National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tc upper ir

  1. High Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by C. Kim (SSRL), D. H. Lu (Stanford), K. M. Shen (Stanford) and Z.-X. Shen (Stanford/SSRL) Extensive research efforts to study the novel electronic properties of high-Tc superconductors and their related materials by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at a recently commissioned Beam Line 5-4 (led by Z.-X. Shen) continue to be successful, producing many important results. These results, which are highlighted by five articles recently published in Physical Review Letters and one in

  2. IR-2003- | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IR-2003- IR-2003- PDF icon IR-2003- More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy EIS-0394: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

  3. I\r'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t&

  4. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  5. Hf-irJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hf-irJ jnj,4 States Governmen Department of Energy Inemorandum DOTE: DAY o 1S5a . 7 EPY TO F . O 0 NE-24 SUJEC': Authorization for Remedial Action of Residential Vicinity Properties at * ~ Lodi, New Jersey TO: Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office ~* The data in the attached draft Radiological Survey Reports conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) indicates that the soil concentration on these vicinity properties exceed the Department of Energy remedial action guidelines. Based on

  6. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO{sub 2} in subsurface sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Zachara, J. M.; Plymale, A. E.; Heald, S. M.; McKinley, J. P.; Kennedy, D. W.; Liu, C.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup -}] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O{sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO{sub 2}-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 {micro}m-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass-transfer-limited migration of O{sub 2} into intra-aggregate and intraparticle domains where Tc(IV) existed; and the formation of unique, oxidation-resistant, intragrain Tc(IV)-Fe(III) molecular species.

  7. Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-18

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

  8. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resins ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  9. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ir Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

  10. Tc-99m Labeled carrier for imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henze, Eberhard (Santa Monica, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Novel radionuclide imaging agents, having particular application for lymphangiography are provided by non-covalently binding Tc-99m to a pharmaceutically acceptable cross-linked polysaccharide. Upon injection of the Tc-99m labeled polysaccharide into the blood stream, optimum contrast can be obtained within one hour.

  11. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemoreof 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.less

  12. Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors You are accessing...

  13. Trexler Climate Energy Services TC ES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trexler Climate Energy Services TC ES Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trexler Climate + Energy Services (TC + ES) Place: Portland, Oregon Zip: 97214 Sector: Services Product:...

  14. Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors ...

  15. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Feasibility of Wind to Serve Upper Skagit's Bow Hill Tribal Lands *Assess Feasibility of Residential Wind Energy Applications * * *Upper Skagit Indian Tribe is located in the Pacific Northwest , about 1 hour north of Seattle, Washington *Upper Skagit have two reservation land bases - * Bow Hill the economic land base * Helmick Road Reservation the center of government, community services & residences Skagit River & Puget Sound * Support all 5 species of salmon, steelhead * The Tribe

  16. 119Sn-NMR investigations on superconducting Ca3Ir4Sn13: Evidence for multigap superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, R.; Petrovic, C.; Bruckner, F.; Gunther, M.; Wang, Kefeng; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.; Klauss, H. -H.

    2015-09-25

    In this study, we report bulk superconductivity (SC) in Ca3Ir4Sn13 by means of 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Two classical signatures of BCS superconductivity in spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), namely the Hebel–Slichter coherence peak just below the Tc, and the exponential decay in the superconducting phase, are evident. The noticeable decrease of 119Sn Knight shift below Tc indicates spin-singlet superconductivity. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 119(1/T1) is convincingly described by the multigap isotropic superconducting gap. NMR experiments do not witness any sign of enhanced spin fluctuations.

  17. Insights into Stabilization of the 99TcVO Core for Synthesis of 99TcVO Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Howell, Robertha C.; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of technetium-99 (99Tc; t1/2: 2.1 105 years, max: 253 keV) materials is of importance in studies of the nuclear fuel cycle where Tc is a major fission product (6percent thermal yield from 235U and 239Pu), in understanding radioactive tank waste composition, and in identifying 99mTc compounds for nuclear medicine imaging. One of the most useful synthetic starting materials, (NBu4)TcOCl4, is susceptible to disproportionation in water to form TcO4 and TcIV species, especially TcO2 2H2O. This unwanted reaction is especially problematic when working with ligands bearing hard donor atoms, such as oxygen, where the stability with the soft TcV=O3+ core may be low. Polyoxometalates (POMs) are such ligands. They possess defect sites with four hard oxygen atoms and show low (ca. 108) stability constants with transition metals. Tc complexes of POMs are molecular-level models for Tc metal oxide solid-state materials and can provide information on coordination and redox environments of metal oxides that stabilize low-valent Tc. In order to synthesize pure Tc POM complexes [TcVO(1-P2W17O61)]7 (TcVO-1) and [TcVO(2-P2W17O61)]7 (TcVO-2) from (NBu4)TcOCl4, we have identified strategies that minimize formation of TcIV species and optimize the formation of pure TcV species. The parameters that we consider are the amount of ethylene glycol, which is employed as a transfer ligand to prevent hydrolysis of (NBu4)TcOCl4, and the precipitating agent. The TcIV species that contaminates the non-optimized syntheses is likely a TcIV -oxido-bridged dimer [TcIV-(-O)2-TcIV]. We also employ a novel procedure where the 2 ligand is photoactivated and reduced (in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor) to subsequently reduce TcVIIO4 to an isolatable TcVO-2 product that is remarkably free of TcIV.

  18. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting ...

  19. ARM - Campaign Instrument - tc-bc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentstc-bc Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Total Carbon and Black Carbon Concentrations on Filter Samples (TC-BC) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Carbon Campaigns Aerosol IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2003.05.01 - 2003.05.31 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for

  20. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory

  1. Nonmonotonic pressure evolution of the upper critical field in superconducting FeSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Taufour, Valentin; Böhmer, Anna E.; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kogan, Vladimir G.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Canfield, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    The pressure dependence of the upper critical field, Hc2,c, of single crystalline FeSe was studied using measurements of the interplane resistivity, ρc, in magnetic fields parallel to tetragonal c axis. Hc2,c(T) curves obtained under hydrostatic pressures up to 1.56 GPa, the range over which the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, of FeSe exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence with local maximum at p1 ≈ 0.8 GPa and local minimum at p2 ≈ 1.2 GPa. The slope of the upper critical field at Tc,(dHc2,c/dT)Tc, also exhibits a nonmonotonic pressure dependence with distinct changes at p1 and p2. For p < p1 the slope canmore » be described within a multiband orbital model. For both p1 < p < p2 and p > p2 the slope is in good semiquantitative agreement with a single band, orbital Helfand-Werthamer theory with Fermi velocities determined from Shubnikov–de Haas measurements. Lastly, this finding indicates that Fermi surface changes are responsible for the local minimum of Tc(p) at p2 ≈ 1.2 GPa.« less

  2. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ir8 Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

  3. 99Tc Process Monitoring System In-Lab Performance Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Niver, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Executive Summary A 99Tc Process Monitoring (Tc-Mon) System has been designed and built for deployment at the recently constructed 200 West Pump & Treat (200W P&T) Plant in the 200 West Area ZP-1 Operable Unit of the Hanford Site. The plant is operated by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The Tc-Mon system was created through collaboration between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Burge Environmental, Inc. The new systems design has been optimized based on experience from an earlier field test (2011) of a prototype system at the 200W-ZP-1 Interim Pump & Treat Plant. A portion of the new 200W P&T Plant is dedicated to removal of 99Tc from contaminated groundwater in the 200 West Area. 99Tc, as the pertechnetate anion (99TcO4-), is remediated through delivery of water into two trains (Trains A and B) of three tandem extraction columns filled with Purolite A530E resin. The resin columns cannot be regenerated; therefore, once they have reached their maximum useful capacity, the columns must be disposed of as radioactive waste. The Tc-Mon systems primary duty will be to periodically sample and analyze the effluents from each of the two primary extraction columns to determine 99Tc breakthrough. The Tc-Mon system will enable the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to measure primary extraction column breakthrough on demand. In this manner, CHPRC will be able to utilize each extraction column to its maximum capacity. This will significantly reduce column disposal and replacement costs over the life of the plant. The Tc-Mon system was constructed by Burge Environmental, Inc. and was delivered to PNNL in June 2013 for setup and initial hardware and software performance testing in the 325 Building. By early July, PNNL had initiated an in-laboratory performance characterization study on the system. The objective was to fully calibrate the system and then evaluate the quality of the analytical outputs 1) against a series of clean groundwater samples prepared as 99Tc standards, and 2) on actual 200W P&T Plant grab samples containing 99Tc (and other radioactive and non-radioactive contaminants) at levels reported by the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility. These grab samples included pre-treated (Pre-Resin) and post-treated (Post-Resin) 200W P&T Plant waters for May through August 2013. This report contains the following information: The genesis of the 99Tc sensor and the Tc-Mon analytical system. A description of the Tc-Mon systems major hardware and software components. A description of the operational principles behind the 99Tc sensor. Results from the calibration of three components within the Tc-Mon system. The three systems requiring calibration are: 1. Sampling Chamber 2. Conductivity Sensor 3. 99Tc Sensor Presentation of analytical results obtained on the fully calibrated Tc-Mon system. This includes a determination of the precision and accuracy of each system defined above. Estimation of the 99Tc sensors minimum detectable activity and limit of quantification. A brief discussion of potential chemical and radiological influences on the 99Tc sensor based on known contaminants in 200W P&T Plant water. Observations regarding 99Tc sensor longevity.

  4. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

  5. Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 Recently, superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 (Tc =6.1 K) was discovered. The crystalline lattice contains an array of weakly coupled, double well [(Cr3As3)2-]∞ linkages stretched along the c axis,

  6. RILEM TC ISR Summer 2015 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Pape, Yann

    2015-08-01

    With aging infrastructures, instances of Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) and Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF), broadly covered under the term Internal Swelling Reaction (ISR), are increasingly being detected. They have been observed in bridges, dams, and most recently in nuclear power plants. Concrete swelling may result in bridge partial failure, dams with structural cracks and misaligned turbine shafts, and locked slice gates. For nuclear reactors micro-cracks may cause increased gas permeability which will jeopardize the containment integrity and may decrease the residual structural resistance under accidental loading. This TC, which limits its activity to structures with known expansive concrete, seeks to address two complementary but fundamental questions: a) What is the kinetics of the reaction and b) How would it affect the integrity of the structure (serviceability and strength) and thus establish a science based prognostic to the structure owner.

  7. Mass Measurements of Very Neutron-Deficient Mo and Tc Isotopes and Their Impact on rp Process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Ketelaer, J.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Mazzocco, M.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Vorobjev, G.

    2011-03-25

    The masses of ten proton-rich nuclides, including the N=Z+1 nuclides {sup 85}Mo and {sup 87}Tc, were measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. Compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 a systematic shift of the mass surface by up to 1.6 MeV is observed causing significant abundance changes of the ashes of astrophysical x-ray bursts. Surprisingly low {alpha} separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc are found, making the formation of a ZrNb cycle in the rp process possible. Such a cycle would impose an upper temperature limit for the synthesis of elements beyond Nb in the rp process.

  8. DOE Tour of Zero: The Cedarwood by TC Legend Homes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cedarwood by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero: The Cedarwood by TC Legend Homes Addthis 1 of 13 Custom builder TC Legend Homes packed energy-efficiency features into this tidy...

  9. DOE Tour of Zero: The Net Zero in Seattle by TC Legend Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Net Zero in Seattle by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero: The Net Zero in Seattle by TC Legend Homes Addthis 1 of 15 Northwest builder TC Legend Homes has built a certified U.S. DOE...

  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend

  11. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  12. Spin-orbit tuned metal-insulator transitions in single-crystal Sr?Ir1xRhxO? (0?x?1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, T. F.; Korneta, O. B.; Li, L.; Butrouna, K.; Cao, V. S.; Wan, Xiangang; Schlottmann, P.; Kaul, R. K.; Cao, G.

    2012-09-06

    Sr?IrO? is a magnetic insulator driven by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) whereas the isoelectronic and isostructural Sr?RhO? is a paramagnetic metal. The contrasting ground states have been shown to result from the critical role of the strong SOI in the iridate. Our investigation of structural, transport, magnetic, and thermal properties reveals that substituting 4d Rh?? (4d?) ions for 5d Ir?? (5d?) ions in Sr?IrO? directly reduces the SOI and rebalances the competing energies so profoundly that it generates a rich phase diagram for Sr?Ir1xRhxO? featuring two major effects: (1) Light Rh doping (0 ? x ? 0.16) prompts a simultaneous and precipitous drop in both the electrical resistivity and the magnetic ordering temperature TC, which is suppressed to zero at x = 0.16 from 240 K at x = 0. (2) However, with heavier Rh doping [0.24 < x < 0.85 (0.05)] disorder scattering leads to localized states and a return to an insulating state with spin frustration and exotic magnetic behavior that only disappears near x = 1. The intricacy of Sr?Ir1xRhxO? is further highlighted by comparison with Sr?Ir1xRuxO? where Ru?? (4d?) drives a direct crossover from the insulating to metallic states.

  13. Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Introduction to TcI in Hanford Flowsheet Gary Smith Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) November 18, 2010 2 Rough Flowsheet Diagram Tank Farm Evaporator Pretreatment Evaporator IDF ...

  14. Solvent Extraction of Tc and Cs from Alkaline Nitrate Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, T J.; Sachleben, R A.; Leonard, R A.; Conner, C; Lumetta, Gregg J. ); M. Cox, M. Hidalgo, and M. Valiente

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes progress at three collaborating U.S. national laboratories on the extraction of the fission products 99Tc and 137Cs from alkaline high-level wastes. Efficient economical processes for Tc and Cs extraction (SRTALK and alkaline-side CSEX, respectively) have been developed, and testing has progressed through batch tests on actual wastes and continuous counter-current centrifugal-contactor tests on simulants.

  15. Solvent Extraction of Tc and Cs from Alkaline Nitrate Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, P.V.; Conner, C.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Leonard, R.A.; Lumetta, G.J.; Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1999-07-11

    This paper summarizes progress at three collaborating US national laboratories on the extraction of the fission products {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline high-level wastes (HLW). Efficient, economical processes for Tc and Cs extraction (SRTALK and alkaline-side CSEX, respectively) have been developed, and testing has progressed through batch tests on actual wastes and continuous countercurrent centrifugal-contactor tests on simulants.

  16. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Wednesday, 26 April 2006 00:00 Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in

  17. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-12-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

  18. Tc Reductant Chemistry and Crucible Melting Studies with Simulated Hanford Low-Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B PETER.; Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Yeager, John D.; Matyas, Josef; Darnell, Lori P.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Snow, Lanee A.; Steele, Marilyn J.

    2005-03-30

    The FY 2003 risk assessment (RA) of bulk vitrification (BV) waste packages used 0.3 wt% of the technetium (Tc) inventory as a leachable salt and found it sufficient to create a significant peak in the groundwater concentration in a 100-meter down-gradient well. Although this peak met regulatory limits, considering uncertainty in the actual Tc salt fraction, peak concentrations could exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) under some scenarios so reducing the leachable salt inventory is desirable. The main objective of this study was to reduce the mobile Tc species available within a BV disposal package by reducing the oxidation state of the Tc in the waste feed and/or during melting because Tc in its reduced form of Tc(IV) has a much lower volatility than Tc(VII). Reduced Tc volatility has a secondary benefit of increasing the Tc retention in glass.

  19. trans-K3[TcO2(CN)4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Del Negro, Andrew S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Twamley, Brendan; Krause, Jeanette A.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2010-07-14

    The dioxotetracyanotechnetate anion, [TcO2(CN)4]3-, of the title complex has octahedral symmetry. The technetium is located on a center of inversion and is bound by two oxygen atoms and four cyano ligands. The Tc?O bond distance of 1.7721 (12) is consistent with double bond character. The potassium cations [located on special (1/2,0,1) and general positions] reside in octahedral or tetrahedral environments; interionic KO and KN interactions occur in the 2.7877 (19)-2.8598 (15) range.

  20. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; Whangbo, Myung -Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  1. Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Williams, D. J.; Scott, B. L.; Luo, Yongkang; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis, crystal structure and physical properties studied by means of x-ray diffraction, magnetic, thermal and transport measurements of CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) are reported, along with the electronic structure calculations for LaMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt). These materials adopt a tetragonal crystal structure (space group P4/mmm) comprised of BaAl4 blocks, separated by MAl2 units, stacked along the c-axis. Both CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 order antiferromagnetically below TN1 = 14 and 16 K, respectively, and undergo a second antiferromagnetic transitition at lower temperature (TN2 = 9 and 14 K, respectively). CePtAl4Si2 orders ferromagnetically below TC = 3 Kmore » with an ordered moment of μsat = 0.8 μB for a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the c-axis. Electronic structure calculations reveal quasi-2D character of the Fermi surface.« less

  2. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 g/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 C, 27 C, and 32 C there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  3. T-692: VMware vFabric tc Server Lets Remote Users Login Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: VMware vFabric tc Server Lets Remote Users Login Using Obfuscated Passwords T-692: VMware vFabric tc Server Lets Remote Users Login Using Obfuscated Passwords August 12, 2011 -...

  4. Funda o Parque Tecnol gico da Paraiba PaqTc Incubator | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Funda o Parque Tecnol gico da Paraiba PaqTc Incubator Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fundao Parque Tecnolgico da Paraiba (PaqTc Incubator) Place: Brazil Sector: Services...

  5. IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' w&m PadmmmTuJ tmml' aIs~#l!REm m-t, - 188kwxm BYI alahard 0. cr*rrror cy- r' , ' .~ -' - -' ^ , /' cs< 4. .c :' ; *. .h,- ' (z&&y .' ,/ ;f. .* &J >l a. L \' P" ,,,' ,.' I * :{' \ !' l t ..b c&~ tf ~ , r ,, r. ,* .;;;., k J ;, b $y$' Lrmprrw)rlt&tmxJ- a@. Frqrr at t&i8 raoLli:.y SC\ daummiI~Luualndr8rr~lfCUIf@@?~~oy-~ d )I t rq ,i .* 1 Virium~~bUrlJlOgarspvlr at ma rdutw. (500 p-4 3) i" 1 ) ,ip" 2. rt A8 - u %I* mm

  6. Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data Sets for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Like This Return to Search Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data Sets for Biomass National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology...

  7. Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; George, Easo P.; Bloom, Everett E.

    2006-01-03

    An alloy composition includes, in atomic percent: about 1 to about 10% of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf, balance Ir.

  8. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray transient ...

  9. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics,...

  10. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films Prev Next Title: Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline...

  11. Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: I, spin polarons and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    high-{Tc} pairing (Conference) | SciTech Connect Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: I, spin polarons and high-{Tc} pairing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: I, spin polarons and high-{Tc} pairing The concept of a spin polaron is introduced and contrasted with the more familiar ionic polaron picture. A brief review of aspects of ionic bipolaronic superconductivity is given with particular emphasis on the real-space

  12. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlenga, Klaus (Eggenstein, DE); de Souza, Ricardo E. (Recife, BR); Wong-Foy, Annjoe (Berkeley, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  13. Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Gary Smith Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) November 18, 2010 2 Rough Flowsheet Diagram Tank Farm Evaporator Pretreatment Evaporator IDF ETF HLW LAW Vit Secondary SBS WESP Melter Supplemental ? Repository Secondary -Caustic Scrub (LAW Vit) -HEPA Filters -Carbon Beds -Silver Mordenite (HLW Vit) -Other operating wastes Recycle Options * Continuous recycle of the SBS/WESP bottoms from LAW vitrification are assumed in baseline - could consider purges and

  14. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  15. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  16. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  17. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-03-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

  18. Microsoft Word - HAB Adv #146 Tc-99.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Subject: Technetium Removal at WTP Adopted: April 4, 2003 Page 1 Apr. 4, 2003 Roy Schepens, Manager U. S Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 Richland, WA 99352 Subject: Technetium Removal at WTP Dear Mr. Schepens, Recently the Department of Energy Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) announced the decision to eliminate technetium (Tc-99) pretreatment from the tank waste pretreatment plant (WTP). The Hanford Advisory Board (Board) has several concerns with this

  19. NaIrO3A Pentavalent Post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Bremholm; S Dutton; P Stephens; R Cava

    2011-12-31

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides.

  20. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  1. New IRS Rules for Small and Medium Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) will host a webinar on how certification is being used to meet the new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements for small and medium wind turbines...

  2. IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Treasury and the IRS published new guidance today allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs) for Tribes that have projects that are in the final stages of going to the market to receive financing.

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send...

  4. DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines – defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW – in...

  5. Spin-orbit tuned metal-insulator transitions in single-crystal Sr₂Ir1–xRhxO₄ (0≤x≤1)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qi, T. F.; Korneta, O. B.; Li, L.; Butrouna, K.; Cao, V. S.; Wan, Xiangang; Schlottmann, P.; Kaul, R. K.; Cao, G.

    2012-09-06

    Sr₂IrO₄ is a magnetic insulator driven by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) whereas the isoelectronic and isostructural Sr₂RhO₄ is a paramagnetic metal. The contrasting ground states have been shown to result from the critical role of the strong SOI in the iridate. Our investigation of structural, transport, magnetic, and thermal properties reveals that substituting 4d Rh⁴⁺ (4d⁵) ions for 5d Ir⁴⁺ (5d⁵) ions in Sr₂IrO₄ directly reduces the SOI and rebalances the competing energies so profoundly that it generates a rich phase diagram for Sr₂Ir1–xRhxO₄ featuring two major effects: (1) Light Rh doping (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16) prompts a simultaneous andmore » precipitous drop in both the electrical resistivity and the magnetic ordering temperature TC, which is suppressed to zero at x = 0.16 from 240 K at x = 0. (2) However, with heavier Rh doping [0.24 < x < 0.85 (±0.05)] disorder scattering leads to localized states and a return to an insulating state with spin frustration and exotic magnetic behavior that only disappears near x = 1. The intricacy of Sr₂Ir1–xRhxO₄ is further highlighted by comparison with Sr₂Ir1–xRuxO₄ where Ru⁴⁺ (4d⁴) drives a direct crossover from the insulating to metallic states.« less

  6. Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Precipitator | Department of Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator Lead Performer: GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY Partners: N/A DOE Funding: $1,040,000 Cost Share: $260,001 Project Term: October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2016 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2014 (FOA DE-FOA-0001027) Project Objective The goal

  7. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Instrumentation Working Group (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group The facilities reported on are all in a fairly mature state of operation, as evidenced by the very detailed studies and correction schemes that all groups are working on.

  8. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation Authors: Harpham, M. R. ; Nguyen, S. C. ; Hou, Z. ; Grossman, J. C. ; Harris, C. B. ; Mara, M. W. ; Stickrath, A. B. ; Kanai, Y. ;

  9. Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recap & Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations Gary Smith Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) November 18, 2010 2 Rough Flowsheet Diagram Tank Farm Evaporator Pretreatment Evaporator IDF ETF HLW LAW Vit Secondary SBS WESP Melter Supplemental ? Repository Secondary -Caustic Scrub (LAW Vit) -HEPA Filters -Carbon Beds -Silver Mordenite (HLW Vit) -Other operating wastes Fate of Tc-99 at WTP * WTP flowsheet Tc partitions: - approximately 77.1% to supplemental LAW treatment -

  10. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  11. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation ...

  13. Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recap & Conclusions to TcI in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations Gary Smith Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) November 18, 2010 2 Rough Flowsheet Diagram Tank Farm Evaporator ...

  14. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-11-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC22, the first test campaign using a high moisture lignite from Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC22 was conducted from March 24 to April 17, 2007. The gasification process was operated for 543 hours, increasing the total gasification operation at the PSDF to over 10,000 hours. The PSDF gasification process was operated in air-blown mode with a total of about 1,080 tons of coal. Coal feeder operation was challenging due to the high as-received moisture content of the lignite, but adjustments to the feeder operating parameters reduced the frequency of coal feeder trips. Gasifier operation was stable, and carbon conversions as high as 98.9 percent were demonstrated. Operation of the PCD and other support equipment such as the recycle gas compressor and ash removal systems operated reliably.

  15. Synthesis, structure elucidation and redox properties of 99Tc complexes of lacunary Wells Dawson polyoxometalates: insights into molecular 99Tc - metal oxide interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Howell, Robertha C.; Mbomekalle, Israel M.; Lukens Jr, Wayne W.; Bian, Fang; Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2011-01-10

    The isotope 99Tc (beta max: 250 keV, half-life: 2 x 105 year) is an abundant product of uranium-235 fission in nuclear reactors and is present throughout the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford and Savannah River. Understanding and controlling the extensive redox chemistry of 99Tc is important to identify tunable strategies to separate 99Tc from spent fuel and from waste tanks and once separated, to identify and develop an appropriately stable waste-form for 99Tc. Polyoxometalates (POMs), nanometer sized models for metal oxide solid-state materials, are used in this study to provide a molecular level understanding of the speciation and redox chemistry of incorporated 99Tc. In this study, 99Tc complexes of the (alpha 2-P2W17O61)10- and (alpha 1-P2W17O61)10- isomers were prepared. Ethylene glycol was used as a"transfer ligand" to minimize the formation of TcO2 cdot xH2O. The solution structures, formulations, and purity of TcVO(alpha 1/alpha 2-P2W17O61)7- were determined by multinuclear NMR. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the complexes are in agreement with the formulation and structures determined from 31P and 183W NMR. Preliminary electrochemistry results are consistent with the EXAFS results, showing a facile reduction of the TcVO(alpha 1-P2W17O61)7- species compared to the TcVO(alpha 2-P2W17O61)7- analog. The alpha1- defect is unique in that a basic oxygen atom is positioned toward the alpha1- site and the TcVO center appears to form a dative metal-metal bond with a framework W site. These attributes may lead to the assistance of protonation events that facilitate reduction. Electrochemistry comparison shows that the ReV analogs are about 200 mV more difficult to reduce in accordance with periodic trends.

  16. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  17. On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm054_warren_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography Online Weld Quality NDE & Control with IR Thermography

  18. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% Document provides an overview of how the IRS and MC Realty Group, its property management firm, achieved a 76% reduction in lighting energy use at an IRS facility parking garage in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2

  19. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

  20. Oxidative Dissolution Potential of Biogenic and Abiogenic TcO2 in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2009-04-15

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Exhibiting an intermediate redox potential, Tc is highly mobile in its anionic, oxidized state [Tc(VII)O4-]; and less mobile as a poorly soluble oxyhydroxide precipitate [Tc(IV)O2•nH2O] in its reduced state. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state (FRC, RG). Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Biogenic Tc(IV)O2•nH2O was oxidized in anoxic, but unreduced RG and FRC sediments through redox interaction with Mn(III/IV) oxides. Bioreduction by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 dissolved Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated biogenic Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. Biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO2-like phase in both sediments. Redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular speciation to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro x-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-contained particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 µm-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass-transfer-limited migration of O2 into intra-aggregate and intraparticle domains where Tc(IV) existed; and the formation of unique, oxidation-resistant, intragrain Tc(IV)-Fe(III) molecular species.

