthesize an iron-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase and the elemental composition as well as galvanomagnetic properties in weak magnetic fields (4.2?K?T?300?K, B???0.07?T) of Pb{sub 1?y}Fe{sub y}Te alloys upon varying the iron content, at atmospheric pressure and under hydrostatic compression up to 10 kilobars. We find an increase of iron concentration along the length of the ingot and the appearance of microscopic inclusions enriched with iron in the heavily doped samples. Lightly doped alloys are characterized by the p-type metal conductivity. An increase of the iron impurity content leads to a decrease in the free hole concentration, a stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters, indicating the pinning of the Fermi energy by the iron resonant impurity level lying under the bottom of the valence band, and to the p-n inversion of the conductivity type. Under pressure, the free hole concentration in the sample, in which the stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters takes place, increases by approximately a factor of four due to the flow of electrons from the valence band to the iron-induced resonant level. Using the two-band Kane and the six-band Dimmock dispersion relations, the pressure dependence of the Fermi energy is calculated. The model of the electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1?y}Fe{sub y}Te under pressure is proposed. The energy position and the pressure coefficient of the resonant iron impurity level are determined.

  20. An ab initio study of the electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub 1-x}Te{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Douri, Y.; Ahmad, S.; Hashim, U.; Reshak, Ali Hussain; Baaziz, H.; Charifi, Z.; Khenata, R.

    2010-12-15

    The structural, electronic and optical properties of cubic CdS{sub 1-x}Te{sub x} alloys, with Te-concentrations varying from 0% up to 100% are investigated. The calculations are based on the total-energy calculations using the full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) for the total-energy calculations, while for electronic properties in addition to that the Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA) formalism was also applied. The ground state properties for all Te-concentrations are presented. The optical dielectric constant is also determined for both the binary and their related ternary alloys. (author)

  1. Point defects in CdTexSe1-x crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Yang, G.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.; Cui, Y.

    2015-04-15

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from (1–30) V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material.

  2. Native defects in MBE-grown CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz

    2013-12-04

    Deep-level traps in both n- and p-type CdTe layers, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates, have been investigated by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Four of the traps revealed in the DLTS spectra, which displayed exponential kinetics for capture of charge carriers into the trap states, have been assigned to native point defects: Cd interstitial, Cd vacancy, Te antisite defect and a complex formed of the Te antisite and Cd vacancy. Three further traps, displaying logarithmic capture kinetics, have been ascribed to electron states of treading dislocations generated at the mismatched interface with the substrate and propagated through the CdTe layer.

  3. CdTe Solar Cells: The Role of Copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christain

    2014-06-06

    In this work, we report on developing 1D reaction-diffusion solver to understand the kinetics of p-type doping formation in CdTe absorbers and to shine some light on underlying causes of metastabilities observed in CdTe PV devices. Evolution of intrinsic and Cu-related defects in CdTe solar cell has been studied in time-space domain self-consistently with free carrier transport and Poisson equation. Resulting device performance was simulated as a function of Cu diffusion anneal time showing pronounced effect the evolution of associated acceptor and donor states can cause on device characteristics. Although 1D simulation has intrinsic limitations when applied to poly-crystalline films, the results suggest strong potential of the approach in better understanding of the performance and metastabilities of CdTe photovoltaic device.

  4. Summary of the TeV33 working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagley, P.P.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Colestock, P.

    1996-10-01

    This summary of the TeV33 working group at Snowmass reports on work in the areas of Tevatron store parameters, the beam-beam interaction, Main Injector intensity (slip stacking), antiproton production, and electron cooling.

  5. Extreme solid state refrigeration using nanostructured Bi-Te alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima Sharma, Ana L.; Spataru, Dan Catalin; Medlin, Douglas L.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Morales, Alfredo Martin

    2009-09-01

    Materials are desperately needed for cryogenic solid state refrigeration. We have investigated nanostructured Bi-Te alloys for their potential use in Ettingshausen refrigeration to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These alloys form alternating layers of Bi{sub 2} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} blocks in equilibrium. The composition Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} was identified as having the greatest potential for having a high Ettingshausen figure of merit. Both single crystal and polycrystalline forms of this material were synthesized. After evaluating the Ettingshausen figure of merit for a large, high quality polycrystal, we simulated the limits of practical refrigeration in this material from 200 to 77 K using a simple device model. The band structure was also computed and compared to experiments. We discuss the crystal growth, transport physics, and practical refrigeration potential of Bi-Te alloys.

  6. Experimental investigation of spin-orbit coupling in n-type PbTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peres, M. L.; Monteiro, H. S.; Castro, S. de; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Mengui, U. A.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Abramof, E.; Maude, D. K.

    2014-03-07

    The spin-orbit coupling is studied experimentally in two PbTe quantum wells by means of weak antilocalization effect. Using the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model through a computational global optimization procedure, we extracted the spin-orbit and inelastic scattering times and estimated the strength of the zero field spin-splitting energy ?{sub so}. The values of ?{sub so} are linearly dependent on the Fermi wave vector (k{sub F}) confirming theoretical predictions of the existence of large spin-orbit coupling in IV-VI quantum wells originated from pure Rashba effect.

  7. Ab initio study of the structural, electronic and optical properties of ZnTe compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahloul, B.; Deghfel, B.; Amirouche, L.; Bounab, S.; Bentabet, A.; Bouhadda, Y.; Fenineche, N.

    2015-03-30

    Structural, electronic and optical properties of ZnTe compound were calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on the pseudopotentials and planewaves (PP-PW) method as implemented in the ABINIT computer code, where the exchange–correlation functional is approximated using the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The obtained results from either LDA or GGa calculation for lattice parameter, energy band gap and optical parameters, such as the fundamental absorption edge, the peaks observed in the imaginary part of the dielectric function, the macroscopic dielectric constants and the optical dielectric constant, are compared with the available theoretical results and experimental data.

  8. Shell model calculation for Te and Sn isotopes in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakhelef, A.; Bouldjedri, A.

    2012-06-27

    New Shell Model calculations for even-even isotopes {sup 104-108}Sn and {sup 106,108}Te, in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn have been performed. The calculations have been carried out using the windows version of NuShell-MSU. The two body matrix elements TBMEs of the effective interaction between valence nucleons are obtained from the renormalized two body effective interaction based on G-matrix derived from the CD-bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The single particle energies of the proton and neutron valence spaces orbitals are defined from the available spectra of lightest odd isotopes of Sb and Sn respectively.

  9. Thin Film CIGS and CdTe Photovoltaic Technologies: Commercialization, Critical Issues, and Applications; Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin Film CIGS and CdTe Photovoltaic Technologies: Commercialization, Critical Issues, and Applications Preprint H.S. Ullal and B. von Roedern To be presented at the 22nd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference (PVSEC) and Exhibition Milan, Italy September 3-7, 2007 Conference Paper NREL/CP-520-42058 September 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest

  10. Technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., CdTe module and array at NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Strand, T.; Hansen, R.; Powell, R.; Sasala, R.

    1996-05-01

    The Engineering and Technology Validation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules and arrays. This paper focuses on the technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., (SCI) cadmium telluride (CdTe) module and array performance by attempting to correlate individual module and array performance. This is done by examining the performance and stability of the modules and array over a period of more than one year. Temperature coefficients for module and array parameters (P{sub max}, V{sub oc}, V{sub max}, I{sub sc}, I{sub max}) are also calculated.

  11. Quantum Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells at nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, D. A. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Weishäupl, S.; Krupko, Y.; Portal, J.-C.

    2014-09-29

    We report on the observation of quantized Hall plateaus in a system of two-dimensional Dirac fermions, implemented in a 6.6 nm HgTe quantum well at magnetic fields up to 34 T at nitrogen temperatures. The activation energies determined from the temperature dependence of the longitudinal resistivity are found to be almost equal for the filling factors ν of 1 and 2. This indicates that the large values of the g-factor (about 30–40) remain unchanged at very strong magnetic fields.

  12. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02\\,\\mathrm{TeV} $$$ s NN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-04

    Inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s[NN])=5.02 TeV is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse nanobarns is analyzed.The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range -2.0

  13. Hidden extra U(1) at the electroweak/TeV scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossmann, B. N.; Rai, Santosh Kumar; McElrath, B.; Nandi, S.

    2010-09-01

    We propose a simple extension of the standard model (SM) by adding an extra U(1) symmetry which is hidden from the SM sector. Such a hidden U(1) has not been considered before, and its existence at the TeV scale can be explored at the LHC. This hidden U(1) does not couple directly to the SM particles, and couples only to new SU(2){sub L} singlet exotic quarks and singlet Higgs bosons, and is broken at the TeV scale. The dominant signals at the high-energy hadron colliders are multilepton and multi-b-jet final states with or without missing energy. We calculate the signal rates as well as the corresponding standard model background for these final states. A very distinctive signal is 6 high p{sub T} b-jets in the final state with no missing energy. For a wide range of the exotic quarks masses the signals are observable above the background at the LHC.

  14. High-quality CdTe films from nanoparticle precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, D.L.; Pehnt, M.; Urgiles, E.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors demonstrate that nanoparticulate precursors coupled with spray deposition offers an attractive route into electronic materials with improved smoothness, density, and lower processing temperatures. Employing a metathesis approach, cadmium iodide was reacted with sodium telluride in methanol solvent, resulting in the formation of soluble NaI and insoluble CdTe nanoparticles. After appropriate chemical workup, methanol-capped CdTe colloids were isolated. CdTe thin film formation was achieved by spray depositing the nanoparticle colloids (25-75 {Angstrom} diameter) onto substrates at elevated temperatures (T = 280-440{degrees}C) with no further thermal treatment. These films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cubic CdTe phase formation was observed by XRD, with a contaminant oxide phase also detected. XPS analysis showed that CdTe films produced by this one-step method contained no Na or C and substantial O. AFM gave CdTe grain sizes of {approx}0.1-0.3 {mu}m for film sprayed at 400{degrees}C. A layer-by-layer film growth mechanism proposed for the one-step spray deposition of nanoparticle precursors will be discussed.

  15. Direct imaging of Cl- and Cu-induced short-circuit efficiency changes in CdTe solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Parish, Chad M.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2014-05-30

    To achieve high-efficiency polycrystalline CdTe-based thin-film solar cells, the CdTe absorbers must go through a post-deposition CdCl2 heat treatment followed by a Cu diffusion step. To better understand the roles of each treatment with regard to improving grains, grain boundaries, and interfaces, CdTe solar cells with and without Cu diffusion and CdCl2 heat treatments are investigated using cross-sectional electron beam induced current, electron backscatter diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope techniques. The evolution of the cross-sectional carrier collection profile due to these treatments that cause an increase in short-circuit current and higher open-circuit voltage are identified. Additionally, an increased carriermore » collection in grain boundaries after either/both of these treatments is revealed. The increased current at the grain boundaries is shown to be due to the presence of a space charge region with an intrinsic carrier collection profile width of ≈350 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscope electron-energy loss spectroscopy shows a decreased Te and increased Cl concentration in grain boundaries after treatment, which causes the inversion. Furthermore, each treatment improves the overall carrier collection efficiency of the cell separately, and, therefore, the benefits realized by each treatment are shown to be independent of each other.« less

  16. Fully gapped superconductivity in In-doped topological crystalline insulator Pb0.5Sn0.5Te

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Guan; Gu, G. D.; Du, Zengyi; Fang, Delong; Yang, Huan; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J.; Wen, Hai -Hu

    2015-07-27

    In this study, superconductors derived from topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators by chemical doping have long been considered to be candidates as topological superconductors. Pb0.5Sn0.5Te is a topological crystalline insulator with mirror symmetry protected surface states on (001)-, (011)-, and (111)-oriented surfaces. The superconductor (Pb0.5Sn0.5)0.7In0.3Te is produced by In doping in Pb0.5Sn0.5Te, and is thought to be a topological superconductor. Here we report scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting state as well as the superconducting energy gap in (Pb0.5Sn0.5)0.7In0.3Te on a (001)-oriented surface. The spectrum can be well fitted by an anisotropic s-wave gap function of Δ =more » 0.72 + 0.18cos4θ meV using Dynes model. The results show that the superconductor seems to be a fully gapped one without any in-gap states, in contradiction with the expectation of a topological superconductor.« less

  17. Thermoelectric and microstructural properties of Pb{sub 0.9-x}Sn{sub 0.1}Ge{sub x}Te compounds prepared by spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sondergaard, M.; Christensen, M.; Johnsen, S. [Center for Energy Materials, Department of Chemistry and iNANO, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stiewe, C.; Dasgupta, T.; Mueller, E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Linder Hoehe, DE-51147 Cologne (Germany); Iversen, B.B., E-mail: bo@chem.au.d [Center for Energy Materials, Department of Chemistry and iNANO, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    Three samples of Pb{sub 0.9-x}Sn{sub 0.1}Ge{sub x}Te with x=0.25, 0.35, 0.6 were prepared by heating the mixtures above the melting point of the constituent elements followed by quenching in water. The x=0.6 sample is close to the center of the immiscibility region, while the x=0.25 and 0.35 samples are in the Pb rich region inside the spinodal miscibility gap. Microstructural investigations using Powder X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy revealed both GeTe-rich and PbTe-rich phases. The samples were uniaxially hot pressed and the thermoelectric properties were characterized in the temperature range 2-400 K using a commercial apparatus and from 300 to 650 K with a custom designed setup. The best sample (x=0.6) reached zT{approx}0.6 at 650 K, while the x=0.25 and 0.35 samples showed thermal instability at elevated temperatures. -- Graphical abstract: Spinodal decomposition in the GeTe-SnTe-PbTe system demonstrated by SEM and EXS images. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Investigation of Pb-rich part of the spinodal miscibility gap in PbTe-SnTe-GeTe. {yields} zT=0.6 at 650 K reproduced for Pb{sub 0.3}Sn{sub 0.1}Ge{sub 0.6}Te. {yields} Pb-rich phases shown to be thermally instable. {yields} Thermoelectric property characterization at low and high temperature. {yields} Microstructural investigations using PXRD, SEM, EDX and PSM.

  18. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

  19. Synthesis, transport properties, and electronic structure of Cu{sub 2}CdSnTe{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yongkwan; Khabibullin, Artem R.; Wei, Kaya; Ge, Zhen-Hua; Woods, Lilia M. Nolas, George S.; Martin, Joshua; Salvador, James R.

    2014-06-23

    A new stannite phase was synthesized and its temperature dependent transport properties were investigated. Cu{sub 2}CdSnTe{sub 4} possesses strong p-type conduction, while the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity exhibits typical dielectric behavior. Electronic structure calculations allowed for a description of the transport characteristics in terms the energy band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface. The potential for thermoelectric applications is also discussed.

  20. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators on GaAs (111) substrates: a potential route to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Zhaoquan; Morgan, Timothy A.; Li, Chen; Hirono, Yusuke; Hu, Xian; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Benamara, Mourad; Salamo, Gregory J.; Fan, Dongsheng; Yu, Shuiqing; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 ; Zhao, Yanfei; Lee, Joon Sue; Wang, Jian; The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 ; Wang, Zhiming M.; State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054; Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083

    2013-07-15

    High quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and n type Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

  1. Interferometry radii in heavy-ion collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozek, Piotr

    2011-04-15

    The expansion of the fireball created in Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV and Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV is modelled using relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. The experimentally observed interferometry radii are well reproduced. Additional pre-equilibrium flow slightly improves the results for the lower energies studied.

  2. Effects of Cu Diffusion from ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts on Carrier Lifetime of CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M. R.; Johnston, S.; Dhere, R. G.; Duda, A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film PV devices processed with a ZnTe:Cu/Ti contact to investigate how carrier lifetime in the CdTe layer is affected by Cu diffusion from the contact.

  3. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA). Handout Research conducted by: D.A. Shapiro (Advanced Light Source), Y.S. Yu (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University...

  4. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division and runs optimized reconstruction algorithms developed by the Center for Applied Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA). Handout Research conducted by: D.A....

  5. Towards a predictive route for selection of doping elements for the thermoelectric compound PbTe from first-principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Elad; Amouyal, Yaron

    2015-05-07

    Striving for improvements of the thermoelectric (TE) properties of the technologically important lead telluride (PbTe) compound, we investigate the influence of different doping elements on the thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and electrical conductivity applying density functional theory calculations. Our approach combines total-energy calculations yielding lattice vibrational properties with the Boltzmann transport theory to obtain electronic transport properties. We find that doping with elements from the 1st and 3rd columns of the periodic table reduces the sound velocity and, consequently, the lattice thermal conductivity, while 2nd column dopants have no such influence. Furthermore, 1.6 at. % doping with 4th and 5th column elements provides the highest reduction of lattice thermal conductivity. Out of this group, Hf doping results in maximum reduction of the sound velocity from 2030 m s{sup −1} for pure PbTe to 1370 m s{sup −1}, which is equivalent to ca. 32% reduction of lattice thermal conductivity. The highest power factor values calculated for 1.6 at. % doping range between 40 and 56 μW cm{sup −1} K{sup −2}, and are obtained for substitution with dopants having the same valence as Pb or Te, such as those located at the 2nd, 14th, and 16th columns of the periodic table. We demonstrate how this method may be generalized for dopant-selection-oriented materials design aimed at improving TE performance of other compounds.

  6. Searches for signals from microscopic black holes in processes of proton collisions at {radical} s = 7 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savina, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    If the fundamental scale of multidimensional gravity is about one or several TeV units, microscopic black holes or objects referred to as string balls may be produced at the LHC. The most recent results obtained by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC from searches for such signals at the c.m. protoninteraction energy of 7 TeV and for an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb{sup -1}. Lower limits on the masses of objects of strongly acting gravity were set in the parameter region accessible to tests at the present time. Prospects for further research in this field are discussed.

  7. Investigating Broadband Variability of the TeV Blazar 1ES 1959+650

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Hughes, Z.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; Nieto, D.; O'Faolain de Bhroithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sadun, A.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sheidaei, F.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakeley, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Boettcher, M.; Fumagalli, M.

    2014-12-03

    We summarize broadband observations of the TeV-emitting blazar 1ES 1959 650, including optical R-band observations by the robotic telescopes Super-LOTIS and iTelescope, UV observations by Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope, X-ray observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope, high-energy gamma-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope, and very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations by VERITAS above 315 GeV, all taken between 2012 April 17 and 2012 June 1 (MJD 56034 and 56079). The contemporaneous variability of the broadband spectral energy distribution is explored in the context of a simple synchrotron self Compton (SSC) model. In the SSC emission scenario, we find that the parameters required to represent the high state are significantly different than those in the low state. Motivated by possible evidence of gas in the vicinity of the blazar, we also investigate a reflected emission model to describe the observed variability pattern. This model assumes that the non-thermal emission from the jet is reflected by a nearby cloud of gas, allowing the reflected emission to re-enter the blob and produce an elevated gamma-ray state with no simultaneous elevated synchrotron flux. The model applied here, although not required to explain the observed variability pattern, represents one possible scenario which can describe the observations. As applied to an elevated VHE state of 66% of the Crab Nebula flux, observed on a single night during the observation period, the reflected emission scenario does not support a purely leptonic non-thermal emission mechanism. The reflected model does, however, predict a reflected photon field with sufficient energy to enable elevated gamma-ray emission via pion production with protons of energies between 10 and 100 TeV.