  1. Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History...

  2. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  3. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  4. Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fate of Tc 99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture DOE EM High-Level Waste Corporate Board and as seen at the DOE EM Construction Project Review November 2010 Bechtel National, Inc. Albert A. Kruger, DOE-WED Glass Scientist John Olson, BNI Manager, Process Engineering Design 2 Fate of Tc 99 During Waste Processing A.Technical Basis for planned retention of Tc 99 in LAW and HLW glass B.Overall process mass balance C.Role of recycle, secondary waste and other disposition pathways D.Distribution of

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV. The 1,055-ft2 two-story production home has 6-in. SIP walls, a 10-in. SIP roof, and ICF foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab. A single ductless

  6. DOE Tour of Zero: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes Addthis 1 of 19 TC Legend Homes built this 2,781-square-foot home in Bellingham, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 19 A greenhouse off the kitchen provides a thermal transition zone into the home, minimizing heat losses during the winter. The solar hot water heating panels are visible on the porch roof.

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 37 without PV, HERS -1 with PV. This 1,915-square-foot custom home has SIP walls and roof, R-20 XPS under the slab, triple-pane windows, an air to water heat pump for radiant heat, and balanced ventilation with timer-controlled fans to bring in and exhaust air. PDF icon TC Legend Homes

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend, Seattle, WA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored ...

  9. V-183: Cisco TelePresence TC and TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent Authenticated Users Gain Root Shell Access V-183: Cisco TelePresence TC and TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent...

  10. ITER Generic Diagnostic Upper Port Plug Nuclear Heating and Personnel Dose Rate Assesment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell E. Feder and Mahmoud Z. Youssef

    2009-01-28

    Neutronics analysis to find nuclear heating rates and personnel dose rates were conducted in support of the integration of diagnostics in to the ITER Upper Port Plugs. Simplified shielding models of the Visible-Infrared diagnostic and of a large aperture diagnostic were incorporated in to the ITER global CAD model. Results for these systems are representative of typical designs with maximum shielding and a small aperture (Vis-IR) and minimal shielding with a large aperture. The neutronics discrete-ordinates code ATTILA and SEVERIAN (the ATTILA parallel processing version) was used. Material properties and the 500 MW D-T volume source were taken from the ITER Brand Model MCNP benchmark model. A biased quadrature set equivelant to Sn=32 and a scattering degree of Pn=3 were used along with a 46-neutron and 21-gamma FENDL energy subgrouping. Total nuclear heating (neutron plug gamma heating) in the upper port plugs ranged between 380 and 350 kW for the Vis-IR and Large Aperture cases. The Large Aperture model exhibited lower total heating but much higher peak volumetric heating on the upper port plug structure. Personnel dose rates are calculated in a three step process involving a neutron-only transport calculation, the generation of activation volume sources at pre-defined time steps and finally gamma transport analyses are run for selected time steps. ANSI-ANS 6.1.1 1977 Flux-to-Dose conversion factors were used. Dose rates were evaluated for 1 full year of 500 MW DT operation which is comprised of 3000 1800-second pulses. After one year the machine is shut down for maintenance and personnel are permitted to access the diagnostic interspace after 2-weeks if dose rates are below 100 ?Sv/hr. Dose rates in the Visible-IR diagnostic model after one day of shutdown were 130 ?Sv/hr but fell below the limit to 90 ?Sv/hr 2-weeks later. The Large Aperture style shielding model exhibited higher and more persistent dose rates. After 1-day the dose rate was 230 ?Sv/hr but was still at 120 ?Sv/hr 4-weeks later.

  11. PV Standards: What IEC TC82 is Doing for You | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards: What IEC TC82 is Doing for You PV Standards: What IEC TC82 is Doing for You Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado PDF icon pvmrw13_ps3_sunset_kelly.pdf More Documents & Publications QA TG5 UV, temperature and humidity Test Procedure for UV Weathering Resistance of Backsheet PV QA Task Group #2: Thermal and Mechanical Fatigue Including Vibration

  12. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Authors: Grady, Nathaniel [1] ; Perkins Jr., Bradford G. [2] ; Hwang, Harold Y. [2] ; Brandt, Nate [2] ; Torchinsky, Darius [2] ; Singh, Ranjan [1] ; Yan, Li [3] ; Jia, Quanxi [1] ; Trugman, Stuart A. [1] ;

  13. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  14. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  15. Investigation of Tc Migration Mechanism During Bulk Vitrification Process Using Re Surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Fluegel, Alex; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Martinez, Baudelio; Matyas, Josef; Meyer, Perry A.; Paulsen, Dan; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Stewart, Charles W.; Swoboda, Robert G.; Yeager, John D.

    2006-12-04

    As a part of Bulk vitrification (BV) performance enhancement tasks, Laboratory scoping tests were performed in FY 2004-2005 to explore possible ways to reduce the amount of soluble Tc in the BV waste package. Theses scoping tests helped identify which mechanisms play an important role in the migration of Tc in the BV process (Hrma et al. 2005 and Kim et al. 2005). Based on the results from these scoping tests, additional tests were identified that will improve the understanding of Tc migration and to clearly identify the dominant mechanisms. The additional activities identified from previous studies were evaluated and prioritized for planning for Tasks 29 and 30 conducted in FY2006. Task 29 focused on the improved understanding of Tc migration mechanisms, and Task 30 focused on identifying the potential process changes that might reduce Tc/Re migration into the castable refractory block (CRB). This report summarizes the results from the laboratory- and crucible-scale tests in the lab for improved Tc migration mechanism understanding utilizing Re as a surrogate performed in Task 29.

  16. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

    1998-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  18. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: ...

  19. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  20. Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSIM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-08-05

    URGSIM estimates the location of surface water and groundwater resources in the upper Rio Grande Basin between the Colorado-New Mexico state line, and Caballo Reservoir from 1975 - 2045. It is a mass balance hydrology model of the Upper Rio Grande surface water, groundwater, and water demand systems which runs at a monthly timestep from 1975-1999 in calibration mode, 2000 – 2004 in validation mode, and 2005 – 2045 in scenario analysis mode.

  1. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe - Strategic Energy Planning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Tribal Lands Location Tribal lands Tribal lands Two Tribe Land sites: Two Tribe Land sites: Bow Hill Complex Bow Hill Complex The Tribal economic center with both development The Tribal economic center with both development & undeveloped lands. & undeveloped lands. Helmick Road Reservation Helmick Road Reservation The community & government center with both The community & government center with both developed & newly required community lands.

  2. Online Weld Quality NDE & Control with IR Thermography | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Weld Quality NDE & Control with IR Thermography Online Weld Quality NDE & Control with IR Thermography 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm026_feng_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography

  3. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr3Ir4Sn13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  4. IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

    2008-09-02

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 15004500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera arrays sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

  5. Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE I.: ~ CONTRACT NO. DE-AC04-83AL18796 1. Vicinity Property i: Completion Report i , . Remedial Actions , cContractor 4,. -~'~ ~for the Uranium Mill Tailings ~~~z ~ Remedial Actions Project - MK-FEROUSON COMPANY *C~Ad PEE *CMIWN>tfIOW VICINITY PROPERTY COMPLETION REPORT AT CA-401 MAYERS STREET BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 JUNE 30, 1987 FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT OFFICE ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF

  6. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History You are accessing a document from the...

  7. Upper Cumberland E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Upper Cumberland E M C Jump to: navigation, search Name: Upper Cumberland E M C Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 931-528-5449 or 931-372-2323 or 931-268-2123 or 931-268-5866 or...

  8. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM) Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Systems Modeling Upper Rio Grande Simulation...

  9. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  10. Analysis Of Leakage In Carbon Sequestration Projects In Forestry:A Case Study Of Upper Magat Watershed, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, Rodel D.; Pulhin, Florencia B.; Sales, Renezita F.

    2007-06-01

    The role of forestry projects in carbon conservation andsequestration is receiving much attention because of their role in themitigation of climate change. The main objective of the study is toanalyze the potential of the Upper Magat Watershed for a carbonsequestration project. The three main development components of theproject are forest conservation, tree plantations, and agroforestry farmdevelopment. At Year 30, the watershed can attain a net carbon benefit of19.5 M tC at a cost of US$ 34.5 M. The potential leakage of the projectis estimated using historical experience in technology adoption inwatershed areas in the Philippines and a high adoption rate. Two leakagescenarios were used: baseline and project leakage scenarios. Most of theleakage occurs in the first 10 years of the project as displacement oflivelihood occurs during this time. The carbon lost via leakage isestimated to be 3.7 M tC in the historical adoption scenario, and 8.1 MtC under the enhanced adoption scenario.

  11. Upper East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Upper East Fork Poplar Creek This document discusses the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek. Topics include: * The area's safety * Any use limitations for the area * History and cleanup background for this area * How DOE's cleanup program addressed the problem PDF icon Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Watershed fact sheet More Documents & Publications Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Recommendation 229: Recommendation on the Preferred Alternative for the Proposed Plan for

  12. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe lands consist of 550 acres of the Bow Hill Complex with reservation and new development economic lands located in Skagit County, Washington, adjacent to Interstate 5. The strategic energy plan would complete an assessment of the existing economic enterprises including hotel, convention center, and casino, plus potential green energy sources to serve the existing and developing facilities. The strategic energy analysis would complete an assessment of 50 acres acquired in October 2004, to build more low-income houses, and identify energy improvements for the existing fully developed 74 acres of the Helmick Road Reservation established in 1981.

  13. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universit de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  14. Qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iancso, Georgeta Iliescu, Elena Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-16

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the {sup 192}Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  15. Anisotropy reversal of the upper critical field at low temperatures and spin-locked superconductivity in K2Cr3As3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Kong, T.; Jaime, M.; McDonald, R. D.; Mielke, C. H.; Gurevich, A.; Canfield, P. C.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-06-23

    We report measurements of the anisotropic upper critical field Hc2(T) for K2Cr3As3 single crystals up to 60 T and T>0.6K. Our results show that the upper critical field parallel to the Cr chains, H∥c2(T), exhibits a paramagnetically limited behavior, whereas the shape of the H⊥c2(T) curve (perpendicular to the Cr chains) has no evidence of paramagnetic effects. As a result, the curves H⊥c2(T) and H∥c2(T) cross at T≈4K, so that the anisotropy parameter γH(T)=H⊥c2/H∥c2(T)increases from γH(Tc)≈0.35 near Tc to γH(0)≈1.7 at 0.6 K. This behavior of H∥c2(T) is inconsistent with triplet superconductivity but suggests a form of singlet superconductivity withmore » the electron spins locked onto the direction of Cr chains.« less

  16. HIPed Tailored Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Cs, Sr and Tc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: HIPed Tailored Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Cs, Sr and Tc Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HIPed Tailored Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Cs, Sr and Tc × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV. The 1,055-ft2 two-story production home has 6-in. SIP walls, a 10-in. SIP roof, and ICF foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab. A single ductless heat pump heats

  18. Universal versus Materials-Dependent Two-Gap Behaviour of the High-Tc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cuprate Superconductors: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of La2-xSrxCuO4 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Universal versus Materials-Dependent Two-Gap Behaviour of the High-Tc Cuprate Superconductors: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of La2-xSrxCuO4 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universal versus Materials-Dependent Two-Gap Behaviour of the High-Tc Cuprate Superconductors: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of La2-xSrxCuO4 We have investigated the doping and temperature

  19. Universal versus Materials-Dependent Two-Gap Behaviour of the High-Tc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cuprate Superconductors: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of La2-xSrxCuO4 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Universal versus Materials-Dependent Two-Gap Behaviour of the High-Tc Cuprate Superconductors: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of La2-xSrxCuO4 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universal versus Materials-Dependent Two-Gap Behaviour of the High-Tc Cuprate Superconductors: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of La2-xSrxCuO4 × You are accessing a document from the

  20. High-Risk Components Removed from K-25's Tc-99 Area | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy High-Risk Components Removed from K-25's Tc-99 Area High-Risk Components Removed from K-25's Tc-99 Area November 6, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM contractor URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) has removed one of the highest risk components remaining in the East Tennessee Technology Park's (ETTP) K-25 building, with the successful crane removal of five components known as NaF traps. The NaF traps contain a material that was used to absorb uranium from the

  1. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  2. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Botes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ?20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are ?/(1 + z) = 0.040 and ?/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the ?{sub ?}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ?1900 AGN deg{sup 2}.

  3. The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging A wide selection of lenses is very useful to the thermographer working in a research environment, where applications can vary from week to week. Both wide angle and telephoto infrared lenses are widely used alternatives to the standard lenses typically supplied by IR camera manufacturers. However, in some extreme applications the need

  4. On Loops in Inflation II: IR Effects in Single Clock Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On Loops in Inflation II: IR Effects in Single Clock Inflation Authors: Senatore, Leonardo ; Stanford U., ITP KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Zaldarriaga, Matias ; Princeton, Inst....

  5. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24 (MSr, Ba) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates ...

  6. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  7. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Babich, John W. (Redhill Surrey, GB2); Straub, Rita (Brookhaven, NY); Richards, Powell (New Bern, NC)

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  8. New method for the selective labeling of erythrocytes in whole blood with Tc-99m

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1984-01-27

    Method and kit are described for the preparation of /sup 99m/Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for the reduction of technetium.

  9. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruffner, Judith A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bullington, Jeff A. (Albuquerque, NM); Clem, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM); Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Tuttle, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwartz, Robert W. (Seneca, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

  10. Luminescence-Based Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for [Tc(dmpe)3]2+/+ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) within a Charge-Selective Polymer Film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Del Negro, Andrew S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Kaval, Necati; Pantelic, Nebojsa; Morris, Laura K.; Heineman, W. R.; Seliskar, Carl J.

    2011-03-01

    A spectroelectrochemical sensor consisting of an indium tin oxide (ITO) optically transparent electrode (OTE) coated with a thin film of sulfonated polystyrene-blockpoly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SSEBS) was developed for [Tc(dmpe)3]+.. [Tc(dmpe)3]+ preconcentrated by ion-exchange into the SSEBS film after 20 min exposure to aqueous [Tc(dmpe)3]+ solution, resulting in a 14-fold increase in cathodic peak current compared to a bare OTE. Colorless [Tc(dmpe)3]+ was reversibly oxidized to colored [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ by cyclic voltammetry. Detection of [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ was accomplished by electrochemically cycling the complex between non-emissive [Tc(dmpe)3]+ and emissive [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ and monitoring the modulated emission (?exc = 532 nm; ?em = 660 nm). The sensor gave a linear response over the range of 0.16 to 340.0 M.

  11. Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected...

  12. Upper Midwest Hydrogen Initiative UMHI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Midwest Hydrogen Initiative UMHI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Upper Midwest Hydrogen Initiative (UMHI) Place: Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip: 55407 Product: An industry-led,...

  13. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on upper crustal structure. We used results from surface geological mapping, drill hole data from water wells and geothermal exploration wells, KRISP 85 seismic data for a...

  14. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNIT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS...

  15. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: TC Legend, Seattle, WA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TC Legend Homes Seattle, WA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you superior

  17. Systematic investigation of electronic structure in BEDT-TTF based organic superconductors with Tc above 10 K; [kappa]-(BEDT-TTF)[sub 2]X (X = Cu(NCS)[sub 2], Cu[N(CN)[sub 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Toshikazu; Nobutoki, Tomoko; Miyamoto, Masao; Tsubokura, Yuichi; Tsuchiya, Ryota; Takahashi, Toshihiro ); Kanoda, Kazushi ); Saito, Gunzi )

    1994-06-01

    The electronic structure of the title superconductors has been investigated by electrical resistivity, complex susceptibility, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The superconducting properties (pressure dependence of Tc, magnetic penetration depth, upper critical field, and so on) of these three salts are similar to each other, while transport properties in the normal state have shown a large variety in the temperature dependence. In order to clarify the electronic structure in the normal state, the EPR parameters, the spin susceptibility ([Chi][sub spin]), and the linewidth ([Delta]H[sub pp]), are compared. An anomalous temperature dependence of the g-value has been observed below 150 K in the Cu(NCS)[sub 2] and Cu(CN)[N(CN)[sub 2

  18. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in biological tissues at ultraspatial resolutions.« less

  19. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  20. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  1. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 This content will become publicly available on November 23, 2016 « Prev Next » Title: Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal

  2. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ralph G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, S. Blaine (Idaho Falls, ID); Petti, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  3. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  4. New Insulating Antiferromagnetic Quaternary Iridates MLa10Ir4O24...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... other than t2g5, or the effect of hybridization with the O sublattice network. ... and 324 K for BaLa10Ir4O24. The magnetic entropy in the low-T regime can then be ...

  5. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    evolution in Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 This content will become publicly available on November 23, 2016 Prev Next Title: Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in ...

  6. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  7. Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley Authors T. Blum, K. van Wijk, L. Liberty, M. Batzle, R. Krahenbuhl, A. Revil and R. Reynolds Conference Society of...

  8. Geothermal resources of the Upper San Luis and Arkansas valleys...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resources of the Upper San Luis and Arkansas valleys, Colorado Authors R.H. Pearl and J.K. Barrett Editors Epis, R.C. & Weimer and R.I. Published Colorado School of Mines:...

  9. Nonmonotonic pressure evolution of the upper critical field in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the upper critical field, Hc2,c, of single crystalline FeSe was studied using measurements of the interplane resistivity, c, in magnetic fields parallel to tetragonal c axis. ...

  10. Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Schlumberger soundings in the...

  11. About EffectiveŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of

  12. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison to Reference Methods | Department of Energy Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_lake.pdf More Documents & Publications Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx

  13. IR-based Spot Weld NDT in Automotive Applications (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect IR-based Spot Weld NDT in Automotive Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IR-based Spot Weld NDT in Automotive Applications Authors: Chen, Jian [1] ; Feng, Zhili [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1185972 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Thermosense XXXVII - 2015, Baltimore, MD, USA, 20150420, 20150424 Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

  14. Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure Authors: Yusenko, Kirill V. [1] ; Bykova, Elena [2] ; Bykov, Maxim [2] ; Gromilov, Sergey A. [3] ; Kurnosov, Alexander V. [2] ; Prescher, Clemens [4] ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. [4] ; Hanfland, Michael [5] ; van Smaalen, Sander [2] ; Margadonna, Serena [1] ; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S. [2] + Show Author Affiliations Univ. of Oslo, Oslo

  15. IRS Issues New Tax Credit Guidance for Owners of Small Wind Turbines |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy IRS Issues New Tax Credit Guidance for Owners of Small Wind Turbines IRS Issues New Tax Credit Guidance for Owners of Small Wind Turbines February 19, 2015 - 10:02am Addthis Homeowners who install small wind turbines similar to these can qualify for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Wind Utility Consulting Homeowners who install small wind turbines similar to these can qualify for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Wind Utility Consulting Patrick Gilman Wind Market

  16. Table B-1: Analytical Results Statistical Mean Upper Confidence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B-1: Analytical Results Statistical Mean Upper Confidence Limit Statistical Mean Upper Confidence Limit TCLP Metals: TCLP Semivolatiles: Arsenic o-Cresol Barium p-Cresol Cadmium m-Cresol Chromium Cresol Lead 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Mercury Hexachlorobenzene Selenium Hexachlorobutadiene Silver Nitrobenzene TCLP Volatiles Pentachlorophenol Benzene 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol Carbon Tetrachloride 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Chlorobenzene Hexachloroethane Chloroform TCLP Pesticides and Herbicides:

  17. EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chelan County, Washington | Department of Energy EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project, Chelan County, Washington EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project, Chelan County, Washington SUMMARY BPA is preparing an EA that will analyze the potential impacts of a proposal to fund the Yakama Nation to improve, develop, and use fish rearing acclimation ponds for hatchery raised steelhead and Chinook salmon in the Methow and Wenatchee

  18. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M.; Fu, Hai; Wardlow, J.; Amber, S.; Baker, A. J.; Baes, M.; Bock, J.; Bourne, N.; Dye, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 ?m bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (?17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 ?m magnification factor (?{sub 880}) is ?1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (?{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ?2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  19. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24 (M=Sr, Ba)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Qingbiao; Han, Fei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Han, Tian -Heng; Li, Hao; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, oxides of Ir4+ have received renewed attention in the condensed matter physics community, as it has been reported that certain iridates have a strongly spin-orbital coupled (SOC) electronic state, Jeff = ½, that defines the electronic and magnetic properties. The canonical example is the Ruddlesden-Popper compound Sr2IrO4, which has been suggested as a potential route to a new class of high temperature superconductor due to the formal analogy between Jeff = ½ and the S = ½ state of the cuprate superconductors. The quest for other iridium oxides that present tests of the underlying SOC physics is underway. Inmore » this spirit, here we report the synthesis and physical properties of two new quaternary tetravalent iridates, MLa10Ir4O24 (M = Sr, Ba). The crystal structure of both compounds features isolated IrO6 octahedra in which the electronic configuration of Ir is d5. As a result, both compounds order antiferromagnetically despite the lack of obvious superexchange pathways, and resistivity measurement shows that SrLa10Ir4O24 is an insulator.« less

  20. Planar Hall effect in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X. Zou, L. K.

    2014-12-29

    The planar Hall effect of IrMn on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG = Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was measured in the magnetic field rotating in the film plane. The magnetic field angular dependence of planar Hall resistance (PHR) was observed in YIG/IrMn bilayer at different temperatures, while the Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn film shows constant PHR for different magnetic field angles at both 10 K and 300 K. This provides evidence that IrMn has interfacial spins which can be led by ferrimagnetic layer in YIG/IrMn structure. A hysteresis can be observed in PHR-magnetic field angle loop of YIG/IrMn film at 10 K, indicative of the irreversible switching of IrMn interfacial spins at low temperature.

  1. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  2. {sup 97}Tc produced by the ({sup 3}He,{ital pn}{gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslan, H.; Crowe, B.; Dague, T.; Savage, D.G.; Zeghib, S.; Rickey, F.A.; Simms, P.C.

    1996-08-01

    The nuclear structure of {sup 97}Tc was studied using the {sup 96}Mo({sup 3}He,{ital pn}{gamma}) reaction, which has populated most states in the nucleus below 2 MeV excitation energy. The proton exit channel was isolated from competing reaction channels by operating {gamma}-ray detectors in coincidence with a large-solid-angle proton detector. The experiments included {gamma}-ray excitation functions, {gamma}-ray angular distributions, and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences. The results were interpreted using a particle-rotor model. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. {sup 101}Tc produced by the ({sup 3}He,pn{gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, D.G.; Aslan, H.; Crowe, B.; Dague, T.; Zeghib, S.; Rickey, F.A.; Simms, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear structure of {sup 101}Tc was studied using the {sup 100}Mo({sup 3}He,pn{gamma}) reaction, which has populated most states in the nucleus below 2 MeV excitation energy. The proton exit channel was isolated from competing reaction channels by operating {gamma}-ray detectors in coincidence with a large-solid-angle proton detector. The experiments included {gamma}-ray excitation functions, {gamma}-ray angular distributions, and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences. The results were interpreted using a particle-rotor model. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    House, Bellingham, WA | Department of Energy Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6" SIP walls and 10" SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV;

  5. Interfacial Electron-Phonon Coupling as the Cause of Enhanced Tc in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single-layer FeSe Films on SrTiO3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Interfacial Electron-Phonon Coupling as the Cause of Enhanced Tc in Single-layer FeSe Films on SrTiO3 Friday, February 27, 2015 In the past several years, multiple studies have confirmed superconductivity in single-unit-cell-thick films of iron selenide (1UC FeSe) grown on strontium titanate (STO), with gap opening temperatures approaching the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, which is nearly a decade higher than

  6. Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liem, Peng Hong [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.) Scientific Computational Division, 416 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Ibaraki (Japan); Tran, Hoai Nam [Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Applied Physics, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan, Banten (Indonesia); Arbie, Bakri [PT MOTAB Technology, Kedoya Elok Plaza Blok DA 12, Jl. Panjang, Kebun Jeruk, Jakarta Barat (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

  7. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75?ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between IrC and IrIr interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  8. Rapid formation of the Bi{sub 2{minus}x}Pb{sub x}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} high {Tc}-phase, using spray-dried nitrate precursor powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Driessche, I.; Mouton, R.; Hoste, S.

    1996-08-01

    This study describes the use of spray-dried nitrate precursor powders in the synthesis of Bi-2223 high {Tc}-superconductors. The decomposition of the precursor powder is studied using TGA/DTA, XRD, IR, and nitrogen analyses. The particle size is determined using SEM. The low decomposition temperature of the nitrates ({approximately}600 C) and the small particle size of the spray dried powder ({approximately}3{center_dot}10{sup {minus}6} m), resulting in a lowering of the calcination temperature and a shortening of the sinter time, enabled the authors to synthesize a > 96% pure Bi-2223 phase (from XRD peak intensities) after a thermal process of 5h at 650 C and 60 h at 855 C.

  9. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775?K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77?K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  10. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OPERABLE UNIT (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNIT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNIT No abstract prepared. Authors: Paller, M. ; Dyer, S. ; Scott, S. Publication Date: 2011-07-18 OSTI Identifier: 1023278 Report Number(s): SRNL-TR-2011-00201 TRN: US201118%%1082 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC09-08SR22470

  11. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  12. Handling collision debris in quad- and dipole-first LHC IR options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    Detailed MARS15 Monte Carlo energy deposition calculations are performed for two main designs of the LHC interaction regions (IR) capable to achieve a luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}: a traditional quadrupole-first scheme and the one with a dual-bore inner triplet with separation dipoles placed in front of the quadrupoles. It is shown that with the appropriate design of the Nb3Sn magnets, IR layout and a number of protective measures implemented, both schemes are feasible for the LHC luminosity upgrade up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  13. Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the CH activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the CH bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and regenerate the catalyst.

  14. FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) in saline reservoirs in sedimentary formations has the potential to reduce the impact of fossil fuel combustion on climate change by reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and storing the CO2 in geologic formations in perpetuity. At pressure and temperature

  15. Filamentation of IR and UV femtosecond pulses upon focusing in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dergachev, A A; Ionin, Andrei A; Kandidov, V P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shlenov, Svyatoslav A

    2013-01-31

    The filamentation of IR and UV laser pulses has been studied numerically and experimentally for different initial beam focusing geometries, and linear electron density profiles along the plasma channel of filaments have been obtained. The results demonstrate that changes in laser beam focusing have a stronger effect on filament and plasma channel parameters for UV radiation than for IR radiation. Focusing causes individual high fluence regions produced by refocusing to merge to form a continuous extended filament with a continuous plasma channel. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  16. Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7 Authors: Shapiro, M. C. ; Riggs, Scott C. ; Stone, M. B. ; de la Cruz, C. R. ; Chi, S. ; Podlesnyak, A. A. ; Fisher, I. R. Publication Date: 2012-06-26 OSTI Identifier: 1103656 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review. B. Condensed Matter and Materials

  17. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 No abstract prepared. Authors: Asbury, John B. ; Ghosh, Hirendra N. ; Yeston, Jake S. ; Bergman, Robert G. ; Lian, Tianquan Publication Date:

  18. Synthesis of monoclinic IrT e 2 under high pressure and its physical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Synthesis of monoclinic IrT e 2 under high pressure and its physical properties Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 11, 2016 Title: Synthesis of monoclinic IrT e 2 under high pressure and its physical properties Authors: Li, X. ; Yan, J.-Q. ; Singh, D. J. ; Goodenough, J. B. ; Zhou, J.-S. Publication Date: 2015-10-12 OSTI Identifier: 1224648 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal

  19. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density

  20. To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7, 19% To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§ Subject: Extrusion of Billets, Titus Metals, Inc., Waterloo, Iowa A grpup of ANL aqloyees consisting of LE. Walker and S. Matsas (MET), E. Leverens (SSE), I(. C.~Buffy'(SPM), and G. T. Lonergan (IRS), traveled to Waterloo, Iowa, on June 29 where they accomplished the extrusion of U308 billets into fuel plates for Argonaut. Prior to beginning the extrusion operation, the floor area around the press,

  1. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers. PDF icon p-07_frazee.pdf More Documents & Publications 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods Urea SCR and DPF

  2. Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2009-08-13

    There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

  3. ITER Generic Diagnostic Upper Port Plug Nuclear Heating and Personnel Dose Rate Assesment Neutronics Analysis using the ATTILA Discrete Ordinates Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell Feder and Mahmoud Z. Yousef

    2009-05-29

    Neutronics analysis to find nuclear heating rates and personnel dose rates were conducted in support of the integration of diagnostics in to the ITER Upper Port Plugs. Simplified shielding models of the Visible-Infrared diagnostic and of the ECH heating system were incorporated in to the ITER global CAD model. Results for these systems are representative of typical designs with maximum shielding and a small aperture (Vis-IR) and minimal shielding with a large aperture (ECH). The neutronics discrete-ordinates code ATTILA and SEVERIAN (the ATTILA parallel processing version) was used. Material properties and the 500 MW D-T volume source were taken from the ITER Brand Model MCNP benchmark model. A biased quadrature set equivelant to Sn=32 and a scattering degree of Pn=3 were used along with a 46-neutron and 21-gamma FENDL energy subgrouping. Total nuclear heating (neutron plug gamma heating) in the upper port plugs ranged between 380 and 350 kW for the Vis-IR and ECH cases. The ECH or Large Aperture model exhibited lower total heating but much higher peak volumetric heating on the upper port plug structure. Personnel dose rates are calculated in a three step process involving a neutron-only transport calculation, the generation of activation volume sources at pre-defined time steps and finally gamma transport analyses are run for selected time steps. ANSI-ANS 6.1.1 1977 Flux-to-Dose conversion factors were used. Dose rates were evaluated for 1 full year of 500 MW DT operation which is comprised of 3000 1800-second pulses. After one year the machine is shut down for maintenance and personnel are permitted to access the diagnostic interspace after 2-weeks if dose rates are below 100 ?Sv/hr. Dose rates in the Visible-IR diagnostic model after one day of shutdown were 130 ?Sv/hr but fell below the limit to 90 ?Sv/hr 2-weeks later. The Large Aperture or ECH style shielding model exhibited higher and more persistent dose rates. After 1-day the dose rate was 230 ?Sv/hr but was still at 120 ?Sv/hr 4-weeks later. __________________________________________________

  4. A technique using {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for radiotherapy treatment planning for liver cancers or metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Sui; Jacob, Rojymon; Bender, Luvenia W.; Duan, Jun; Spencer, Sharon A.

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) requires a sufficient functional liver volume to tolerate the treatment. The current study extended the work of de Graaf et al. (2010) [3] on the use of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin imaging for presurgery planning to radiotherapy planning for liver cancer or metastases. Patient was immobilized and imaged in an identical position on a single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT-CT) system and a radiotherapy simulation CT system. {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT was registered to the planning CT through image registration of noncontrast CT from SPECT-CT system to the radiotherapy planning CT. The voxels with higher uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin were transferred to the planning CT as an avoidance structure in optimizing a 2-arc RapidArc plan for SBRT delivery. Excellent dose coverage to the target and sparing of the healthy remnant liver volume was achieved. This report illustrated a procedure for the use of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for optimizing radiotherapy for liver cancers and metastases.

  5. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with Tc-99m

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1988-07-05

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available for the reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  6. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with TC-99M

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Babich, John W. (Redhill, GB2); Straub, Rita (Brookhaven, NY); Richards, Powell (New Bern, NC)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for the reduction of technetium.

  7. Photophysics and Luminescence Spectroelectrochemistry of [Tc(dmpe)3]+/2+ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Del Negro, Andrew S.; Smith, Frances N.; Wang, Zheming; Hightower, Sean E.; Sullivan, Brian P.; Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2013-12-05

    The ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) excited state luminescence of [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ (dmpe is 1,2-bis-(dimethylphosphino)ethane) has been measured in solution at room temperature, and is compared to its Re analogue. Surprisingly, both [M(dmpe)3]2+* (M = Re, Tc) species have extremely large excited-state potentials (ESPs) as oxidants - the highest for any simple coordination complex of a transition metal. Furthermore, this potential is available using a photon of visible light (calculated for M = Re(Tc); E1/2* = +2.61(2.48) V versus SCE; ?max = 526(585) nm). Open shell TDDFT calculations support the assignment of the lowest energy transition in both the technetium and rhenium complexes to be a doublet-doublet process that involve predominantly LMCT (dmpe-to-metal) character and is in agreement with past assignments for the Re system. As expected for highly oxidizing excited state potentials, quenching is observed for the excited states by both the rhenium and technetium complexes. Stern-Volmer analysis resulted in quenching parameters for both the rhenium and technetium complexes under identical conditions, and are compared using Rehm-Weller analysis. Of particular interest is the fact that both benzene and toluene are oxidized by both the Re and Tc systems.

  8. A field trial of novel bifunctional resins for removing pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, B.; Liang, L.; Brown, G.M.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Moyer, B.A.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Ober, R.

    1998-03-01

    A field trial using a custom-designed bifunctional synthetic resin prepared at the University of Tennessee and designed to selectively remove pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) from groundwater was conducted in summer 1997 at the Northwest Plume Pump-and-Treat Facility at the US Department of Energy`s Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site. The bifunctional resin, RO-02-119, was a copolymer of vinylbenzylchloride and divinylbenzene that had been functionalized with trihexylamine and triethylamine. The experiment was a parallel test of the synthetic resin and a commercial resin, Purolite A-520E, to directly compare the performance of the two resins. Purolite resin is currently used by the treatment facility to remove Tc-99 from the contaminated groundwater containing {approximately}1,000 pCi/L TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. A total of {approximately}692,000 bed volumes of groundwater was passed through the column containing the synthetic resin (RO-02-119) whereas only {approximately}205,000 bed volumes of groundwater were passed through the Purolite resin column because of reduced hydraulic conductivity and clogging within the latter column. Despite less groundwater passing through the Purolite resin column, however, the breakthrough of TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} occurred earlier in the Purolite column than in the RO-02-119 column.

  9. Nature of the insulating ground state of the 5d postperovskite CaIrO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Sun -Woo; Liu, Chen; Kim, Hyun -Jung; Lee, Jun -Ho; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Cho, Jun -Hyung

    2015-08-26

    In this study, the insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate thatmore » CaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.« less

  10. Thermodynamics and superconductivity of Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James L; Lashley, Jason C; Volz, Heather M; Fisher, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Expanding the temperature range of previous specific-heat measurements on the Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system, we measure the effect of transition-metal substitution on total entropy (S{sub 298 k}), electronic specific heat ({gamma}), and Debye temperature ({Theta}D). In addition we measure the pressure dependence, up to 10 kbar, of the superconducting transition.

  11. Nature of the insulating ground state of the5d postperovskite CaIrO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sun -Woo; Liu, Chen; Kim, Hyun -Jung; Lee, Jun -Ho; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Cho, Jun -Hyung

    2015-08-26

    In this study, the insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate that CaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.

  12. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  13. Nature of the insulating ground state of the5d postperovskite CaIrO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Sun -Woo; Liu, Chen; Kim, Hyun -Jung; Lee, Jun -Ho; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Cho, Jun -Hyung

    2015-08-26

    In this study, the insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate thatmoreCaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.less

  14. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matthew D.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-01

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850?C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR activity on the supported highly dispersed Rh catalyst can be rationalized by the thermodynamic limitation for the very first C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst. The C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst is highly endothermic although the barrier is competitive with the barriers of both the C-C and the C-H bond-breakings on the small Rh50 catalyst. The calculations also imply that, for the supported Rh catalysts the C-C and C-H bond scissions are competitive, independently of the Rh cluster sizes. After the initial dissociation step via either the C-C or the C-H bond scission, the C-H bond breaking seems to be more favorable rather than the C-C bond breaking on the larger Rh terrace surface. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energys Office of Biomass Programs. Computing time was granted by a user project at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  15. Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  16. Vertical dispersion of inertial waves in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenstein, D.M.

    1983-05-20

    A linear model of the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves is developed. A porosity distribution near the bottom of the computational domain minimizes bottom reflections and simulates an ocean of the infinite depth. The model is used to show that the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves in the upper ocean may, under certain conditions, contribute significanlty to the observed rapid decay of inertial oscillations in the surface layer. The kinetic energy of inertial oscillations at mid-latitudes decays with an e folding time scale of 10 days or less, when the parameter lambda(km)/N(cph)d(m) is less than or of the order of unity, where lambda is the wavelength of the wind-generated near-inertial waves, N is the Vaeisaelae frequency in the upper pycnocline, and d is the surface layer thickness. At the top of the pycnocline the model predicts a velocity maximum, which develops as energy propagates downward, out of the surface layer. However, when the upper pycnocline is sufficiently peaked, a resonant frequency interference effect is predicted. This effect modulates the dissipation of surface layer inertial oscillations, and their magnitude after a storm need not decay monotonically. We also make qualitative comparisons with deep-ocean current meter observations taken during the Mixed Layer Experiment (MILE) and with shallow water (105 m) observations taken in the Baltic Sea.

  17. Method for generating a crystalline {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} product and the isolation {sup 99m}Tc compositions therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Kirkham, R.J.; Tranter, T.J.

    1998-09-01

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions. {sup 100}Mo metal is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to produce {sup 99}Mo metal which is dissolved in a solvent. A solvated {sup 99}Mo product is then dried to generate a supply of {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} crystals. The crystals are thereafter heated at a temperature which will sublimate the crystals and form a gaseous mixture containing vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3} and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2} but will not cause the production of vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. The mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled to a temperature sufficient to convert the vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing product. The product has high purity levels resulting from the use of reduced temperature conditions and ultrafine crystalline {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} starting materials with segregated {sup 99m}Tc compositions therein which avoid the production of vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} contaminants. 1 fig.

  18. Method for generating a crystalline .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 product and the isolation .sup.99m Tc compositions therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ralph G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kirkham, Robert J. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions. .sup.100 Mo metal is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to produce .sup.99 Mo metal which is dissolved in a solvent. A solvated .sup.99 Mo product is then dried to generate a supply of .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 crystals. The crystals are thereafter heated at a temperature which will sublimate the crystals and form a gaseous mixture containing vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3 and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2 but will not cause the production of vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. The mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled to a temperature sufficient to convert the vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing product. The product has high purity levels resulting from the use of reduced temperature conditions and ultrafine crystalline .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 starting materials with segregated .sup.99m Tc compositions therein which avoid the production of vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 contaminants.

  19. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  20. C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) at IR wavelengths and the variability of CO abundances among Oort Cloud comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Gibb, E. L.

    2014-08-20

    We report production rates, rotational temperatures, and related parameters for gases in C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the Near InfraRed SPECtrometer at the Keck Observatory, on six UT dates spanning heliocentric distances (R{sub h} ) that decreased from 1.35 AU to 1.16 AU (pre-perihelion). We quantified nine gaseous species (H{sub 2}O, OH*, CO, CH{sub 4}, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}) and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO). Compared with organics-normal comets, our results reveal highly enriched CO, (at most) slightly enriched CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and HCN, and CH{sub 4} consistent with {sup n}ormal{sup ,} yet depleted, NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}CO. Rotational temperatures increased from ?50 K to ?70 K with decreasing R{sub h} , following a power law in R{sub h} of 2.0 0.2, while the water production rate increased from 1.0 to 3.9 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup 1}, following a power law in R{sub h} of 4.7 0.9. The ortho-para ratio for H{sub 2}O was 3.01 0.49, corresponding to spin temperatures (T {sub spin}) ? 29 K (at the 1? level). The observed spatial profiles for these emissions showed complex structures, possibly tied to nucleus rotation, although the cadence of our observations limits any definitive conclusions. The retrieved CO abundance in Lovejoy is more than twice the median value for comets in our IR survey, suggesting this comet is enriched in CO. We discuss the enriched value for CO in comet C/2013 R1 in terms of the variability of CO among Oort Cloud comets.

  1. Curing the UV/IR mixing for field theories with translation-invariant star products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasa, Adrian; Vitale, Patrizia

    2010-03-15

    The ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing of noncommutative field theories has been recently shown to be a generic feature of translation-invariant associative products. In this paper we propose to take into account the quantum corrections of the model to modify in this way the noncommutative action. This idea was already used to cure the UV/IR mixing for theories on Moyal space. We show that in the present framework also, this proposal proves successful for curing the mixing. We achieve this task by explicit calculations of one and higher loops Feynman amplitudes. For the sake of completeness, we compute the form of the new action in the matrix base for the Wick-Voros product.

  2. Nodal bilayer-splitting controlled by spin-orbit interactions in underdoped high-Tc cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harrison, N.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Shekhter, A.

    2015-06-03

    The highest superconducting transition temperatures in the cuprates are achieved in bilayer and trilayer systems, highlighting the importance of interlayer interactions for high Tc. It has been argued that interlayer hybridization vanishes along the nodal directions by way of a specific pattern of orbital overlap. Recent quantum oscillation measurements in bilayer cuprates have provided evidence for a residual bilayer-splitting at the nodes that is sufficiently small to enable magnetic breakdown tunneling at the nodes. Here we show that several key features of the experimental data can be understood in terms of weak spin-orbit interactions naturally present in bilayer systems, whosemore » primary effect is to cause the magnetic breakdown to be accompanied by a spin flip. These features can now be understood to include the equidistant set of three quantum oscillation frequencies, the asymmetry of the quantum oscillation amplitudes in c-axis transport compared to ab-plane transport, and the anomalous magnetic field angle dependence of the amplitude of the side frequencies suggestive of small effective g-factors. We suggest that spin-orbit interactions in bilayer systems can further affect the structure of the nodal quasiparticle spectrum in the superconducting phase. PACS numbers: 71.45.Lr, 71.20.Ps, 71.18.+y« less

  3. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant.

  4. An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern

  5. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  6. Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt,

  7. Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband

  8. NGC 7538 IRS. 1. Interaction of a polarized dust spiral and a molecular outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, M. C. H.; Hull, Charles L. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pillai, Thushara [Max Planck Institut fr Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hgel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Zhao, Jun-Hui [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sandell, Gran, E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Room 146, PO Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present dust polarization and CO molecular line images of NGC 7538 IRS 1. We combined data from the Submillimeter Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to make images with ?2.''5 resolution at 230 and 345 GHz. The images show a remarkable spiral pattern in both the dust polarization and molecular outflow. These data dramatically illustrate the interplay between a high infall rate onto IRS 1 and a powerful outflow disrupting the dense, clumpy medium surrounding the star. The images of the dust polarization and the CO outflow presented here provide observational evidence for the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the infall and the outflow. The spiral dust pattern, which rotates through over 180 from IRS 1, may be a clumpy filament wound up by conservation of angular momentum in the infalling material. The redshifted CO emission ridge traces the dust spiral closely through the MM dust cores, several of which may contain protostars. We propose that the CO maps the boundary layer where the outflow is ablating gas from the dense gas in the spiral.

  9. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy development within Western’s Upper Great Plains Customer Service Region (Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota) and upon the Service’s landscape-level grassland and wetland easements. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  10. Project Reports for Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe lands consist of 550 acres of the Bow Hill Complex with reservation and new development economic lands located in Skagit County, Washington, adjacent to Interstate 5. The strategic energy plan would complete an assessment of the existing economic enterprises including hotel, convention center, and casino, plus potential green energy sources to serve the existing and developing facilities. The strategic energy analysis would complete an assessment of 50 acres acquired in October 2004, to build more low-income houses, and identify energy improvements for the existing fully developed 74 acres of the Helmick Road Reservation established in 1981.

  11. Crystal structure of Sr{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} investigated by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transmission electron microscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect structure of Sr{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} investigated by transmission electron microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crystal structure of Sr{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} investigated by transmission electron microscopy We report on the crystallographic structure of the layered perovskite iridate Sr{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7}, investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The space group was found to be Bbcb

  12. V-183: Cisco TelePresence TC and TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent Authenticated Users Gain Root Shell Access

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cisco TelePresence TC and TE Software contain two vulnerabilities in the implementation of the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) that could allow an unauthenticated remote attacker to cause a denial of service (DoS) condition. Additionally, Cisco TelePresence TC Software contain an adjacent root access vulnerability that could allow an attacker on the same physical or logical Layer-2 network as the affected system to gain an unauthenticated root shell.

  13. Effects of constraint on upper shelf fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The upper shelf fracture toughness and tearing resistance of two structural steels, HY-100 and ASTM A533, Gr. B, were determined over a wide range of applied constraint. The constraint conditions were varied by changes in specimen geometry and loading mode. Bend specimens with shallow and deep cracks, compact specimens, and single and double edge notched tension specimens were used in this study. A rotation correction was developed for the single edge notch tension specimen which greatly improved the behavior of the J-R curves determined using this specimen. The experimental results were used to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance, T{sub mat}. The J-Q and J-T stress loci, and corresponding plots of material tearing resistance plotted against Q and T, were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance, T{sub mat}, is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  14. Combined upper limit for SM Higgs at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penning, Bjorn; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels (WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b}) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95%C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Role of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer on spin wave properties in IrMn/NiFe based spin-valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubbiotti, G. Tacchi, S.; Del Bianco, L.; Bonfiglioli, E.; Giovannini, L.; Spizzo, F.; Zivieri, R.; Tamisari, M.

    2015-05-07

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) was exploited to study the spin wave properties of spin-valve (SV) type samples basically consisting of two 5?nm-thick NiFe layers (separated by a Cu spacer of 5?nm), differently biased through the interface exchange coupling with an antiferromagnetic IrMn layer. Three samples were investigated: a reference SV sample, without IrMn (reference); one sample with an IrMn underlayer (10?nm thick) coupled to the bottom NiFe film; one sample with IrMn underlayer and overlayer of different thickness (10?nm and 6?nm), coupled to the bottom and top NiFe film, respectively. The exchange coupling with the IrMn, causing the insurgence of the exchange bias effect, allowed the relative orientation of the NiFe magnetization vectors to be controlled by an external magnetic field, as assessed through hysteresis loop measurements by magneto-optic magnetometry. Thus, BLS spectra were acquired by sweeping the magnetic field so as to encompass both the parallel and antiparallel alignment of the NiFe layers. The BLS results, well reproduced by the presented theoretical model, clearly revealed the combined effects on the spin dynamic properties of the dipolar interaction between the two NiFe films and of the interface IrMn/NiFe exchange coupling.

  16. Transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk around L1551 IRS 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Ti-Lin [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P., E-mail: tlchou@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-20

    We present combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) +Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) images of the Class I protobinary L1551 IRS 5 in the CS (J = 7-6) line, the submillimeter images of L1551 IRS 5 with the most complete spatial sampling ever achieved (0.''9-36''). The SMA image of L1551 IRS 5 in the 343 GHz dust-continuum emission is also presented, which shows an elongated feature along the northwest to southeast direction (?160 AU 80 AU), perpendicular to the associated radio jets. The combined SMA+ASTE images show that the high-velocity (?1.5 km s{sup 1}) CS emission traces the structure of the dust component and shows a velocity gradient along the major axis, which is reproduced by a geometrically thin Keplerian-disk model with a central stellar mass of ?0.5 M {sub ?}. The low-velocity (?1.3 km s{sup 1}) CS emission shows an extended (?1000 AU) feature that exhibits slight south (blueshifted) to north (redshifted) emission offsets, which is modeled with a rotating and infalling envelope with a conserved angular momentum. The rotational motion of the envelope connects smoothly to the inner Keplerian rotation at a radius of ?64 AU. The infalling velocity of the envelope is ?three times lower than the free-fall velocity toward the central stellar mass of 0.5 M {sub ?}. These results demonstrate transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk, consistent with the latest theoretical studies of disk formation. We suggest that sizable (r ? 50-200 AU) Keplerian disks are already formed when the protostars are still deeply embedded in the envelopes.

  17. The 125 MW Upper Mahiao geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forte, N.

    1996-12-31

    The 125 MW Upper Mahiao power plant, the first geothermal power project to be financed under a Build-Own-Operate-and-Transfer (BOOT) arrangement in the Philippines, expected to complete its start-up testing in August of this year. This plant uses Ormat`s environmentally benign technology and is both the largest geothermal steam/binary combined cycle plant as well as the largest geothermal power plant utilizing air cooled condensers. The Ormat designed and constructed plant was developed under a fast track program, with some two years from the April 1994 contract signing through design, engineering, construction and startup. The plant is owned and operated by a subsidiary of CalEnergy Co., Inc. and supplies power to PNOC-Energy Development Corporation for the National Power Corporation (Napocor) national power grid in the Philippines.

  18. ATOMIC CARBON IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF TITAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.; Yung, Y. L.; Ajello, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The atomic carbon emission C I line feature at 1657 A ({sup 3} P {sup 0} {sub J}-{sup 3} P{sub J} ) in the upper atmosphere of Titan is first identified from the airglow spectra obtained by the Cassini Ultra-violet Imaging Spectrograph. A one-dimensional photochemical model of Titan is used to study the photochemistry of atomic carbon on Titan. Reaction between CH and atomic hydrogen is the major source of atomic carbon, and reactions with hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) are the most important loss processes. Resonance scattering of sunlight by atomic carbon is the dominant emission mechanism. The emission intensity calculations based on model results show good agreement with the observations.

  19. Microsoft Word - Cover letter to RRTT-IR-001 Comments.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8, 2012 via electronic mail to: Lamont.Jackson@hq.doe.gov Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Rapid Response Team for Transmission OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson: Pursuant to the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's February 21, 2012 Request for Information in the above-referenced docket, attached please find

  20. Microsoft Word - PSEG Companies Comments in OE Docket No RRTT-IR-001.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    K. Richter Assistant General Regulatory Counsel Regulatory Department 80 Park Plaza, T5C, Newark, NJ 07102-4194 tel: 973.430.6451 fax: 973.802.1267 email: david.richter@pseg.com March 28, 2012 VIA ELECTRONIC FILING Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW. Washington, DC 20585 RE: DOE's Request for Information OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson, Public Service Electric and Gas Company

  1. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  2. IR-584-11-83-1 RADIOLOGICAL STUDY OF MAYWOOD CHEMICAL, MAYWOOD, NEW JERSEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IR-584-11-83-1 RADIOLOGICAL STUDY OF MAYWOOD CHEMICAL, MAYWOOD, NEW JERSEY PREPARED UNDER TECHNICAL DIRECTIVE DOCUMENT NO. 02-8305-10C CONTRACT NO. 68-01-6699 I FOR THE SURVEILLANCE AND ANALYSIS DIVISION U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY NOVEMBER 7, 1983 NUS CORPORATION SUPERFUND DIVISION SUBMITTED BY APPROVED BY 3RRY RILLI PETER FRANCONERI, P.E. PROJECT MANAGER REGIONAL PROJECT MANAGER I I CONTENTS TITLE PAGE 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1-1 2.0 OBJECTIVE 2-1 3.0 BACKGROUND 3-1 4.0 METHODOLOGY 41

  3. Laser separation of nitrogen isotopes by the IR+UV dissociation of ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apatin, V M; Klimin, S A; Laptev, V B; Lokhman, V N; Ogurok, D D; Pigul'skii, S V; Ryabov, E A

    2008-08-31

    The separation of nitrogen isotopes is studied upon successive single-photon IR excitation and UV dissociation of ammonia molecules. The excitation selectivity was provided by tuning a CO{sub 2} laser to resonance with {sup 14}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(30) laser line] or with {sup 15}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(10) laser line]. Isotopic mixtures containing 4.8% and 0.37% (natural content) of the {sup 15}NH isotope were investigated. The dependences of the selectivity and the dissociation yield for each isotopic component on the buffer gas pressure (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, Ar) and the ammonia pressure were obtained. In the limit of low NH{sub 3} pressures (0.5-2 Torr), the dissociation selectivity {alpha}(15/14) for {sup 15}N was 17. The selectivity mechanism of the IR+UV dissociation is discussed and the outlook is considered for the development of the nitrogen isotope separation process based on this approach. (laser isotope separation)

  4. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-02-18

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  5. Anisotropic Hc2 , thermodynamic and transport measurements, and pressure dependence of Tc in K2Cr3As3 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-01-30

    We present a detailed study of single crystalline K2Cr3As3 and analyze its thermodynamic and transport properties, anisotropic Hc2(T), and initial pressure dependence of Tc. In zero field, the temperature-dependent resistivity is metallic. Deviation from a linear temperature dependence is evident below 100 K and a T3 dependence is roughly followed from just above Tc (~10K) to ~40K. Anisotropic Hc2(T) data were measured up to 140 kOe with field applied along and perpendicular to the rodlike crystals. For the applied field perpendicular to the rod, Hc2(T) is linear with a slope ~–70 kOe/K. For field applied along the rod, the slopemore » is about –120 kOe/K below 70 kOe. Above 70 kOe, the magnitude of the slope decreases to ~–70 kOe/K. The electronic specific heat coefficient γ, just above Tc, is 73 mJ/mol K2; the Debye temperature ΘD is 220 K. As a result, the specific heat jump at the superconducting transition ΔC~2.2γTc. Finally, for hydrostatic pressures up to ~7 kbar, Tc decreases under pressure linearly at a rate of –0.034K/kbar.« less

  6. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V.; Supanitsky, A.D. E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E>10{sup 18} eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set.