  8. Investigating broadband variability of the TeV blazar 1ES 1959+650

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; et al

    2014-12-03

    We summarize broadband observations of the TeV-emitting blazar 1ES 1959 650, including optical R-band observations by the robotic telescopes Super-LOTIS and iTelescope, UV observations by Swift UVOT, X-ray observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope, high-energy gamma-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope, and very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations by VERITAS above 315 GeV, all taken between 2012 April 17 and 2012 June 1 (MJD 56034 and 56079). The contemporaneous variability of the broadband spectral energy distribution is explored in the context of a simple synchrotron self Compton (SSC) model. In the SSC emission scenario, we find that the parameters requiredmore » to represent the high state are significantly different than those in the low state. Motivated by possible evidence of gas in the vicinity of the blazar, we also investigate a reflected emission model to describe the observed variability pattern. This model assumes that the non-thermal emission from the jet is reflected by a nearby cloud of gas, allowing the reflected emission to re-enter the blob and produce an elevated gamma-ray state with no simultaneous elevated synchrotron flux. The model applied here, although not required to explain the observed variability pattern, represents one possible scenario which can describe the observations. As applied to an elevated VHE state of 66% of the Crab Nebula flux, observed on a single night during the observation period, the reflected emission scenario does not support a purely leptonic non-thermal emission mechanism. The reflected model does, however, predict a reflected photon field with sufficient energy to enable elevated gamma-ray emission via pion production with protons of energies between 10 and 100 TeV.« less

  9. Investigating broadband variability of the TeV blazar 1ES 1959+650

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Hughes, Z.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; Nieto, D.; de Bhróithe, A. O'Faoláin; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sadun, A.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sheidaei, F.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, and B.; Böttcher, M.; Fumagalli, M.

    2014-12-03

    We summarize broadband observations of the TeV-emitting blazar 1ES 1959 650, including optical R-band observations by the robotic telescopes Super-LOTIS and iTelescope, UV observations by Swift UVOT, X-ray observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope, high-energy gamma-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope, and very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations by VERITAS above 315 GeV, all taken between 2012 April 17 and 2012 June 1 (MJD 56034 and 56079). The contemporaneous variability of the broadband spectral energy distribution is explored in the context of a simple synchrotron self Compton (SSC) model. In the SSC emission scenario, we find that the parameters required to represent the high state are significantly different than those in the low state. Motivated by possible evidence of gas in the vicinity of the blazar, we also investigate a reflected emission model to describe the observed variability pattern. This model assumes that the non-thermal emission from the jet is reflected by a nearby cloud of gas, allowing the reflected emission to re-enter the blob and produce an elevated gamma-ray state with no simultaneous elevated synchrotron flux. The model applied here, although not required to explain the observed variability pattern, represents one possible scenario which can describe the observations. As applied to an elevated VHE state of 66% of the Crab Nebula flux, observed on a single night during the observation period, the reflected emission scenario does not support a purely leptonic non-thermal emission mechanism. The reflected model does, however, predict a reflected photon field with sufficient energy to enable elevated gamma-ray emission via pion production with protons of energies between 10 and 100 TeV.

  10. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb? for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z'SSM resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z'? lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Similarly, lower limits on ?, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.

  11. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D’Alfonso, M.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; John, J. St.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O’Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb–1 for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z SSM ' resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z ψ ' lighter than 2.57 TeV, and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Thus lower limits on Λ, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.

  12. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb–1 for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z SSM ' resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z ψ ' lighter than 2.57more » TeV, and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Thus lower limits on Λ, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.« less

  13. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb? for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z'SSM resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z'? lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall-SundrummoreKaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Similarly, lower limits on ?, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.less

  14. Search for new phenomena with photon+jet events in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-03-08

    A search is performed for the production of high-mass resonances decaying into a photon and a jet in 3.2 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s =13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Selected events have an isolated photon and a jet, each with transverse momentum above 150 GeV. No significant deviation of the γ+jet invariant mass distribution from the background-only hypothesis is found. Limits are set at 95% confidence level on the cross sections of generic Gaussian-shaped signals and of a few benchmark phenomena beyond the Standard Model: excited quarks withmore » vector-like couplings to the Standard Model particles, and non-thermal quantum black holes in two models of extra spatial dimensions. The minimum excluded visible cross sections for Gaussian-shaped resonances with width-to-mass ratios of 2% decrease from about 6 fb for a mass of 1.5 TeV to about 0.8 fb for a mass of 5 TeV. The minimum excluded visible cross sections for Gaussian-shaped resonances with width-to-mass ratios of 15% decrease from about 50 fb for a mass of 1.5 TeV to about 1.0 fb for a mass of 5 TeV. As a result, excited quarks are excluded below masses of 4.4 TeV, and non-thermal quantum black holes are excluded below masses of 3.8 (6.2) TeV for Randall-Sundrum (Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulous-Dvali) models with one (six) extra dimensions.« less

  15. The half-life of {sup 131g,m}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruivo, J. C.; Zamboni, C. B.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Heder Medina, Nilberto

    2013-05-06

    In this work, the half-lives of {sup 131m}Te and {sup 131g}Te were measured. Radioactive sources of {sup 131}Te were obtained using the {sup 130}Te(n,{gamma}){sup 131}Te nuclear reaction. These nuclear parameters have been determined with a better confidence and accuracy than previously available: 18.89 {+-} 0.11 min and 33.18 {+-} 0.13 h, respectively. These results are quite helpful for new calculations that attempt to describe the low-lying levels in {sup 131}I from the decay of {sup 131g,m}Te.

  16. Search for contact interactions in dimuon events from pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-07-01

    A search for contact interactions has been performed using dimuon events recorded with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 42 pb⁻¹. No significant deviation from the standard model is observed in the dimuon mass spectrum, allowing the following 95% C.L. limits to be set on the energy scale of contact interactions: Λ>4.9 TeV (4.5 TeV) for constructive (destructive) interference in the left-left isoscalar compositeness model. These limits are the most stringent to date for μμqq contact interactions.

  17. ATLAS search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-08

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. No excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% credibility level for masses up to 2.55 TeV. Excited chiral bosons (W*) with equivalent coupling strength are excluded for masses up to 2.42 TeV.

  18. Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 April 1990--31 March 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sites, J.R.

    1991-12-31

    The polycrystalline nature of thin-film CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells continues to be a major factor in several individual losses that limit overall cell efficiency. This report describes progress in the quantitative separation of these losses, including both measurement and analysis procedures. It also applies these techniques to several individual cells to help document the overall progress with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} cells. Notably, CdTe cells from Photon Energy have reduced window photocurrent losses to 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; those from the University of South Florida have achieved a maximum power voltage of 693 mV; and CuInSe{sub 2} cells from International Solar Electric Technology have shown a hole density as high as 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, implying a significant reduction in compensation. 9 refs.

  19. Growth, steady-state, and time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Kirk, Alexander P.; Zhang, Yong-Hang; School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 ; Zhao, Xin-Hao; School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287

    2013-11-04

    CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) are grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy and reveal strong photoluminescence with over double the intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with an identical layer structure design grown on GaAs. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the CdTe/MgCdTe DH gives a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime of 86 ns, which is more than one order of magnitude longer than that of typical polycrystalline CdTe films. These findings indicate that monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe DHs effectively reduce surface recombination, have limited nonradiative interface recombination, and are promising for solar cells that could reach power conversion efficiencies similar to that of GaAs.

  20. Two-particle Bose–Einstein correlations in pp collisions at √s=0.9 and 7 TeV measured with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents studies of Bose–Einstein Correlations (BEC) for pairs of like-sign charged particles measured in the kinematic range pT> 100 MeV and |η|< 2.5 in proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The integrated luminosities are approximately 7 μb-1, 190 μb-1 and 12.4 nb-1 for 0.9 TeV, 7 TeV minimum-bias and 7 TeV high-multiplicity data samples, respectively. The multiplicity dependence of the BEC parameters characterizing the correlation strength and the correlation source size are investigated for charged-particle multiplicities of up to 240. A saturation effect inmore » the multiplicity dependence of the correlation source size parameter is observed using the high-multiplicity 7 TeV data sample. In conclusion, the dependence of the BEC parameters on the average transverse momentum of the particle pair is also investigated.« less

  1. Two-particle Bose–Einstein correlations in pp collisions at √s=0.9 and 7 TeV measured with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. 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K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. 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S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. 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M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents studies of Bose–Einstein Correlations (BEC) for pairs of like-sign charged particles measured in the kinematic range pT> 100 MeV and |η|< 2.5 in proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The integrated luminosities are approximately 7 μb-1, 190 μb-1 and 12.4 nb-1 for 0.9 TeV, 7 TeV minimum-bias and 7 TeV high-multiplicity data samples, respectively. The multiplicity dependence of the BEC parameters characterizing the correlation strength and the correlation source size are investigated for charged-particle multiplicities of up to 240. A saturation effect in the multiplicity dependence of the correlation source size parameter is observed using the high-multiplicity 7 TeV data sample. In conclusion, the dependence of the BEC parameters on the average transverse momentum of the particle pair is also investigated.

  2. A CdTe position sensitive detector for a hard X- and gamma-ray wide field camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroli, E.; Cesare, G. de; Donati, A.; Dusi, W.; Landini, G.; Stephen, J.B.; Perotti, F.

    1998-12-31

    An important region of the electromagnetic spectrum for astrophysics is the hard X- and gamma ray band between 10 keV and a few MeV, where several processes occur in a wide variety of objects and with different spatial distribution and time scales. In order to fulfill the observational requirements in this energy range and taking into account the opportunities given by small/medium size missions (e.g., on the ISS), the authors have proposed a compact, wide field camera based on a thick (1 cm) position sensitive CdTe detector (PSD). The detector is made of an array of 128x96 CdTe microspectrometers with a pixel size of 2x2 mm{sup 2}. The basic element of the PSD is the linear module that is an independent detection unit with 32 CdTe crystals and monolithic front-electronics (ASIC) supported by a thin (300 {micro}m) ceramic layer. The expected performance of the PSD over the operative energy range and some of the required ASIC functionality are presented and discussed.

  3. EVIDENCE OF A HADRONIC ORIGIN FOR THE TeV SOURCE J1834-087

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frail, D. A.; Claussen, M. J.; Mehault, J.

    2013-08-20

    We report on the discovery of compact, narrow OH line emission from the hydroxyl molecule at 1720 MHz toward the extended TeV source J1834-087. The origin of this high energy emission is unknown; it could be powered by one or more candidate neutron stars (leptonic) or by cosmic rays interacting with dense gas (hadronic). The OH emission is detected near the center of J1834-087, coincident with the radio continuum of the supernova remnant W41, and the radial velocity of the line is the same velocity as a giant molecular cloud along the line of sight. We argue that the OH is maser emission stimulated by the interaction of the W41 shock with the molecular cloud. The known correlation between {gamma}-ray bright supernova remnants and OH masers favors a hadronic interpretation for this high energy emission.

  4. Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Alan J.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Ferreira de Lima, Enoque Danilo; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-02-03

    An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. We focus on the bb¯γγ final state, including possible enhancements in sensitivity by exploiting dihiggs recoils against a hard jet. In conclusion, we find that it should be possible to measure the trilinear self-coupling with 40% accuracy given 3/ab and 12% with 30/ab of data.

  5. Surface defect states in MBE-grown CdTe layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Fronc, Krzysztof; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Chusnutdinow, Sergij; Karczewski, Grzegorz

    2014-02-21

    Semiconductor surface plays an important role in the technology of semiconductor devices. In the present work we report results of our deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) investigations of surface defect states in nitrogen doped p-type CdTe layers grown by the molecular-beam epitaxy technique. We observed a deep-level trap associated with surface states, with the activation energy for hole emission of 0.33 eV. DLTS peak position in the spectra for this trap, and its ionization energy, strongly depend on the electric field. Our measurements allow to determine a mechanism responsible for the enhancement of hole emission rate from the traps as the phonon-assisted tunnel effect. Density of surface defect states significantly decreased as a result of passivation in ammonium sulfide. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed the results obtained by the DLTS technique.

  6. Resetting the Defect Chemistry in CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, Wyatt K.; Burst, James; Albin, David; Colegrove, Eric; Moseley, John; Duenow, Joel; Farrell, Stuart; Moutinho, Helio; Reese, Matt; Johnston, Steve; Barnes, Teresa; Perkins, Craig; Guthrey, Harvey; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2015-06-14

    CdTe cell efficiencies have increased from 17% to 21% in the past three years and now rival polycrystalline Si [1]. Research is now targeting 25% to displace Si, attain costs less than 40 cents/W, and reach grid parity. Recent efficiency gains have come largely from greater photocurrent. There is still headroom to lower costs and improve performance by increasing open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor. Record-efficiency CdTe cells have been limited to Voc <; 880 mV, whereas GaAs can attain Voc of 1.10 V with a slightly smaller bandgap [2,3]. To overcome this barrier, we seek to understand and increase lifetime and carrier concentration in CdTe. In polycrystalline structures, lifetime can be limited by interface and grain-boundary recombination, and attaining high carrier concentration is complicated by morphology.

  7. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-29

    Pseudorapidity ( $\\eta $ ) distributions of charged particles produced in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $~\\text {TeV}$ are measured in the ranges $|\\eta | moredepleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.less

  8. THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. I. IMPLICATIONS OF PLASMA INSTABILITIES FOR THE INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD AND EXTRAGALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Chang, Philip; Pfrommer, Christoph E-mail: pchang@cita.utoronto.ca

    2012-06-10

    Inverse Compton cascades (ICCs) initiated by energetic gamma rays (E {approx}> 100 GeV) enhance the GeV emission from bright, extragalactic TeV sources. The absence of this emission from bright TeV blazars has been used to constrain the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF), and the stringent limits placed on the unresolved extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) by Fermi have been used to argue against a large number of such objects at high redshifts. However, these are predicated on the assumption that inverse Compton scattering is the primary energy-loss mechanism for the ultrarelativistic pairs produced by the annihilation of the energetic gamma rays on extragalactic background light photons. Here, we show that for sufficiently bright TeV sources (isotropic-equivalent luminosities {approx}> 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) plasma beam instabilities, specifically the 'oblique' instability, present a plausible mechanism by which the energy of these pairs can be dissipated locally, heating the intergalactic medium. Since these instabilities typically grow on timescales short in comparison to the inverse Compton cooling rate, they necessarily suppress the ICCs. As a consequence, this places a severe constraint on efforts to limit the IGMF from the lack of a discernible GeV bump in TeV sources. Similarly, it considerably weakens the Fermi limits on the evolution of blazar populations. Specifically, we construct a TeV-blazar luminosity function from those objects currently observed and find that it is very well described by the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 0.1, shifted to lower luminosities and number densities, suggesting that both classes of sources are regulated by similar processes. Extending this relationship to higher redshifts, we show that the magnitude and shape of the EGRB above {approx}10 GeV are naturally reproduced with this particular example of a rapidly evolving TeV-blazar luminosity function.

  9. Current enhancement of CdTe-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; More, Karren Leslie; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-07-30

    We report on the realization of CdTe solar cell photocurrent enhancement using an n-type CdSe heterojunction partner sputtered on commercial SnO2/SnO2:F coated soda-lime glass substrates. With high-temperature close-space sublimation CdTe deposition followed by CdCl2 activation, this thin-film stack allows for substantial interdiffusion at the CdSe/CdTe interface facilitating a CdSexTe1-x alloy formation. The bowing effect causes a reduced optical bandgap of the alloyed absorber layer and, therefore, leads to current enhancement in the long-wavelength region and a decrease in open-circuit voltage (VOC). To overcome the VOC loss and maintain a high short-circuit current (JSC), the CdTe cell configuration has been modified using combined CdS:O/CdSe window layers. The new device structure has demonstrated enhanced collection from both short-and long-wavelength regions as well as a VOC improvement. With an optimized synthesis process, a small-area cell using CdS:O/CdSe window layer showed an efficiency of 15.2% with a VOC of 831 mV, a JSC of 26.3 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 69.5%, measured under an AM1.5 illumination without antireflection coating. Furthermore, the results provide new directions for further improvement of CdTe-based solar cells.

  10. Exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in a two-dimensional semimetal in HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovkun, L. S. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Zholudev, M. S.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Spirin, K. E.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    The exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in perpendicular magnetic fields to 12 T in HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells 20 nm wide with a semimetal band structure is studied. The electron effective mass and g-factor at the Fermi level are determined by analyzing the temperature dependence of the amplitude of Shubnikov–de Haas oscillation in weak fields and near odd Landau-level filling factors ν ≤ 9. The experimental values are compared with theoretical calculations performed in the one-electron approximation using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The found dependence of g-factor enhancement on the electron concentration is explained by changes in the contributions of hole- and electron-like states to exchange corrections to the Landau-level energies in the conduction band.

  11. Deflection and Extraction of Pb Ions up to 33 TeV/c by a Bent Silicon Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arduini, G.; Biino, C.; Clement, M.; Cornelis, K.; Doble, N.; Elsener, K.; Ferioli, G.; Fidecaro, G.; Gatignon, L.; Grafstroem, P.; Gyr, M.; Herr, W.; Klem, J.; Mikkelsen, U.; Weisse, E.; Mo Uggerho Taratin, A.; Freund, A.; Keppler, P.; Major, J.

    1997-11-01

    The first results from an experiment to deflect a beam of fully stripped, ultrarelativistic Pb{sup 82+} ions of 400 GeV/c per unit of charge, equivalent to 33 TeV/c , by means of a bent crystal are reported. Deflection efficiencies are as high as 14{percent}, in agreement with theoretical estimates. In a second experiment a bent crystal was used to extract 270 GeV/c -per-charge Pb{sup 82+} (22 TeV/c) ions from a coasting beam in the CERN-SPS, and a high extraction efficiency of up to 10{percent} was found. These represent the first measurements to demonstrate applications of bent crystals in high energy heavy ion beams. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. New Perspectives in Thermoelectric Energy Recovery System Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Karri, Naveen K.; Hogan, Tim; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2013-02-12

    Abstract: Large amounts of waste heat are generated worldwide in industrial processes, automotive transportation, diesel engine exhaust, military generators, and incinerators because 60-70% of the fuel energy is typically lost in these processes. There is a strong need to develop technologies that recover this waste heat to increase fuel efficiency and minimize fuel requirements in these industrial processes, automotive and heavy vehicle engines, diesel generators, and incinerators. There are additional requirements to reduce CO2 production and environmental footprints in many of these applications. Recent work with the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program office has investigated new thermoelectric (TE) materials and systems that can operate at higher performance levels and show a viable pathway to lightweight, small form-factor, advanced thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems to recover waste heat in many of these applications. New TE materials include nano-composite materials such as lead-antimony-silver-telluride (LAST) and lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride (LASTT) compounds. These new materials have created opportunities for high-performance, segmented-element TE devices. New higher-performance TE devices segmenting LAST/LASTT materials with bismuth telluride have been designed and fabricated. Sectioned TEG systems using these new TE devices and materials have been designed. Integrated heat exchanger/TE device system analyses of sectioned TE system designs have been performed creating unique efficiency-power maps that provide better understandings and comparisons of design tradeoffs and nominal and off-nominal system performance conditions. New design perspectives in optimization of sectioned TE design approaches are discussed that provide insight on how to optimize such sectioned TE systems. System performance analyses using ANSYS TE modeling capabilities have integrated heat exchanger performance models with ANSYS TE models to extend

  13. Indication of Te segregation in laser-irradiated ZnTe observed by in situ coherent-phonon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, Toru; Kamaraju, N.; Frischkorn, Christian; Wolf, Martin; Kampfrath, Tobias

    2014-09-15

    We irradiate a ZnTe single crystal with 10-fs laser pulses at a repetition rate of 80 MHz and investigate its resulting gradual modification by means of coherent-phonon spectroscopy. We observe the emergence of a phonon mode at about 3.6 THz whose amplitude and lifetime grow monotonously with irradiation time. The speed of this process depends sensitively on the pump-pulse duration. Our observations strongly indicate that the emerging phonon mode arises from a Te phase induced by multiphoton absorption of incident laser pulses. A potential application of our findings is laser-machining of microstructures in the bulk of a ZnTe crystal, a highly relevant electrooptic material.