  7. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  8. Unstable spin-ice order in the stuffed metallic pyrochlore Pr2+xIr2-xO7-δ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    MacLaughlin, D. E.; Bernal, O. O.; Shu, Lei; Ishikawa, Jun; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Wen, Jia -Jia; Mourigal, Martin P.; Stock, C.; Ehlers, Georg; Broholm, C. L.; et al

    2015-08-24

    Specific heat, elastic neutron scattering, and muon spin rotation experiments have been carried out on a well-characterized sample of “stuffed” (Pr-rich) Pr2+xIr2-xO7-δ. Elastic neutron scattering shows the onset of long-range spin-ice “2-in/2-out” magnetic order at 0.93 kelvin, with an ordered moment of 1.7(1) Bohr magnetons per Pr ion at low temperatures. Approximate lower bounds on the correlation length and correlation time in the ordered state are 170 angstroms and 0.7 nanosecond, respectively. Muon spin rotation experiments yield an upper bound 2.6(7) milliteslas on the local field B4floc at the muon site, which is nearly two orders of magnitude smaller thanmore » the expected dipolar field for long-range spin-ice ordering of 1.7-Bohr magneton moments (120–270 milliteslas, depending on the muon site). This shortfall is due in part to splitting of the non-Kramers crystal-field ground-state doublets of near-neighbor Pr3+ ions by the positive-muon-induced lattice distortion. For this to be the only effect, however, ~160 Pr moments out to a distance of ~14 angstroms must be suppressed. An alternative scenario—one consistent with the observed reduced nuclear hyperfine Schottky anomaly in the specific heat—invokes slow correlated Pr-moment fluctuations in the ordered state that average B4floc on the μSR time scale (~10-7 second), but are static on the time scale of the elastic neutron scattering experiments (~10-9 second). In this picture, the dynamic muon relaxation suggests a Pr3+ 4f correlation time of a few nanoseconds, which should be observable in a neutron spin echo experiment.« less

  9. Unstable spin-ice order in the stuffed metallic pyrochlore Pr2+xIr2-xO7-δ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    MacLaughlin, D. E.; Bernal, O. O.; Shu, Lei; Ishikawa, Jun; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Wen, Jia -Jia; Mourigal, Martin P.; Stock, C.; Ehlers, Georg; Broholm, C. L.; et al

    2015-08-24

    Specific heat, elastic neutron scattering, and muon spin rotation experiments have been carried out on a well-characterized sample of “stuffed” (Pr-rich) Pr2+xIr2-xO7-δ. Elastic neutron scattering shows the onset of long-range spin-ice “2-in/2-out” magnetic order at 0.93 kelvin, with an ordered moment of 1.7(1) Bohr magnetons per Pr ion at low temperatures. Approximate lower bounds on the correlation length and correlation time in the ordered state are 170 angstroms and 0.7 nanosecond, respectively. Muon spin rotation experiments yield an upper bound 2.6(7) milliteslas on the local field B4floc at the muon site, which is nearly two orders of magnitude smaller thanmore »the expected dipolar field for long-range spin-ice ordering of 1.7-Bohr magneton moments (120–270 milliteslas, depending on the muon site). This shortfall is due in part to splitting of the non-Kramers crystal-field ground-state doublets of near-neighbor Pr3+ ions by the positive-muon-induced lattice distortion. For this to be the only effect, however, ~160 Pr moments out to a distance of ~14 angstroms must be suppressed. An alternative scenario—one consistent with the observed reduced nuclear hyperfine Schottky anomaly in the specific heat—invokes slow correlated Pr-moment fluctuations in the ordered state that average B4floc on the μSR time scale (~10-7 second), but are static on the time scale of the elastic neutron scattering experiments (~10-9 second). In this picture, the dynamic muon relaxation suggests a Pr3+ 4f correlation time of a few nanoseconds, which should be observable in a neutron spin echo experiment.« less

  10. Assessment of RELAP/MOD3 using BETHSY 6.2TC 6-inch cold leg side break comparative test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Young-Jong; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Chang, Won-Pyo; Kim, Dong-Su

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the results of the RELAP5/MOD3 Version 7j assessment on BETHSY 6.2TC. BETHSY 6.2TC test corresponding to a six inch cold leg break LOCA of the Pressurizer Water Reactor(PWR). The primary objective of the test was to provide reference data of two facilities of different scales (BETHSY and LSTF facility). On the other hand, the present calculation aims at analysis of RELAP5/N4OD3 capability on the small break LOCA simulation, The results of calculation have shown that the RELAP5/MOD3 reasonably predicts occurrences as well as trends of the major phenomena such as primary pressure, timing of loop seal clearing, liquid hold up, etc. However, some disagreements also have been found in the predictions of loop seal clearing, collapsed core water level after loop seal clearing, and accumulator injection behaviors. For better understanding of discrepancies in same predictions, several sensitivity calculations have been performed as well. These include the changes of two-phase discharge coefficient at the break junction and some corrections of the interphase drag term. As result, change of a single parameter has not improved the overall predictions and it has been found that the interphase drag model has still large uncertainties.

  11. NMR characterization of sulphur substitution effects in the KxFe2-ySe2-zSz high-Tc superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Torchetti, D. A.; Imai, T.; Lei, H. C.; Petrovic, C.

    2012-04-17

    We present a⁷⁷ Se NMR study of the effect of S substitution in the high-Tc superconductor KxFe2-ySe2-zSz in a temperature range up to 250 K. We examine two S concentrations, with z=0.8 (Tc~ 26 K) and z=1.6 (nonsuperconducting). The samples containing sulphur exhibit broader NMR line shapes than the KxFe₂Se₂ sample due to local disorder in the Se environment. Our Knight shift ⁷⁷K data indicate that in all samples, uniform spin susceptibility decreases with temperature, and that the magnitude of the Knight shift itself decreases with increased S concentration. In addition, S substitution progressively suppresses low-frequency spin fluctuations. None ofmore » the samples exhibit an enhancement of low-frequency antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations near Tc in 1/T₁T, as seen in FeSe.« less

  12. Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

  13. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Que, Yande D.; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yeliang L.; Wu, Lijun J.; Zhu, Yimei M.; Kim, Kisslinger; Weinl, Michael; Schreck, Matthias; Shen, Chengmin M.; Du, Shixuan X.; Liu, Yunqi Q.; Gao, H. -J.; Huang, Li; Xu, Wenyan Y.

    2015-01-20

    Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal crystals, such as Ru,??? Ir,????? and Ni,??? provides large-area, uniform graphene layers with controllable defect density, which is crucial for practical applications in future devices. To decrease the high cost of single-crystalline metal bulks, single-crystalline metal films are strongly suggested as the substrates for epitaxial growth large-scale high-quality graphene.????? Moreover, in order to weaken the interactions of graphene with its metal host, which may result in a suppression of the intrinsic properties of graphene,? ? the method of element intercalation of semiconductors at the interface between an epitaxial graphene layer and a transition metal substrate has been successfully realized.????

  14. In-situ FT-IR diagnostics for monitoring and control of fossil fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonanno, A.S.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.; Nelson, C.M.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and testing of a prototype fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) based measurement system for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) and process control in fossil fuel-fired power plants. On several occasions, prototype systems have been transported and assembled at full-scale and pilot-scale fossil fuel-fired combustors. The in-situ version of the prototype is able to measure NH{sub 3} and HCl concentrations, which are difficult to measure extractively, as well as CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, and SO{sub x} concentrations. The results of recent tests will be presented which involve in-situ monitoring of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of NO{sub x} based on simultaneous measurement of NO, NH{sub 3} and CO.

  15. On the Relative Utility of Infrared (IR) versus Terahertz (THz) for Optical Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Atkinson, David A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2007-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has active programs investigating the optical absorption strengths of several types of molecules including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), microbiological threats such as bacteria, as well as explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. While most of our work has centered on the mid-infrared domain (600 to 6,500 cm-1), more recent work has also included work in the far-infrared, also called the terahertz (THz) region (500 to ~8 cm-1). Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have been able to compare the relative, and in some cases absolute, IR/THz cross sections of a number of species in the solid and liquid phases. The relative band strengths of a number of species of interest are discussed in terms of both experimental and computational results.

  16. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Que, Yande D.; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yeliang L.; Wu, Lijun J.; Zhu, Yimei M.; Kim, Kisslinger; Weinl, Michael; Schreck, Matthias; Shen, Chengmin M.; et al

    2015-01-20

    Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal crystals, such as Ru,⁽¹⁻³⁾ Ir,⁽⁴⁻⁶⁾ and Ni,⁽⁷⁾ provides large-area, uniform graphene layers with controllable defect density, which is crucial for practical applications in future devices. To decrease the high cost of single-crystalline metal bulks, single-crystalline metal films are strongly suggested as the substrates for epitaxial growth large-scale high-quality graphene.⁽⁸⁻¹⁰⁾ Moreover, in order to weaken the interactions of graphene with its metal host, which may result in a suppression of the intrinsic properties of graphene,⁽¹¹ ¹²⁾ the method of element intercalation of semiconductors at the interface between an epitaxial graphene layer and a transitionmore » metal substrate has been successfully realized.⁽¹³⁻¹⁶⁾« less

  17. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

    2007-06-18

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  18. In Situ Diffuse Reflectance IR Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Fast Catalytic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N Marinkovic; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    A new instrument for synchronous in situ investigations of catalytic materials by IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopies was designed and built at the X18A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides analytical tools for solving structural, electronic and kinetic problems in catalysis science by two complementary methods. Among the features attractive for catalysis research are the broad range of catalytically active elements that can be investigated (starting with Ni and beyond), the wide range of reaction conditions (temperatures up to 873 K, various reactive gases) and time scales (starting from tens of seconds). The results of several representative experiments that illustrate the attractive capabilities of the new set-up are discussed.

  19. Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of powerful 2Jy and 3CRR radio galaxies. II. AGN power indicators and unification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicken, D.; Tadhunter, C.; Morganti, R.; Axon, D.; Robinson, A.; Magagnoli, M.; Kharb, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hardcastle, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Singh, V.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Rose, M.; Spoon, H.; Inskip, K. J.; Holt, J.

    2014-06-20

    It remains uncertain which continuum and emission line diagnostics best indicate the bolometric powers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially given the attenuation caused by the circumnuclear material and the possible contamination by components related to star formation. Here we use mid-IR spectra along with multiwavelength data to investigate the merit of various diagnostics of AGN radiative power, including the mid-IR [Ne III] ?25.89 ?m and [O IV] ?25.89 ?m fine-structure lines, the optical [O III] ?5007 forbidden line, and mid-IR 24 ?m, 5 GHz radio, and X-ray continuum emission, for complete samples of 46 2Jy radio galaxies (0.05 < z < 0.7) and 17 3CRR FRII radio galaxies (z < 0.1). We find that the mid-IR [O IV] line is the most reliable indicator of AGN power for powerful radio-loud AGNs. By assuming that the [O IV] is emitted isotropically, and comparing the [O III] and 24 ?m luminosities of the broad- and narrow-line AGNs in our samples at fixed [O IV] luminosity, we show that the [O III] and 24 ?m emission are both mildly attenuated in the narrow-line compared to the broad-line objects by a factor of ?2. However, despite this attenuation, the [O III] and 24 ?m luminosities are better AGN power indicators for our sample than either the 5 GHz radio or the X-ray continuum luminosities. We also detect the mid-IR 9.7 ?m silicate feature in the spectra of many objects but not ubiquitously: at least 40% of the sample shows no clear evidence for these features. We conclude that, for the majority of powerful radio galaxies, the mid-IR lines are powered by AGN photoionization.

  20. Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Meng; Cullen, David A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Marinkovic, N.; More, Karren Leslie; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2013-01-01

    Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

  1. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Domnguez, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although the mechanisms for the formation of PopIII stars are rather well understood on theoretical grounds, their formation history is still veiled in mystery because of their faintness. To shed light on this matter, we study jointly the gamma-ray opacity of distant objects and the reionization constraints from studies of intergalactic gas. By combining these studies, we obtain a sensitive upper bound on the PopIII star formation rate density of ?-dot {sub ?}(z)<0.01[(1+z)/(1+7.0)]{sup 3.4}(f{sub esc}/0.2){sup ?1}(C/3.0)M{sub ?}yr{sup ?1}Mpc{sup ?3} at z ? 7, where f {sub esc} and C are the escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies and the clumping factor of the intergalactic hydrogen gas. This limit is a ?10times tighter constraint compared with previous studies that take into account gamma-ray opacity constraints only. Even if we do not include the current gamma-ray constraints, the results do not change. This is because the detected gamma-ray sources are still at z ? 4.35 where the reionization has already finished.

  2. Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

    2013-01-02

    This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin – Madison under Dr. Turner’s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

  3. Upper critical fields in liquid-quenched metastable superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.M.; Cotts, E.J.; Poon, S.J.

    1984-08-01

    A systematic and quantitative study of upper critical fields in alloys with increasing atomic number is carried out. The alloys are prepared by the technique of liquid (splat) quenching. They include the metastable body-centered-cubic (..beta..) phase of Ti-Pd, Zr-Mo, Zr-Pd, and Hf-Mo, amorphous phase of Zr-Rh, and the stable ..beta.. phase of Ti-Mo and Ta-Hf. Measurements are made in magnetic fields up to 90 kG and in temperatures down to 0.5 K. The results are analyzed within the framework of the dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM). A least-squares fitting routine is performed using all the data (weighted equally) for a given sample. It is emphasized that the visual critical-field gradient near the transition temperature cannot be taken as the actual gradient in the presence of Pauli paramagnetic limitation. The main findings are the following: (i) Even without including renormalization corrections due to electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, very good fits to the WHHM theory are obtained; (ii) critical-field data for all our samples (with minor exceptions in Hf-Mo)= are found to fall below or on the Maki curve (i.e., when the spin-orbit scattering parameter lambda/sub s.o./ goes to infinity); (iii) values of lambda/sub s.o./ are observed to range from 0.28 to 2.51 for the 3d and 4d alloys; (iv) the spin-orbit scattering rates 1/tau/sub s.o./ are found to compare well with theoretical estimation using results from band-structure calculation. The effect of sample inhomogeneity on the value of lambda/sub s.o./ in Zr-Mo alloys is also illustrated.

  4. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-Tc superconductor and a topological insulator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zareapour, Parisa; Hayat, Alex; Zhao, Shu Yang F.; Kreshchuk, Michael; Lee, Yong Kiat; Reijnders, Anjan A.; Jain, Achint; Xu, Zhijun; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; et al

    2014-12-09

    In this research, high-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O₈₊δ/Bi₂Te₂Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observedmore » and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.« less

  5. Attenuation compensation in TC-99M SPECT brain imaging: Use of attenuation maps derived from tranmission versus emission data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, T.S.; Licho, R.; Penney, B.C. [Univ. of Massachusetts Mecical Center, Worcester, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    This study compares reconstructions of Tc-99m brain SPECT studies made using two methods of estimating the attenuation map: (1) transmission scanning, and (2) segmenting reconstructions of emission data and assigning attenuation coefficient values. A three-head SPECT system with fan beam collimators was used. Transmission scanning was performed using a line source at the focal line of a fan beam collimator right after the regular emission scan. The higher attenuation of the skull and the lower attenuation in the sinus cavities were identifiable despite the noise in the reconstructed transmission data due to: (1) the contamination of the transmission data by emission photons, (2) the maximum acquisition count rate imposed by the SPECT system, and (3) the clinical scanning time. Emission data were recorded using both photopeak and Compton scatter energy windows. Outlines of the head and the maxillary sinus could be obtained using only the Compton scatter reconstructions, whereas identifying the skull regions and the frontal sinus required the photopeak data as well. We placed appropriate linear attenuation coefficients in the soft tissue, bone, sinus and air regions (0.15,. 0.22, 0, and 0 cm{sup -1}) and blurred this attenuation map with a Gaussian kernel of about 0.2 cm standard deviation to obtain the attenuation map based on the emission data. Reconstructions were computed using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm with Siddon`s ray-tracing algorithm. Reconstructions based on the two attenuation maps were compared quantitatively on the patient data. The differences noted were quite small. These results imply that attenuation correction based on emission data alone may be adequate for Tc-99m SPECT brain imaging.

  6. High-Tc superconductivity at the interface between the CaCuO2 and SrTiO3 insulating oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Di Castro, D.; Cantoni, C.; Ridolfi, F.; Aruta, C.; Tebano, A.; Yang, N.; Balestrino, G.

    2015-09-28

    At interfaces between complex oxides it is possible to generate electronic systems with unusual electronic properties, which are not present in the isolated oxides. One important example is the appearance of superconductivity at the interface between insulating oxides, although, until now, with very low Tc. We report the occurrence of high Tc superconductivity in the bilayer CaCuO2/SrTiO3, where both the constituent oxides are insulating. In order to obtain a superconducting state, the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface must be realized between the Ca plane of CaCuO2 and the TiO2 plane of SrTiO3. Only in this case can oxygen ions be incorporated in themore » interface Ca plane, acting as apical oxygen for Cu and providing holes to the CuO2 planes. In addition, a detailed hole doping spatial profile can be obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy at the O K edge, clearly showing that the (super)conductivity is confined to about 1–2 CaCuO2 unit cells close to the interface with SrTiO3. The results obtained for the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface can be extended to multilayered high Tc cuprates, contributing to explaining the dependence of Tc on the number of CuO2 planes in these systems.« less

  7. Kondo-lattice behavior and multiple characteristic temperatures in CeIr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallik, R.; Sampathkumaran, E.V.; Paulose, P.L.; Dumschat, J.; Wortmann, G.

    1997-02-01

    The results of electrical-resistivity {rho} measurements (1.4{endash}300 K) on the alloys, Ce{sub 1{minus}x}La{sub x}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (0{le}x{le}1), CeIr{sub 2{minus}x}(Rh,Pt){sub x}Ge{sub 2} (x=0.2 and 0.4), and CeIr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2{minus}x}(Si,Sn){sub x} (x=0.2 and 0.4), are reported in order to understand the Kondo effect in CeIr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}. There is a significant decrease in {rho} as the temperature is lowered from 100 to 4.2 K for x = 0.0. This feature disappears for a small replacement of Ce by La (x = 0.3), thereby resulting in a single-ion Kondo effect for higher values of x. This finding establishes that the temperature T{sub coh}, characterizing the coherent scattering among the Kondo centers for x=0 is as large as about 100 K. The coherent scattering is not destroyed by small substitutions at the Ir or Ge site. The observed sensitivity of this coherence effect to a small disruption of Ce sublattice periodicity alone by La substitution is uncommon among trivalent Ce alloys. Such a large T{sub coh} value enables us to emphasize the need to invoke three characteristic temperatures for nonmagnetic Kondo lattices. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Wrinkles of graphene on Ir(111): Macroscopic network ordering and internal multi-lobed structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petrovic, Marin; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Siber, Antonio; Kralj, Marko

    2015-07-17

    The large-scale production of graphene monolayer greatly relies on epitaxial samples which often display stress-relaxation features in the form of wrinkles. Wrinkles of graphene on Ir(111) are found to exhibit a fairly well ordered interconnecting network which is characterized by low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The high degree of quasi-hexagonal network arrangement for the graphene aligned to the underlying substrate can be well described as a (non-Poissonian) Voronoi partition of a plane. The results obtained strongly suggest that the wrinkle network is frustrated at low temperatures, retaining the order inherited from elevated temperatures when the wrinkles interconnect in junctions which mostmore » often join three wrinkles. Such frustration favors the formation of multi-lobed wrinkles which are found in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. The existence of multiple lobes is explained within a model accounting for the interplay of the van der Waals attraction between graphene and iridium and bending energy of the wrinkle. The presented study provides new insights into wrinkling of epitaxial graphene and can be exploited to further expedite its application.« less

  9. Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2013-04-15

    Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

  10. Wrinkles of graphene on Ir(111): Macroscopic network ordering and internal multi-lobed structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrovic, Marin; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Siber, Antonio; Kralj, Marko

    2015-07-17

    The large-scale production of graphene monolayer greatly relies on epitaxial samples which often display stress-relaxation features in the form of wrinkles. Wrinkles of graphene on Ir(111) are found to exhibit a fairly well ordered interconnecting network which is characterized by low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The high degree of quasi-hexagonal network arrangement for the graphene aligned to the underlying substrate can be well described as a (non-Poissonian) Voronoi partition of a plane. The results obtained strongly suggest that the wrinkle network is frustrated at low temperatures, retaining the order inherited from elevated temperatures when the wrinkles interconnect in junctions which most often join three wrinkles. Such frustration favors the formation of multi-lobed wrinkles which are found in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. The existence of multiple lobes is explained within a model accounting for the interplay of the van der Waals attraction between graphene and iridium and bending energy of the wrinkle. The presented study provides new insights into wrinkling of epitaxial graphene and can be exploited to further expedite its application.

  11. A CATALOG OF NEAR-IR SOURCES FOUND TO BE UNRESOLVED WITH MILLIARCSECOND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richichi, A.; Fors, O.; Cusano, F.; Moerchen, M.

    2012-12-15

    Calibration is one of the long-standing problems in optical interferometric measurements, particularly with long baselines which demand stars with angular sizes on the milliarcsecond scale and no detectable companions. While systems of calibrators have been generally established for the near-infrared in the bright source regime (K {approx}< 3 mag), modern large interferometers are sensitive to significantly fainter magnitudes. We aim to provide a list of sources found to be unresolved from direct observations with high angular resolution and dynamic range, which can be used to choose interferometric calibrators. To this purpose, we have used a large number of lunar occultations recorded with the ISAAC instrument at the Very Large Telescope to select sources found to be unresolved and without close companions. An algorithm has been used to determine the limiting angular resolution achieved for each source, taking into account a noise model built from occulted and unocculted portions of the light curves. We have obtained upper limits on the angular sizes of 556 sources, with magnitudes ranging from K{sub s} Almost-Equal-To 4 to 10, with a median of 7.2 mag. The upper limits on possible undetected companions (within Almost-Equal-To 0.''5) range from K{sub s} Almost-Equal-To 8 to 13, with a median of 11.5 mag. One-third of the sources have angular sizes {<=}1 mas, and two-thirds have sizes {<=}2 mas. This list of unresolved sources matches well the capabilities of current large interferometric facilities. We also provide available cross-identifications, magnitudes, spectral types, and other auxiliary information. A fraction of the sources are found to be potentially variable. The list covers parts of the Galactic Bulge and in particular the vicinity of the Galactic Center, where extinction is very significant and traditional lists of calibrators are often insufficient.

  12. Upper Missouri G&T El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    G&T El Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Upper Missouri G&T El Coop Inc Place: Montana Phone Number: 406-433-4100 Website: uppermo.com Outage Hotline: 406-433-4100...

  13. Upper limit power for self-guided propagation of intense lasers in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Weimin; Hu Zhidan; Chen Liming; Li Yutong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Zeng Ming; Liu Yue; Kawata, Shigeo; Zheng Chunyang; Mori, Warren B.

    2012-10-29

    It is shown that there is an upper-limit laser power for self-focusing of a laser pulse in plasma in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical power set by the relativistic effect. This upper limit is caused by the transverse ponderomotive force of the laser, which tends to expel plasma electrons from the laser propagating area. Furthermore, there is a lower-limit plasma density for a given laser spot size, below which self-focusing does not occur for any laser power. Both the lower-limit density and the upper-limit power are derived theoretically and verified by two-dimensional and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is also found that plasma channels may be unfavorable for stable guiding of lasers above the upper-limit power.

  14. An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  15. Upper bounds on sparticle masses from naturalness or how to disprove weak

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scale supersymmetry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Upper bounds on sparticle masses from naturalness or how to disprove weak scale supersymmetry Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 15, 2017 Title: Upper bounds on sparticle masses from naturalness or how to disprove weak scale supersymmetry Authors: Baer, Howard ; Barger, Vernon ; Savoy, Michael Publication Date: 2016-02-16 OSTI Identifier: 1238092 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  16. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of the series of double perovskites (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bufaial, L.; Adriano, C.; Lora-Serrano, R.; Duque, J.G.S.; Mendona-Ferreira, L.; Rojas-Ayala, C.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bittar, E.M.; Pagliuso, P.G.

    2014-04-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the series of double perovskites Sr{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} were synthesized. Their structural, electronic and magnetic properties were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, Mssbauer spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity and electrical resistivity experiments. The compounds crystallize in a monoclinic structure and were fitted in space group P2{sub 1}/n, with a significant degree of Fe/Ir cationic disorder. As in Ca{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} the Sr-based system seems to evolve from an antiferromagnetic ground state for the end members (x=0.0 and x=2.0) to a ferrimagnetic order in the intermediate regions (x?1). Since Mssbauer spectra indicate that Fe valence remains 3+ with doping, this tendency of change in the nature of the microscopic interaction could be attributed to Ir valence changes, induced by La{sup 3+} electrical doping. Upon comparing both Ca and Sr series, Sr{sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} is more structurally homogenous and presents higher magnetization and transition temperatures. Magnetic susceptibility measurements at high temperatures on Sr{sub 1.2}La{sub 0.8}FeIrO{sub 6} indicate a very high ferrimagnetic Curie temperature T{sub C}?700K. For the Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6} compound, electrical resistivity experiments under applied pressure suggest that this material might be a Mott insulator. - Graphical abstract: The Weiss constant as a function of La doping for the (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} series, indicating changes in FeIr magnetic coupling on both families. - Highlights: The double perovskite series (Ca,Sr){sub 2?x}La{sub x}FeIrO{sub 6} were synthesized. Changes in the Fe-Ir magnetic coupling due to La doping on both series. Evidence of high T{sub C} on Sr{sub 1.2}La{sub 0.8}FeIrO{sub 6}. Indication of Mott insulator behavior on Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6}.

  17. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P., E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com, E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32305 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of ? and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 ?m, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a ?-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 ?m can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical depth, the size and morphology of B, and the aspect angle of the observer. The spectra require a resolution of about 500 km s{sup 1} and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 20%. Two other strong near-IR spectral features at about 1.5 and 1.8 ?m are used to demonstrate the importance of line blending, which may invalidate a kinematic interpretation of emission lines. Flat-topped line profiles between 300 and 400 days have been observed and reported in the literature. They lend support for M {sub Ch} mass explosions in at least some cases and require magnetic fields equal to or in excess of 10{sup 6} G. We briefly discuss the effects of the size and morphology of B on light curves, as well as limitations. We argue that line profiles are a more direct measurement of B than light curves because they measure both the distribution of {sup 56}Ni and the redistribution of the energy input by positrons rather than the total energy input. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of high B-fields and the limitations of our analysis.