  14. Computer simulation of dislocation dechanneling in bent crystals at tera-electron-volt energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biryukov, V.

    1995-08-01

    The dislocation dechanneling of protons in the high-GeV and TeV energy ranges in long curved crystals has been investigated by means of computer simulation. The prospects for multi-TeV applications of bent crystals are discussed.

  15. Resonant Level Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Power of Bi2Te3...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resonant Level Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Power of Bi2Te3 with Tin Resonant Level Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Power of Bi2Te3 with Tin Application to practical p-type...

  16. ETA-HIAC07 - Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) Prepared by Electric Transportation ... The objective of this procedure is to assure that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used ...

  17. ETA-HAC07 - Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) Prepared by Electric Transportation ... The objective of this procedure is to assure that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used ...

  18. Probing TeV physics in the structure of the neutron (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Probing TeV physics in the structure of the neutron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing TeV physics in the structure of the neutron You are accessing a document ...

  19. First-principles study of roles of Cu and Cl in polycrystalline CdTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Yin, Wan -Jian; Park, Ji -Sang; Metzger, Wyatt; Wei, Su -Huai

    2016-01-25

    In this study, Cu and Cl treatments are important processes to achieve high efficiency polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells, thus it will be beneficial to understand the roles they play in both bulk CdTe and CdTe grain boundaries (GBs). Using first-principles calculations, we systematically study Cu and Cl-related defects in bulk CdTe. We find that Cl has only a limited effect on improving p-type doping and too much Cl can induce deep traps in bulk CdTe, whereas Cu can enhance ptype doping of bulk CdTe. In the presence of GBs, we find that, in general, Cl and Cu willmore » prefer to stay at GBs, especially for those with Te-Te wrong bonds, in agreement with experimental observations.« less

  20. Pressure-induced Phase Transition in Thiol-capped CdTe Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, F; Zaug, J; Young, C; Zhang, J Z

    2006-11-29

    Phase transitions for CdTe nanoparticles (NPs) under high pressure up to 37.0 GPa have been studied using fluorescence measurements. The phase transition from cinnarbar to rocksalt phase has been observed in CdTe NPs solution at 5.8 GPa, which is much higher than the phase transition pressure of bulk CdTe (3.8 GPa) and that of CdTe NPs in solid form (0.8 GPa). CdTe NPs solution therefore shows elevated phase transition pressure and enhanced stability against pressure compared with bulk CdTe and CdTe NPs in solid forms. The enhanced stability of CdTe NPs solution has been attributed to possible shape change in the phase transition and/or inhomogeneous strains in nanoparticle solutions.

  1. TeV gamma rays from blazars beyond z = 1 ? (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TeV gamma rays from blazars beyond z 1 ? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TeV gamma rays from blazars beyond z 1 ? Authors: Aharonian, Felix ; Essey, Warren ; ...

  2. APT mass spectrometry and SEM data for CdTe solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba R.; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei

    2016-03-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) data acquired from a CAMECA LEAP 4000 XHR for the CdS/CdTe interface for a non-CdCl2 treated CdTe solar cell as well as the mass spectrum of an APT data set including a GB in a CdCl2-treated CdTe solar cell are presented. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data showing the evolution of sample preparation for APT and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) electron beam induced current (EBIC) are also presented. As a result, these data show mass spectrometry peak decomposition of Cu and Te within an APT dataset, the CdS/CdTe interface of an untreated CdTe solar cell, preparationmore » of APT needles from the CdS/CdTe interface in superstrate grown CdTe solar cells, and the preparation of a cross-sectional STEM EBIC sample.« less

  3. Current enhancement of CdTe-based solar cells (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Current enhancement of CdTe-based solar cells This content will become publicly available on July 30, 2016 Prev Next Title: Current enhancement of CdTe-based solar cells We ...

  4. Current enhancement of CdTe-based solar cells (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CdTe-based solar cells Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 30, 2016 Title: Current enhancement of CdTe-based solar cells We ...

  5. CsBi4Te6: A High-Performance Thermoelectric Material for Low...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermoelectric properties of CsBi(4)Te(6) appear to match or exceed those of Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3-y)Se(y) alloys. URL: Link to article - National Center for Biotechnology Information

  6. From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials: Current progress for Bi 2 Te 3 and CoSb 3: From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peranio, N.; Eibl, O.; Bäßler, S.; Nielsch, K.; Klobes, B.; Hermann, R. P.; Daniel, M.; Albrecht, M.; Görlitz, H.; Pacheco, V.; Bedoya-Martínez, N.; Hashibon, A.; Elsässer, C.

    2015-10-29

    We synthesized Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials and their thermoelectric, structural, and vibrational properties analyzed to assess and reduce ZT-limiting mechanisms. The same preparation and/or characterization methods were applied in the different materials systems. Single-crystalline, ternary p-type Bi15Sb29Te56, and n-type Bi38Te55Se7 nanowires with power factors comparable to nanostructured bulkmaterialswere prepared by potential-pulsed electrochemical deposition in a nanostructured Al2O3 matrix. p-type Sb2Te3, n-type Bi2Te3, and n-type CoSb3 thin films were grown at room temperature using molecular beam epitaxy and were subsequently annealed at elevated temperatures. It yielded polycrystalline, single phase thin films with optimized charge carrier densities. In CoSb3 thin films the speed of sound could be reduced by filling the cage structure with Yb and alloying with Fe yielded p-type material. Bi2(Te0.91Se0.09)3/SiC and (Bi0.26Sb0.74)2Te3/SiC nanocomposites with low thermal conductivities and ZT values larger than 1 were prepared by spark plasma sintering. Nanostructure, texture, chemical composition, as well as electronic and phononic excitations were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nuclear resonance scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, M ossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, for Bi2Te3 materials, ab-initio calculations together with equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for point defects yielded their formation energies and their effect on lattice thermal conductivity, respectively. Current advances in thermoelectric Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials are

  7. Junction Evolution During Fabrication of CdS/CdTe Thin-film PV Solar Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.

    2010-09-01

    Discussion of the formation of CdTe thin-film PV junctions and optimization of CdTe thin-film PV solar cells.

  8. Study of the effect of the stress on CdTe nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayoub, M.; Radley, I.; Mullins, J. T.; Hage-Ali, M.

    2013-09-14

    CdTe detectors are commonly used for X and ? ray applications. The performance of these detectors is strongly affected by different types of mechanical stress; such as that caused by differential expansion between the semiconductor and its intimate metallic contacts and that caused by applied pressure during the bonding process. The aim of this work was to study the effects of stress on the performance of CdTe detectors. A difference in expansion coefficients induces transverse stress under the metallic contact, while contact pressure induces longitudinal stress. These stresses have been simulated by applying known static pressures. For the longitudinal case, the pressure was applied directly to the metallic contact; while in the transverse case, it was applied to the side. We have studied the effect of longitudinal and transverse stresses on the electrical characteristics including leakage current measurements and ?-ray detection performance. We have also investigated induced defects, their nature, activation energies, cross sections, and concentrations under the applied stress by using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy and thermoelectric effect spectroscopy techniques. The operational stress limit is also given.

  9. Research | Energy Frontier Research Centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decomposed regions in PbTe-16%PbS. TEM image TEM images showing dispersed nanoparticles in samples of: (A) PbTe-Sb(2%) (B) PbTe-Sb(4%) (C) PbTe-Sb(8%) and (D)...

  10. Propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase: Reactivity of surface cations in hydrogen abstraction steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Yu, Junjun; Xu, Ye; Guliants, Vadim V.

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations (GGA-PBE) have been performed to investigate the adsorption of C3 (propane, isopropyl, propene, and allyl) and H species on the proposed active center present in the surface ab planes of the bulk Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase in order to better understand the roles of the different surface cations in propane ammoxidation. Modified cluster models were employed to isolate the closely spaced V=O and Te=O from each other and to vary the oxidation state of the V cation. While propane and propene adsorb with nearly zero adsorption energy, the isopropyl and allyl radicals bind strongly to V=O and Te=O with adsorption energies, {Delta}E, being {le} -1.75 eV, but appreciably more weakly on other sites, such as Mo=O, bridging oxygen (Mo-O-V and Mo-O-Mo), and empty metal apical sites ({Delta}E > -1 eV). Atomic H binds more strongly to Te = O ({Delta}E {le} -3 eV) than to all the other sites, including V = O ({Delta}E = -2.59 eV). The reduction of surface oxo groups by dissociated H and their removal as water are thermodynamically favorable except when both H atoms are bonded to the same Te=O. Consistent with the strong binding of H, Te=O is markedly more active at abstracting the methylene H from propane (E{sub a} {le} 1.01 eV) than V = O (E{sub a} = 1.70 eV on V{sup 5+} = O and 2.13 eV on V{sup 4+} = O). The higher-than-observed activity and the loose binding of Te = O moieties to the mixed metal oxide lattice of M1 raise the question of whether active Te = O groups are in fact present in the surface ab planes of the M1 phase under propane ammoxidation conditions.

  11. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Pingbing; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2014-07-20

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere.

  12. Adsorption of propane, isopropyl, and hydrogen on cluster models of the M1 phase of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, Agalya; Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Yu, Junjun; Xu, Ye; Guliants, Vadim V.

    2010-01-01

    The Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst possessing the M1 phase structure is uniquely capable of directly converting propane into acrylonitrile. However, the mechanism of this complex eight-electron transformation, which includes a series of oxidative H-abstraction and N-insertion steps, remains poorly understood. We have conducted a density functional theory study of cluster models of the proposed active and selective site for propane ammoxidation, including the adsorption of propane, isopropyl (CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 3}), and H which are involved in the first step of this transformation, that is, the methylene C-H bond scission in propane, on these active site models. Among the surface oxygen species, the telluryl oxo (Te=O) is found to be the most nucleophilic. Whereas the adsorption of propane is weak regardless of the MO{sub x} species involved, isopropyl and H adsorption exhibits strong preference in the order of Te=O > V=O > bridging oxygens > empty Mo apical site, suggesting the importance of TeO{sub x} species for H abstraction. The adsorption energies of isopropyl and H and consequently the reaction energy of the initial dehydrogenation of propane are strongly dependent on the number of ab planes included in the cluster, which points to the need to employ multilayer cluster models to correctly capture the energetics of surface chemistry on this mixed metal oxide catalyst.

  13. TeVeS gets caught on caustics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contaldi, Carlo R.; Wiseman, Toby; Withers, Benjamin

    2008-08-15

    TeVeS uses a dynamical vector field with timelike unit-norm constraint to specify a preferred local frame. When matter moves slowly in this frame--the so-called quasistatic regime--modified Newtonian dynamics results. Theories with such vectors (such as Einstein-Aether) are prone to the vector dynamics forming singularities that render their classical evolution problematic. Here, we analyze the dynamics of the vector in TeVeS in various situations. We begin by analytically showing that the vacuum solution of TeVeS forms caustic singularities under a large class of physically reasonably initial perturbations. This shows the classical evolution of TeVeS appears problematic in the absence of matter. We then consider matter by investigating black hole solutions. We find large classes of new black hole solutions with static geometries, where the curves generated by the vector field are attracted to the black hole and may form caustics. We go on to consider the full dynamics with matter by numerically simulating, assuming spherical symmetry, the gravitational collapse of a scalar, and the evolution of an initially nearly static boson star. We find that in both cases our initial data evolves so that the vector field develops caustic singularities on a time scale of order the gravitational in-fall time. Having shown singularity formation is generic with or without matter, Bekenstein's original formulation of TeVeS appears dynamically problematic. We argue that by modifying the vector field kinetic terms to the more general form used by Einstein-Aether, this problem may be avoided.

  14. Reverse Monte Carlo simulation of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Baset, A. M.; Rashad, M.; Moharram, A. H.

    2013-12-16

    Two-dimensional Monte Carlo of the total pair distribution functions g(r) is determined for Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} alloys, and then it used to assemble the three-dimensional atomic configurations using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The partial pair distribution functions g{sub ij}(r) indicate that the basic structure unit in the Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glass is di-antimony tri-selenide units connected together through Se-Se and Se-Te chain. The structure of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} alloys is a chain of Se-Te and Se-Se in addition to some rings of Se atoms.

  15. Superconducting Bi2Te: Pressure-induced universality in the (Bi2)m(Bi2Te3)n series

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stillwell, Ryan L.; Jeffries, Jason R.; Jenei, Zsolt; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2016-03-09

    Using high-pressure magnetotransport techniques we have discovered superconductivity in Bi2Te, a member of the infinitely adaptive (Bi2)m(Bi2Te3)n series, whose end members, Bi and Bi2Te3, can be tuned to display topological surface states or superconductivity. Bi2Te has a maximum Tc = 8.6 K at P = 14.5 GPa and goes through multiple high pressure phase transitions, ultimately collapsing into a bcc structure that suggests a universal behavior across the series. High-pressure magnetoresistance and Hall measurements suggest a semi-metal to metal transition near 5.4 GPa, which accompanies the hexagonal to intermediate phase transition seen via x-ray diffraction measurements. In addition, the linearitymore » of Hc2 (T) exceeds the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg limit, even in the extreme spin-orbit scattering limit, yet is consistent with other strong spin-orbit materials. Furthermore, considering these results in combination with similar reports on strong spin-orbit scattering materials seen in the literature, we suggest the need for a new theory that can address the unconventional nature of their superconducting states.« less

  16. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-01

    Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV05/08/2014A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  17. Enhanced thermoelectric performance and novel nanopores in AgSbTe{sub 2} prepared by melt spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Baoli; Li, Han; Xu, Jingjing; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2011-01-15

    We report a melt-spinning spark-plasma-sintering synthesis process of the polycrystalline p-type material composed of AgSbTe{sub 2} coarse grains and evenly formed 5-10 nm pores that occur primarily on the surface of matrix grains. The formation mechanism of nanopores and their influences on the thermoelectric properties have been studied and correlated. Microstructure analysis shows that the as-prepared sample can be regarded as a nanocomposite of matrix and in situ generated nanopores evenly coated on matrix grains. For the single-phase component and the possible energy-filter effect caused by the nanopores, the electrical transport properties are improved. Moreover, the thermal conductivity is significantly reduced by strong phonon scattering effect resulted from the nanopores. The thermoelectric performance of the as prepared sample enhances greatly and a ZT of 1.65 at 570 K is achieved, increasing{approx}200% compared with the sample prepared by traditional melt and slow-cooling method. -- Graphical abstract: Representative nanostructure of AgSbTe{sub 2} sample (a) ribbons obtained after melt spinning (b) bulk AgSbTe{sub 2} material obtained after spark plasma sintering. Display Omitted

  18. Electron interactions and Dirac fermions in graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sa, Baisheng; Sun, Zhimei

    2014-06-21

    Graphene based superlattices have been attracted worldwide interest due to the combined properties of the graphene Dirac cone feature and all kinds of advanced functional materials. In this work, we proposed a novel series of graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices based on the density functional theory calculations. We demonstrated the stability in terms of energy and lattice dynamics for such kind of artificial materials. The analysis of the electronic structures unravels the gap opening nature at Dirac cone of the insert graphene layer. The Dirac fermions in the graphene layers are strongly affected by the electron spin orbital coupling in the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers. The present results show the possible application in phase-change data storage of such kind of superlattice materials, where the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers exhibit as the phase-change data storage media and the graphene layer works as the electrode, probe, and heat conductor.

  19. Sandia Energy - Energy Surety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering,...

  20. Sandia Energy - Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering,...

  1. Renewable Energy: A Centuries-old Tradition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ItWe often associate renewable energy as future, forward-thinking technology. However, just as in the case of da Vinci’s curved mirror – many of these technologies are based on centuries old concepts and inventions.

  2. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficientmore » and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.« less

  3. Probing color coherence effects in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-22

    A study of color coherence effects in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data used in the analysis were collected in 2010 with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. Events are selected that contain at least three jets and where the two jets with the largest transverse momentum exhibit a back-to-back topology. The measured angular correlation between the second- and third-leading jet is shown to be sensitive to color coherence effects, and is compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo models with various implementationsmoreof color coherence. None of the models describe the data satisfactorily.less

  4. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    A search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at ?s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation, and limits are set on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.

  5. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    A search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at ?s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation, and limits aremoreset on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.less

  6. Optical spectroscopy study of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal ZrTe5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, R. Y.; Gu, G. D.; Zhang, S. J.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhang, C.; Li, Q.; Wang, N. L.

    2015-08-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological Dirac materials have been under intensive study recently. The layered compound ZrTe5 has been suggested to be one such material as a result of transport and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Here, we perform infrared reflectivity measurements to investigate the underlying physics of this material. The derived optical conductivity increases linearly with frequency below normal interband transitions, which provides optical spectroscopic proof of a 3D Dirac semimetal. In addition, the plasma edge shifts dramatically to lower energy upon temperature cooling, which might be due to the shrinking of the lattice parameters. Additionally, an extremely sharp peak shows up in the frequency-dependent optical conductivity, indicating the presence of a Van Hove singularity in the joint density of state.

  7. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Michael J.; Zalden, Peter; Chen, Frank; Weems, Ben; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Xiong, Feng; Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Pop, Eric; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2014-06-23

    The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap transmission as a probe of the electronic and structural response below the switching threshold, we observe a field-induced heating of the carrier system and resolve the picosecond-time-scale energy relaxation processes and their dependence on the sample annealing condition in the crystalline phase. In the amorphous phase, an instantaneous electroabsorption response is observed, quadratic in the terahertz field, followed by field-driven lattice heating, with Ohmic behavior up to 200 kV/cm.

  8. Optical spectroscopy study of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal ZrTe5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, R. Y.; Gu, G. D.; Zhang, S. J.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhang, C.; Li, Q.; Wang, N. L.

    2015-08-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological Dirac materials have been under intensive study recently. The layered compound ZrTe5 has been suggested to be one such material as a result of transport and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Here, we perform infrared reflectivity measurements to investigate the underlying physics of this material. The derived optical conductivity increases linearly with frequency below normal interband transitions, which provides optical spectroscopic proof of a 3D Dirac semimetal. In addition, the plasma edge shifts dramatically to lower energy upon temperature cooling, which might be due to the shrinking of the lattice parameters. Additionally, an extremely sharp peak shows upmore » in the frequency-dependent optical conductivity, indicating the presence of a Van Hove singularity in the joint density of state.« less

  9. Probing color coherence effects in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-06-11

    A study of color coherence effects in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data used in the analysis were collected in 2010 with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. Events are selected that contain at least three jets and where the two jets with the largest transverse momentum exhibit a back-to-back topology. The measured angular correlation between the second- and third-leading jet is shown to be sensitive to color coherence effects, and is compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo models with various implementationsmore » of color coherence. None of the models describe the data satisfactorily.« less

  10. Pulsed power supplies for the Fermilab 1 TeV switchyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartelson, L.; Walton, J.