  18. Unstable spin-ice order in the stuffed metallic pyrochlore Pr2+xIr2-xO7-?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLaughlin, D. E.; Bernal, O. O.; Shu, Lei; Ishikawa, Jun; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Wen, Jia -Jia; Mourigal, Martin P.; Stock, C.; Ehlers, Georg; Broholm, C. L.; Machida, Yo; Kimura, Kenta; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Shimura, Yasuyuki; Sakakibara, Toshiro

    2015-08-24

    Specific heat, elastic neutron scattering, and muon spin rotation experiments have been carried out on a well-characterized sample of stuffed (Pr-rich) Pr2+xIr2-xO7-?. Elastic neutron scattering shows the onset of long-range spin-ice 2-in/2-out magnetic order at 0.93 kelvin, with an ordered moment of 1.7(1) Bohr magnetons per Pr ion at low temperatures. Approximate lower bounds on the correlation length and correlation time in the ordered state are 170 angstroms and 0.7 nanosecond, respectively. Muon spin rotation experiments yield an upper bound 2.6(7) milliteslas on the local field B4floc at the muon site, which is nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than the expected dipolar field for long-range spin-ice ordering of 1.7-Bohr magneton moments (120270 milliteslas, depending on the muon site). This shortfall is due in part to splitting of the non-Kramers crystal-field ground-state doublets of near-neighbor Pr3+ ions by the positive-muon-induced lattice distortion. For this to be the only effect, however, ~160 Pr moments out to a distance of ~14 angstroms must be suppressed. An alternative scenarioone consistent with the observed reduced nuclear hyperfine Schottky anomaly in the specific heatinvokes slow correlated Pr-moment fluctuations in the ordered state that average B4floc on the ?SR time scale (~10-7 second), but are static on the time scale of the elastic neutron scattering experiments (~10-9 second). In this picture, the dynamic muon relaxation suggests a Pr3+ 4f correlation time of a few nanoseconds, which should be observable in a neutron spin echo experiment.

  19. On the potential of mid-IR lasers for generating high harmonics with subnanometer wavelengths in gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2013-03-31

    The influence of the magnetic field of a laser pulse and the depletion of bound levels of working-medium atoms on the generation of high harmonics of mid-IR laser radiation in gases is investigated using numerical quantum-mechanical calculations. The maximum attainable spectral widths of high harmonics are estimated for model atoms with different ionisation potentials taking into account the aforementioned limiting effects. It is shown (within a two-dimensional model) that high harmonics with wavelengths to several angstroms can be generated by irradiating helium atoms with high-power femtosecond pulses of a laser [5] with a centre wavelength of 3.9 {mu}m. The possibility of observing experimentally relativistic effects using modern desktop mid-IR laser sources is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (?) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (? ? 200400 HU) resulted in low ?-maps noise (? ? 1%3%). Noise levels greater than ?10% in 140 keV ?-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ?15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 ?Gy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected ? values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in ?. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ?100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in ?{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ?10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ? 4 ?Gy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.

  1. The role of the (111) texture on the exchange bias and interlayer coupling effects observed in sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, I. L.; Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Larica, C.; Tafur, M.; Pelegrini, F.

    2013-05-28

    Magnetic properties of sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers grown on different seed layers (Cu or Ta) deposited on Si (100) substrates were investigated by magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. Exchange bias effect and magnetic spring behavior have been studied by changing the IrMn thickness. As shown by X-ray diffraction, Ta and Cu seed layers provoke different degrees of (111) fcc-texture that directly affect the exchange bias and indirectly modify the exchange spring coupling behavior. Increasing the IrMn thickness, it was observed that the coupling angle between the Co and NiFe ferromagnetic layers increases for the Cu seed system, but it reduces for the Ta case. The results were explained considering (i) different anisotropies of the Co and IrMn layers induced by the different degree of the (111) texture and (ii) the distinct exchange bias set at the NiFe/IrMn and IrMn/Co interfaces in both systems. The NiFe and Co interlayer coupling angle is strongly correlated with both exchange bias and exchange magnetic spring phenomena. It was also shown that the highest exchange bias field occurs when an unstressed L1{sub 2} IrMn structure is stabilized.

  2. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca3Ir4Sn13

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Chinotti, M.; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Morenzoni, E.

    2015-11-11

    We repormore » t microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca3Ir4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). Our findings show a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈ 1.6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the “Uemura” plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multi-band structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.« less

  3. Effect of L1{sub 2} ordering in antiferromagnetic Ir-Mn epitaxial layer on exchange bias of FePd films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. C.; Duh, J. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsiao, S. N. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Liu, S. H.; Su, S. H.; Chiu, K. F.; Hsieh, W. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lin, Y. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Lee, H. Y.; Sung, C. K.

    2015-05-07

    Two series of samples of single-layer IrMn and IrMn/FePd bilayer films, deposited on a single-crystal MgO substrate at different IrMn deposition temperatures (T{sub s}?=?300700?C), were investigated using magnetron sputtering. L1{sub 2} ordering was revealed for the 30?nm-thick IrMn epitaxial (001) films with T{sub s}???400?C, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry (XRD). XRD results also provide evidence of the epitaxial growth of the IrMn films on MgO substrate. Increasing T{sub s} from 400 to 700?C monotonically increases the ordering parameter of L1{sub 2} phases from 0.17 to 0.81. An in-plane exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) of 22?Oe is obtained in a 10?nm-thick FePd film that is deposited on the disordered IrMn films. As the L1{sub 2} ordering of the IrMn layers increases, the H{sub eb} gradually decreases to 0?Oe, meaning that the exchange bias behavior vanishes. The increased surface roughness, revealed by atomic force microscopy, of the epitaxial IrMn layers with increasing T{sub s} cannot be the main cause of the decrease in H{sub eb} due to the compensated surface spins regardless of the disordered and ordered (001) IrMn layers. The change of antiferromagnetic structure from the A1 to the L1{sub 2} phase was correlated with the evolution of H{sub eb}.

  4. Probability of Future Observations Exceeding One-Sided, Normal, Upper Tolerance Limits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edwards, Timothy S.

    2014-10-29

    Normal tolerance limits are frequently used in dynamic environments specifications of aerospace systems as a method to account for aleatory variability in the environments. Upper tolerance limits, when used in this way, are computed from records of the environment and used to enforce conservatism in the specification by describing upper extreme values the environment may take in the future. Components and systems are designed to withstand these extreme loads to ensure they do not fail under normal use conditions. The degree of conservatism in the upper tolerance limits is controlled by specifying the coverage and confidence level (usually written inmore » “coverage/confidence” form). Moreover, in high-consequence systems it is common to specify tolerance limits at 95% or 99% coverage and confidence at the 50% or 90% level. Despite the ubiquity of upper tolerance limits in the aerospace community, analysts and decision-makers frequently misinterpret their meaning. The misinterpretation extends into the standards that govern much of the acceptance and qualification of commercial and government aerospace systems. As a result, the risk of a future observation of the environment exceeding the upper tolerance limit is sometimes significantly underestimated by decision makers. This note explains the meaning of upper tolerance limits and a related measure, the upper prediction limit. So, the objective of this work is to clarify the probability of exceeding these limits in flight so that decision-makers can better understand the risk associated with exceeding design and test levels during flight and balance the cost of design and development with that of mission failure.« less

  5. Prototype Development of Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press (ROHUP) to Fabricate Advanced Tc-99 Bearing Ceramic Waste Forms - 13381

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alaniz, Ariana J.; Delgado, Luc R.; Werbick, Brett M.; Hartmann, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this senior student project is to design and build a prototype construction of a machine that simultaneously provides the proper pressure and temperature parameters to sinter ceramic powders in-situ to create pellets of rather high densities of above 90% (theoretical). This ROHUP (Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press) device is designed specifically to fabricate advanced ceramic Tc-99 bearing waste forms and therefore radiological barriers have been included in the system. The HUP features electronic control and feedback systems to set and monitor pressure, load, and temperature parameters. This device operates wirelessly via portable computer using Bluetooth{sup R} technology. The HUP device is designed to fit in a standard atmosphere controlled glove box to further allow sintering under inert conditions (e.g. under Ar, He, N{sub 2}). This will further allow utilizing this HUP for other potential applications, including radioactive samples, novel ceramic waste forms, advanced oxide fuels, air-sensitive samples, metallic systems, advanced powder metallurgy, diffusion experiments and more. (authors)

  6. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr3Ir4Sn13

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth λ. The dependence of λ⁻² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ withmore » a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature λ(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio Δ(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  7. Near-IR spectroscopic monitoring of CLASS I protostars: Variability of accretion and wind indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connelley, Michael S.; Greene, Thomas P.

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of a program that monitored the near-IR spectroscopic variability of a sample of 19 embedded protostars. Spectra were taken on time intervals from 2 days to 3 yr, over a wavelength range from 0.85 ?m to 2.45 ?m, for 4-9 epochs of observations per target. We found that the spectra of all targets are variable and that every emission feature observed is also variable (although not for all targets). With one exception, there were no drastic changes in the continua of the spectra, nor did any line completely disappear, nor did any line appear that was not previously apparent. This analysis focuses on understanding the connection between accretion (traced by H Br ? and CO) and the wind (traced by He I, [Fe II], and sometimes H{sub 2}). For both accretion and wind tracers, the median variability was constant versus the time interval between observations; however, the maximum variability that we observed increased with the time interval between observations. Extinction is observed to vary within the minimum sampling time of 2 days, suggesting extinguishing material within a few stellar radii at high disk latitudes. The variability of [Fe II] and H{sub 2} were correlated for most (but not all) of the 7 young stellar objects showing both features, and the amplitude of the variability depends on the veiling. Although the occurrence of CO and Br ? emission are connected, their variability is uncorrelated, suggesting that these emissions originate in separate regions near the protostar (e.g., disk and wind). The variability of Br ? and wind tracers were found to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated, depending on the target. The variability of Br ?, [Fe II], and H{sub 2} always lies on a plane, although the orientation of the plane in three dimensions depends on the target. While we do not understand all interactions behind the variability that we observed, we have shown that spectroscopic variability is a powerful tool toward understanding the star formation process.

  8. Heat up and potential failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the steam dome, steam separators, and dryers above the core are comprised of approximately 100 tons of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. Historically, the upper internals have been modeled using severe accident codes with relatively simple approximations. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplified heat transfer characteristics, with no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. This modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. The results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident; they are predicted to reach a high enough temperature such that they lose their structural integrity and relocate. The additional 100 tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.

  9. Use of instrumented Charpy tests to determine onset of upper-shelf energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J., Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1981-05-01

    Identifying the onset of C/sub v/ upper-shelf toughness is of paramount importance to the continued integrity of a pressure vessel. Most in-service surveillance programs require that the C/sub v/ upper-shelf toughness be determined. This is particularly true for the surveillance programs for nuclear pressure vessels. In the nuclear systems the change in C/sub v/ upper-shelf energy due to irradiation must frequently be determined with a limited number of surveillance specimens. Currently, fracture appearance is the criterion used to assure that the tests are being conducted in the C/sub v/ upper-shelf temperature range. This procedure is satisfactory when a number of specimens are available and accessible for interpretation. This is not always the case; irradiated specimens must be remotely tested and interpreted. Examining a specimen remotely may result in an erroneous interpretation of the fracture surface. To avoid this possibility we have developed a procedure, using an instrumented Charpy impact tester, that by linear extrapolation can identify the onset of the C/sub v/ upper-shelf toughness regime with as few as two specimens. This paper discusses the development of the procedure and its application.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: IR Thermography as a Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Tool for Lithium-Ion Battery Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about IR thermography...

  11. An upper limit to ground state energy fluctuations in nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Jorge G.; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, Jose [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-348, 04511 Mexico DF (Mexico); Isacker, Piet van [GANIL, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Zuker, Andres P. [IReS, Ba27-CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2007-02-12

    Shell model calculations are employed to estimate un upper limit of statistical fluctuations in the nuclear ground state energies. In order to mimic the presence of quantum chaos associated with neutron resonances at energies between 6 to 10 MeV, calculations include random interactions in the upper shells. The upper bound for the energy fluctuations at mid-shell is shown to have the form {sigma}(A) {approx_equal} 20A-1.34 MeV. This estimate is consistent with the mass errors found in large shell model calculations along the N=126 line, and with local mass error estimated using the Garvey-Kelson relations, all being smaller than 100 keV.

  12. Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Redshift Survey (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey We present a new limit of (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to and when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w{ne}-1, respectively. These are derived from a

  13. Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a

  14. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although

  15. Mass spectrometers for studying the ionic and neutral composition of the upper layers of the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutov, M.D.

    1984-04-01

    The investigation of the ionic and neutral composition of the upper layers of the atmosphere and outer space which is of interest for solving theoretical and applied problems of astrophysics, geophysics, space biology, and other closely-tied areas of science is discussed. The upper layers of the atmosphere are of practical significance for launching rockets and artificial satellites, for which the nature of movement depends on the structure and composition of the atmosphere. The study of the chemical composition of the ionosphere, the degree of ionization of the upper layers of the atmosphere at different latitudes and different times of day, and the dependence of ionization on the action of ultraviolet and corpuscular radiation is necessary to study the processes of the propagation of radio waves, and to explain the chemical and photochemical reaction which cause the ionosphere to exist. The most modern methods of study the composition of the mass spectral method which is a direct method and is especially valuable at great altitudes to study the composition of the upper atmosphere is considered. The mass spectrometric method is the only one to analyze the composition of ionizing gases.

  16. The upper Aptian-Albian succession of the Sergipe basin, Brazil: An integrated paleoenvironmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koutsoukos, E.A.M.; Mello, M.R.; de Azambuja Filho, N.C. ); Hart, M.B. ); Maxwell, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A combined micropaleontological, geochemical, and sedimentological study of the upper Aptian-Albian succession from the Sergipe basin, northeastern Brazil, has been undertaken. The paleoenvironmental evolution of the basin from the late Aptian to late Albian can be subdivided into three major depositional phases: (1) late Aptian, (2) early to middle Albian; (3) late Albian. A shallow carbonate compensation depth within upper mesopelagic depths (c. 300-500 m) is inferred for the late Aptian-Albian. Intermittent anoxic events, associated with salinity-stratified water masses, occurred in the basin during the late Aptian to Albian. An oxygen minimum (dysaerobic to anoxic conditions) occurred during the late Aptian to earliest Albian, in middle-outer neritic to upper bathyal settings. Waning dysaerobic to oxic conditions are apparent in the late Albian. The foraminiferal assemblages recovered from the upper Aptian marine deposits have a characteristic Tethyan affinity. The microfaunal evidence suggests that this area of the northern South Atlantic had at least some surface water exchange with low-latitude central North Atlantic-western Tethyan Provinces, even possible at intermediate (epipelagic to mesopelagic) water depths. Contribution of microfaunal elements coming from high-latitude northern (Boreal Realm) and/or southern (Austral) regions is also apparent, although of less significance.

  17. High-Tc Superconductor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    following their remarkable discovery in 1986, continue to be at the center stage of modern condensed matter physics. Despite great efforts from both theoretical and...

  18. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 C, 65 C, and 80 C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  19. Molecular origin of the difference in the HOH bend of the IR spectra between liquid water and ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

    2013-02-07

    The intensity of the HOH bend in the IR spectrum of ice is significantly smaller than the corresponding one in liquid water. This difference in the IR intensities of the HOH bend in the two systems is investigated using MD simulations with the flexible, polarizable, ab-initio based TTM3-F model for water, a potential that correctly reproduces the experimentally observed increase of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice from the water monomer value. We have identified two factors that are responsible for the difference in the intensity of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice: (i) the decrease of the intensity of the HOH bend in ice caused by the strong anti-correlation between the permanent dipole moment of a molecule and the induced dipole moment of a neighboring hydrogen bond acceptor molecule and (ii) the weakening of this anti-correlation by the disordered hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The presence of the anti-correlation in ice is further confirmed by ab initio electronic structure calculations of water pentamer clusters extracted from the trajectories of the MD simulations for ice and liquid water.

  20. The ITER VIS/IR wide angle viewing system: Challenges and on-going R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travere, J. M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Joanny, M.; Jouve, M.; Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Salasca, S.; Marot, L.; Chabaud, D.; Ferme, J. J.; Bremond, F.; Thonnat, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER tokamak is the next generation fusion device which will allow studying burning plasma obtained by a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction during hundreds of seconds. ITER vacuum vessel real-time protection will be mandatory during plasma operation to avoid water leaks and critical plasma facing components degradation. The protection system will be based on a wide angle viewing system (WAVS) composed with 18 visible (VIS) and 18 infrared (IR) cameras covering 80 % of the vacuum vessel which will be one of the major imaging systems of ITER. Compared to protection systems routinely used on current tokamaks and based on imaging (VIS and/or IR), new constraints must be taken into account because of their influence on the system performance: the harsh environment (high neutron flux) and the metallic plasma facing components (both first wall and divertor). In this new demanding context, we have achieved three mandatory R and D studies starting from the understanding of the source of signals by using realistic photonic simulation up to real-time processing strategy taken into account first order optical design constraints to define what type of performance could be reached for ITER vacuum vessel protection. (authors)

  1. Mixing antiferromagnets to tune NiFe-[IrMn/FeMn] interfacial spin-glasses, grains thermal stability, and related exchange bias properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akmaldinov, K.; Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Joumard, I.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V.

    2014-05-07

    Spintronics devices and in particular thermally assisted magnetic random access memories require a wide range of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (F/AF) exchange bias (EB) properties and subsequently of AF materials to fulfil diverse functionality requirements for the reference and storage. For the reference layer, large EB energies and high blocking temperature (T{sub B}) are required. In contrast, for the storage layer, mostly moderate T{sub B} are needed. One of the present issues is to find a storage layer with properties intermediate between those of IrMn and FeMn and in particular: (i) with a T{sub B} larger than FeMn for better stability at rest-T but lower than IrMn to reduce power consumption at write-T and (ii) with improved magnetic interfacial quality, i.e., with reduced interfacial glassy character for lower properties dispersions. To address this issue, the EB properties of F/AF based stacks were studied for various mixed [IrMn/FeMn] AFs. In addition to EB loop shifts, the F/AF magnetic interfacial qualities and the AF grains thermal stability are probed via measurements of the low- and high-temperature contributions to the T{sub B} distributions, respectively. A tuning of the above three parameters is observed when evolving from IrMn to FeMn via [IrMn/FeMn] repetitions.

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kerry A. ; Liu, Hailong ; Zedler, Sarah E. To incorporate the effects of tropical cyclone (TC)-induced upper ocean mixing and sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on TC ...

  3. Uses of upper-air meteorological data for air quality data analysis and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, C.G.; Dye, T.S.; Ray, S.E.; Roberts, P.T.

    1996-12-31

    A series of regional-scale field studies have been conducted in recent years to study meteorological and photochemical processes that lead to ozone episodes (periods of high ozone concentration) and other types of reduced air quality. An important component of these studies has been to increase the temporal and spatial resolution of aloft measurements of winds, temperatures, and related parameters over those provided by the twice-per-day National Weather Service (NWS) balloon sounding network. Supplemental upper-air stations deployed for these studies have been equipped with a variety of observing systems, including rawinsonde sounding systems, Doppler radar wind profilers, radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS, for temperature profiling), Doppler acoustic sounders (sodar), tethersondes, lidar, and aircraft-based measurements, among others. The upper-air data collected during these programs have been used.

  4. LOCA analyses for nuclear steam supply systems with upper head injection. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, R.K.; Bartel, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    The term Upper Head Injection describes a relatively new addition to a nuclear reactor's emergency cooling system. With this feature, water is delivered directly to the top of the reactor vessel during a loss-of-coolant accident, in addition to the later injection of coolant into the primary operating loops. Established computer programs, with various modifications to models for heat transfer and two-phase flow, were used to analyze a transient following a large break in one of the main coolant loops of a reactor equipped with upper head injection. The flow and heat transfer modifications combined to yield fuel cladding temperatures during blowdown which were as much as 440K (800/sup 0/F) lower than were obtained with standard versions of the codes (for best estimate calculations). The calculations also showed the need for more uniformity of applications of heat transfer models in the computer programs employed.

  5. Bifurcation and chaos in the simple passive dynamic walking model with upper body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qingdu; Guo, Jianli; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2014-09-01

    We present some rich new complex gaits in the simple walking model with upper body by Wisse et al. in [Robotica 22, 681 (2004)]. We first show that the stable gait found by Wisse et al. may become chaotic via period-doubling bifurcations. Such period-doubling routes to chaos exist for all parameters, such as foot mass, upper body mass, body length, hip spring stiffness, and slope angle. Then, we report three new gaits with period 3, 4, and 6; for each gait, there is also a period-doubling route to chaos. Finally, we show a practical method for finding a topological horseshoe in 3D Poincar map, and present a rigorous verification of chaos from these gaits.

  6. Second-harmonic generation of upper-hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, D.P.; Tripathi, V.K.

    1980-05-01

    Employing the fluid model for the nonlinear response of electrons, we have studied the phenomenon of second-harmonic generation of upper-hybrid electromagnetic radiation in an inhomogeneous plasma. In the case of laser-pallet fusion, the maximum contribution for harmonic generation comes from the vicinity of the upper-hybrid layer, and the harmonic conversion efficiency turns out to be approx.0.1% at the power densities approx.10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ (CO/sub 2/ laser), the same order as observed experimentally. In the case of electron cyclotron heating experiments of tokamak, a strong second harmonic must be generated at the cyclotron resonance layer. The wave-number-matching condition could be satisfied in a tokamak, which adds to the conversion efficiency.

  7. Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Suk Bum

    2010-04-05

    It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

  8. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; et al

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore » RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  9. Lasing in the UV, IR and visible spectral ranges in a runaway-electron-preionised diffuse dischrage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vil'tovskii, P O; Lomaev, Mikhail I; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Panchenko, N A; Rybka, D V; Tarasenko, Viktor F

    2013-07-31

    Lasers on the mixtures of inert gases, H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and nitrogen with NF{sub 3} and (or) SF{sub 6} are studied under pumping by the volume (diffusive) discharge formed in a nonuniform electric field due to runaway-electron preionisation. Generation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges is obtained on atomic transitions of neon ({lambda} = 585.3 nm), argon (750.3 nm) and fluorine (712.8 and 731.1 nm), and on molecular transitions of N2 (337.1 nm), XeF * (351 and 353 nm), HF (2.8 - 3.2 {mu}m) and DF (3.8 - 4.2 {mu}m). It is shown that in N{sub 2} - SF{sub 6}, H{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} and D{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} mixtures the generation efficiency approaches the limiting values. (lasers)

  10. Beam driven upper-hybrid-wave instability in quantized semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Rozina, Ch.; Moslem, W. M.; Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt , El-Shorouk City, Cairo ; Salimullah, M.

    2014-02-15

    The excitation of Upper-Hybrid waves (UHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The bandwidth of the UHWs spectrum shows that the system supports purely growing unstable mode. The latter has been studied for diversified parameters of nano-sized GaAs semiconductor.

  11. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  12. Comparison of hydrocarbon production trends in Middle and Upper members of Minnelusa formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reel, C.L.; Horne, J.C.; Kelly, A.O.

    1985-05-01

    The main reservoir rocks in the upper and middle members of the Minnelusa Formation consist of wind blown dunal sands in the area surrounding the Lusk embayment. Changes in the local depositional setting, tectonic framework, and eustatic sea level controlled the distribution and reservior quality of these sandstones. The middle member exhibits two production trends. Age-equivalent Tensleep rocks deposited along the western margin of the embayment produce from sandstones accumulated in a sand sea paleoenvironment. Structure is atnececessary for trapping owing to permeability continuity. Along the eastern margin of the embayment, production comes from isolated accumulations of sandstone deposited as dunes on broad coastal sabkhas. Fields in these sandstones define a linear trend due to the coast-parallel alignment of these dunes. Production from the upper member defines four major trends. Upper member sandstones in the southern part of the basin, similar to Leo reservoirs, produce from sediments deposited as coast-parallel dunes in a northwest-southeast alignment. In the northern portion of the basin, production is from sandstones deposited in broad, flat eolian sand seas. Because of the permeability continuity of these sandstones, structural closure is necessary for trapping hydrocarbons. Upper member production has been influenced by the unconformity developed at the top of the Minnelusa. Movement along the Rosebud arch resulted in a southwest-northeast production trend apparent in each sandstone unit reflecting their northwestward erosional limits. The last, and most apparent, production trend, results from the Opeche Shale infilling of northwest-southeast-oriented stream valleys. Most production to date has been from sandstones following this alignment juxta-posed downdip of these impermeable shales.

  13. Formation of a Keplerian disk in the infalling envelope around L1527 IRS: transformation from infalling motions to Kepler motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohashi, Nagayoshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Saigo, Kazuya [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Machida, Masahiro N. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Saito, Masao [Joint ALMA Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Takahashi, Sanemichi Z. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tomida, Kengo [Department of Astronomical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tomisaka, Kohji, E-mail: nohashi@naoj.org [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle 0 observations of the C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1), SO (J{sub N} = 6{sub 5}-5{sub 4}), and the 1.3 mm dust continuum toward L1527 IRS, a class 0 solar-type protostar surrounded by an infalling and rotating envelope. C{sup 18}O emission shows strong redshifted absorption against the bright continuum emission associated with L1527 IRS, strongly suggesting infall motions in the C{sup 18}O envelope. The C{sup 18}O envelope also rotates with a velocity mostly proportional to r {sup 1}, where r is the radius, whereas the rotation profile at the innermost radius (?54 AU) may be shallower than r {sup 1}, suggestive of formation of a Keplerian disk around the central protostar of ?0.3 M {sub ?} in dynamical mass. SO emission arising from the inner part of the C{sup 18}O envelope also shows rotation in the same direction as the C{sup 18}O envelope. The rotation is, however, rigid-body-like, which is very different from the differential rotation shown by C{sup 18}O. In order to explain the line profiles and the position-velocity (PV) diagrams of C{sup 18}O and SO observed, simple models composed of an infalling envelope surrounding a Keplerian disk of 54 AU in radius orbiting a star of 0.3 M {sub ?} are examined. It is found that in order to reproduce characteristic features of the observed line profiles and PV diagrams, the infall velocity in the model has to be smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by a star of 0.3 M {sub ?}. Possible reasons for the reduced infall velocities are discussed.

  14. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-05-15

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  15. MID-IR SPECTRA OF TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82 SPANNING THE FIRST 4 MONTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telesco, Charles M.; Li, Dan; Barnes, Peter J.; Marias, Naib; Zhang, Han; Hflich, Peter; lvarez, Carlos; Fernndez, Sergio; Rebolo, Rafael; Hough, James H.; Levenson, N. A.; Pantin, Eric; Roche, Patrick E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com

    2015-01-10

    We present a time series of 8-13 ?m spectra and photometry for SN 2014J obtained 57, 81, 108, and 137days after the explosion using CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias. This is the first mid-IR time series ever obtained for a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). These observations can be understood within the framework of the delayed detonation model and the production of ?0.6 M {sub ?} of {sup 56}Ni, consistent with the observed brightness, the brightness decline relation, and the ?-ray fluxes. The [Co III] line at 11.888 ?m is particularly useful for evaluating the time evolution of the photosphere and measuring the amount of {sup 56}Ni and thus the mass of the ejecta. Late-time line profiles of SN 2014J are rather symmetric and not shifted in the rest frame. We see argon emission, which provides a unique probe of mixing in the transition layer between incomplete burning and nuclear statistical equilibrium. We may see [Fe III] and [Ni IV] emission, both of which are observed to be substantially stronger than indicated by our models. If the latter identification is correct, then we are likely observing stable Ni, which might imply central mixing. In addition, electron capture, also required for stable Ni, requires densities larger than ?1 10{sup 9}gcm{sup 3}, which are expected to be present only in white dwarfs close to the Chandrasekhar limit. This study demonstrates that mid-IR studies of SNe Ia are feasible from the ground and provide unique information, but it also indicates the need for better atomic data.