    1985-06-01

    An upgraded system of pulseed switching magnets has been implemented in the Fermilab Switchyard to accommodate proton energies up to 1 TeV. These devices are required for switching the ''slow'' and ''fast'' extracted beams into their respective beam lines. ''Slow'' beam passes undeflected through the magnet in the off condition. During a puls ''slow'' is disabled and ''fast'', which is of approx.1 ms duration, is deflected. The requirement then is for a ''flat-top'' current pulse of minimum rise and fall time. The circuit chosen is of the resonant charge recovery type. Several different styles and combinations of magnets and constraints. In all cases maximum voltage is limited to 600 volts and pulse width to 100 ms.

  11. The GeV to TeV view of SNR IC443: predictions for Fermi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrero, Ana Y. Rodriguez; Torres, Diego F.; Cea Del Pozo, Elsa de

    2009-04-08

    We present a theoretical model that explains the high energy phenomenology of the neighborhood of SNR IC 443, as observed with the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). We also discuss how the model can be tested with observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope. We interpret MAGIC J0616+225 as delayed TeV emission of cosmic-rays diffusing from IC 443 and interacting with a known cloud located at a distance of about 20 pc in the foreground of the remnant. This scenario naturally explains the displacement between EGRET and MAGIC sources, their fluxes, and their spectra. Finally, we predict how this context can be observed by Fermi.

  12. Incubadora de Empresas da Universidade de Aveiro IEUA | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incubadora de Empresas da Universidade de Aveiro IEUA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Incubadora de Empresas da Universidade de Aveiro (IEUA) Place: Portugal Sector: Services...

  13. dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\DA SYSTEM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    g3t4 6 dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\DA SYSTEM tw ?r@ D O E / D P / O 1 2 6 3 - 2 0 L , n z l t P ' " WATER RESOURCES CENTER itf.l This report was prepared as an aecount of work sponsore$ by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, mal assumes any legal liability or responsib usefulness of any informationr apparatus' I that its use would not infringe privately speeifie eommereial produetr proeesst ufacturen, or

  14. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $$ s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $ is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 $\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25 $\\,\\text {GeV}$ respectively, in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta |<2.5$ , $|\\eta |\

  15. Measurement of the Inclusive Jet Cross Section in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-09-19

    The inclusive jet cross section is measured in pp collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider using the CMS experiment. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 34 pb⁻¹. The measurement is made for jet transverse momenta in the range 18–1100 GeV and for absolute values of rapidity less than 3. The measured cross section extends to the highest values of jet pT ever observed and, within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties, is generally in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions.

  16. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at ?s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anti?i?, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Buml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belltoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blmer, H.; Boh?ov, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceio, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; del Ro, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Daz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; DOlivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; DUrso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Frhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garca, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gmez Berisso, M.; Gonalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hrandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsk, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kgl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krmer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leo, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lpez, R.; Lopez Agera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martnez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostaf, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mller, G.; Mnchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Noka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlger, J.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; P?kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.

    2012-08-10

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [50522(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  17. Double Higgs boson production via WW fusion in TeV e sup + e sup minus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, V.; Han, T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-04-10

    The production of two standard model Higgs bosons via the WW fusion process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} {bar v}{sub e}v{sub e}HH would test the predicted HHH, HWW and HHWW couplings. At TeV energies this fusion cross section dominates over that from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} ZHH and would give significant event rates for M{sub H}{approx lt} 1/2 M{sub z} at high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders. The authors evaluate the rates and present the dynamical distributions.

  18. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelling, M.; Hashim, N.O.; Grupen, C.; Luitz, S.; Maciuc, F.; Mailov, A.; Muller, A.-S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Tcaciuc, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2012-09-14

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

  19. Mechanisms of charge transport in anisotype n-TiO{sub 2}/p-CdTe heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brus, V. V.; Ilashchuk, M. I.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Maryanchuk, P. D.; Ulyanytsky, K. S.; Gritsyuk, B. N.

    2011-08-15

    Surface-barrier anisotype n-TiO{sub 2}/p-CdTe heterojunctions are fabricated by depositing thin titanium-dioxide films on a freshly cleaved surface of single-crystalline cadmium-telluride wafers by reactive magnetron sputtering. It is established that the electric current through the heterojunctions under investigation is formed by generation-recombination processes in the space-charge region via a deep energy level and tunneling through the potential barrier. The depth and nature of the impurity centers involved in the charge transport are determined.

  20. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a potentially promising thermoelectric material because of its similar electronic band structure as the well-known lead telluride. Here we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single crystalline SnTe nanowires (NWs) with different diameters ranging from ~200 to ~1000 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ, and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While σ does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of 2 when the nanowire diameter is decreased from 1000 nm to 200 nm. The thermal conductivities of the measured NWs are only about half of that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon-grain boundary and phonon-defect scatterings. Temperature dependent figure-of-merit ZT was determined and the maximum value at room temperature is ~3 times higher than what was obtained in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.

  1. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a potentially promising thermoelectric material because of its similar electronic band structure as the well-known lead telluride. Here we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single crystalline SnTe nanowires (NWs) with different diameters ranging from ~200 to ~1000 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ, and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While σ does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of 2 when the nanowiremore » diameter is decreased from 1000 nm to 200 nm. The thermal conductivities of the measured NWs are only about half of that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon-grain boundary and phonon-defect scatterings. Temperature dependent figure-of-merit ZT was determined and the maximum value at room temperature is ~3 times higher than what was obtained in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.« less

  2. Quantum oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas at the rocksalt/zincblende interface of PbTe/CdTe (111) heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Jiao, Lin; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, M.; Balakirev, F. F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; et al

    2015-06-05

    Quantum oscillations are observed in the 2DEG system at the interface of novel heterostructures, PbTe/CdTe (111), with nearly identical lattice parameters (aPbTe = 0.6462 nm, aCdTe = 0.648 nm) but very different lattice structures (PbTe: rock salt, CdTe: zinc blende). The 2DEG formation mechanism, a mismatch in the bonding configurations of the valence electrons at the interface, is uniquely different from the other known 2DEG systems. The aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC-STEM) characterization indicates an abrupt interface without cation interdiffusion due to a large miscibility gap between the two constituent materials. As a result, electronic transport measurements under magneticmore » field up to 60 T, with the observation of Landau level filling factor ν = 1, unambiguously reveal a π Berry phase, suggesting the Dirac Fermion nature of the 2DEG at the heterostructure interface, and the PbTe/CdTe heterostructure being a new candidate for 2D topological crystalline insulators.« less

  3. Quantum oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas at the rocksalt/zincblende interface of PbTe/CdTe (111) heterostructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Jiao, Lin; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, M.; Balakirev, F. F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-05

    Quantum oscillations are observed in the 2DEG system at the interface of novel heterostructures, PbTe/CdTe (111), with nearly identical lattice parameters (aPbTe = 0.6462 nm, aCdTe = 0.648 nm) but very different lattice structures (PbTe: rock salt, CdTe: zinc blende). The 2DEG formation mechanism, a mismatch in the bonding configurations of the valence electrons at the interface, is uniquely different from the other known 2DEG systems. The aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC-STEM) characterization indicates an abrupt interface without cation interdiffusion due to a large miscibility gap between the two constituent materials. As a result, electronic transport measurements under magnetic field up to 60 T, with the observation of Landau level filling factor ν = 1, unambiguously reveal a π Berry phase, suggesting the Dirac Fermion nature of the 2DEG at the heterostructure interface, and the PbTe/CdTe heterostructure being a new candidate for 2D topological crystalline insulators.

  4. Quantum oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas at the rocksalt/zincblende interface of PbTe/CdTe (111) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Jiao, Lin; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, M.; Balakirev, F. F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-05

    Quantum oscillations are observed in the 2DEG system at the interface of novel heterostructures, PbTe/CdTe (111), with nearly identical lattice parameters (aPbTe = 0.6462 nm, aCdTe = 0.648 nm) but very different lattice structures (PbTe: rock salt, CdTe: zinc blende). The 2DEG formation mechanism, a mismatch in the bonding configurations of the valence electrons at the interface, is uniquely different from the other known 2DEG systems. The aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC-STEM) characterization indicates an abrupt interface without cation interdiffusion due to a large miscibility gap between the two constituent materials. As a result, electronic transport measurements under magnetic field up to 60 T, with the observation of Landau level filling factor ν = 1, unambiguously reveal a π Berry phase, suggesting the Dirac Fermion nature of the 2DEG at the heterostructure interface, and the PbTe/CdTe heterostructure being a new candidate for 2D topological crystalline insulators.

  5. Comparing the same-side ridge in p-p angular correlations at 7 TeV to data measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Kettler, David T.

    2011-08-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid Collaboration (CMS) has recently reported the appearance of a same-side ridge structure in two-particle angular correlations from 7-TeV p-p collisions. The ridge in p-p collisions at 7 TeV has been compared to a ridge structure in more-central Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV, interpreted by some as evidence for a dense, flowing QCD medium. In this study we make a detailed comparison between 200-GeV p-p correlations and the CMS results. We find that 7-TeV minimum-bias jet correlations are remarkably similar to those at 200 GeV, even to the details of the same-side peak geometry. Appearance of a same-side ridge reflects a change in the sign of the azimuth curvature determined by the ratio of azimuth quadrupole-to-dipole amplitudes. Extrapolation of quadrupole systematics from 200 GeV suggests that the same-side ridge at 7 TeV is a manifestation of the quadrupole amplitude enhanced relative to the dipole by the energy increase and applied cuts.

  6. Computational discovery of ferromagnetic semiconducting single-layer CrSnTe3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Xie, Yu; Kent, P. R. C.; Ganesh, P.

    2015-07-06

    Despite many single-layer materials being reported in the past decade, few of them exhibit magnetism. Here we perform first-principles calculations using accurate hybrid density functional methods (HSE06) to predict that single-layer CrSnTe3 (CST) is a ferromagnetic semiconductor, with band gaps of 0.9 and 1.2 eV for the majority and minority spin channels, respectively. We determine the Curie temperature as 170 K, significantly higher than that of single-layer CrSiTe3 (90K) and CrGeTe3 (130 K). This is due to the enhanced ionicity of the Sn-Te bond, which in turn increases the superexchange coupling between the magnetic Cr atoms. We further explore the mechanical and dynamical stability and strain response of this single-layer material for possible epitaxial growth. Lastly, our study provides an intuitive approach to understand and design novel single-layer magnetic semiconductors for a wide range of spintronics and energy applications.

  7. Measurement of the proton-air cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}=57$ TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, Auger

    2012-08-01

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505 {+-} 22(stat){sub -36}{sup +28}(syst)] mb is found.

  8. Measurement of Bose-Einstein Correlations in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=0.9 and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-05-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations between identical particles are measured in samples of proton-proton collisions at 0.9 and 7 TeV centre-of-mass energies, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The signal is observed in the form of an enhancement of number of pairs of same-sign charged particles with small relative momentum. The dependence of this enhancement on kinematic and topological features of the event is studied.

  9. Combined upper limit on standard model higgs boson production at D0 in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, Ralf; /Freiburg U.

    2010-12-01

    The latest searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 and the CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. For the first time since the LEP experiments the sensitivity for a Standard Model Higgs boson has been reached at a Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at √s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; et al

    2012-08-10

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505±22(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  11. Measuring the chargino mixing parameters of the minimal SUSY extension of the standard model at e sup + e sup minus colliders in the TeV region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leike, A. )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed to measure the parameters of the chargino mixing of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model by chargino pair production at e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} colliders with TeV energies. Some information about the lightest SUSY particle and its mass can be gained. With a polarized beam the minimal SUSY extension of the Standard model could be ruled out.

  12. Dynamic conductivity of the bulk states of n-type HgTe/CdTe quantum well topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qinjun; Sanderson, Matthew; Cao, J. C.; Zhang, Chao

    2014-11-17

    We theoretically studied the frequency-dependent current response of the bulk state of topological insulator HgTe/CdTe quantum well. The optical conductivity is mainly due to the inter-band process at high frequencies. At low frequencies, intra-band process dominates with a dramatic drop to near zero before the inter-band contribution takes over. The conductivity decreases with temperature at low temperature and increases with temperature at high temperature. The transport scattering rate has an opposite frequency dependence in the low and high temperature regime. The different frequency dependence is due to the interplay of the carrier-impurity scattering and carrier population near the Fermi surface.

  13. LHC Physics Potential vs. Energy: Considerations for the 2011 Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2011-02-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I quantify the advantage of increasing the beam energy from 3.5 TeV to 4 TeV. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u {bar d}, qq, and gq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes. This note extends the analysis presented in Ref. [1]. Full-size figures are available as pdf files at lutece.fnal.gov/PartonLum11/.

  14. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals for Room-temperature Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Yang, Ge; Egarievwe, Alexander; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gray, Justin; Hales, Zaveon M.; Hossain, Anwar; Camarda, Guiseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2015-02-11

    Bridgman-grown cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) and cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe or CMT) crystals often have Te inclusions that limit their performances as X-ray- and gamma-ray-detectors. We present here the results of post-growth thermal annealing aimed at reducing and eliminating Te inclusions in them. In a 2D analysis, we observed that the sizes of the Te inclusions declined to 92% during a 60-h annealing of CZT at 510 °C under Cd vapor. Further, tellurium inclusions were eliminated completely in CMT samples annealed at 570 °C in Cd vapor for 26 h, whilst their electrical resistivity fell by an ordermore » of 102. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CMT at 730 °C and an 18 °C/cm temperature gradient for 18 h in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar, we observed the diffusion of Te from the sample, causing a reduction in size of the Te inclusions. For CZT samples annealed at 700 °C in a 10 °C/cm temperature gradient, we observed the migration of Te inclusions from a low-temperature region to a high one at 0.022 μm/s. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CZT in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar at 570 °C and 30 °C/cm for 18 h, some Te inclusions moved toward the high-temperature side of the wafer, while other inclusions of the same size, i.e., 10 µm in diameter, remained in the same position. These results show that the migration, diffusion, and reaction of Te with Cd in the matrix of CZT- and CMT-wafers are complex phenomena that depend on certain conditions.« less

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for a type II Weyl semimetallic state in MoTe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Lunan; McCormick, Timothy M.; Ochi, Masayuki; Zhao, Zhiying; Suzuki, Michi -To; Arita, Ryotaro; Wu, Yun; Mou, Daixiang; Cao, Huibo; Yan, Jiaqiang; et al

    2016-07-11

    In a type I Dirac or Weyl semimetal, the low-energy states are squeezed to a single point in momentum space when the chemical potential μ is tuned precisely to the Dirac/Weyl point1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Recently, a type II Weyl semimetal was predicted to exist, where the Weyl states connect hole and electron bands, separated by an indirect gap7, 8, 9, 10. This leads to unusual energy states, where hole and electron pockets touch at the Weyl point. Here we present the discovery of a type II topological Weyl semimetal state in pure MoTe2, where two sets ofmore » Weyl points (W±2 , W±3) exist at the touching points of electron and hole pockets and are located at different binding energies above EF. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, modelling, density functional theory and calculations of Berry curvature, we identify the Weyl points and demonstrate that they are connected by different sets of Fermi arcs for each of the two surface terminations. We also find new surface ‘track states’ that form closed loops and are unique to type II Weyl semimetals. Lastly, this material provides an exciting, new platform to study the properties of Weyl fermions.« less

  16. Performance of the CMS missing transverse momentum reconstruction in pp data at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-02-12

    The performance of missing transverse energy reconstruction algorithms is presented by our team using√s=8 TeV proton-proton (pp) data collected with the CMS detector. Events with anomalous missing transverse energy are studied, and the performance of algorithms used to identify and remove these events is presented. The scale and resolution for missing transverse energy, including the effects of multiple pp interactions (pileup), are measured using events with an identified Z boson or isolated photon, and are found to be well described by the simulation. Novel missing transverse energy reconstruction algorithms developed specifically to mitigate the effects of large numbers of pileupmore » interactions on the missing transverse energy resolution are presented. These algorithms significantly reduce the dependence of the missing transverse energy resolution on pileup interactions. Furthermore, an algorithm that provides an estimate of the significance of the missing transverse energy is presented, which is used to estimate the compatibility of the reconstructed missing transverse energy with a zero nominal value.« less

  17. Performance of the CMS missing transverse momentum reconstruction in pp data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-02-12

    The performance of missing transverse energy reconstruction algorithms is presented by our team using√s=8 TeV proton-proton (pp) data collected with the CMS detector. Events with anomalous missing transverse energy are studied, and the performance of algorithms used to identify and remove these events is presented. The scale and resolution for missing transverse energy, including the effects of multiple pp interactions (pileup), are measured using events with an identified Z boson or isolated photon, and are found to be well described by the simulation. Novel missing transverse energy reconstruction algorithms developed specifically to mitigate the effects of large numbers of pileup interactions on the missing transverse energy resolution are presented. These algorithms significantly reduce the dependence of the missing transverse energy resolution on pileup interactions. Furthermore, an algorithm that provides an estimate of the significance of the missing transverse energy is presented, which is used to estimate the compatibility of the reconstructed missing transverse energy with a zero nominal value.

  18. Evaluation of a CdTe semiconductor based compact gamma camera for sentinel lymph node imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Paolo; Curion, Assunta S.; Mettivier, Giovanni; Esposito, Michela; Aurilio, Michela; Caraco, Corradina; Aloj, Luigi; Lastoria, Secondo

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The authors assembled a prototype compact gamma-ray imaging probe (MediPROBE) for sentinel lymph node (SLN) localization. This probe is based on a semiconductor pixel detector. Its basic performance was assessed in the laboratory and clinically in comparison with a conventional gamma camera. Methods: The room-temperature CdTe pixel detector (1 mm thick) has 256x256 square pixels arranged with a 55 {mu}m pitch (sensitive area 14.08x14.08 mm{sup 2}), coupled pixel-by-pixel via bump-bonding to the Medipix2 photon-counting readout CMOS integrated circuit. The imaging probe is equipped with a set of three interchangeable knife-edge pinhole collimators (0.94, 1.2, or 2.1 mm effective diameter at 140 keV) and its focal distance can be regulated in order to set a given field of view (FOV). A typical FOV of 70 mm at 50 mm skin-to-collimator distance corresponds to a minification factor 1:5. The detector is operated at a single low-energy threshold of about 20 keV. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc, at 50 mm distance, a background-subtracted sensitivity of 6.5x10{sup -3} cps/kBq and a system spatial resolution of 5.5 mm FWHM were obtained for the 0.94 mm pinhole; corresponding values for the 2.1 mm pinhole were 3.3x10{sup -2} cps/kBq and 12.6 mm. The dark count rate was 0.71 cps. Clinical images in three patients with melanoma indicate detection of the SLNs with acquisition times between 60 and 410 s with an injected activity of 26 MBq {sup 99m}Tc and prior localization with standard gamma camera lymphoscintigraphy. Conclusions: The laboratory performance of this imaging probe is limited by the pinhole collimator performance and the necessity of working in minification due to the limited detector size. However, in clinical operative conditions, the CdTe imaging probe was effective in detecting SLNs with adequate resolution and an acceptable sensitivity. Sensitivity is expected to improve with the future availability of a larger CdTe detector permitting operation at shorter

  19. Sandia Energy - Energy Surety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SMART...

  20. Charge transfer and mobility enhancement at CdO/SnTe heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishitani, Junichi; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2014-09-29

    We report a study of the effects of charge transfer on electrical properties of CdO/SnTe heterostructures. A series of structures with variable SnTe thicknesses were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Because of an extreme type III band offset with the valence band edge of SnTe located at 1.5?eV above the conduction band edge of CdO, a large charge transfer is expected at the interface of the CdO/SnTe heterostructure. The electrical properties of the heterostructures are analyzed using a multilayer charge transport model. The analysis indicates a large 4-fold enhancement of the CdO electron mobility at the interface with SnTe. The mobility enhancement is attributed to reduction of the charge center scattering through neutralization of the donor-like defects responsible for the Fermi level pinning at the CdO/SnTe interface.