  16. Jacking mechanism for upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Wineman, Arthur L. (Greensburg, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A jacking mechanism for raising the upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor which jacking mechanism uses a system of gears and drive shafts to transmit force from a single motor to four mechanically synchronized ball jacks to raise and lower support columns which support the upper internals structure. The support columns have a pin structure which rides up and down in a slot in a housing fixed to the reactor head. The pin has two locking plates which can be rotated around the pin to bring bolt holes through the locking plates into alignment with a set of bolt holes in the housing, there being a set of such housing bolt holes corresponding to both a raised and a lowered position of the support column. When the locking plate is so aligned, a surface of the locking plate mates with a surface in the housing such that the support column is then supported by the locking plate and not by the ball jacks. Since the locking plates are to be installed and bolted to the housing during periods of reactor operation, the ball jacks need not be sized to react the large forces which occur or potentially could occur on the upper internals structure of the reactor during operation. The locking plates react these loads. The ball jacks, used only during refueling, can be smaller, which enable conventionally available equipment to fulfill the precision requirements for the task within available space.

  17. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850C. Turnover rate at 850C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time was granted by a user proposal at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at PNNL. Part of the computational time was provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  18. Analysis of the spin Hall effect in CuIr alloys: Combined approach of density functional theory and Hartree-Fock approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhuo Gu, Bo; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Ziman, Timothy

    2015-05-07

    We analyze the spin Hall effect in CuIr alloys in theory by the combined approach of the density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The spin Hall angle (SHA) is obtained to be negative without the local correlation effects. After including the local correlation effects of the 5d orbitals of Ir impurities, the SHA becomes positive with realistic correlation parameters and consistent with experiment [Niimi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 126601 (2011)]. Moreover, our analysis shows that the DFT?+?HF approach is a convenient and general method to study the influence of local correlation effects on the spin Hall effect.

  19. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai, Feng [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Chen, YiPing, E-mail: ypchen007@sina.com [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua [Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)?]?[CoW??O??]9H?O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)?]?[FeW??O??]H?OH?O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UVDRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)?]? cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 050 mT in the range of 6001000 cm?, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  20. A PAN-STARRS + UKIDSS SEARCH FOR YOUNG, WIDE PLANETARY-MASS COMPANIONS IN UPPER SCORPIUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aller, Kimberly M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Liu, Michael C.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene A.; Price, Paul A.

    2013-08-10

    We have combined optical and NIR photometry from Pan-STARRS 1 and UKIDSS to search the young (5-10 Myr) star-forming region of Upper Scorpius for wide ( Almost-Equal-To 400-4000 AU) substellar companions down to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}. Our search is Almost-Equal-To 4 mag deeper than previous work based on the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We identified several candidates around known stellar members using a combination of color selection and spectral energy distribution fitting. Our follow-up spectroscopy has identified two new companions as well as confirmed two companions previously identified from photometry, with spectral types of M7.5-M9 and masses of {approx}15-60 M{sub Jup}, indicating a frequency for such wide substellar companions of {approx}0.6% {+-} 0.3%. Both USco 1610-1913B and USco 1612-1800B are more luminous than expected for their spectral type compared with known members of Upper Sco. HIP 77900B has an extreme mass ratio (M{sub 2}/M{sub 1} Almost-Equal-To 0.005) and an extreme separation of 3200 AU. USco 1602-2401B also has a very large separation of 1000 AU. We have also confirmed a low-mass stellar companion, USco 1610-2502B (730 AU, M5.5). Our substellar companions appear both non-coeval with their primary stars according to evolutionary models and, as a group, are systematically more luminous than the Upper Sco cluster sequence. One possible reason for these luminosity discrepancies could be different formation processes or accretion histories for these objects.

  1. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 20002800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic studies of peptides and proteins.

  2. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kito, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Daiju; Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto; Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya ; Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  3. Lower and upper estimates on the excitation threshold for breathers in discrete nonlinear Schroedinger lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuevas, J.; Palmero, F.

    2009-11-15

    We propose analytical lower and upper estimates on the excitation threshold for breathers (in the form of spatially localized and time periodic solutions) in discrete nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) lattices with power nonlinearity. The estimation, depending explicitly on the lattice parameters, is derived by a combination of a comparison argument on appropriate lower bounds depending on the frequency of each solution with a simple and justified heuristic argument. The numerical studies verify that the analytical estimates can be of particular usefulness, as a simple analytical detection of the activation energy for breathers in DNLS lattices.

  4. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; DAngelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-30

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  5. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madaric, Juraj; Klepanec, Andrej; Mistrik, Martin; Altaner, Cestmir; Vulev, Ivan

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  6. Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISO/TC 201 Technical Report: ISO 14187:2011 -Surface Chemical Analysis- Characterization of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2012-09-01

    ISO Technical Report (TR) 14187 provides an introduction to (and examples of) the information that can be obtained about nanostructured materials using surface-analysis tools. In addition, both general issues and challenges associated with characterising nanostructured materials and the specific opportunities and challenges associated with individual analytical methods are identified. As the size of objects or components of materials approaches a few nanometres, the distinctions among 'bulk', 'surface' and 'particle' analysis blur. This Technical Report focuses on issues specifically relevant to surface chemical analysis of nanostructured materials. The report considers a variety of analysis methods but focuses on techniques that are in the domain of ISO/TC 201 including Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and scanning probe microscopy. Measurements of nanoparticle surface properties such as surface potential that are often made in a solution are not discussed.

  7. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  8. Ir I L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LIST OF FIGURES 1 2 General location of the Granite City Steel Facility' Granite City, Illinois . . . View of the betatron building, looking south . ' ' 3 View o[ the betatron building, looking west . ' ' ' ' ' 11 4 Diagram of the ground floor of the betatron building ' 5 Photo showing the larger of the two betatrons (no. 1, Fig. ) 6 View of transformer storage area inside the betatron building 7 Directly measured radiation levels inside the betatron building, first level 8 Results of directly

  9. Ir I L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    *- -I ..' -I I... "- II .- (1 "^ 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 LIST O F FIGURES General location of the Granite City Steel Facility , Granite City , Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 View of the betatron building, look ing south . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 View of the betatron building, look ing west . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Diagram of the ground floor of the betatron building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Photo

  10. Tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer demonstration sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) is the primary document describing field and laboratory activities and requirements for the tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer (CP) demonstration. It is written in accordance with Hanford Tank Initiative Tank 241-AX-104 Upper Vadose Zone Demonstration Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999). This technology demonstration, to be conducted at tank 241-AX-104, is being performed by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) Project as a part of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Program (EM-30) and the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) Tanks Focus Area. Sample results obtained as part of this demonstration will provide additional information for subsequent revisions to the Retrieval Performance Evaluation (RPE) report (Jacobs 1998). The RPE Report is the result of an evaluation of a single tank farm (AX Tank Farm) used as the basis for demonstrating a methodology for developing the data and analyses necessary to support making tank waste retrieval decisions within the context of tank farm closure requirements. The RPE includes a study of vadose zone contaminant transport mechanisms, including analysis of projected tank leak characteristics, hydrogeologic characteristics of tank farm soils, and the observed distribution of contaminants in the vadose zone in the tank farms. With limited characterization information available, large uncertainties exist as to the nature and extent of contaminants that may exist in the upper vadose zone in the AX Tank Farm. Traditionally, data has been collected from soils in the vadose zone through the installation of boreholes and wells. Soil samples are collected as the bore hole is advanced and samples are screened on site and/or sent to a laboratory for analysis. Some in-situ geophysical methods of contaminant analysis can be used to evaluate radionuclide levels in the soils adjacent to an existing borehole. However, geophysical methods require compensation for well casing interference and soil moisture content and may not be successful in some conditions. In some cases the level of interference must be estimated due to uncertainties regarding the materials used in well construction and soil conditions, Well casing deployment used for many in-situ geophysical methods is relatively expensive and geophysical methods do not generally provide real time values for contaminants. In addition, some of these methods are not practical within the boundaries of the tank farm due to physical constraints, such as underground piping and other hardware. The CP technologies could facilitate future characterization of vadose zone soils by providing vadose zone data in near real-time, reducing the number of soil samples and boreholes required, and reducing characterization costs.

  11. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  12. Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compounds CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Calder, S.; Janoschek, M.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we have investigated the magnetic ground state of the antiferromagnetic Kondo-lattice compounds CeMAl4Si2(M = Rh, Ir) using neutron powder diffraction. Although both of these compounds show two magnetic transitions TN1 and TN2 in the bulk properties measurements, evidence for magnetic long-range order was only found below the lower transition TN2. Analysis of the diffraction profiles reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector k = (0, 0, 1/2). The magnetic moment in the ordered state of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 were determined to be 1.14(2) and 1.41(3) μB/Ce, respectively, and are parallel to the crystallographic c-axis inmore » agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  13. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Thoma, Ed; Ojzcyk, Cindy

    2012-12-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored.

  14. Upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, W. M.; Luo, D.; Walbridge, S. B.; Crawford, B. E.; Gan, K.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Opper, A. K.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E.; Sharapov, E. I.; Zhumabekova, V.

    2011-02-15

    We report an upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He. This experiment is the most sensitive search for neutron-weak optical activity yet performed and represents a significant advance in precision in comparison to past measurements in heavy nuclei. The experiment was performed at the NG-6 slow-neutron beamline at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. Our result for the neutron spin rotation angle per unit length in {sup 4}He is d{phi}/dz=[+1.7{+-}9.1(stat.){+-}1.4(sys.)]x10{sup -7} rad/m. The statistical uncertainty is smaller than current estimates of the range of possible values of d{phi}/dz in n+{sup 4}He.

  15. Mass-transport models to predict toxicity of inhaled gases in the upper respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubal, E.A.C.; Fedkiw, P.S.; Kimbell, J.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Mass-transport (the movement of a chemical species) plays an important role in determining toxic responses of the upper respiratory tract (URT) to inhaled chemicals. Mathematical dosimetry models incorporate physical characteristics of mass transport and are used to predict quantitative uptake (absorption rate) and distribution of inhaled gases and vapors in the respiratory tract. Because knowledge of dose is an essential component of quantitative risk assessment, dosimetry modeling plays an important role in extrapolation of animal study results to humans. A survey of existing mathematical dosimetry models for the URT is presented, limitations of current models are discussed, and adaptations of existing models to produce a generally applicable model are suggested. Reviewed URT dosimetry models are categorized as early, lumped-parameter, and distributed-parameter models. Specific examples of other relevant modeling work are also presented. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Williams, D. J.; Scott, B. L.; Luo, Yongkang; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis, crystal structure and physical properties studied by means of x-ray diffraction, magnetic, thermal and transport measurements of CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) are reported, along with the electronic structure calculations for LaMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt). These materials adopt a tetragonal crystal structure (space group P4/mmm) comprised of BaAl4 blocks, separated by MAl2 units, stacked along the c-axis. Both CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 order antiferromagnetically below TN1 = 14 and 16 K, respectively, and undergo a second antiferromagnetic transitition at lower temperature (TN2 = 9 and 14 K, respectively). CePtAl4Si2 orders ferromagnetically below TC = 3 K with an ordered moment of ?sat = 0.8 ?B for a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the c-axis. Electronic structure calculations reveal quasi-2D character of the Fermi surface.

  17. Evolution of competing magnetic order in the Jeff=1/2 insulating state of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Calder, Stuart A.; Kim, Jong-Woo; Cao, Guixin; Cantoni, Claudia; May, Andrew F; Cao, Huibo B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Choi, Yongseong; Haskel, Daniel; et al

    2015-10-27

    We investigate the magnetic properties of the series Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 with neutron, resonant x-ray and magnetization measurements. The results indicate an evolution and coexistence of magnetic structures via a spin flop transition from ab-plane to c-axis collinear order as the 5d Ir4+ ions are replaced with an increasing concentration of 4d Ru4+ ions. The magnetic structures within the ordered regime of the phase diagram (x<0.3) are reported. Despite the changes in magnetic structure no alteration of the Jeff=1/2 ground state is observed. This behavior of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 is consistent with electronic phase separation and diverges from a standard scenario of hole doping.more » The role of lattice alterations with doping on the magnetic and insulating behavior is considered. Our results presented here provide insight into the magnetic insulating states in strong spin-orbit coupled materials and the role perturbations play in altering the behavior.« less

  18. Phase mixing of upper hybrid oscillations in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-05-15

    We study phase mixing/wave breaking phenomena of upper hybrid modes in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Inhomogeneities both in the background ion density and magnetic field profile are treated as periodic in space but independent in time. The Lagrangian fluid description is employed to obtain an exact solution of this fully nonlinear problem. It is demonstrated that the upper hybrid modes, excited by an initial local charge imbalance, break via phase mixing, induced by the inhomogeneities. It is also shown that it is possible to avoid phase mixing in excited upper hybrid oscillations in an inhomogeneous plasma containing a finite amplitude ion density fluctuation. The choice of external magnetic field is shown to have a key role in avoiding phase mixing in such oscillations. The relevance of our investigation regarding the particle acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma has also been discussed.

  19. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant fish kill for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etnier, E.L.; Opresko, D.M.; Talmage, S.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the monitoring of fish kills in upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) from July 1990 to June 1993. Since the opening of Lake Reality (LR) in 1988, total numbers of fish inhabiting upper EFPC have increased. However, species diversity has remained poor. Water quality data have been collected in upper EFPC during the time period covered in this report. Total residual chlorine (TRC) levels have exceeded federal and state water quality criteria over the years. However, with the installation of two dechlorination systems in late 1992, TRC levels have been substantially lowered in most portions of upper EFPC. By June 1993, concentrations of TRC were 0.04 to 0.06 mg/L at the north-south pipes (NSP) and below detection limits at sampling station AS-8 and were 0 to 0.01 mg/L at the inlet and outlet of LR. The daily chronic fish mortality in upper EFPC has been attributed to background stress resulting from the continuous discharge of chlorine into upper EFPC. Mean daily mortality rates for 22 acute fish kills were three fold or more above background and usually exceeded ten fish per day. Total number of dead fish collected per acute kill event ranged from 30 to over 1,000 fish; predominant species killed were central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) and striped shiners (Luxilus chrysocephalus). Spills or elevated releases of toxic chemicals, such as acids, organophosphates, aluminum nitrate, ammonia, or chlorine, were identified as possible causative agents; however, a definitive cause-effect relationship was rarely established for any acute kills. Ambient toxicity testing, in situ chemical monitoring, and streamside experiments were used to examine TRC dynamics and ambient toxicity in EFPC.

  20. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  1. Wang-Landau density of states based study of the folding-unfolding transition in the mini-protein Trp-cage (TC5b)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Priya; Sarkar, Subir K.; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2014-07-07

    We present the results of a high-statistics equilibrium study of the folding/unfolding transition for the 20-residue mini-protein Trp-cage (TC5b) in water. The ECEPP/3 force field is used and the interaction with water is treated by a solvent-accessible surface area method. A Wang-Landau type simulation is used to calculate the density of states and the conditional probabilities for the various values of the radius of gyration and the number of native contacts at fixed values of energyalong with a systematic check on their convergence. All thermodynamic quantities of interest are calculated from this information. The folding-unfolding transition corresponds to a peak in the temperature dependence of the computed specific heat. This is corroborated further by the structural signatures of folding in the distributions for radius of gyration and the number of native contacts as a function of temperature. The potentials of mean force are also calculated for these variables, both separately and jointly. A local free energy minimum, in addition to the global minimum, is found in a temperature range substantially below the folding temperature. The free energy at this second minimum is approximately 5?k{sub B}T higher than the value at the global minimum.

  2. FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RICH, LAUREN

    2013-09-30

    A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe�s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

  3. Irradiation effects on Charpy impact and tensile properties of low upper-shelf welds, HSSI series 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Berggren, R.G. )

    1991-08-01

    When reactor pressure vessel steels exhibit Charpy V-notch impact upper-shelf energy levels of less than 68 J (50 ft-lb), the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50, Appendix G, are not met. The regulations require, as an option, that a fracture mechanics analysis be performed that conservatively demonstrates adequate safety margins for continued operation. Under conditions where large prefracture crack-tip plastic zones are present, linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts are not applicable, and the use of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concepts has been recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A number of Babcock and Wilcox Company-fabricated reactor vessels in commercial pressurized water reactor plants include welds with both relatively low initial Charpy upper-shelf energies and high copper concentrations, which make them highly sensitive to neutron irradiation. As a result, the Charpy upper-shelf energies of many welds are expected to fall below 68 J (50 ft-lb) prior to reaching design life. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program conducted the Second and Third Irradiation Series to investigate the effects of irradiation on the ductile fracture toughness of seven commercially fabricated, low upper-shelf welds. This report represents analyses of the Charpy impact and tensile test data, including adjustments for irradiation temperature and fluence normalization, which make possible comparison of the irradiation sensitivity the different welds.

  4. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  5. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Thoma, E.; Ojczyk, C.

    2012-12-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored. All three builders commonly seek ENERGY STAR certification on their homes and implement strategies that would allow them to meet the requirements for the Building America Builders Challenge program. Their desire for continuous improvement, willingness to seek outside assistance, and ambition to be leaders in their field are common themes. Problem solving to overcome challenges was accepted as part of doing business. It was concluded that crossing the gap from code-based building to high performance based building was a natural evolution for these leading builders.

  6. Simplified simulation of the transient behavior of temperatures in the upper shaft of the blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxen, H.

    1998-06-01

    The blast furnace is the principal process in the world for production of iron for primary steelmaking. The furnace acts as a huge countercurrent heat exchange and chemical reactor with complicated heat and mass transfer phenomena and chemical reactions. The flows of burden and gas in the blast furnace shaft strongly affect the fuel economy of the process. An optimal gas flow distribution, which is obtained by controlling the burden distribution, leads to a high utilization degree of the reducing gas, smooth burden descent, and little wear of the furnace lining. Here, a one-dimensional dynamic model of the upper part of the blast furnace shaft is applied to study the evolution of gas and burden temperatures, mainly in order to shed light on the transient phenomena after charging dumps of burden. The effects of irregularities in the burden descent and charging are also studied briefly. The simulations demonstrate that the temperatures of the burden layers in the lower part of the simulated region assume a quasi-steady state, indicating that the changes in the top gas temperature experienced immediately after a dump of burden arise primarily because of heat transfer between the gas and the dump. These results support the idea that such temporary changes can be interpreted in terms of distribution of the dumps on the burden surface.

  7. Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David

    2009-08-13

    The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

  8. Petroleum potential of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois: A coordinated geological and geochemical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. ); Kruge, M.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois, predominantly composed of shale, calcareous shale, and carbonates, has long been considered a potential source for Illinois basin hydrocarbons. Methods used to better define the petroleum potential of the Maquoketa in the Illinois basin were lithostratigraphic study, Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) analyses, comparison of molecular markers from whole-rock extracts and produced oil, and construction of burial history models. Organic-rich submature Maquoketa potential source rocks are present in western Illinois at shallow depths on the basin flank. Deeper in the basin in southern Illinois, Rock-Eval analyses indicate that the Maquoketa shale is within the oil window. Solvent extracts of the Maquoketa from western Illinois closely resemble the Devonian New Albany Shale, suggesting that past studies may have erroneously attributed Maquoketa-generated petroleum to a New Albany source or failed to identify mixed source oils. Subtle differences between Maquoketa and New Albany solvent extracts include differences in pristane/phytane ratios, proportions of steroids, and distribution of dimethyldibenzothiophene isomers. Maquoketa solvent extracts show little resemblance to Middle Ordovician oils from the Illinois or Michigan basins. Lithostratigraphic studies identified localized thick carbonate facies in the Maquoketa, suggesting depositional response to upper Ordovician paleostructures. Sandstone facies in the Maquoketa in southwestern Illinois offer a potential source/trap play, as well as serving as potential carrier beds for hydrocarbon migration. Maquoketa source and carrier beds may feed older Ordovician rocks in faulted areas along and south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois.

  9. Upper Pleistocene-to-Holocene depositional sequences in the north-central Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowland, C. ); Wood, L.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Upper Quaternary depositional sequences and their systems tracts can be delineated in the Main Pass area using minisparker seismic data. Core collected by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Shelf/Slope Research Consortium (Amoco, ARCO, BP, Chevron, Elf-Aquitaine, Exxon, Marathon, Mobil, and Texaco) sampled these systems tracts on one site in Main Pass 303. At the shelfbreak, a distinct change in depositional style occurs across the latest Wisconsinan sequence boundary. Widespread progradational systems (late highstand systems tract) below become focused into discrete depocenters with predominantly aggradational deposits (lowstand systems tract) above. Focusing was probably a result of localized high subsidence rates due to salt movement, progradation into rapidly deepening water, and, possibly, stabilization of sediment transport paths on the exposed shelf. No age-equivalent submarine canyons are present in this area. The oldest mappable systems tract is a highstand systems tract deposited during stage 3 interstadial and the early-to-middle stage 2 glacial. The overlying transgressive systems tract was deposited coeval with the stage 2-stage 1 transition. It thins in a land-ward direction, except where an updip depocenter was present. At the corehole site, the transgressive systems tract consists of fining-upward deposits ranging from medium-grained sands to clays. The transgressive systems tract includes small slope-front-fill lenses deposited on the uppermost slope above and adjacent to lowstand deltaic depocenters. These lenses likely comprise silt and clay derived from either reworking of lowstand deltas or sediment bypassing the outer shelf.

  10. Switchgrass Cultivar/Ecotype Selection and Management for Biofuels in the Upper Southeast USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lemus, Rocky; Parrish, David J.; Wolf, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial warm-season grass indigenous to the eastern USA, has potential as a biofuels feedstock. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of upland and lowland switchgrass cultivars under different environments and management treatments. Four cultivars of switchgrass were evaluated from 2000 to 2001 under two management regimes in plots established in 1992 at eight locations in the upper southeastern USA. Two management treatments included 1) a single annual harvest (in late October to early November) and a single application of 50 kg N/ha/yr and 2) two annual harvests (in midsummer andmore » November) and a split application of 100 kg N/ha/yr. Biomass yields averaged 15 Mg/ha/yr and ranged from 10 to 22 Mg/ha/yr across cultivars, managements, locations, and years. There was no yield advantage in taking two harvests of the lowland cultivars (Alamo and Kanlow). When harvested twice, upland cultivars (Cave-in-Rock and Shelter) provided yields equivalent to the lowland ecotypes. Tiller density was 36% lower in stands cutting only once per year, but the stands appeared vigorous after nine years of such management. Lowland cultivars and a one-cutting management (after the tops have senesced) using low rates of applied N (50 kg/ha) are recommended.« less

  11. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, Joshua L.

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  12. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-21

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H{sub 2}O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 04000 cm{sup ?1} is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  14. A global analysis of the ozone deficit in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Allen, M. )

    1993-01-20

    The global measurements of temperature, ozone, water vapor, and nitrogen dioxide acquired by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS), supplemented by a precomputed distribution of chlorine monoxide, are used to test the balance between odd oxygen production and loss in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. An efficient photochemical equilibrium model, validated by comparison with the results from a fully time-dependent one-dimensional model at selected latitudes, is used in the calculations. The computed ozone abundances are systematically lower than observations for May 1-7, 1979, which suggests, contrary to the conclusions of other recent studies, a problem in model simulations of stratospheric ozone. The ozone deficit' at 30[degrees]N is smaller than previous analyses of LIMS data have indicated. In the stratosphere, this reduction in the deficit is due to the fact that CIO abundances for the 1979 period utilized in this study are much lower than in earlier work, mainly as a result of lower Cl[sub y] concentrations. In the mesosphere, a correlation of the ozone deficit with the distribution of water vapor is indicated. The ozone deficit in the stratosphere can be eliminated by modifying only one model reaction rate: either by decreasing the rate of odd oxygen loss or by increasing the rate of odd oxygen production Cl[sub y] increasing the photodissociation rate of molecular oxygen primarily in the Herzberg continuum and/or invoking photolysis of vibrationally excited molecular oxygen. With the ozone abundances thus increased, a small residual deficit in the lower mesophere can be eliminated by reducing, within the recommended kinetic uncertainties, the efficiency of odd hydrogen-catalyzed odd oxygen loss. With the adjusted model, the calculated ozone abundances for the week of January 1-7. 1979, outside of winter latitudes, also agree with the LIMS observations to within 10%. 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Episodic potassic alteration of Ordovician tuffs in the Upper Mississippi Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Hay, R.L.; Kolata, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Tuffs of middle and late Ordovician age are altered to mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) and to K-feldspar in the Upper Mississippi Valley in northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota, and southwest Wisconsin. Some and perhaps much of the I/S replaces previously feldspathized tuff, as shown by field and petrographic relationships. Samples for K-Ar dating were collected over a 200 km southeast-northwest traverse. Dates from authigenic K-feldspar are early Devonian and range from 397 +/- 13 to 406 +/- 18, averaging 400 m.y. in three samples, including a middle Ordovician tuff in Iowa and Minnesota and a late Ordovician tuff in Minnesota. Ages of illite layers in I/S are late Devonian and early Mississippian and range from 356 +/- 16 to 371 +/- 17, averaging 366 m.y. in 5 samples including 4 from two middle Ordovician tuffs in Minnesota and Iowa and the late Ordovician tuff in Minnesota. Oxygen-isotopic composition of the K-feldspar and I/S shows that the two minerals crystallized under different conditions and probably reflect introduction of waters of varying chemistry and temperature. K-feldspar very likely crystallized under higher temperatures and possibly lower salinity than the I/S. Introduction of these pore waters may have been caused by groundwater movements resulting from recharge in distal areas undergoing tectonic uplift. K-feldspar alteration was concurrent with early Devonian uplift on the Northeast Missouri Arch and possibly the Transcontinental Arch. Age of the illite layers corresponds to movements on the Sangamon Arch and possibly the Wisconsin Arch.