  1. A W' boson near 2 TeV: Predictions for run 2 of the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-11-20

    We present a renormalizable theory that includes a W' boson of mass in the 1.8–2 TeV range, which may explain the excess events reported by the ATLAS Collaboration in a WZ final state, and by the CMS Collaboration in e+e jj, Wh0, and jj final states. The W' boson couples to right-handed quarks and leptons, including Dirac neutrinos with TeV-scale masses. This theory predicts a Z' boson of mass in the 3.4–4.5 TeV range. The cross section times branching fractions for the narrow Z' dijet and dilepton peaks at the 13 TeV LHC are 10 and 0.6 fb, respectively, for MZ'=3.4 TeV, and an order of magnitude smaller for MZ'=4.5 TeV.

  2. A W' boson near 2 TeV: Predictions for run 2 of the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-11-20

    We present a renormalizable theory that includes a W' boson of mass in the 1.8–2 TeV range, which may explain the excess events reported by the ATLAS Collaboration in a WZ final state, and by the CMS Collaboration in e+e– jj, Wh0, and jj final states. The W' boson couples to right-handed quarks and leptons, including Dirac neutrinos with TeV-scale masses. This theory predicts a Z' boson of mass in the 3.4–4.5 TeV range. The cross section times branching fractions for the narrow Z' dijet and dilepton peaks at the 13 TeV LHC are 10 and 0.6 fb, respectively, formore » MZ'=3.4 TeV, and an order of magnitude smaller for MZ'=4.5 TeV.« less

  3. The Effect of Structural Vacancies on the Thermoelectric Properties of (Cu2Te)1-x(Ga2Te3)x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Zuxin; Cho, Jung Y; Tessema, Misle; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard; Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the effects of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of the ternary compounds (Cu2Te)1-x(Ga2Te3)x (x = 0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75), which are solid solutions found in the pseudo-binary phase diagram for Cu2Te and Ga2Te3. This system possesses tunable structural vacancy concentrations. The x= 0.5 phase, CuGaTe2, is nominally devoid of structural vacancies, while the rest of the compounds contain varying amounts of these features, and the volume density of vacancies increases with Ga2Te3 content. The sample with x = 0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625 crystallize in the chalcopyrite structure while the x = 0.667 and 0.75 adopt the Ga2Te3 defect zinc blende structure. Strong scattering of heat carrying phonons by structural defects, leads to the reduction of thermal conductivity, which is beneficial to the thermoelectric performance of materials. On the other hand, these defects also scatter charge carriers and reduce the electrical conductivity. All the samples investigated are p-type semiconductors as inferred by the signs of their respective Hall (RH) and Seebeck (S) coefficients. The structural vacancies were found to scatter phonons strongly, while a combination of increased carrier concentration, and vacancies decreases the Hall mobility ( H), degrading the overall thermoelectric performance. The room temperature H drops from 90 cm2/V s for CuGaTe2 to 13 cm2/V s in Cu9Ga11Te21 and 4.6 cm2/V s in CuGa3Te5. The low temperature thermal conductivity decreases significantly with higher Ga2Te3 concentrations (higher vacancy concentration) due to increased point defect scattering which dominate thermal resistance terms. At high temperatures, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the Ga2Te3 content is less significant. The presence of strong Umklapp scattering leads to low thermal conductivity at high temperatures for all samples investigated. The highest ZT among the samples in this study was found for the defect-free CuGaTe

  4. Sandia Energy Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity http:energy.sandia.govdoe-international-energy-stora...

  5. High Efficiency Single Crystal CdTe Solar Cells: November 19, 2009 - January 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmody, M.; Gilmore, A.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the program was to develop single crystal CdTe-based top cells grown on Si solar cells as a platform for the subsequent manufacture of high efficiency tandem cells for CPV applications. The keys to both the single junction and the tandem junction cell architectures are the ability to grow high quality single-crystal CdTe and CdZnTe layers on p-type Si substrates, to dope the CdTe and CdZnTe controllably, both n and p-type, and to make low resistance ohmic front and back contacts. EPIR demonstrated the consistent MBE growth of CdTe/Si and CdZnTe/Si having high crystalline quality despite very large lattice mismatches; epitaxial CdTe/Si and CdZnTe/Si consistently showed state-of-the-art electron mobilities and good hole mobilities; bulk minority carrier recombination lifetimes of unintentionally p-doped CdTe and CdZnTe grown by MBE on Si were demonstrated to be consistently of order 100 ns or longer; desired n- and p-doping levels were achieved; solar cell series specific resistances <10 ?-cm2 were achieved; A single-junction solar cell having a state-of-the-art value of Voc and a unverified 16.4% efficiency was fabricated from CdZnTe having a 1.80 eV bandgap, ideal for the top junction in a tandem cell with a Si bottom junction.

  6. Crystal chemistry peculiarities of Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamani, David; Mirgorodsky, Andrei; Masson, Olivier; Merle-Mejean, Therese; Colas, Maggy; Smirnov, Mikhael; Thomas, Philippe

    2011-03-15

    The Raman and IR-absorption spectra of the Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 4}O{sub 12} lattice are first recorded and interpreted. Extraordinary features observed in the structure and Raman spectra of Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 4}O{sub 12} are analyzed by using ab initio and lattice-dynamical model calculations. This compound is specified as a caesium-tellurium tellurate Cs{sub 2}Te{sup IV}(Te{sup VI}O{sub 4}){sub 3} in which Te{sup IV} atoms transfer their 5p electrons to [Te{sup VI}O{sub 4}]{sub 3}{sup 6-} tellurate anions, thus fulfilling (jointly with Cs atoms) the role of cations. The Te{sup VI}-O-Te{sup VI} bridge vibration Raman intensity is found abnormally weak, which is reproduced by model treatment including the Cs{sup +} ion polarizability properties in consideration. -- Graphical abstract: Two versions of the BPM estimations of the Raman intensity for the Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 4}O{sub 12} lattice vibrations: (a) without including effects of the Cs-O bonds and (b) including the above mentioned effects. Experimentally observed peaks are characterized by their frequency positions. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Extraordinary features observed in the structure and Raman spectra of Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 4}O{sub 12}. > Ab initio and lattice-dynamical model calculations. > Abnormally weak Raman intensities of the symmetric Te{sup VI}-O-Te{sup VI} bridge. > The monovalent Cs{sup +} cations profoundly influence the polarizability properties.

  7. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-29

    Our search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. We found that the search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q*decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton GRS decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' ? WZ and GRS ? WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* ? qW, q* ? qZ, W' ? WZ, GRS ? WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a bulk graviton Gbulk that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  8. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} $$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-29

    Our search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. We found that the search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95%more » on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q*decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton GRS decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' → WZ and GRS → WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* → qW, q* → qZ, W' → WZ, GRS → WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a “bulk” graviton Gbulk that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.« less

  9. MODELING PHOTODISINTEGRATION-INDUCED TeV PHOTON EMISSION FROM LOW-LUMINOSITY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Xuewen [Physics Department, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wu Xuefeng; Lu Tan, E-mail: astrolxw@gmail.com, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray heavy nuclei have recently been considered as originating from nearby low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts that are associated with Type Ibc supernovae. Unlike the power-law decay in long duration gamma-ray bursts, the light curve of these bursts exhibits complex UV/optical behavior: shock breakout dominated thermal radiation peaks at about 1 day, and, after that, nearly constant emission sustained by radioactive materials for tens of days. We show that the highly boosted heavy nuclei at PeV energy interacting with the UV/optical photon field will produce considerable TeV photons via the photodisintegration/photo-de-excitation process. It was later predicted that a thermal-like {gamma}-ray spectrum peaks at about a few TeV, which may serve as evidence of nucleus acceleration. The future observations by the space telescope Fermi and by the ground atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S., VERITAS, and MAGIC will shed light on this prediction.

  10. Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz booster simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 130405 (2007)] allows direct and e#14;fficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted and beam loaded laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV (parameters not computationally accessible otherwise). This verifies the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated electron beam transverse dynamics and energy spread. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively. Agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference for a 0.1 GeV class stage. Obtaining these speedups and levels of accuracy was permitted by solutions for handling data input (in particular particle and laser beams injection) and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference, as well as mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness.

  11. Preparation and properties of evaporated CdTe films compared with single crystal CdTe. Progress report No. 2, February 1-April 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bube, R H

    1981-01-01

    The design, construction and testing of the hot-wall vacuum evaporation system is proceeding on schedule. The vacuum system, a Varian 3118 diffusion pump system, has been installed and tested. A calculation of the optimum possible efficiency for an n-p CdTe homojunction indicates a value of 14%. A complete background is given on the growth of over fifty CdTe single crystals at Stanford, the last four of which were grown as part of this program. Use of crystal regrowth and vibration during growth both increase crystal quality. Higher electrical activity of phosphorus acceptors in CdTe is achieved when 0.1% excess Te is used in place of 0.5% excess Te. Careful characterization of boules grown for this program are underway, using Hall effect or capacitance-voltage data on selected samples. Initial investigation of the properties of grain boundaries in p-type CdTe : P crystals indicates a grain boundary height of 0.44 eV unaffected by illumination. These results suggest that grain boundaries are more strongly pinned in p-type than in n-type CdTe.

  12. PROJECT PROFILE: Interface Science and Engineering for Reliable, High Efficiency CdTe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    While crystalline silicon accounted for two thirds of the PV market in 2014, cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules are becoming increasingly competitive with continued improvements in efficiency and reduction in price. This project will contribute to enabling 24% efficient CdTe cells by improving surface and interface recombination in the devices. Surface and interface recombination, which is the loss of photo-generated carriers before they are collected, becomes more detrimental to CdTe device performance as carrier lifetime increases. This project will develop effective surface passivation for CdTe and carrier selective contacts for higher efficiency, improved reproducibility, and increased stability.

  13. Nanoscale imaging of photocurrent and efficiency in CdTe solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cells The local collection characteristics of grain interiors and grain boundaries in thin film CdTe polycrystalline solar cells are investigated using scanning photocurrent...

  14. Probing TeV physics in the structure of the neutron (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Probing TeV physics in the structure of the neutron Citation Details ... Sponsoring Org: LDRD; USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English ...

  15. Characterization and Analysis of CIGS and CdTE Solar Cells: December 2004 - July 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sites, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    The work reported here embodies a device-physics approach based on careful measurement and interpretation of data from CIGS and CdTe solar cells.

  16. Analysis of Surface Chemistry and Detector Performance of Chemically Process CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOSSAIN A.; Yang, G.; Sutton, J.; Zergaw, T.; Babalola, O. S.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda. ZG. S.; Gul, R.; Roy, U. N., and James, R. B.

    2015-10-05

    The goal is to produce non-conductive smooth surfaces for fabricating low-noise and high-efficiency CdZnTe devices.

  17. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pairmore » resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.« less

  18. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  19. A search for $ t\\overline{t} $ resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. 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R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of s√=8s=8 TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to W+bW-b¯¯W+bW-b¯, with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to tt¯tt¯. These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  20. High-Efficiency, Commercial Ready CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sites, James R.

    2015-11-19

    Colorado State’s F-PACE project explored several ways to increase the efficiency of CdTe solar cells and to better understand the device physics of those cells under study. Increases in voltage, current, and fill factor resulted in efficiencies above 17%. The three project tasks and additional studies are described in detail in the final report. Most cells studied were fabricated at Colorado State using an industry-compatible single-vacuum closed-space-sublimation (CSS) chamber for deposition of the key semiconductor layers. Additionally, some cells were supplied by First Solar for comparison purposes, and a small number of modules were supplied by Abound Solar.

  1. Effect of charge trapping on effective carrier lifetime in compound semiconductors: High resistivity CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamieniecki, Emil

    2014-11-21

    The dominant problem limiting the energy resolution of compound semiconductor based radiation detectors is the trapping of charge carriers. The charge trapping affects energy resolution through the carrier lifetime more than through the mobility. Conventionally, the effective carrier lifetime is determined using a 2-step process based on measurement of the mobility-lifetime product (μτ) and determining drift mobility using time-of-flight measurements. This approach requires fabrication of contacts on the sample. A new RF-based pulse rise-time method, which replaces this 2-step process with a single non-contact direct measurement, is discussed. The application of the RF method is illustrated with high-resistivity detector-grade CdZnTe crystals. The carrier lifetime in the measured CdZnTe, depending on the quality of the crystals, was between about 5 μs and 8 μs. These values are in good agreement with the results obtained using conventional 2-step approach. While the effective carrier lifetime determined from the initial portion of the photoresponse transient combines both recombination and trapping in a manner similar to the conventional 2-step approach, both the conventional and the non-contact RF methods offer only indirect evaluation of the effect of charge trapping in the semiconductors used in radiation detectors. Since degradation of detector resolution is associated not with trapping but essentially with detrapping of carriers, and, in particular, detrapping of holes in n-type semiconductors, it is concluded that evaluation of recombination and detrapping during photoresponse decay is better suited for evaluation of compound semiconductors used in radiation detectors. Furthermore, based on previously reported data, it is concluded that photoresponse decay in high resistivity CdZnTe at room temperature is dominated by detrapping of carriers from the states associated with one type of point defect and by recombination of carriers at one type of

  2. Measurement of long-range near-side two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Our results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|?| < 2.4) and over the full azimuth (?) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|??| > 2.0), near-side (??? 0) structure emerges in the two-particle DhDf correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0 < pT < 2.0 GeV/c and an approximately linear increase with the charged particle multiplicity. The overall correlation strength at ?s = 13 TeV is similar to that found in earlier pp data at ?s = 7 TeV, but is measured up to much higher multiplicity values. We observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  3. Measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-08-11

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of jet transverse momentum pT and absolute jet rapidity |y| is presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 71 and 44 inverse picobarns for |y| < 3 and 3.2 < |y| < 4.7, respectively. Jets are reconstructed with the anti-kt clustering algorithm for two jet sizes, R, of 0.7 and 0.4, in a phase space region covering jet pT up to 2 TeV andmore » jet rapidity up to |y| = 4.7. Predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order precision, complemented with electroweak and nonperturbative corrections, are used to compute the absolute scale and the shape of the inclusive jet cross section. The cross section difference in R, when going to a smaller jet size of 0.4, is best described by Monte Carlo event generators with next-to-leading order predictions matched to parton showering, hadronisation, and multiparton interactions. In the phase space accessible with the new data, this measurement provides a first indication that jet physics is as well understood at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV as at smaller centre-of-mass energies.« less

  4. Search for jet extinction in the inclusive jet-pt spectrum from proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    The first search at the LHC for the extinction of QCD jet production is presented, using data collected with the CMS detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.7 inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The extinction model studied in this analysis is motivated by the search for signatures of strong gravity at the TeV scale (terascale gravity) and assumes the existence of string couplings in the strong-coupling limit. In this limit, the string model predicts the suppression of all high-transverse-momentum standard model processes, including jet production, beyond a certain energy scale. To test this prediction, the measured transverse-momentum spectrum is compared to the theoretical prediction of the standard model. No significant deficit of events is found at high transverse momentum. A 95% confidence level lower limit of 3.3 TeV is set on the extinction mass scale.

  5. Estimation of the extragalactic background light using TeV observations of BL Lac objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Atreyee; Acharya, B. S.; Sahayanathan, S.; Godambe, S.; Misra, R. E-mail: acharya@tifr.res.in E-mail: gsagar@barc.ernet.in

    2014-11-01

    The very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray spectral index of high-energy peaked blazars correlates strongly with its corresponding redshift, whereas no such correlation is observed in the X-ray or GeV bands. We attribute this correlation to photon-photon absorption of TeV photons with the extragalactic background light (EBL), and utilizing this we compute the allowed flux range for the EBL, which is independent of previous estimates. The observed VHE spectrum of the sources in our sample can be well approximated by a power law, and if the de-absorbed spectrum is also assumed to be a power law, then we show that the spectral shape of EBL will be εn(ε) ∼ klog (ε/ε {sub p}). We estimate the range of values for the parameters defining the EBL spectrum, k and ε {sub p}, such that the correlation of the intrinsic VHE spectrum with redshift is nullified. The estimated EBL depends only on the observed correlation and the assumption of a power-law source spectrum. Specifically, it does not depend on the spectral modeling or radiative mechanism of the sources or on any theoretical shape of the EBL spectrum obtained through cosmological calculations. The estimated EBL spectrum is consistent with the upper and lower limits imposed by different observations. Moreover, it also agrees closely with the theoretical estimates obtained through cosmological evolution models.

  6. Search for scalar leptoquarks in the acoplanar jet topology in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-07-01

    A search for leptoquarks has been performed in 310 pb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The topology analyzed consists of acoplanar jets with missing transverse energy. The data show good agreement with standard model expectations, and a lower mass limit of 136 GeV has been set at the 95% C.L. for a scalar leptoquark decaying exclusively into a quark and a neutrino.

  7. Purification of CdZnTe by Electromigration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.; Kim, Sangsu; Hong, Jinki; Lee, Jinseo; Hong, Taekwon; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; James, R. B.

    2015-04-14

    Electro-migration of ionized/electrically active impurities in CdZnTe (CZT) was successfully demonstrated at elevated temperature with an electric field of 20 V/mm. Copper, which exists in positively charged states, electro-migrated at a speed of 15 lm/h in an electric field of 20 V/mm. A notable variation in impurity concentration along the growth direction with the segregation tendency of the impurities was observed in an electro-migrated CZT boule. Notably, both Ga and Fe, which exist in positively charged states, exhibited the opposite distribution to that of their segregation tendency in Cd(Zn)Te. Furthermore, a CZT detector fabricated from the middle portion of the electromigrated CZT boule showed an improved mobility-lifetime product of 0.91 10-2 cm2 /V, compared to that of 1.4 10-3 cm2 /V, observed in an as-grown (non-electro-migrated) CZT detector. The optimum radiation detector material would have minimum concentration of deep traps required for compensation.

  8. Advanced CdTe Photovoltaic Technology: September 2007 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, K.

    2011-05-01

    During the last eighteen months, Abound Solar (formerly AVA Solar) has enjoyed significant success under the SAI program. During this time, a fully automated manufacturing line has been developed, fabricated and commissioned in Longmont, Colorado. The facility is fully integrated, converting glass and semiconductor materials into complete modules beneath its roof. At capacity, a glass panel will enter the factory every 10 seconds and emerge as a completed module two hours later. This facility is currently undergoing trials in preparation for large volume production of 120 x 60 cm thin film CdTe modules. Preceding the development of the large volume manufacturing capability, Abound Solar demonstrated long duration processing with excellent materials utilization for the manufacture of high efficiency 42 cm square modules. Abound Solar prototype modules have been measured with over 9% aperture area efficiency by NREL. Abound Solar demonstrated the ability to produce modules at industry leading low costs to NREL representatives. Costing models show manufacturing costs below $1/Watt and capital equipment costs below $1.50 per watt of annual manufacturing capacity. Under this SAI program, Abound Solar supported a significant research and development program at Colorado State University. The CSU team continues to make progress on device and materials analysis. Modeling for increased device performance and the effects of processing conditions on properties of CdTe PV were investigated.

  9. Purification of CdZnTe by Electromigration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, K.; Kim, Sangsu; Hong, Jinki; Lee, Jinseo; Hong, Taekwon; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; James, R. B.

    2015-04-14

    Electro-migration of ionized/electrically active impurities in CdZnTe (CZT) was successfully demonstrated at elevated temperature with an electric field of 20 V/mm. Copper, which exists in positively charged states, electro-migrated at a speed of 15 lm/h in an electric field of 20 V/mm. A notable variation in impurity concentration along the growth direction with the segregation tendency of the impurities was observed in an electro-migrated CZT boule. Notably, both Ga and Fe, which exist in positively charged states, exhibited the opposite distribution to that of their segregation tendency in Cd(Zn)Te. Furthermore, a CZT detector fabricated from the middle portion of themore » electromigrated CZT boule showed an improved mobility-lifetime product of 0.91 10-2 cm2 /V, compared to that of 1.4 10-3 cm2 /V, observed in an as-grown (non-electro-migrated) CZT detector. The optimum radiation detector material would have minimum concentration of deep traps required for compensation.« less

  10. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV in the range 0.4 T CM| T CM = 0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lowermorecenter-of-mass energies. The pT distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20 GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.less

  11. Search for heavy neutrinos and W bosons with right-handed couplings in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-26

    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, N? (?=e,?), and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in protonproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb?1. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one N? flavor contributes significantly to the WR decay width, the region in the two-dimensional (MWR,MN?) mass plane excluded at a 95 % confidence level extends to approximately MWR=3.0TeVmoreand covers a large range of neutrino masses below the WR boson mass, depending on the value of MWR. This search significantly extends the (MWR,MN?) exclusion region beyond previous results.less

  12. Photoconductivity of CdTe Nanocrystal-Based Thin Films. Te2- Ligands Lead To Charge Carrier Diffusion Lengths Over 2 Micrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisp, Ryan W.; Callahan, Rebecca; Reid, Obadiah G.; Dolzhnikov, Dmitriy S.; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Rumbles, Garry; Luther, Joseph M.; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2015-11-16

    We report on photoconductivity of films of CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) using time-resolved microwave photoconductivity (TRMC). Spherical and tetrapodal CdTe NCs with tunable size-dependent properties are studied as a function of surface ligand (including inorganic molecular chalcogenide species) and annealing temperature. Relatively high carrier mobility is measured for films of sintered tetrapod NCs (4 cm2/(V s)). Our TRMC findings show that Te2- capped CdTe NCs show a marked improvement in carrier mobility (11 cm2/(V s)), indicating that NC surface termination can be altered to play a crucial role in charge-carrier mobility even after the NC solids are sintered into bulk films.

  13. Thermoelectric properties of Sn- and Pb-doped Tl{sub 9}BiTe{sub 6} and Tl{sub 9}SbTe{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Quansheng; Chan, Meghan; Kuropatwa, Bryan A.; Kleinke, Holger

    2014-11-14

    A variety of substitutions in Tl{sub 9}BiTe{sub 6} and Tl{sub 9}SbTe{sub 6} with Sn and Pb, amounting to 14 different samples, were performed by melting the stoichiometric amounts of elements at 923 K, followed by slow cooling. The pulverized powders were sintered using the hot-pressing technique. All samples were of single phase according to the powder X-ray diffraction patterns. Thermoelectric property measurements were performed to investigate the effects of Sn- and Pb-doping on the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity. Increasing the concentration of the dopants caused increases in electrical and thermal conductivity, while decreasing the Seebeck coefficient. Tl{sub 9}Bi{sub 0.90}Pb{sub 0.10}Te{sub 6} and Tl{sub 9}Bi{sub 0.85}Pb{sub 0.15}Te{sub 6} exhibited the highest power factor. The changes in lattice thermal conductivity were minor and did not follow a clear trend. Competitive ZT values were obtained for Tl{sub 9}Bi{sub 0.95}Sn{sub 0.05}Te{sub 6}, Tl{sub 9}Bi{sub 0.95}Pb{sub 0.05}Te{sub 6}, Tl{sub 9}Sb{sub 0.97}Sn{sub 0.03}Te{sub 6}, and Tl{sub 9}Sb{sub 0.95}Pb{sub 0.05}Te{sub 6}, namely 0.95, 0.94, 0.83, and 0.71 around 500 K, respectively. Higher dopant concentrations led to lower ZT values.

  14. Performance of photon reconstruction and identification with the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-08-10

    A description is provided of the performance of the CMS detector for photon reconstruction and identification in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the CERN LHC. Details are given on the reconstruction of photons from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) and the extraction of photon energy estimates. Furthermore, the reconstruction of electron tracks from photons that convert to electrons in the CMS tracker is also described, as is the optimization of the photon energy reconstruction and its accurate modelling in simulation, in the analysis of the Higgs boson decay into two photons. In themore » barrel section of the ECAL, an energy resolution of about 1% is achieved for unconverted or late-converting photons from H → γγ decays. Furthermore, different photon identification methods are discussed and their corresponding selection efficiencies in data are compared with those found in simulated events.« less

  15. ZnTeO{sub 3} crystal growth by a modified Bridgman technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nawash, Jalal M. Lynn, Kelvin G.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • ZnTeO{sub 3} single crystals were grown for the first time by a modified Bridgman method. • The growth is still possible in a system that lacks congruent melting. • A growth is best when melt is exposed to a steeper axial thermal gradient. • Optical and electrical properties were investigated for the grown crystals. - Abstract: Zinc Tellurite (ZnTeO{sub 3}) crystals were grown for the first time using a modified Bridgman method with a 2.5 kHz radio frequency (RF) furnace. Single crystal growth of ZnTeO{sub 3} was hindered by many complicating factors, such as the evaporation of TeO{sub 2} above 700 °C and the formation of more than one phase during crystal growth. While there were several successful runs that produced ZnTeO{sub 3} single crystals, it was found that large (≥10 cm{sup 3}) single ZnTeO{sub 3} crystals resulted when the crucible was exposed to a steeper vertical thermal gradient and when the temperature of the melt was raised to at least 860 °C. The results of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were in accordance with the X-ray powder diffraction file (PDF) for ZnTeO{sub 3}. Some optical, electrical and structural properties of ZnTeO{sub 3} single crystals were reported in this paper.

  16. Fabrication and Physics of CdTe Devices by Sputtering: Final Report, 1 March 2005 - 30 November 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A.; Collins, R.; Karpov, V.; Giolando, D.

    2009-04-01

    Work to understand CdS/CdTe solar cell device physics; increase magnetron sputtering rate (while keeping high device quality); reduce thickness of CdTe layers (while keeping voltage and fill factor).

  17. Sandia Energy - Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Surety, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Grid Integration, Mesa del Sol, Microgrid, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Solar Mesa del Sol Unveils First...

  18. Sandia Energy Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Participates in Preparation of New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Report http:energy.sandia.govsandia-participates-in-preparation-of-new-mexico-renewable-energy-storage-...

  19. Sandia Energy Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Energy Program Wins Two Federal Laboratory Consortium 2015 Awards http:energy.sandia.govsandias-energy-program-wins-two-federal-laboratory-consortium-2015-awards...

  20. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small Nuclear Reactor Efficiency Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small...

  1. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$=5.02 TeV pPb and $$\\sqrt{s}$$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum ofmore » transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.« less

  2. Ba{sub 2}TeO: A new layered oxytelluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen, J.B.; Tokumoto, T.D.; McGill, S.A.; Singh, D.J.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-02-15

    Single crystals of the new semiconducting oxytelluride phase, Ba{sub 2}TeO, were synthesized from barium oxide powder and elemental tellurium in a molten barium metal flux. Ba{sub 2}TeO crystallizes in tetragonal symmetry with space group P4/nmm (#129), a=5.0337(1) Å, c=9.9437(4) Å, Z=2. The crystals were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction, heat capacity and optical measurements. The optical measurements along with electronic band structure calculations indicate semiconductor behavior with a band gap of 2.93 eV. Resistivity measurements show that Ba{sub 2}TeO is highly insulating. - Graphical abstract: Starting from a simple stacking of rocksalt layers, the final structure of Ba{sub 2}TeO can be obtained by accommodation of structural strain via atom displacements. Density of states calculations and optical absorbance measurements show that Ba{sub 2}TeO has a band gap of 2.93 eV, indicative of semiconductor behavior. - Highlights: • Single crystal synthesis of a new layered oxytelluride, Ba{sub 2}TeO. • The structure features inverse PbO-type BaO layers and NaCl-type BaTe layers. • Optical absorbance show Ba{sub 2}TeO to be a semiconductor with a 2.93 eV gap. • Density of states indicate a small hybridization between Te 5p and Ba 5d states. • The BaTe (BaO) layers dominate the heat capacity at low (high) temperatures.

  3. Transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charged hadrons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai

    2010-05-01

    Charged-hadron transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV are measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the LHC. The charged-hadron yield is obtained by counting the number of reconstructed hits, hit-pairs, and fully reconstructed charged-particle tracks. The combination of the three methods gives a charged-particle multiplicity per unit of pseudorapidity dN{sub ch}/d{eta}|{eta}|<0.5 = 5.78 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.23 (syst.) for non-single-diffractive events, higher than predicted by commonly used models. The relative increase in charged-particle multiplicity from {radical}s = 0.9 to 7 TeV is 66.1% {+-} 1.0% (stat.) {+-} 4.2% (syst.). The mean transverse momentum is measured to be 0.545 {+-} 0.005 (stat.) {+-} 0.015 (syst.) GeV/c. The results are compared with similar measurements at lower energies.

  4. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-03-17

    Our search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ*) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ* →ℓγ and ℓ* → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or twomore » leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale L. For the case Mℓ* = L the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. The neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f ', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign.« less

  5. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-05

    Our search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ*) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ* →ℓγ and ℓ* → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or two leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale L. For the case Mℓ* = L the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. The neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f ', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign.

  6. Knoxville Utilities Board Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermostats Customer Systems for 4,200 customers Home Area Networks Web Portal Access In-Home DisplaysEnergy Management Systems Distribution Automation (DA) Equipment for 5 out...

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) | Seawater Cooling - Depth...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Author National Renewable Energy Laboratory Maintainer Nicholas Langle bureaucode 019:20 Catalog DOE harvestobjectid 3ba3acfd-d54a-4a3d-a971-1cf4ac97fcb0 harvestsourceid...

  8. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Over Five Years Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Systems Analysis Consortium for Advanced Simulation of...

  9. News - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archives Events/News Archives 1st Annual CSTEC External Workshop: August 4, 2010 2nd Annual CSTEC External Workshop: May 3, 2011 3rd Annual CSTEC External Workshop: October 2, 2012 DOE to establish Energy Frontier Research Center in solar energy at U-M CSTEC investigators co-chair ICEL2010 Forcing mismatched elements together could yield better solar cells Recycling waste heat into energy: Researchers take a step toward more efficient conversion Multi-EFRC Collaborative Effort on TE in

  10. Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules | Department of Energy Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules Discusses progress toward the fabrication of a skutterudite-based TE module and provides module performance data under operating conditions similar to those for automotive applications deer11_salvador.pdf (2.68

  11. Search for W' $$\\to $$ tb decays in the lepton + jets final state in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-05-23

    Results are presented from a search for the production of a heavy gauge boson W' decaying into a top and a bottom quark, using a data set collected by the CMS experiment at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. Various models of W'-boson production are studied by allowing for an arbitrary combination of left- and right-handed couplings. The analysis is based on the detection of events with a lepton (e, mu), jets, and missing transverse energy in the final state. No evidence for W'-boson production is found and 95% confidence level uppermore » limits on the production cross section times branching fraction are obtained. For W' bosons with purely right-handed couplings, and for those with left-handed couplings assuming no interference effects, the observed 95% confidence level limit is M(W') > 2.05 TeV. For W' bosons with purely left-handed couplings, including interference effects, the observed 95% confidence level limit is M(W') > 1.84 TeV. The results presented in this paper are the most stringent limits published to date.« less

  12. Understanding and managing health and environmental risks of CIS, CGS, and CdTe photovoltaic module production and use: A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1994-04-28

    Environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risks presented by CIS, CGS and CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning have been reviewed and discussed by several authors. Several EH&S concerns exit. The estimated EH&S risks are based on extrapolations of toxicity, environmental mobility, and bioavailability data for other related inorganic compounds. Sparse data, however, are available for CIS, CGS or CdTe. In response to the increased interest in these materials, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been engaged in a cooperative research program with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Technology (IFT), the Institute of Ecotoxicity of the GSF Forschungszentrum fair Umwelt und Gesundheit, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) to develop fundamental toxicological and environmental data for these three compounds. This workshop report describes the results of these studies and describes their potential implications with respect to the EH&S risks presented by CIS, CGS, and CdTe module production, use and decommissioning.

  13. Search for contact interactions in μ⁺μ⁺ events in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; et al

    2013-02-01

    Results are reported from a search for the effects of contact interactions using events with a high-mass, oppositely charged muon pair. The events are collected in proton-proton collisions at s√=7 TeV using the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb⁻¹. The observed dimuon mass spectrum is consistent with that expected from the standard model. The data are interpreted in the context of a quark- and muon-compositeness model with a left-handed isoscalar current and an energy scale parameter Λ. The 95% confidence level lower limit on Λ ismore » 9.5 TeV under the assumption of destructive interference between the standard model and contact-interaction amplitudes. For constructive interference, the limit is 13.1 TeV. These limits are comparable to the most stringent ones reported to date.« less

  14. Empirical correlations between the arrhenius' parameters of impurities' diffusion coefficients in CdTe crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shcherbak, L.; Kopach, O.; Fochuk, P.; James, R. B.; Bolotnikov, A. E.

    2015-01-21

    Understanding of self- and dopant-diffusion in semiconductor devices is essential to our being able to assure the formation of well-defined doped regions. In this paper, we compare obtained in the literature up to date the Arrhenius’ parameters (D=D0exp(–ΔEa/kT)) of point-defect diffusion coefficients and the I-VII groups impurities in CdTe crystals and films. We found that in the diffusion process there was a linear dependence between the pre-exponential factor, D0, and the activation energy, ΔEa, of different species: This was evident in the self-diffusivity and isovalent impurity Hg diffusivity as well as for the dominant IIIA and IVA groups impurities andmore » Chlorine, except for the fast diffusing elements (e.g., Cu and Ag), chalcogens O, S, and Se, halogens I and Br as well as the transit impurities Mn, Co, Fe. As a result, reasons of the lack of correspondence of the data to compensative dependence are discussed.« less

  15. Empirical correlations between the arrhenius' parameters of impurities' diffusion coefficients in CdTe crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbak, L.; Kopach, O.; Fochuk, P.; James, R. B.; Bolotnikov, A. E.

    2015-01-21

    Understanding of self- and dopant-diffusion in semiconductor devices is essential to our being able to assure the formation of well-defined doped regions. In this paper, we compare obtained in the literature up to date the Arrhenius’ parameters (D=D0exp(–ΔEa/kT)) of point-defect diffusion coefficients and the I-VII groups impurities in CdTe crystals and films. We found that in the diffusion process there was a linear dependence between the pre-exponential factor, D0, and the activation energy, ΔEa, of different species: This was evident in the self-diffusivity and isovalent impurity Hg diffusivity as well as for the dominant IIIA and IVA groups impurities and Chlorine, except for the fast diffusing elements (e.g., Cu and Ag), chalcogens O, S, and Se, halogens I and Br as well as the transit impurities Mn, Co, Fe. As a result, reasons of the lack of correspondence of the data to compensative dependence are discussed.

  16. Inclusive b-jet production in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-04-01

    The inclusive b-jet production cross section in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is measured using data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The cross section is presented as a function of the jet transverse momentum in the range 18 < pT < 200 GeV for several rapidity intervals. The results are also given as the ratio of the b-jet production cross section to the inclusive jet production cross section. The measurement is performed with two different analyses, which differ in their trigger selection and b-jet identification: a jet analysis that selects events with a b jet using a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 34 inverse picobarns, and a muon analysis requiring a b jet with a muon based on an integrated luminosity of 3 inverse picobarns. In both approaches the b jets are identified by requiring a secondary vertex. The results from the two methods are in agreement with each other and with next-to-leading order calculations, as well as with predictions based on the PYTHIA event generator.

  17. Diffractive dijet production in p?p collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

    2012-08-01

    We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in p?p collisions at s?=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p?p collider. A data sample from 310 pb? of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, EjetT, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of xp? of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, xp?Bj, and a Q?(EjetT) in the ranges 10?p?Bj<10? and 10p?<0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared tp?>-4 GeV. The tp? dependence is measured as a function of Q and xp?Bj and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak xp?Bj and Q dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q dependence in the diffractive tp? distributions.

  18. Substitution of Ni for Fe in superconducting Fe?.??Te?.?Se?.? depresses the normal-state conductivity but not the magnetic spectral weight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jinghui; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhong, Ruidan; Li, Shichao; Gan, Yuan; Xu, Zhijun; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, T.; Matsuda, M.; Zhao, Yang; et al

    2015-01-05

    We have performed systematic resistivity and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe?.???zNizTe?.?Se?.? samples to study the impact of Ni substitution on the transport properties and the low-energy (? 12 meV) magnetic excitations. It is found that, with increasing Ni doping, both the conductivity and superconductivity are gradually suppressed; in contrast, the low-energy magnetic spectral weight changes little. Comparing with the impact of Co and Cu substitution, we find that the effects on conductivity and superconductivity for the same degree of substitution grow systematically as the atomic number of the substituent deviates from that of Fe. The impact of the substituentsmoreas scattering centers appears to be greater than any contribution to carrier concentration. The fact that low-energy magnetic spectral weight is not reduced by increased electron scattering indicates that the existence of antiferromagnetic correlations does not depend on electronic states close to the Fermi energy.less

  19. The effect of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of (Cu?Te){sub 1x}(Ga?Te?)x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Zuxin; Young Cho, Jung; Tessema, Misle M.; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard A.; Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the effects of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of the ternary compounds (Cu?Te)1x(Ga?Te?)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75), which are solid solutions found in the pseudo-binary phase diagram for Cu?Te and Ga?Te?, and possesses tunable structural vacancy concentrations. This materials system is not suitable due to the cost and scarcity of the constituent elements, but the vacancy behavior is well understood and will provide a valuable test case for other systems more suitable from the standpoint of cost and abundance of raw materials, which also possesses these vacancy features, but whose structural characterization is lacking at this stage. We find that the nominally defect free phase CuGaTe? possess the highest ZT (ZT=ST/??, where S is the Seebeck coefficient and ? is the electrical resistivity ? is the thermal conductivity and T is the absolute temperature) which approaches 1 at 840 K and seems to continuously increase above this temperature. This result is due to the unexpectedly low thermal conductivity found for this material at high temperature. The low thermal conductivity was caused by strong Umklapp (thermally resistive scattering processes involving three phonons) phonon scattering. We find that due to the coincidentally strong scattering of carriers by the structural defects that higher concentrations of these features lead to poor electrical transport properties and decreased ZT. - Graphical abstract: Thermal conductivity and zT as a function of temperature for a series of compounds of the type (Cu?Te)1x(Ga?Te?)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75). Highlights: All the samples show p-type semiconducting behavior in the temperature dependence of the Seebeck and Hall coefficients. The increased carrier concentration and the introduction of vacancies diminish the carrier mobility and power factor. The low temperature k decreases significantly as

  20. Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped PbTe (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped PbTe Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped PbTe We report results of low-temperature thermodynamic and transport measurements of Pb{sub 1-x}Tl{sub x}Te single crystals for Tl concentrations up to the solubility limit of approximately x = 1.5%. For all doped samples, we observe a low-temperature resistivity upturn that scales in magnitude

  1. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    A measurement of the W boson pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √ s = 8 TeV is presented. The data we collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1 . The W+W- candidates are selected from events with two charged leptons, electrons or muons, and large missing transverse energy. The measured W+W- cross section is 60.1 ± 0.9 (stat) ± 3.2 (exp) ± 3.1 (theo) ± 1.6 (lumi) pb = 60.1 ± 4.8 pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. The W+W-cross sections are also measured in two different fiducial phase space regions. The normalized differential cross section is measured as a function of kinematic variables of the final-state charged leptons and compared with several perturbative QCD predictions. Limits on anomalous gauge couplings associated with dimension-six operators are also given in the framework of an effective field theory. Finally, the corresponding 95% confidence level intervals are -5.7 < cWWW2 < 5.9 TeV-2 , -11.4 < cW2 < 5.4 TeV-2 , -29.2 < cB2 < 23.9 TeV-2 , in the HISZ basis.