  16. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of upper Pleistocene carbonates of southeastern Barbardos, West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N. (Univ. of Texas, Richardson (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Upper Pleistocene reef-associated carbonates of southeastern Barbados have been studied in outcrop and core. Reef terraces, formed during glacio-eustatic sea level highstands and subsequently uplifted, are characterized by thick and areally extensive sequences of allochthonous and autochthonous fore-reef calcarenites. Depositional textures are primarily packstones, and grainstones, wackestones, and coral floatstones are volumetrically less significant. Sediments are coarse- to fine-grained reef-derived allochems and micrite, and autochthonous benthic foraminifera and coralline red algae. Rates of sediment accumulation of fore-reef calcarenites range from about 1 to 4 m/1,000 yr. Although of relatively small scale, the carbonate terraces of southeastern Barbados provide excellent analogs for sequence stratigraphic concepts in carbonate settings. The terraces are primarily highstand systems tract deposits separated by type 1 unconformities. These highstand deposits are characterized by reef development and the progradation of fore-reef calcarenites. Extensive fore-reef deposits resulted from mechanical erosion of the reef framework on this high-energy, windward coastline. Type 1 unconformities are characterized by thin caliche layers developed during lowstand subaerial exposure. Thin basal transgressive systems tract deposits are characterized by incorporation of extraformational clasts derived from the underlying sequence during sea level rise. Slope-front erosion, vertical shift in the position of freshwater lens, and shift in the position of coastal onlap are all consequences of the interplay between eustasy and tectonics. These effects and the development of facies geometries on Barbados are primarily controlled by the glacio-eustatic component, inasmuch as rates of eustatic changes of sea level are at least two orders of magnitude greater than the maximum average rates of tectonic uplift. 12 figs.

  17. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, sa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Rivard, Mark J.; Siebert, Frank-Andr; Sloboda, Ron S.; and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup } Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then compared against dose calculated using TG-43 and MBDCA methods. Results: TG-43 and PSS datasets were generated for the generic source, the PSS data for use with the ACE algorithm. The dose-rate constant values obtained from seven MC simulations, performed independently using different codes, were in excellent agreement, yielding an average of 1.1109 0.0004 cGy/(h U) (k = 1, Type A uncertainty). MC calculated dose-rate distributions for the two plans were also found to be in excellent agreement, with differences within type A uncertainties. Differences between commercial MBDCA and MC results were test, position, and calculation parameter dependent. On average, however, these differences were within 1% for ACUROS and 2% for ACE at clinically relevant distances. Conclusions: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed and implemented in two commercially available TPSs employing different MBDCAs. Reference dose distributions for this source were benchmarked and used for the evaluation of MBDCA calculations employing a virtual, cubic water phantom in the form of a CT DICOM image series. The implementation of a generic source of identical design in all TPSs using MBDCAs is an important step toward supporting univocal commissioning procedures and direct comparisons between TPSs.

  18. Evaluate the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The earth's radiation budget is sensitive to changes in the microphysical properties of low-level stratiform clouds. Their extensive coverage can significantly reduce the solar energy

  19. Experimental Study on Flow Optimization in Upper Plenum of Reactor Vessel for a Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Kenji; Kamide, Hideki; Itoh, Masami; Sekine, Tadashi

    2005-11-15

    An innovative sodium-cooled fast reactor has been investigated in a feasibility study of fast breeder reactor cycle systems in Japan. A compact reactor vessel and a column-type upper inner structure with a radial slit for an arm of a fuel-handling machine (FHM) are adopted. Dipped plates are set in the reactor vessel below the free surface to prevent gas entrainment. We performed a one-tenth-scaled model water experiment for the upper plenum of the reactor vessel. Gas entrainment was not observed in the experiment under the same velocity condition as the reactor. Three vortex cavitations were observed near the hot-leg inlet. A vertical rib on the reactor vessel wall was set to restrict the rotating flow near the hot leg. The vortex cavitation between the reactor vessel wall and the hot leg was suppressed by the rib under the same cavitation factor condition as in the reactor. The cylindrical plug was installed through the hole in the dipped plates for the FHM to reduce the flow toward the free surface. It was effective when the plug was submerged into the middle height in the upper plenum. This combination of two components had a possibility to optimize the flow in the compact reactor vessel.

  20. TC&WM EIS Scoping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    call 711 for relay service or 800-833-6388 for TTY. Scoping the Tank Closure & Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Public Involvement Process Planning Activity...

  1. TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intensity (e.g. May and Ballinger, 2007) Resulting Cloud Properties Examine rain DSD using polarimetric radar Examine ice cloud properties using MMCR and MPL Expect...

  2. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86upper branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach. Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum and reentrant ferromagnetic transition. The ferromagnetic phase disappears for large and negative effective ranges.

  3. TU-F-12A-04: Differential Radiation Avoidance of Functional Liver Regions Defined by 99mTc-Sulfur Colloid SPECT/CT with Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, S; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G; Vesselle, H; Nyflot, M; Apisarnthanarax, S; Saini, J; Wong, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients is conventionally planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in hepatic function, which may increase risk of radiation-induced liver disease. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton radiotherapy (pRT) plans were generated to differentially decrease dose to functional liver volumes (FLV) defined on [{sup 99m}Tc]sulfur colloid (SC) SPECT/CT images (functional avoidance plans) and compared against conventional pRT plans. Methods: Three HCC patients underwent SC SPECT/CT scans for pRT planning acquired 15 min post injection over 24 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM following scatter, collimator, and exhale CT attenuation correction. Functional liver volumes (FLV) were defined by liver:spleen uptake ratio thresholds (43% to 90% maximum). Planning objectives to FLV were based on mean SC SPECT uptake ratio relative to GTV-subtracted liver and inversely scaled to mean liver dose of 20 Gy. PTV target coverage (V{sub 95}) was matched between conventional and functional avoidance plans. PBS pRT plans were optimized in RayStation for single field uniform dose (SFUD) and systematically perturbed to verify robustness to uncertainty in range, setup, and motion. Relative differences in FLV DVH and target dose heterogeneity (D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D50 were assessed. Results: For similar liver dose between functional avoidance and conventional PBS pRT plans (D{sub mean}?5% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?1% difference), dose to functional liver volumes were lower in avoidance plans but varied in magnitude across patients (FLV{sub 70%max} D{sub mean}?26% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?8% difference). Higher PTV dose heterogeneity in avoidance plans was associated with lower functional liver dose, particularly for the largest lesion [(D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D{sub 50}=13%, FLV{sub 90%max}=50% difference]. Conclusion: Differential avoidance of functional liver regions defined on sulfur colloid SPECT/CT is feasible with proton therapy. The magnitude of benefit appears to be patient specific and dependent on tumor location, size, and proximity to functional volumes. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients may validate the clinical utility of functional avoidance planning of HCC radiotherapy.

  4. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-10-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for highdose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with {sup 192}Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3 mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at 50% and 70% and 2 coordinates at 30% profile widths. The point source measurements and calculations for 50% profile widths revealed a difference > 3 mm in 1 coordinate on the sagittal plane and 2 coordinates on the axial plane. The doses of 3 coordinates on the sagittal plane and 4 coordinates on the axial plane could not be evaluated in 30% profile width because of low doses. There was good agreement between the gel dosimetry and TPS results. Gel dosimetry provides dose distributions in all 3 planes at the same time, which enables us to define the dose distributions in any plane with high resolution. It can be used to obtain 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources and 3D dose verification of TPS.

  5. Electronic excitations and structure of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} thin films grown on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenderka, Marcus Schmidt-Grund, Rdiger; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2015-01-14

    Thin films are a prerequisite for application of the emergent exotic ground states in iridates that result from the interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations. We report on pulsed laser deposition of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} films on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) single crystalline substrates. X-ray diffraction confirms preferential (001) and (10-1) out-of-plane crystalline orientations with well defined in-plane orientation. Resistivity between 35 and 300?K is dominated by a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The dielectric function is determined by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and, complemented by Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy, reveals a small optical gap of ?300?meV, a splitting of the 5d-t{sub 2g} manifold, and several in-gap excitations attributed to phonons and possibly magnons.

  6. Measuring galaxy clustering and the evolution of [C II] mean intensity with far-IR line intensity mapping during 0.5 < z < 1.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzgil, B. D.; Aguirre, J. E.; Lidz, A.; Bradford, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. Total line emission, when compared to the total star formation activity and/or other line intensities, reveals evolution of the interstellar conditions of galaxies in aggregate. As a case study, we consider measurement of [C II] autocorrelation in the 0.5 < z < 1.5 epoch, where interloper lines are minimized, using far-IR/submillimeter balloon-borne and future space-borne instruments with moderate and high sensitivity, respectively. In this context, we compare the intensity mapping approach to blind galaxy surveys based on individual detections. We find that intensity mapping is nearly always the best way to obtain the total line emission because blind, wide-field galaxy surveys lack sufficient depth and deep pencil beams do not observe enough galaxies in the requisite luminosity and redshift bins. Also, intensity mapping is often the most efficient way to measure the power spectrum shape, depending on the details of the luminosity function and the telescope aperture.

  7. VERY BLUE UV-CONTINUUM SLOPE {beta} OF LOW LUMINOSITY z {approx} 7 GALAXIES FROM WFC3/IR: EVIDENCE FOR EXTREMELY LOW METALLICITIES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Stiavelli, M.; Franx, M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Labbe, I.

    2010-01-10

    We use the ultra-deep WFC3/IR data over the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Early Release Science WFC3/IR data over the CDF-South GOODS field to quantify the broadband spectral properties of candidate star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 7. We determine the UV-continuum slope {beta} in these galaxies, and compare the slopes with galaxies at later times to measure the evolution in {beta}. For luminous L* {sub z=3} galaxies, we measure a mean UV-continuum slope {beta} of -2.0 {+-} 0.2, which is comparable to the {beta} {approx} -2 derived at similar luminosities at z {approx} 5-6. However, for the lower luminosity 0.1L* {sub z=3} galaxies, we measure a mean {beta} of -3.0 {+-} 0.2. This is substantially bluer than is found for similar luminosity galaxies at z {approx} 4, just 800 Myr later, and even at z {approx} 5-6. In principle, the observed {beta} of -3.0 can be matched by a very young, dust-free stellar population, but when nebular emission is included the expected {beta} becomes {>=}-2.7. To produce these very blue {beta}s (i.e., {beta} {approx} -3), extremely low metallicities and mechanisms to reduce the red nebular emission seem to be required. For example, a large escape fraction (i.e., f {sub esc} {approx}> 0.3) could minimize the contribution from this red nebular emission. If this is correct and the escape fraction in faint z {approx} 7 galaxies is {approx}>0.3, it may help to explain how galaxies reionize the universe.

  8. Upper ocean model of dissolved atmospheric gases. Final report for the period 1 August 1991--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schudlich, R.; Emerson, S.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes results from three years of funding for a modelling study of processes controlling the distribution of metabolic chemical tracers in surface waters. We determined concentrations of the gases O{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, and the stable isotope ratio ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) of molecular oxygen in surface waters at Station ALOHA in conjunction with the Global Ocean Flux Study (GOFS) Hawaiian Ocean Time-series project during the years 1989- 90 and 1992-93. Under this contract we have incorporated chemical tracers into an existing ocean mixed-layer model to simulate the physical processes controlling the distribution and seasonal cycle of dissolved gases in the upper ocean. The broad background of concurrent chemical, physical, and biological measurements at Station ALOHA provides enough redundancy of ``ground truth`` to assess the model`s accuracy. Biological oxygen production estimated from modelled chemical tracers agrees with estimates based on measurement of carbon fluxes into the deep ocean and nitrate fluxes into the upper ocean during 1989-90 and 1992-93, verifying for the first time the utility of chemical tracers for determining biological fluxes in the ocean. Our results suggest that in the euphotic zone (the upper 100 m of the ocean), the net biological O{sub 2} production is 1.0-2. 0 moles m{sup -2}yr{sup - 1}. Inert gas (Ar, N{sub 2}) supersaturation levels show that air and bubble injection are important modes of air-sea gas transfer in the Station ALOHA region.

  9. Assessing Summer and Fall Chinook Salmon Restoration in the Upper Clearwater River and Principal Tributaries, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnsberg, Billy D.; Statler, David P.

    1995-08-01

    This is the first annual report of a five year study to assess summer and fall chinook salmon restoration potential in the upper Clearwater River and principal tributaries, Salmon, Grande Ronde, and Imnaha Rivers. During 1994, the authors focused primarily on assessing water temperatures and spawning habitat in the upper Clearwater River and principal tributaries. Water temperature analysis indicated a colder temperature regime in the upper Clearwater River above the North Fork Clearwater River confluence during the winter as compared to the lower Clearwater. This was due to warm water releases from Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork moderating temperatures in the lower Clearwater River. Thermal temperature unit analysis and available literature suggest a 75% survival threshold level may be anticipated for chinook salmon egg incubation if spawning would occur by November 1 in the upper Clearwater River. Warm water upwelling in historic summer and fall chinook spawning areas may result in increased incubation survivals and will be tested in the future. The authors observed a total of 37 fall chinook salmon redds in the Clearwater River subbasin. They observed 30 redds in the mainstem Clearwater below the North Fork Clearwater River confluence and seven redds in the North Fork Clearwater River. No redds were observed in the South Fork Clearwater, Middle Fork Clearwater, or Selway Rivers. They observed one fall chinook salmon redd in the Salmon River. They recovered 10 fall chinook salmon carcasses in the Clearwater River to obtain biological measurements and to document hatchery contribution to spawning. Unseasonably high and cold Dworshak Dam releases coinciding with early juvenile fall chinook salmon rearing in the lower Clearwater River may be influencing selective life history traits including growth, smolt development, outmigration timing, behavior, and could be directly affecting survival. During July 1994, discharges from Dworshak Dam increased from a baseline release of 1,300 cfs to a maximum release of 25,530 cfs with an overall temperature depression in the lower Clearwater River exceeding 10 C. With continued Dworshak Dam operations as those documented in 1994, there is potential risk to the continued existence of the endangered fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. Additional data and conclusions will be contained in successive years` annual reports.

  10. Marine carbonate embayment system in an Eolian dune terrain, Permian Upper Minnelusa Formation, Rozet Area, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achauer, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    The eolian origin for Minnelusa sandstones has been stressed in numerous published articles. However, the dolomites that are interbedded with the eolian sandstones have received little attention. Isopach mapping of one of the dolomite units (Dolomite I) reflects a marine embayment system whose individual embayments range from 1/2 to 1 mi in width and trend primarily in a northwest direction. Consistently the embayment dolomites pinch out against the flanks of reworked, low relief, broad, eolian dune ridges. So far, 108 mi/sup 2/ of the Dolomite I marine embayment system have been mapped, but the overall extent of the system is undoubtedly much greater. Dolomite I is rarely cored, but cores from stratigraphically higher embayment dolomites in the upper Minnelusa show that these dolomites display the following, shoaling-upward sequence: (1) subtidal, sparingly fossiliferous dolomite; (2) intertidal, algal-laminated or brecciated or mud-cracked dolomite; and (3) very thin, supratidal, nodular anhydrite. The embayments, therefore, became the sites of marine sabkhas located between eolian dunes. Two main conclusions emerge from this study: (1) the juxtaposition of eolian sandstones and marine dolomites in a tectonically stable area suggests that eustatic sea level changes and a very arid climate were responsible for the marked environmental and lithologic changes observed in the upper Minnelusa, and (2) arid, coastal, evaporitic sabkhas bordered by eolian dunes are known from a number of modern and ancient cases, but marine carbonate embayments and associated evaporitic sabkhas that penetrate deeply into eolian sandstone terrains are rare.

  11. Initial activity of reduced chromia/alumina catalyst in n-butane dehydrogenation monitored by on-line FT-IR gas analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakuli, A.; Kytoekivi, A.; Suntola, T.

    1996-06-01

    The initial activity of chromia/alumina catalyst (13 wt% Cr) in n-butane dehydrogenation was studied in a flow reactor at 853 K. The initial activity was determined by on-line FT-IR gas analysis, which enabled sampling of the gaseous product mixture at a time resolution of seconds. The catalysts were processed in repeated cycles of oxidation, reduction, and dehydrogenation using n-butane, methane, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide as reducing agents. With n-butane, methane, and hydrogen and dehydrogenation activity was associated with Cr{sup 3+} species apparently formed in the reduction of high-valence Cr species. The catalyst reduced with carbon monoxide at 853 K showed poor initial selectivity for butenes and, relative to the other catalysts. Simultaneous data relating the initial activity, coke content, and some of the physicochemical properties of the catalyst indicated that the surfaces of all catalysts were modified to some extent by the successive reaction cycles. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. THE NASA AMES PAH IR SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE VERSION 2.00: UPDATED CONTENT, WEB SITE, AND ON(OFF)LINE TOOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boersma, C.; Mattioda, A. L.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr.; Ricca, A.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; De Armas, F. Snchez; Saborido, G. Puerta; Hudgins, D. M.

    2014-03-01

    A significantly updated version of the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database, the first major revision since its release in 2010, is presented. The current version, version 2.00, contains 700 computational and 75 experimental spectra compared, respectively, with 583 and 60 in the initial release. The spectra span the 2.5-4000 ?m (4000-2.5 cm{sup -1}) range. New tools are available on the site that allow one to analyze spectra in the database and compare them with imported astronomical spectra as well as a suite of IDL object classes (a collection of programs utilizing IDL's object-oriented programming capabilities) that permit offline analysis called the AmesPAHdbIDLSuite. Most noteworthy among the additions are the extension of the computational spectroscopic database to include a number of significantly larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the ability to visualize the molecular atomic motions corresponding to each vibrational mode, and a new tool that allows one to perform a non-negative least-squares fit of an imported astronomical spectrum with PAH spectra in the computational database. Finally, a methodology is described in the Appendix, and implemented using the AmesPAHdbIDLSuite, that allows the user to enforce charge balance during the fitting procedure.

  13. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stablemore » and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.« less

  14. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  15. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h? at 100 C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stable and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 ?mol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a speciation approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H? generation from FA.

  16. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Φ⁻⁻(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; et al

    2012-01-30

    We searched for the Φ⁻⁻(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the Ξ⁻π⁻-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the Ξ⁻π⁻ system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of Φ⁻⁻(1860) with a consecutive decay intoΞ⁻π⁻ in the photon-energy range 4.5GeVγ<5.5GeV.

  17. The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsilingiris, P.T. )

    1992-07-01

    The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

  18. Upper limits to surface-force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, Ludovico; Ciani, Giacomo; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Tombolato, David; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph; Cavalleri, Antonella

    2007-02-15

    We have measured surface-force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA proof mass surrounded by its capacitive motion sensor. Forces are detected through the torque exerted on the proof mass by means of a torsion pendulum in the 0.1-30 mHz range. The sensor and electronics have the same design as for the flight hardware, including 4 mm gaps around the proof mass. The measured upper limit for forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal-to-noise ratio up to {approx_equal}40 for 1 yr integration. We also discuss how LISA Pathfinder will substantially improve this limit, approaching the LISA performance.

  19. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  20. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, J.S.; Gross, E.A.; Joyner, D.R.; Godo, M.N.; Morgan, K.T. (Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  1. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-15

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  2. Broadly tunable picosecond ir source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, A.J.; Hyer, R.C.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1980-04-23

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 ..mu..m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 ..mu..m along both pump lines are 6 to 8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 ..mu..m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 ..mu..J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 ..mu..m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 ..mu..m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  3. Broadly tunable picosecond IR source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, Anthony J. (Nesconset, NY); Hyer, Ronald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Shapiro, Stanley J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  4. Microsoft Word - S07118_IR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection of the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties December 2010 LMS/MNT/S07118 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S07118 2010 Annual Inspection of the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties December 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2010 Annual Inspection-Monticello, Utah December 2010 Doc. No. S07118 Page i Contents Executive Summary

  5. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; ,

    2006-06-01

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  6. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell, Uravan, Colorado, DOE/AL/62350-250, Revision 1, July 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DISPOSAL CELL URAUAN, COLORADO July 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Dhrision U MTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico DOElAU62350-250 REV. 1 Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank LONG-TERM GURMIWNCE P U N FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DrsPosAL CEU. WYAAI. COhORAOD TABLE OF DONENTe TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSEANDSCOPE

  7. Penetration depth and absorption mechanisms of spin currents in Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} and Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 50} polycrystalline films by ferromagnetic resonance and spin pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merodio, P.; Ghosh, A.; Lemonias, C.; Gautier, E.; Ebels, U.; Chshiev, M.; Béa, H. E-mail: helene.bea@cea.fr; Baltz, V. E-mail: helene.bea@cea.fr

    2014-01-20

    Spintronics relies on the spin dependent transport properties of ferromagnets (Fs). Although antiferromagnets (AFs) are used for their magnetic properties only, some fundamental F-spintronics phenomena like spin transfer torque, domain wall motion, and tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance also occur with AFs, thus making AF-spintronics attractive. Here, room temperature critical depths and absorption mechanisms of spin currents in Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} and Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 50} are determined by F-resonance and spin pumping. In particular, we find room temperature critical depths originating from different absorption mechanisms: dephasing for Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} and spin flipping for Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 50}.

  8. Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

    2010-07-01

    The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also appears to be transient such that the evolution of the contaminant plumes is transient.

  9. Geochemical indicators of depositional environment and soruce-rock potential for the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group, Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. )

    1994-05-01

    Two depositional cycles are recognized within the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group of the Illinois basin in a core from the New Jersey Zinc 1 Parrish well of Fulton County, Illinois. Organic carbon (C[sub org]), total sulfur, [sup 13]C content of the organic carbon ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org]), hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI and OI) from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and yields of extractable organic matter (EOM) vary through the cycles. Dark-brown to black, laminated shales are present in the lower portion of each cycle and have high values of C[sub org] (1.0-3.0%), HI (500-1000 mg hydrocarbon [HC]/g total organic carbon[TOC]), and EOM (500-2500 ppm), and more negative [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org] = -30 to -30.5%). Gray to greenish-gray, bioturbated shales are present in the upper portion of each cycle and have low values of C[sub org] (<1.0%), HI (<500 mg HC/g TOC), and EOM (<500 ppm), and more positive [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values (-28.5 to 29.5%) compared to the laminated shales. Although thermally immature or marginally mature in this core, the laminated shales represent potential source rock s for petroleum because they contain good to excellent quantities of oil-prone organic matter and are more deeply buried in other areas of the basin. Kerogen elemental data and Rock-Eval data suggest that the source of organic matter in the Maquoketa was uniform, with the notable exception of graptolite-rich layers. Distributions of saturated hydrocarbons for Maquoketa samples resemble those derived from amorphous organic matter. Variations in bulk geochemical data and carbon isotopic compositions within the Maquoketa Group indicate substantial reworking and degradation of organic matter associated with bioturbation and oxygenated depositional conditions. 64 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Distribution, volume, and depositional origin of Upper Eocene bolide-generated sediments along the U. S. East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poag, C.W.; Poppe, L.J. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States)); Powars, D.S.; Mixon, R.B. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Upper Eocene bolidites (bolide-generated sedimentary deposits) appear to form a continuous coastwise band, 600 km long and 30--100 km wide, from North Carolina to New Jersey (> 65,000 km[sup 2]). The authors sampled these deposits in 14 boreholes (cores and rotary cuttings) and identified them on 36 offshore seismic-reflection profiles. Cores from the bolidites contain allogenic phenoclasts and fossils, as well as shock-altered minerals and tektite glass. On seismic profiles, the bolidites commonly exhibit interrupted, chaotic reflections and fill elongate or ovate excavations. Maximum bolidite thickness offshore is 500m in the presumed impact crater (New Jersey Continental Shelf); maximum thickness onshore is > 60m (southeastern Virginia). Estimated bolidite volume is at least 1,700km[sup 3]. Disparate depositional processes formed four types of bolidites: (1) chaotic fill within the impact crater; (2) stratified( ) ejecta around the crater; (3) ejecta-bearing debrite at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 612 (New Jersey slope); and (4) impact tsunamiite in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, and New Jersey.

  11. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  12. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V.; Sykes, Jenna; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony; Dawson, Laura A.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ?5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ?5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ?10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ?60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  14. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones To incorporate the effects of tropical cyclone (TC)-induced upper ocean ...

  15. Internal attachment of laser beam welded stainless steel sheathed thermocouples into stainless steel upper end caps in nuclear fuel rods for the LOFT Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welty, R.K.; Reid, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc., acting as a subcontractor to EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, conducted a laser beam welding study to attach internal stainless steel thermocouples into stainless steel upper end caps in nuclear fuel rods. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of laser welding a single 0.063 inch diameter stainless steel (304) sheathed thermocouple into a stainless steel (316) upper end cap for nuclear fuel rods. A laser beam was selected because of the extremely high energy input in unit volume that can be achieved allowing local fusion of a small area irrespective of the difference in material thickness to be joined. A special weld fixture was designed and fabricated to hold the end cap and the thermocouple with angular and rotational adjustment under the laser beam. A commercial pulsed laser and energy control system was used to make the welds.

  16. On the possibility of the generation of high harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV upon interaction of intense mid-IR radiation with neutral gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelina, A S; Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2014-05-30

    Based on the analytical quantum-mechanical description in the framework of the modified strong-field approximation, we have investigated high harmonic generation of mid-IR laser radiation in neutral gases taking into account the depletion of bound atomic levels of the working medium and the electron magnetic drift in a high-intensity laser field. The possibility is shown to generate high-order harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV under irradiation of helium atoms by intense femtosecond laser pulses with a centre wavelength of 8 – 10.6 μm. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  17. Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compounds CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Calder, S.; Janoschek, M.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we have investigated the magnetic ground state of the antiferromagnetic Kondo-lattice compounds CeMAl4Si2(M = Rh, Ir) using neutron powder diffraction. Although both of these compounds show two magnetic transitions TN1 and TN2 in the bulk properties measurements, evidence for magnetic long-range order was only found below the lower transition TN2. Analysis of the diffraction profiles reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector k = (0, 0, 1/2). The magnetic moment in the ordered state of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 were determined to be 1.14(2) and 1.41(3) ?B/Ce, respectively, and are parallel to the crystallographic c-axis in agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  18. Decay of the 9/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 181}Tl and mass determination of low-lying states in {sup 181}Tl, {sup 177}Au, and {sup 173}Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-08-15

    A detailed spectroscopic study of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 181}Tl and the daughter of its {alpha} decay, {sup 177}Au, has been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI). The mass excess, excitation energy, and decay scheme of the isomeric 1.40(3) ms, 9/2{sup -} intruder state in {sup 181}Tl have been established for the first time. These results solve a long-standing puzzle of the unrealistically large reduced {alpha}-decay width of this isomer. Based on this, the previously unknown masses of the long-lived isomeric states in {sup 177}Au and {sup 173}Ir have been derived. In turn, it now allows the excitation energies of previously identified bands in {sup 177}Au and {sup 173}Ir to be deduced and compared with theoretical predictions. First measurements of {alpha}-decay branching ratios for {sup 181}Tl{sup m} and {sup 177}Au{sup m,g} are also reported.