  2. Optical properties of ZnO/ZnS and ZnO/ZnTe heterostructures forphotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrier, Joshua; Demchenko, Denis O.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos,A. Paul

    2007-05-01

    Although ZnO and ZnS are abundant, stable, environmentallybenign, their band gap energies (3.44 eV, 3.72 eV) are too large foroptimal photovoltaic efficiency. By using band-corrected pseudopotentialdensity-functional theory calculations, we study how the band gap,opticalabsorption, and carrier localization canbe controlled by formingquantum-well like and nanowire-based heterostructures ofZnO/ZnS andZnO/ZnTe. In the case of ZnO/ZnS core/shell nanowires, which can besynthesized using existing methods, we obtain a band gap of 2.07 eV,which corresponds to a Shockley-Quiesser efficiency limitof 23 percent.Based on these nanowire results, we propose that ZnO/ZnScore/shellnanowires can be used as photovoltaic devices with organic polymersemiconductors as p-channel contacts.

  3. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at √s = 1 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improvesmore » to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.« less

  4. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-07-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`-(ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp = ZZ) = 1.40-0.37-0.43more » (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  5. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 < pT < 100 GeV, with a statistical uncertainty of less than 0.01 % and a systematic uncertainty of 0.6 %. The pT range for efficiency determination is extended by using muons from decays of J/ψ mesons, W bosons, and top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.

  6. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-02-01

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E_T-gamma in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |eta_gamma|<1.45 and E_T-gamma > 21 GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006 < x_T < 0.086. The measured cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 < pT < 100 GeV, with a statistical uncertainty of less than 0.01 % and a systematic uncertainty of 0.6 %. The pT range for efficiency determination is extended by using muons from decays of J/ψ mesons, W bosons, andmore » top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.« less

  8. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at ?s = 1 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improves to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.

  9. Thermal stability and transport studies of (100 - 2x)TeO{sub 2}-xAg{sub 2}O-xWO{sub 3} (7.5 {<=} x {<=} 30) glass system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upender, G.; Ramesh, Ch.; Mouli, V. Chandra

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Typical modulated DSC (NRHF and C{sub p}) results during a heating scan in the 85TeO{sub 2}-7.5Ag{sub 2}O-7.5WO{sub 3} glass sample. Research highlights: {yields} The addition of equal mol% of WO{sub 3} and Ag{sub 2}O to TeO{sub 2} increases the thermal stability. {yields} The 55TeO{sub 2}-22.5WO{sub 3}-22.5Ag{sub 2}O shows the highest thermal stability ({Delta}T = 237 {sup o}C). {yields} These glasses are more useful for drawing of optical fibers. {yields} The present glass system shows higher conductivity. -- Abstract: Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR) and direct current (DC) conductivity studies have been carried out on (100 - 2x)TeO{sub 2}-xAg{sub 2}O-xWO{sub 3} (7.5 {<=} x {<=} 30) glass system. The IR studies show that the structure of glass network consists of [TeO{sub 4}], [TeO{sub 3}]/[TeO{sub 3+1}], [WO{sub 4}] units. Thermal properties such as the glass transition (T{sub g}), onset crystallization (T{sub o}), thermal stability ({Delta}T), glass transition width ({Delta}T{sub g}), heat capacities in the glassy and liquid state (C{sub pg} and C{sub pl}), heat capacity change ({Delta}C{sub p}) and ratios C{sub pl}/C{sub pg} of the glass systems were calculated. The highest thermal stability (237 {sup o}C) obtained in 55TeO{sub 2}-22.5Ag{sub 2}O-22.5WO{sub 3} glass suggests that this new glass may be a potentially useful candidate material host for rare earth doped optical fibers. The DC conductivity of glasses was measured in temperature region 27-260 {sup o}C, the activation energy (E{sub act}) values varied from 1.393 to 0.272 eV and for the temperature interval 170-260 {sup o}C, the values of conductivity ({sigma}) of glasses varied from 8.79 x 10{sup -9} to 1.47 x 10{sup -6} S cm{sup -1}.

  10. Magnetic anisotropy induced by crystal distortion in Ge{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te/PbTe//KCl (001) ferromagnetic semiconductor layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoff, W. Łusakowski, A.; Domagała, J. Z.; Minikayev, R.; Taliashvili, B.; Łusakowska, E.; Pieniążek, A.; Szczerbakow, A.; Story, T.

    2015-09-21

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) study of magnetic anisotropy is presented for thin layers of IV-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te with x = 0.14 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on KCl (001) substrate with a thin PbTe buffer. Analysis of the angular dependence of the FMR resonant field reveals that an easy magnetization axis is located near to the normal to the layer plane and is controlled by two crystal distortions present in these rhombohedral Ge{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te layers: the ferroelectric distortion with the relative shift of cation and anion sub-lattices along the [111] crystal direction and the biaxial in-plane, compressive strain due to thermal mismatch.

  11. Intrinsic Rashba-like splitting in asymmetric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} heterogeneous topological insulator films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Guo, Wanlin

    2014-08-25

    We show by density functional theory calculations that asymmetric hetero-stacking of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films can modulate the topological surface states. Due to the structure inversion asymmetry, an intrinsic Rashba-like splitting of the conical surface bands is aroused. While such splitting in homogeneous Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-class topological insulators can be realized in films with more than three quintuple layers under external electric fields, the hetero-stacking breaks the limit of thickness for preserving the topological nature into the thinnest two quintuple layers. These results indicate that the hetero-stacking can serve as an efficient strategy for spin-resolved band engineering of topological insulators.

  12. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  13. Science Highlights- Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - Abstracts and Highlight Slides Efficiency of Thermoelectric Energy Conversion in Biphenyl-dithiol Junctions: Effect of Electron-Phonon Interactions Plasmonic Backscattering Enhanced Inverted Photovoltaics Femtosecond Laser-induced Nanostructure Formation in Sb2Te3 Ideal Diode Equation For Organic Heterojunctions. I and II

  14. Department of Energy - Energy Tomorrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 en Indian Energy Blog Archive http:energy.govindianenergylistingsindian-energy-blog-archive energy-blog-archive"...

  15. Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on September 7, 2016 Title: Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 Authors: Qi, Jingshan ; Li, Xiao ; Niu, Qian ; Feng, ...

  16. Ultrathin nanosheets of CrSiTe3. A semiconducting two-dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    As a result, the ferromagnetic mono- and few-layer 2D CrSiTe3 indicated here should enable ... Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal of Materials Chemistry. C Additional ...

  17. Efficiency, Cost and Weight Trade-off in TE Power Generation System for Vehicle Exhaust Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It contains a detailed co-optimization of the thermoelectric module with the heat sink and a study of the tradeoff between the material cost and efficiency for the TE module and the heat sink. An optimum design is found.

  18. V-183: Cisco TelePresence TC and TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent Authenticated Users Gain Root Shell Access V-183: Cisco TelePresence TC and TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent...

  19. THE EI'IVIRONMENTAL QUALITY COMPANY CORPCl~V\\TE OFFICE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EI'IVIRONMENTAL QUALITY COMPANY CORPClVTE OFFICE Ill 36255 MICI*at:l;1 '1 J.VENIJE * WAYNE , IVICHICA148 '184 te800-5925489 tit fax 800-592-5329 February 20, 2013 Yia ...

  20. Structural analysis of Cr aggregation in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamawaki, K.; Nishio, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kuroda, S.; Mitome, M.; Bando, Y.

    2013-12-04

    The Cr aggregation in a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te was studied by performing precise analyses using TEM and XRD of microscopic structure of the Cr-aggregated regions formed in iodine-doped Zn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}Te films with a relatively high Cr composition x ? 0.2. It was found that the Cr-aggregated regions are composed of Cr{sub 1??}Te nanocrystals of the hexagonal structure and these hexagonal precipitates are stacked preferentially on the (111)A plane of the zinc-blende (ZB) structure of the host ZnTe crystal with its c-axis nearly parallel to the (111){sub ZB} plane.

  1. Thermoelectric Enhancement in PbTe with K or Na codoping from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermoelectric Enhancement in PbTe with K or Na codoping from tuning the interaction of the light- and heavy-hole valence bands Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  2. A comparison of NNLO QCD predictions with 7 TeV ATLAS and CMS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with 7 TeV ATLAS and CMS data for V+jet processes Authors: Boughezal, Radja ; Liu, Xiaohui ; Petriello, Frank Publication Date: 2016-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1258296 Grant...

  3. Shape-controlled narrow-gap SnTe nanostructures: From nanocubes to nanorods and nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shaojun; Andrew F. Fidler; He, Kai; Su, Dong; Chen, Gen; Lin, Qianglu; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2015-11-06

    In this study, the rational design and synthesis of narrow-gap colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is an important step toward the next generation of solution-processable photovoltaics, photodetectors, and thermoelectric devices. SnTe NCs are particularly attractive as a Pb-free alternative to NCs of narrow-gap lead chalcogenides. Previous synthetic efforts on SnTe NCs have focused on spherical nanoparticles. Here we report new strategies for synthesis of SnTe NCs with shapes tunable from highly monodisperse nanocubes, to nanorods (NRs) with variable aspect ratios, and finally to long, straight nanowires (NWs). Reaction at high temperature quickly forms thermodynamically favored nanocubes, but low temperatures lead to elongated particles. Transmission electron microscopy studies of reaction products at various stages of the synthesis reveal that the growth and shape-focusing of monodisperse SnTe nanocubes likely involves interparticle ripening, while directional growth of NRs and NWs may be initiated by particle dimerization via oriented attachment.

  4. Atomic-force microscopy and photoluminescence of nanostructured CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babentsov, V.; Sizov, F.; Franc, J.; Luchenko, A.; Svezhentsova, E. Tsybrii, Z.

    2013-09-15

    Low-dimensional CdTe nanorods with a diameter of 10-30 nm and a high aspect ratio that reaches 100 are studied. The nanorods are grown by the physical vapor transport method with the use of Bi precipitates on the substrates. In addition, thin films of closely packed CdTe nanorods with the transverse dimensions {approx}(100-200) nm are grown. Atomic-force microscopy shows that the cross sections of all of the nanorods were hexagonally shaped. By photoluminescence measurements, the inference about the wurtzite structure of CdTe is supported, and the structural quality, electron-phonon coupling, and defects are analyzed. On the basis of recent ab initio calculations, the nature of defects responsible for the formation of deep levels in the CdTe layers and bulk crystals are analyzed.

  5. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Appl. Phys. Lett.; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 25 Research ...

  6. Distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV with a data sample collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to a luminosity of 5.1fb-1. We corrected the distributions for detector effects, and compared with several event generators based on two- and multi-parton matrix elements at leading order. Thus, among the considered calculations, MADGRAPH interfaced with PYTHIA6displays the overall best agreement with data.

  7. Study of substructure of high transverse momentum jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alon, R.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; et al

    2012-05-03

    A study of the substructure of jets with transverse momentum greater than 400 GeV/c produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and recorded by the CDF II detector is presented. The distributions of the jet mass, angularity, and planar flow are measured for the first time in a sample with an integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb⁻¹. The observed substructure for high mass jets is consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  8. Distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV with a data sample collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to a luminosity of 5.1fb-1. The distributions are corrected for detector effects, and compared with several event generators based on two- and multi-parton matrix elements at leading order. Among the considered calculations, MadGraph interfaced with pythia6 displays the overall best agreement with data.

  9. Searches for electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons decaying to leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-26

    Our searches for the direct electroweak production of supersymmetric charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons in a variety of signatures with leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons are presented. Results are based on a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at center-of-mass energy √s=8TeV with the CMS detector in 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. These observed event rates are in agreement with expectations from the standard model. Finally, these results probe charginos and neutralinos with masses up to 720 GeV, and sleptons up to 260 GeV, depending on the model details.

  10. Distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV with a data sample collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to a luminosity of 5.1fb-1. The distributions are corrected for detector effects, and compared with several event generators based on two- and multi-parton matrix elements at leading order. Among the considered calculations, MadGraph interfaced with pythia6 displays the overall best agreement with data.

  11. Study of substructure of high transverse momentum jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alon, R.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; DellOrso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Duchovni, E.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Martnez-Ballarn, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Perez, G.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.

    2012-05-01

    A study of the substructure of jets with transverse momentum greater than 400 GeV/c produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and recorded by the CDF II detector is presented. The distributions of the jet mass, angularity, and planar flow are measured for the first time in a sample with an integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb?. The observed substructure for high mass jets is consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  12. Studies of Basic Electronic Properties of CdTe-Based Solar Cells and Their Evolution During Processing and Stress; Annual Technical Report, 1 November 2005 - 31 October 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, J.; Seymour, F. H.; Kaydanov, V. I.; Ohno, T. R.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the results of our continuing study of deep electronic states controlling open-circuit voltage in CdTe/CdS thin-film solar cells (Task 1). The study includes: (1) analysis of factors affecting trap signatures derived from admittance spectroscopy and capacitance transients measurements, such as activation-energy capture cross-sections and trap-density estimates, and (2) comparative studies of cells received from four different sources and prepared with significant variations in cell structure and processing procedures.

  13. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-29

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton–proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 are used. Furthermore, candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network.

  14. Inclusive high-p(T) b anti-b cross section measurement at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galyaev, Eugene N.; /Notre Dame U.

    2006-08-01

    The Run II physics program at the Tevatron started in the spring of 2001 with protons and antiprotons colliding at an energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and is continuing with about 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data currently collected by the CDF and D0 experiments. A measurement of the b-jet cross section as function of jet transverse momentum p{perpendicular} has been performed using 312 pb{sup -1} of D0 data. The results for this measurement were obtained and are presented herein. A neural network algorithm was used to identify b jets.

  15. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Sandia is developing computer models that show how...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and...

  17. Deformation and shape transitions in hot rotating neutron deficient Te isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Mazumdar, I.

    2009-08-15

    Evolution of the nuclear shapes and deformations under the influence of temperature and rotation is investigated in Te isotopes with neutron number ranging from the proton drip line to the stability valley. Spin dependent critical temperatures for the shape transitions in Te nuclei are computed. Shape transitions from prolate at low temperature and spin to oblate via triaxiality are seen with increasing neutron number and spin.

  18. Spin glass in semiconducting KFe1.05Ag0.88Te2 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryu, H.; Lei, H.; Klobes, B.; Warren, J. B.; Hermann, R. P.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-05-26

    We report discovery of KFe1.05Ag0.88Te2 single crystals with semiconducting spin glass ground state. Composition and structure analysis suggest nearly stoichiometric I4/mmm space group but allow for the existence of vacancies, absent in long range semiconducting antiferromagnet KFe1.05Ag0.88Te2. The subtle change in stoichometry in Fe/Ag sublattice changes magnetic ground state but not conductivity, giving further insight into the semiconducting gap mechanism.

  19. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Authors: Shu, Michael J. ; Zalden, Peter ; Chen, Frank ; Weems, Ben ; Chatzakis, Ioannis ; Xiong, Feng ; Jeyasingh, Rakesh ; Hoffmann, Matthias C. ; Pop, Eric ; Wong, H.-S.Philip ; Wuttig, Matthias ; Lindenberg, Aaron M. Publication Date: 2014-07-08 OSTI

  20. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Illinois | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illinois Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Illinois Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Illinois. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 20, 2016 CX-100656 Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving reliability and reducing cost in CdTe photovoltaics via grain boundary engineering Award Number: DE-EE0007545 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 7/12/2016 Location(s): IL Office(s): Golden Field Office April 6, 2016 CX-100589

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Colorado | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Colorado Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Colorado. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 5, 2016 CX-100650 Categorical Exclusion Determination Device Architecture for Next-Generation CdTe PV Award Number: DE-EE0007543 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technology Office Date: 6/21/2016 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office June 13, 2016 CX-100643 Categorical Exclusion Determination NWTC Diesel Storage

  2. Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas ...

  3. Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  4. Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  5. Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  6. Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  7. Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  8. Aquion Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage ...

  9. The low energy spectrum of TeO2 bolometers: results and perspectives...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tomei, C. ; Trentalange, S. ; Ventura, G. ; Vignati, M. ; Wang, B. S. ; Wang, H. W. ; Whitten Jr., C. A. ; Wise, T. ; Woodcraft, A. ; Zanotti, L. ; Zarra, C. ; Zhu, B. X. ;...

  10. The low energy spectrum of TeO2 bolometers: results and perspectives...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    K. M. ; Huang, H. Z. ; Kadel, R. ; Kazkaz, K. ; Keppel, G. ; Kogler, L. ; Kolomensky, Yu. G. ; Lenz, D. ; Li, Y. L. ; Ligi, C. ; Liu, X. ; Ma, Y. G. ; Maiano, C. ; Maino, M. ;...

  11. PbTe/TAGS RTG Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A. )

    1993-01-10

    The paper describes the results of studies on an RTG option for powering the global network of unmanned landers for NASA's Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission. RTGs are essentially unaffected by diurnal and seasonal variations, Martian sandstorms, and landing site latitudes, and their waste heat can stabilize the temperatures of the landers and their payload. The RTG designs described in this paper are based on PbTe/TAGS thermoelectric elements, in contast to the SiGe-based RTGs the author described in previous publications. The presently described RTGs differ not only in the choice of thermoelectric materials but also in the use of much lower operating temperatures, conductive rather than radiative heat transfer, an inert cover gas instead of vacuum in the RTG's converter, and fibrous instead of multifoil thermal insulation. As in a previous Teledyne design, the Fairchild designs described in this paper employ flight-proven General Purpose Source modules and Close-Pack Arrays of thermoelectric converter modules. Illustrative point designs of RTGs producing 41 and 51 watts(e) at 28 volts are presented. The presented performance parameters were derived by detailed thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analyses (including radiator geometry optimization) described in the paper. The Fairchild study showed that, with appropriate modifications, the Teledyne design can be scaled up to higher power levels, and it identified solutions to ensure adequate fuel clad ductility at launch temperatures and adequate thermal conductance from the thermoelectric cold ends to the RTG housing.

  12. Chiral magnetic effect in ZrTe5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Q.; Kharzeev, D. E.; Zhang, C.; Huang, Y.; Pletikosic, I.; Fedorov, A. V.; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Gu, G. D.; Valla, T.