  19. First-principles studies of structural stabilities and enthalpies of formation of refractory intermetallics: TM and TM3 (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Weiwei; Chen, X.; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Y. Y.; Fu, Chong Long; Meschel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Using first-principles local density functional approach, we have calculated the ground-state structural phase stabilities and enthalpies of formation of thirty-six binary transition-metal refractory TM and TM3 compounds formed by Group IV elements T (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and platinum group elements M (M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt) . We compared our results with the available experimental data and found good agreement between theory and experiment in both the trends of structural stabilities and the magnitudes of formation enthalpies. Moreover, based on our calculated results, an empirical relationship between cohesive energies ( E) and melting temperatures (Tm) was derived as Tm = 0.0292 E/kB (where kB is the Boltzmann constant) for both TM and TM3 compounds.

  20. Effects of irradiation temperature on Charpy and tensile properties of high-copper, low upper-shelf, submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Berggren, R.G.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents analyses of the Charpy impact and tensile test data, including adjustments for irradiation temperature and fluence normalization which make possible comparison of the irradiation sensitivity of the different welds. Analyses revealed dependence of yield and ultimate strength on irradiation temperature {minus}0.8 MPA/{degrees}C, respectively. Similarly, the Charpy impact energy changes due to irradiation temperature were {minus}0.5{degrees}C/{degrees}C for transition shift and {minus}0.05 J/{degrees}C for upper-shelf energy decrease. After adjustment to an irradiation temperature of 288{degrees}C and normalization to a fluence of 8 {times} 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2} percentage increases in yield strength due to irradiation ranged from about 21 to 35% while those for ultimate strength ranged from about 13 to 20%. The Charpy transition temperature shifts ranged from 59 to 123{degrees}C while the postirradiation upper-shelf energies ranged from 58 to 79 J.

  1. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with 2.1 - 5.4 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, The CDF; Collaboration, the D0; Physics, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

    2009-11-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-4.8 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 2.1-5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.70 (0.94) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.78 (0.89). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs is 163 < m{sub H} < 166 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion of 159 < m{sub H} < 168 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. The overthrusted Zaza Terrane of middle Cretaceous over the North American continental carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age - relationships to oil generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echevarria Rodriguez, G.; Castro, J.A.; Amaro, S.V.

    1996-08-01

    The Zaza Terrane is part of the Caribbean plate thrust over the southern edge of the North American basinal and platform carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age. Zaza Terrane are volcanic and ophiolitic rocks of Cretaceous age. The ophiolites are mostly serpentines which behave as reservoirs and seals. All Cuban oil fields are either within Zaza Terrane or basinal carbonates underneath, or not far away to the north of the thrust contacts. It appears that the overthrusting of the Zaza Terrane caused the generation of oil in the basinal carbonate source rocks underneath, due to the increase of rock thickness which lowered the oil window to a deeper position and increased the geothermal gradient. Oil generation was after thrusting, during post-orogenic. API gravity of oil is light toward the south and heavy to very heavy to the north. Source rocks to the south are probably of terrigenous origin.

  3. Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

  4. Evaluation of the dosimetric impact of applying flattening filter-free beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage upper thoracic carcinoma of oesophagus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Zhixiong; Yang, Zhining; Fang, Weisheng; Lai, Peibo; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Vincent WC

    2015-06-15

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) radiation beams have recently become clinically available on modern linear accelerators in radiation therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric impact of using FFF beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer. Eleven patients with primary stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer were recruited. For each patient, two IMRT plans were computed using conventional beams (Con-P) and FFF beams (FFF-P), respectively. Both plans employed a five-beam arrangement and were prescribed with 64 Gy to (planning target volume) PTV1 and 54 Gy to PTV2 in 32 fractions using 6 MV photons. The dose parameters of the target volumes and organs at risks (OARs), and treatment parameters including the monitor units (MU) and treatment time (TT) for Con-P and FFF-P were recorded and compared. The mean D{sub 5} of PTV1 and PTV2 were higher in FFF-P than Con-P by 0.4 Gy and 0.3 Gy, respectively. For the OARs, all the dose parameters did not show significant difference between the two plans except the mean V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the lung in which the FFF-P was lower (46.7% vs. 47.3% and 39.1% vs. 39.6%, respectively). FFF-P required 54% more MU but 18.4% less irradiation time when compared to Con-P. The target volume and OARs dose distributions between the two plans were comparable. However, FFF-P was more effective in sparing the lung from low dose and reduced the mean TT compared with Con-P. Long-term clinical studies are suggested to evaluate the radiobiological effects of FFF beams.

  5. Upper critical fields and two-band superconductivity in Sr1-xEux(Fe0.89Co0.11)₂As₂ (x=0.20 and 0.46)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Rongwei; Mun, Eun Deok; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Zapf, V. S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2012-02-13

    The upper critical fields Hc2(T) of single crystals of Sr1-xEux(Fe₀.₈₉Co₀.₁₁)₂As₂ (x=0.20 and 0.46) were determined by radio-frequency penetration depth measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. Hc2(T) approaches the Pauli limiting field but shows an upward curvature with an enhancement from the orbital limited field, as inferred from the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory. We discuss the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields and the decreasing anisotropy using a two-band BCS model.

  6. Gemini long-slit observations of luminous obscured quasars: Further evidence for an upper limit on the size of the narrow-line region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Greene, Jenny E.; Myers, Adam D.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Liu, Xin

    2014-05-20

    We examine the spatial extent of the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of a sample of 30 luminous obscured quasars at 0.4 < z < 0.7 observed with spatially resolved Gemini-N GMOS long-slit spectroscopy. Using the [O III] ?5007 emission feature, we estimate the size of the NLR using a cosmology-independent measurement: the radius where the surface brightness falls to 10{sup 15} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2} arcsec{sup 2}. We then explore the effects of atmospheric seeing on NLR size measurements and conclude that direct measurements of the NLR size from observed profiles are too large by 0.1-0.2 dex on average, as compared to measurements made to best-fit Srsic or Voigt profiles convolved with the seeing. These data, which span a full order of magnitude in IR luminosity (log (L {sub 8} {sub ?m}/erg s{sup 1}) = 44.4-45.4), also provide strong evidence that there is a flattening of the relationship between NLR size and active galactic nucleus luminosity at a seeing-corrected size of ?7 kpc. The objects in this sample have high luminosities which place them in a previously under-explored portion of the size-luminosity relationship. These results support the existence of a maximal size of the NLR around luminous quasars; beyond this size, there is either not enough gas or the gas is over-ionized and does not produce enough [O III] ?5007 emission.

  7. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

  8. Evidence of climatic variations in upper Pleistocene and Holocene sediments from the lagoon of Venice (Italy and the Bohai Sea (China))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonardi, M.; Carbognin, L.; Tosi, L.; Marabini, F.

    1996-12-31

    An accurate forecasting of environmental impact on sea level and shoreline changes due to global warming, requires a detailed investigation and interpretation of the events that occurred during the past 20,000 years. This time interval in fact corresponds to two significant climatic global changes: the last Wuermian glaciation, during the Upper Pleistocene, and the warming during the Holocene. Examples of the climatic variation impact on paleoenvironments are here evidenced by sedimentological studies, radiocarbon dating, paleobotanic, paleontological, mineralogical and geochemical investigations of two stratigraphic columns that are geographically far apart: the Lagoon of Venice, Italy, and the Bohai Sea, China. The study focuses first on a general overview of the regional paleoclimatic history of these two core locations and their correlation with the sedimentological variations; second on some depositional events, such clay layers and beachrock formations, that carry the imprints of the climatic conditions. The results of this investigation may contribute to a better understanding of diagenetic processes, still not sufficiently described, caused by the climatic changes. Furthermore the study provided information that may be useful to a more complete overview of the environmental impact caused by natural global warming before the anthropogenic input.

  9. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  10. TWO UPPER LIMITS ON THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT, WITH DIFFERING IMPLICATIONS: WASP-1 HAS A HIGH OBLIQUITY AND WASP-2 IS INDETERMINATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teruyuki; Johnson, John Asher; Paul Butler, R.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Narita, Norio; Sato, Bun'ei; Enya, Keigo; Fischer, Debra

    2011-09-01

    We present precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-1 and WASP-2 throughout transits of their giant planets. Our goal was to detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, the anomalous RV observed during eclipses of rotating stars, which can be used to study the obliquities of planet-hosting stars. For WASP-1, a weak signal of a prograde orbit was detected with {approx}2{sigma} confidence, and for WASP-2 no signal was detected. The resulting upper bounds on the RM amplitude have different implications for these two systems because of the contrasting transit geometries and the stellar types. Because WASP-1 is an F7V star, and such stars are typically rapid rotators, the most probable reason for the suppression of the RM effect is that the star is viewed nearly pole-on. This implies that the WASP-1 star has a high obliquity with respect to the edge-on planetary orbit. Because WASP-2 is a K1V star, and is expected to be a slow rotator, no firm conclusion can be drawn about the stellar obliquity. Our data and our analysis contradict an earlier claim that WASP-2b has a retrograde orbit, thereby revoking this system's status as an exception to the pattern that cool stars have low obliquities.

  11. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  12. A Simultaneous Multi-phase Approach to Determine P-wave and S-wave Attenuation of the Crust and Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M

    2009-02-26

    We have generalized the methodology of our regional amplitude tomography from the Lg phase to the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg). Differences in the geometrical spreading, source term, site term, and travel paths are accounted for, while event source parameters such as seismic moment are consistent among phases. In the process, we have developed the first regional attenuation model that uses the amplitudes of four regional phases to determine a comprehensive P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle. When applied to an area encompassing the Middle East, eastern Europe, western Asia, south Asia, and northeast Africa for the 1-2 Hz passband, we find large differences in the attenuation of the lithosphere across the region. The tectonic Tethys collision zone has high attenuation, while stable outlying regions have low attenuation. While crust and mantle Q variations are often consistent, we do find several notable areas where they differ considerably, but are appropriate given the region's tectonic history. Lastly, the relative values of Qp and Qs indicate that scattering Q is likely the dominant source of attenuation in the crust at these frequencies.

  13. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  14. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

    2011-03-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W{sup +}W{sup -}, although acceptance for decays into {tau}{sup |+} {tau}{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg {yields} H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158 < m{sub H} < 173 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added, additional new channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 6.7 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.56 and 0.68 the values of the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2} and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg -> H -> W^+W^- and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.

    2010-05-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.o6 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of itnegrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% Confidence Level upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, they exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 Gev.

  17. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Artikov, A.; Budagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Glagolev, V.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Semenov, A.; Simonenko, A.; Sisakyan, A.

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} in pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% confidence level upper limit on {sigma}(gg{yields}H)xB(H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H}=120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H}=165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H}=200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% confidence level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 GeV.

  18. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    project entails collecting soil and rock samples using the most efficient and least-invasive methods practicable defining the nature and extent of any residual contamination...

  19. IR-Improved DGLAP-CS Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ward, B. F. L.

    2008-01-01

    We show that it is possible to improve the infrared aspects of the standard treatment of the DGLAP-CS evolution theory to take into account a large class of higher-order corrections that significantly improve the precision of the theory for any given level of fixed-order calculation of its respective kernels. We illustrate the size of the effects we resum using the moments of the parton distributions.

  20. Microsoft Word - S05949_IR.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2009 LMS/MNT/S05949 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S05949 2009 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2009 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Annual Inspection-Monticello, Utah December 2009 Doc. No. S05949 Page i Contents Executive

  1. Microsoft Word - S08313_IR_Final

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection of the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties November 2011 LMS/MNT/S08313 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S08313 2011 Annual Inspection of the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties November 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Annual Inspection-Monticello, Utah November 2011 Doc. No. S08313 Page i Contents Executive Summary

  2. IRS SCAN-MAPPING OF THE WASP-WAIST NEBULA (IRAS 16253-2429). I. DERIVATION OF SHOCK CONDITIONS FROM H{sub 2} EMISSION AND DISCOVERY OF 11.3 {mu}m PAH ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsony, Mary; Wolf-Chase, Grace A.; Ciardi, David R.

    2010-09-01

    The outflow driven by the Class 0 protostar, IRAS 16253-2429, is associated with bipolar cavities visible in scattered mid-infrared light, which we refer to as the Wasp-Waist Nebula. InfraRed Spectometer (IRS) scan mapping with the Spitzer Space Telescope of a {approx}1' x 2' area centered on the protostar was carried out. The outflow is imaged in six pure rotational (0-0 S(2) through 0-0 S(7)) H{sub 2} lines, revealing a distinct, S-shaped morphology in all maps. A source map in the 11.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature is presented in which the protostellar envelope appears in absorption. This is the first detection of absorption in the 11.3 {mu}m PAH feature. Spatially resolved excitation analysis of positions in the blue- and redshifted outflow lobes, with extinction-corrections determined from archival Spitzer 8 {mu}m imaging, shows remarkably constant temperatures of {approx}1000 K in the shocked gas. The radiated luminosity in the observed H{sub 2} transitions is found to be 1.94 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -5} L{sub sun} in the redshifted lobe and 1.86 {+-} 0.04 x 10{sup -5} L{sub sun} in the blueshifted lobe. These values are comparable to the mechanical luminosity of the flow. By contrast, the mass of hot (T {approx} 1000 K) H{sub 2} gas is 7.95 {+-} 0.19 x 10{sup -7} M{sub sun} in the redshifted lobe and 5.78 {+-} 0.17 x 10{sup -7} M{sub sun} in the blueshifted lobe. This is just a tiny fraction, of order 10{sup -3}, of the gas in the cold (30 K), swept-up gas mass derived from millimeter CO observations. The H{sub 2} ortho/para ratio of 3:1 found at all mapped points in this flow suggests previous passages of shocks through the gas. Comparison of the H{sub 2} data with detailed shock models of Wilgenbus et al. shows the emitting gas is passing through Jump (J-type) shocks. Pre-shock densities of 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3{<=}} n {sub H{<=}} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} are inferred for the redshifted lobe and n {sub H{<=}} 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} for the blueshifted lobe. Shock velocities are 5 km s{sup -1} {<=} v{sub s} {<=} 10 km s{sup -1} for the redshifted gas and v{sub s} = 10 km s{sup -1} for the blueshifted gas. Initial transverse (to the shock) magnetic field strengths for the redshifted lobe are in the range 10-32 {mu}G, and just 3 {mu}G for the blueshifted lobe. A cookbook for using the CUBISM contributed software for IRS spectral mapping data is presented in the Appendix.

  3. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

  4. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  5. The influence of differential irradiation and circulation on the thermal evolution of gas giant planets. I. Upper limits from radiative equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauscher, Emily; Showman, Adam P.

    2014-04-01

    As a planet ages, it cools and its radius shrinks at a rate set by the efficiency with which heat is transported from the interior out to space. The bottleneck for this transport is at the boundary between the convective interior and the radiative atmosphere; the opacity there sets the global cooling rate. Models of planetary evolution are often one dimensional (1D), such that the radiative-convective boundary (RCB) is defined by a single temperature, pressure, and opacity. In reality the spatially inhomogeneous stellar heating pattern and circulation in the atmosphere could deform the RCB, allowing heat from the interior to escape more efficiently through regions with lower opacity. We present an analysis of the degree to which the RCB could be deformed and the resultant change in the evolutionary cooling rate. In this initial work we calculate the upper limit for this effect by comparing an atmospheric structure in local radiative equilibrium to its 1D equivalent. We find that the cooling through an uneven RCB could be enhanced over cooling through a uniform RCB by as much as 10%-50%. We also show that the deformation of the RCB (and the enhancement of the cooling rate) increases with a greater incident stellar flux or a lower inner entropy. Our results indicate that this mechanism could significantly change a planet's thermal evolution, causing it to cool and shrink more quickly than would otherwise be expected. This may exacerbate the well-known difficulty in explaining the very large radii observed for some hot Jupiters.

  6. Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakirev, Fedor F; Jaroszynski, J; Hunte, F; Balicas, L; Jo, Youn - Jung; Raicevic, I; Gurevich, A; Larbalestier, D C; Fang, L; Cheng, P; Jia, Y; Wen, H H

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

  7. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  8. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ACS IMAGING OF THE GOALS SAMPLE: QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF NEARBY LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES WITH L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11.4} L{sub Sun}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Privon, G. C. E-mail: aevans@virginia.edu; and others

    2013-05-10

    A Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys study of the structural properties of 85 luminous and ultraluminous (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11.4} L{sub Sun }) infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample is presented. Two-dimensional GALFIT analysis has been performed on F814W ''I-band'' images to decompose each galaxy, as appropriate, into bulge, disk, central point-spread function (PSF) and stellar bar components. The fraction of bulge-less disk systems is observed to be higher in LIRGs (35%) than in ULIRGs (20%), with the disk+bulge systems making up the dominant fraction of both LIRGs (55%) and ULIRGs (45%). Further, bulge+disk systems are the dominant late-stage merger galaxy type and are the dominant type for LIRGs and ULIRGs at almost every stage of galaxy-galaxy nuclear separation. The mean I-band host absolute magnitude of the GOALS galaxies is -22.64 {+-} 0.62 mag (1.8{sup +1.4}{sub -0.4} L{sup *}{sub I}), and the mean bulge absolute magnitude in GOALS galaxies is about 1.1 mag fainter than the mean host magnitude. Almost all ULIRGs have bulge magnitudes at the high end (-20.6 to -23.5 mag) of the GOALS bulge magnitude range. Mass ratios in the GOALS binary systems are consistent with most of the galaxies being the result of major mergers, and an examination of the residual-to-host intensity ratios in GOALS binary systems suggests that smaller companions suffer more tidal distortion than the larger companions. We find approximately twice as many bars in GOALS disk+bulge systems (32.8%) than in pure-disk mergers (15.9%) but most of the disk+bulge systems that contain bars are disk-dominated with small bulges. The bar-to-host intensity ratio, bar half-light radius, and bar ellipticity in GOALS galaxies are similar to those found in nearby spiral galaxies. The fraction of stellar bars decreases toward later merger stages and smaller nuclear separations, indicating that bars are destroyed as the merger advances. In contrast, the fraction of nuclear PSFs increases toward later merger stages and is highest in late-stage systems with a single nucleus. Thus, light from an active galactic nucleus or compact nuclear star cluster is more visible at I band as ULIRGs enter their latter stages of evolution. Finally, both GOALS elliptical hosts and nearby Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ellipticals occupy the same part of the surface brightness versus half-light radius plot (i.e., the {sup K}ormendy Relation{sup )} and have similar slopes, consistent with the possibility that the GOALS galaxies belong to the same parent population as the SDSS ellipticals.

  9. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  10. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  11. Materials Data on IrS3Cl11 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on IrS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, Robert C.; Costello, Ronald J.

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  14. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  15. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: PECS-X: 10th International Symposium on Photonic and Electromagnetic Crystal Structures ; 2012-06-03 - 2012-06-08 ; Santa Fe, New Mexico, United ...

  16. TC&WM EIS doc.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. High Tc YBCO superconductor deposited on biaxially textured Ni substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budai, John D. (Oakridge, TN); Christen, David K. (Oakridge, TN); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); He, Qing (Knoxville, TN); Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Dominic F. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN); Norton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Paranthaman, Mariappan (Knoxville, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Knoxville, TN); Specht, Eliot D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting article includes a biaxially-textured Ni substrate, and epitaxial buffer layers of Pd (optional), CeO.sub.2 and YSZ, and a top layer of in-plane aligned, c-axis oriented YBCO having a critical current density (J.sub.c) in the range of at least 100,000 A/cm.sup.2 at 77 K.

  18. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 ; Singh, Ranjan 1 ; Yan, Li 3 ; Jia, Quanxi 1 ; Trugman, Stuart A. 1 ; Taylor, Antoinette J. 1 ; Nelson, Keith A. 2 ; Chen, Hou-Tong 1 + Show Author ...

  19. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Yan, Li 3 ; Jia, Quanxi 1 ; Trugman, Stuart A. 1 ; Taylor, Antoinette J. 1 ; Nelson, Keith A. 2 ; Chen, Hou-Tong 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National ...

  20. High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    INL researchers have created a new thermocouple that can resist high temperature and radiation. This device will improve safety and reduce costs associated with unit failures. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  1. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such an explanation would not only answer a foundational question in modern solid-state physics, but it could provide more precise hints on where to search for the elusive...

  2. Bridging the Gaps of High-Tc Superconductor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 1986, this field has become one of the most important research topics in solid state physics. In the past 20 years many unconventional properties have been discovered in...

  3. LD Vehicles AFDC 11 25 13 TC.xlsx

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Model Year 2014: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 1 (Updated 11252013) MY FuelPowertrain Type Make Model Vehicle Type Engine SizeCylinders Transmission...

  4. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. No abstract prepared. Authors: Grady, Nathaniel 1 ; Perkins, Bradford G. Jr. 2 ; Hwang, Harold Y. 2 ; Singh, Ranjan 1 ; Yang, Hao 3 ;...

  5. Melt-spin processing of high {Tc} oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folkerts, T.J.; Wu, Hengning; Yoo, S.I.; Merkle, B.D.; Arrasmith, S.R.; Dennis, K.W.; Kramer, M.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1993-10-01

    Containerless techniques offer distinct advantages for the melt processing of oxide superconductors. The majority of these materials form liquids which are highly reactive with standard crucible materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt, resulting in non-negligible contamination. We have developed a containerless melt-spin processing technique where in 50--400 {mu}m particles of REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} high temperature oxide superconductors are melted in free fall through a vertical tube furnace and quenched onto a copper wheel. Previously this method has been successful in producing glasses of NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}. In this report we discuss the results for both stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (Y123). Thermal, microstructural, and superconducting characterization of both the as-quenched and the annealed materials will be presented.

  6. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory (LANL) LDRD United States 2012-08-13 English Conference Conference: SPIE Optics+Photonics ; 2012-08-12 - 2012-08-16 ; San Diego, California, United States Medium: ED...

  7. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  8. Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

    2011-08-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

  9. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the tribe will explore the feasibility of wind development in an effort to achieve energy self-sufficiency by reducing the tribe's long-term operational costs and providing reasonable capital cost rate of returns and to reduce the tribe's carbon footprint and impact on climate change.

  10. Upper Mahiao Binary GEPP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  11. Upper Peninsula Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1,874 25,909 16 7,882 68,251 51,750 2008-06 2,955 18,975 45,964 2,515 19,351 5,745 1,709 26,782 13 7,179 65,108 51,722 2008-05 3,109 20,004 46,024 2,552 19,644 5,752 1,858...

  12. Resistivity sections, Upper Arkansas River Basin, Colorado |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    were made to verify a previous gravity survey and to help locate areas where ground-water supplies might be developed. This report presents the results of the surveys in the...

  13. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) Univ. Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany) Publication Date: 2015-01-20 OSTI Identifier: 1193196 Report Number(s):...

  14. On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. IR&D spells success for Battelle scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, C Thomas Jr; Dron, Jonni R.

    2006-04-18

    An overview of the Independent Research and Development program, including the benefits for both Battelle scientists and our industry partners.

  16. Molecular Design of Near-IR Harvesting Unsymmetrical Squaraine Dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Mor, Gopal K.; Paulose, Maggie; Varghese, Oomman K.; Baik, Chul; Grimes, Craig A.

    2010-08-17

    The functionalized unsymmetrical benzothiazole squaraine organic sensitizers 5-carboxy-2-({3-[(3-hexylbenzothiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)methyl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxo-2-cyclobuten-1-ylidene}methyl)-1-hexyl-3,3-dimethyl-3H-indolium (hereafter named as SK-11) and 5-carboxy-2-({3-[(3-hexyl-5-methoxybenzothiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)methyl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxo-2-cyclobuten-1-ylidene}methyl)-1-hexyl-3,3-dimethyl-3H-indolium (coded as SK-12) are designed and developed to observe an intense and wider absorption band in the red/NIR wavelength region. DFT/TDDFT calculations have been performed on the two unsymmetrical squaraine sensitizers to gain insight into their electronic and optical properties. The utility of these dyes in solid state dye sensitized solar cells (SS-DSSCs) is demonstrated.

  17. Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The dryer is unique as it uses an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) to remove humidity from ... by GE. Given the aggressive, competitive nature of the appliance business, higher risk ...

  18. Solar Energy Windows and Smart IR Switchable Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarny, James; Kornish, Brian

    2011-09-30

    The three building envelope functions with the largest impact on the energy usage are illumination, energy flux and energy production. In general, these three functions are addressed separately in the building design. A step change toward a zero-energy building can be achieved with a glazing system that combines these three functions and their control into a single unit. In particular, significant value could be realized if illumination into the building is dynamically controlled such that it occurs during periods of low load on the grid (e.g., morning) to augment illumination supplied by interior lights and then to have that same light diverted to PV energy production and the thermal energy rejected during periods of high load on the grid. The objective of this project is to investigate the feasibility of a glazing unit design that integrates these three key functions (illumination and energy flux control, and power production) into a single module.

  19. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ...

  20. Microsoft Word - IR-03-02-11.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Site March 2011 Page 1 2011 Annual Inspection Report for the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Summary The Grand Junction, Colorado, Site, inspected on February 15, 2011, was in excellent condition. Physical and institutional controls enacted at the site continue to be effective in preventing exposure to contamination remaining on the property. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 1.0 Introduction This report presents the results of the annual U.S.

  1. Microsoft Word - IR-MNT Feb 2014.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Information Repository Index Monticello Mill Tailings Site//Monticello Vicinity Properties Information Repository Index February 2014 File Index: MNT 010.02 Page 1 of 11 Abbreviations used in this index: CERCLA - Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (also known as Superfund) DOE/USDOE - U.S. Department of Energy MMTS - Monticello Mill Tailings Site MVP - Monticello Vicinity Properties OU - Operable Unit (MMTS has three Operable Units: OU I, OU II, and OU III) Ph

  2. Materials Data on Ir (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Building Characterization Sampling Plan. IR-1300-1301-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  4. Buildings Radiological Characterization Report. IR-1300-1302-1.03.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  5. Dismantling of Building 409. IR-800-803-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  6. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The minimum value of beta*sub y attainable at KEKB seems to relate to this scheme. Effectiveness of compensation solenoids and turn-by-turn BPMs etc. should be examined in more ...

  7. Interim Response Actions (IRA's). IR-700-703-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. Interim Response Actions (IRS's). I-900-901-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  9. Microsoft Word - IR-mnt Apr 2009.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site//Monticello Vicinity Properties Information Repository Subject Index, April 2009 File Index: MNT 010.02 Page 1 of 45 Information Repository for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site/Monticello Vicinity Properties Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Information Repository contains Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) Operable Units I, II and III and Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) documents generated after signatory acceptance of the MMTS OU I & II, MVP,

  10. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  11. * The far-infrared (? > 15 m) is an important

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of water vapor, the maximum mid-to-upper tropospheric cooling also occurs in the far-IR (left panel). * ARM science team research has resulted in enormous improvements in the...

  12. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  13. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  14. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    impact on tropical cyclones (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones To incorporate the effects of tropical cyclone (TC)-induced upper ocean