    2016-02-08

    The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electric current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions (massless spin 1/2 particles with a definite projection of spin on momentum) - a dramatic phenomenon arising from a collective motion of particles and antiparticles in the Dirac sea. The recent discovery of Dirac semimetals with chiral quasi-particles opens a fascinating possibility to study this phenomenon in condensed matter experiments. Here we report on the measurement of magneto-transport in zirconium pentatelluride, ZrTe5 that providesmore » a strong evidence for the chiral magnetic effect. Our angleresolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments show that this material’s electronic structure is consistent with a 3D Dirac semimetal. We observe a large negative magnetoresistance when magnetic field is parallel with the current. The measured quadratic field dependence of the magnetoconductance is a clear indication of the chiral magnetic effect. The observed phenomenon stems from the effective transmutation of Dirac semimetal into a Weyl semimetal induced by the parallel electric and magnetic fields that represent a topologically nontrivial gauge field background. We expect that chiral magnetic effect may emerge in a wide class of materials that are near the transition between the trivial and topological insulators.« less

  13. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an eμ pair in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-10

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. Themore » $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $$~\\text {fb}^\\text {-1}$$ collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected $$\\mathrm {e}\\mu $$ pairs, upper limits are set at 95  $$\\%$$ confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for couplings $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=\\lambda '_{311}=0.01$$ , and below 2.30 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=0.07$$ and $$\\lambda '_{311}=0.11$$ . These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the $${\\mathrm {Z}} $$ boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton’s constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass $$M_{\\mathrm {th}}$$ of 1.99 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ . In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for one extra dimension to 3.63 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for six extra dimensions. Furthermore, this is the first search for QBHs decaying into the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ final state.« less

  14. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an e-mu pair in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-06-10

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. Themore » $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $$~\\text {fb}^\\text {-1}$$ collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected $$\\mathrm {e}\\mu $$ pairs, upper limits are set at 95  $$\\%$$ confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The $$\\mathrm {\\tau }$$ sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for couplings $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=\\lambda '_{311}=0.01$$ , and below 2.30 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for $$\\lambda _{132}=\\lambda _{231}=0.07$$ and $$\\lambda '_{311}=0.11$$ . These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the $${\\mathrm {Z}} $$ boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton’s constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass $$M_{\\mathrm {th}}$$ of 1.99 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ . In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for one extra dimension to 3.63 $$~\\text {TeV}$$ for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the $$\\mathrm {e}$$ $${\\mu }$$ final state.« less

  15. Enhanced thermoelectric performance in Cd doped CuInTe{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, N.; Liu, R.; Bai, S.; Shi, X. Chen, L.

    2014-04-28

    CuIn{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te{sub 2} materials (x?=?0, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.1) are prepared using melting-annealing method and the highly densified bulk samples are obtained through Spark Plasma Sintering. The X-ray diffraction data confirm that nearly pure chalcopyrite structures are obtained in all the samples. Due to the substitution of Cd at In sites, the carrier concentration is greatly increased, leading to much enhanced electrical conductivity and power factor. The single parabolic band model is used to describe the electrical transport properties of CuInTe{sub 2} and the low temperature Hall mobility is also modeled. By combing theoretical model and experiment data, the optimum carrier concentration in CuInTe{sub 2} is proposed to explain the greatly enhanced power factors in the Cd doped CuInTe{sub 2}. In addition, the thermal conductivity is reduced by extra phonon scattering due to the atomic mass and radius fluctuations between Cd and In atoms. The maximum zTs are observed in CuIn{sub 0.98}Cd{sub 0.02}Te{sub 2} and CuIn{sub 0.9}Cd{sub 0.1}Te{sub 2} samples, which are improved by over 100% at room temperature and around 20% at 600?K.

  16. Ultrathin nanosheets of CrSiTe3. A semiconducting two-dimensional ferromagnetic material

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Ming -Wei; Zhung, Houlong L.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Ward, Thomas Zac; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Gai, Zheng; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; et al

    2015-11-27

    Finite range ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism in two-dimensional (2D) systems within an isotropic Heisenberg model at non-zero temperature were originally proposed to be impossible. However, recent theoretical studies using an Ising model have recently shown that 2D magnetic crystals can exhibit magnetism. Experimental verification of existing 2D magnetic crystals in this system has remained elusive. In this work we for the first time exfoliate the CrSiTe3, a bulk ferromagnetic semiconductor, to mono- and few-layer 2D crystals onto a Si/SiO2 substrate. The Raman spectra show the good stability and high quality of the exfoliated flakes, consistent with the computed phonon spectra ofmore » 2D CrSiTe3, giving a strong evidence for the existence of 2D CrSiTe3 crystals. When the thickness of the CrSiTe3 crystals is reduced to few-layers, we observed a clear change in resistivity at 80~120 K, consistent with the theoretical calculations on the Curie temperature (Tc) of ~80 K for the magnetic ordering of 2D CrSiTe3 crystals. As a result, the ferromagnetic mono- and few-layer 2D CrSiTe3 indicated here should enable numerous applications in nano-spintronics.« less

  17. Oxygen Incorporation During Fabrication of Substrate CdTe Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Kuciauskas, D.; Li, J. V.; Pankow, J. W.; DeHart, C. M.; Gessert, T. A.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices fabricated in the nonstandard substrate configuration have attracted increasing interest because of their potential compatibility with flexible substrates such as metal foils and polymer films. This compatibility could lead to the suitability of CdTe for roll-to-roll processing and building-integrated PV. Currently, however, the efficiencies of substrate CdTe devices reported in the literature are significantly lower ({approx}6%-8%) than those of high-performance superstrate devices ({approx}17%) because of significantly lower open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). In our recent device development efforts, we have found that processing parameters required to fabricate high-efficiency substrate CdTe PV devices differ from those necessary for traditional superstrate CdTe devices. Here, we investigate how oxygen incorporation in the CdTe deposition, CdCl2 heat treatment, CdS deposition, and post-deposition heat treatment affect device characteristics through their effects on the junction. By adjusting whether oxygen is incorporated during these processing steps, we have achieved Voc values greater than 860 mV and efficiencies greater than 10%.

  18. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in themore » observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  19. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. 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M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  20. CX-011100: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1100: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011100: Categorical Exclusion Determination Unified Numerical Solver for Device Metastabilities in CdTe Thin-Film Photovoltaic CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Arizona State University to complete a project titled "Unified Numerical Solver for Device Metastabilities in CdTe Thin-Film Photovoltaic".

  1. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =\\; $$$ s N N = 5.02 $$$\\,\\text {TeV}$$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2014-06-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt(sNN) = 5.02 TeV. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range pt approximately 0.1-1.7 GeV and laboratory rapidity abs(y) < 1 are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average pt increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average pt with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that EPOS LHC, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is ablemore » to reproduce most of the data features, unlike HIJING and AMPT. The pt spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.« less

  2. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =\\; $$ s N N = 5.02 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Van der Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins Junior, M. Correa; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Lagana, C.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Heine, K.; Höing, R. S.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Marchesini, I.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F. -P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Saxena, P.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Kanishchev, F. K.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Dell’Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. 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S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; Caballero, I. Gonzalez; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Sanchez, J. Gonzalez; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Virto, A. Lopez; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Rivero, C. Martinez; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bendavid, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. 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Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. 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M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. 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A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2014-06-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt(sNN) = 5.02 TeV. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range pt approximately 0.1-1.7 GeV and laboratory rapidity abs(y) < 1 are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average pt increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average pt with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that EPOS LHC, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is able to reproduce most of the data features, unlike HIJING and AMPT. The pt spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.

  3. Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvador, James R.; Cho, Jung Y; Ye, Zuxin; Moczygemba, Joshua E.; Thompson, Alan; Sharp, Jeff W.; Konig, Jan; Maloney, Ryan; Thompson, Travis; Sakamoto, Jeff; Wang, Hsin; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Meisner, G P

    2013-01-01

    The performance of thermoelectric (TE) materials has improved tremendously over the past decade. The intrinsic thermal and electrical properties of state-of-the-art TE materials demonstrate that the potential for widespread practical TE applications is very large and includes TE generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. TE materials for automotive TEG applications must have good intrinsic performance, be thermomechanically compatible, and be chemically stable in the 400 K to 850 K temperature range. Both n-type and p-type varieties must be available at low cost, easily fabricated, and durable. They must also form robust junctions and develop good interfaces with other materials to permit efficient flows of electrical and thermal energy. Among the TE materials of interest for automotive waste heat recovery systems are the skutterudite compounds, which are the antimony-based transition-metal compounds RTE4Sb12, where R can be an alkali metal (e.g., Na, K), alkaline earth (e.g., Ba), or rare earth (e.g., La, Ce, Yb), and TE can be a transition metal (e.g., Co, Fe). We synthesized a considerable quantity of n-type and p-type skutterudites, fabricated TE modules, incorporated these modules into a prototype TEG, and tested the TEG on a production General Motors (GM) vehicle. We discuss our progress on skutterudite TE module fabrication and present module performance data for electrical power output under simulated operating conditions for automotive waste heat recovery systems. We also present preliminary durability results on our skutterudite modules.

  4. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-03-18

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity ranges |ηγ|<1.37 and 1.52≤|ηγ|<1.81 in the transverse energy range 15≤EγT<100 GeV. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 880 nb-1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Photon candidates are identified by combining information from the calorimeters and from the inner tracker. Residual background in the selected sample is estimated from data based on the observed distribution of the transverse isolation energy in a narrowmore » cone around the photon candidate. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.« less

  5. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Gillberg D.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J-F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Hegeman J. G.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Makovec N.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-20

    We present a measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the Run II cone algorithm and data collected by the D0 experiment in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.70 fb{sup -1}. The jet energy calibration and the method used to extract the inclusive jet cross section are described. We discuss the main uncertainties, which are dominated by the jet energy scale uncertainty. The results cover jet transverse momenta from 50 GeV to 600 GeV with jet rapidities in the range -2.4 to 2.4 and are compared to predictions using recent proton parton distribution functions. Studies of correlations between systematic uncertainties in transverse momentum and rapidity are presented.

  6. Structural characterization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature using neutron powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, A. N.; Wong-Ng, W.; Huang, Q.; Tang, W.; Thompson, A.; Sharp, J.

    2014-08-28

    The structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material (SRM™ 3451)) and the related phase Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been characterized as a function of temperature using the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The neutron structural studies were carried out from 20 K to 300 K for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and from 10 K to 298 K for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The EXAFS technique for studying the local structure of the two compounds was conducted from 19 K to 298 K. Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are isostructural, with a space group of R3{sup ¯}m. The structure consists of repeated quintuple layers of atoms, Te2-M-Te1-M-Te2 (where M = Bi or Sb) stacking along the c-axis of the unit cell. EXAFS was used to examine the bond distances and static and thermal disorders for the first three shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature. The temperature dependencies of thermal disorders were analyzed using the Debye and Einstein models for lattice vibrations. The Debye and Einstein temperatures for the first two shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are similar to those of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} within the uncertainty in the data. However, the Debye and Einstein temperatures for the third shell of Bi-Bi are significantly lower than those of the third shell of Sb-Sb. The Einstein temperature for the third shell is consistent with a soft phonon mode in both Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The lower Einstein temperature of Bi-Bi relative to Sb-Sb is consistent with the lower value of thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} relative to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  7. Helium Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Helium Energy Place: Spain Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Spain-based renewable energy development company. References: Helium Energy1...

  8. Semplice Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Semplice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Semplice Energy Place: Reading, United Kingdom Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: Semplice Energy is an energy...

  9. Vision Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vision Energy Place: Cincinnati, Ohio Zip: 45227 Sector: Wind energy Product: Vision Energy focuses on wind energy development and...

  10. Best Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Best Energy Place: Italy Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Italy-based energy company engaged in the development of renewable energy projects. References: Best Energy1 This...

  11. Carrier lifetimes and interface recombination velocities in CdTe/Mg{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Te double heterostructures with different Mg compositions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shi; Lassise, Maxwell B.; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang; Zhao, Xin-Hao; Campbell, Calli M.

    2015-07-27

    The interface recombination velocities of CdTe/Mg{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Te double heterostructure (DH) samples with different CdTe layer thicknesses and Mg compositions are studied using time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. A lowest interface recombination velocity of 30 ± 10 cm/s has been measured for the CdTe/Mg{sub 0.46}Cd{sub 0.54}Te interface, and a longest carrier lifetime of 0.83 μs has been observed for the studied DHs. These values are very close to the best reported numbers for GaAs/AlGaAs DHs. The impact of carrier escape through thermionic emission over the MgCdTe barrier on the recombination process in the DHs is also studied.

  12. TeV/m nano-accelerator: Investigation on feasibility of CNT-channeling acceleration at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Y. M.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R. M.

    2015-03-23

    The development of high gradient acceleration and tight phase-space control of high power beams is a key element for future lepton and hadron colliders since the increasing demands for higher energy and luminosity significantly raise costs of modern HEP facilities. Atomic channels in crystals are known to consist of 10100 V/ potential barriers capable of guiding and collimating a high energy beam providing continuously focused acceleration with exceptionally high gradients (TeV/m). However, channels in natural crystals are only angstrom-size and physically vulnerable to high energy interactions, which has prevented crystals from being applied to high power accelerators. Carbon-based nano-crystals such as carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes have a large degree of dimensional flexibility and thermo-mechanical strength, which could be suitable for channeling acceleration of MW beams. Nano-channels of the synthetic crystals can accept a few orders of magnitude larger phase-space volume of channeled particles with much higher thermal tolerance than natural crystals. This study presents the current status of CNT-channeling acceleration research at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) in Fermilab.

  13. A search for GeV-TeV emission from Gamma-ray Bursts using the Milagro detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2009-04-08

    The Milagro detector surveyed the sky continuously in the Very High Energy regime from January 2000 through March 2008. During that time, over 130 GRBs were detected and well localized by satellites within its 2 sr field of view. We have used Milagro data to search for >1 GeV emission from these bursts. Milagro is a water Cerenkov detector designed primarily for observations in the 0.1-100 TeV energy range. In the standard mode of operation, Milagro data is used to reconstruct the direction of an incoming high energy particle by analyzing the timing information of a large number of photomultiplier tubes that are triggered in coincidence by the air shower generated when such a particle interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro data, however, can also be analyzed in 'scaler mode', where the rates of individual photomultiplier tubes can be used to detect emission above 1 GeV (albeit with no directional information). Here we present results from both techniques for all known GRBs detected by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift, and the IPN, within the field of view of Milagro in its 8 years of operation.

  14. Geothermal Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy ...

  15. PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET ' ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1. H.#~~Sample Nos. 3 --Date Collected~~by-CESS-.Route to CBS LocationTITANIUM Type of Sample airnalyzed for F Alpham Remarks NIAGARA pALI+S* N.Y. U Beta Bldg. 103 - furnace room - -NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description I I I--- R ) T 1 Q I I I 7392 1100 GA Induction furnace area duri-nn ----l----- mDeriod;.02; 151 .3 while furnace was charged with UOT_-

  16. The role of oxygen in CdS/CdTe solar cells deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, D.H.; Levi, D.H.; Matson, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of oxygen during close-spaced sublimation (CSS) of CdTe has been previously reported to be essential for high-efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cells because it increases the acceptor density in the absorber. The authors find that the presence of oxygen during CSS increases the nucleation site density of CdTe, thus decreasing pinhole density and grain size. Photoluminescence showed that oxygen decreases material quality in the bulk of the CdTe film, but positively impacts the critical CdS/CdTe interface. Through device characterization the authors were unable to verify an increase in acceptor density with increased oxygen. These results, along with the achievement of high-efficiency cells (13% AM1.5) without the use of oxygen, led the authors to conclude that the use of oxygen during CSS deposition of CdTe can be useful but is not essential.

  17. First-epoch VLBA imaging of 20 new TeV blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piner, B. Glenn; Edwards, Philip G.

    2014-12-10

    We present Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images of 20 TeV blazars not previously well studied on the parsec scale. All 20 of these sources are high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects (HBLs). Observations were made between August and December of 2013 at a frequency of 8.4 GHz. These observations represent the first epoch of a VLBA monitoring campaign on these blazars, and they significantly increase the fraction of TeV HBLs studied with high-resolution imaging. The peak very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) flux densities of these sources range from ∼10 to ∼100 mJy bm{sup –1}, and parsec-scale jet structure is detected in all sources. About half of the VLBI cores are resolved, with brightness temperature upper limits of a few times 10{sup 10} K, and we find that a brightness temperature of ∼2 × 10{sup 10} K is consistent with the VLBI data for all but one of the sources. Such brightness temperatures do not require any relativistic beaming to reduce the observed value below commonly invoked intrinsic limits; however, the lack of detection of counterjets does place a modest limit on the bulk Lorentz factor of γ ≳ 2. These data are thus consistent with a picture where weak-jet sources like the TeV HBLs develop significant velocity structures on parsec scales. We also extend consideration to the full sample of TeV HBLs by combining the new VLBI data with VLBI and gamma-ray data from the literature. By comparing measured VLBI and TeV fluxes to samples with intrinsically uncorrelated luminosities generated by Monte Carlo simulations, we find a marginally significant correlation between the VLBI and TeV fluxes for the full TeV HBL sample.

  18. Thermal evolution of antiferromagnetic correlations and tetrahedral bond angles in superconducting FeTe1-xSex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Zhijun; Xu, Guangyong; Schneeloch, J. A.; Wen, Jinsheng; Bozin, E. S.; Granroth, G. E.; Winn, B. L.; Feygenson, M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Gu, Genda; et al

    2016-03-14

    It has recently been demonstrated that dynamical magnetic correlations measured by neutron scattering in iron chalcogenides can be described with models of short-range correlations characterized by particular choices of four-spin plaquettes, where the appropriate choice changes as the parent material is doped towards superconductivity. Here we apply such models to describe measured maps of magnetic scattering as a function of two-dimensional wave vectors obtained for optimally superconducting crystals of FeTe1–xSex. We show that the characteristic antiferromagnetic wave vector evolves from that of the bicollinear structure found in underdoped chalcogenides (at high temperature) to that associated with the stripe structure ofmore » antiferromagnetic iron arsenides (at low temperature); these can both be described with the same local plaquette, but with different interplaquette correlations. While the magnitude of the low-energy magnetic spectral weight is substantial at all temperatures, it actually weakens somewhat at low temperature, where the charge carriers become more itinerant. The observed change in spin correlations is correlated with the dramatic drop in the electronic scattering rate and the growth of the bulk nematic response upon cooling. Lastly, we also present powder neutron diffraction results for lattice parameters in FeTe1–xSex indicating that the tetrahedral bond angle tends to increase towards the ideal value upon cooling, in agreement with the increased screening of the crystal field by more itinerant electrons and the correspondingly smaller splitting of the Fe 3d orbitals.« less

  19. Search for tt¯ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-07-23

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt¯) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb⁻¹ of proton–proton (pp ) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy √s =7 TeV . In the tt¯ →WbWb decay, the lepton plus jets final state is used, where one W boson decays leptonically and the other hadronically. The tt¯ system is reconstructed using both small-radius and large-radius jets, the latter being supplemented by a jet substructure analysis. A search for local excesses in the number of data events compared to themore » Standard Model expectation in the tt¯ invariant mass spectrum is performed. No evidence for a tt¯ resonance is found and 95% credibility-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states predicted in two benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' resonance range from 5.1 pb for a boson mass of 0.5 TeV to 0.03 pb for a mass of 3 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 1.74 TeV is excluded. Limits are also derived for a broad color-octet resonance with Γ/m=15.3% . A Kaluza–Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall–Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.07 TeV.« less

  20. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings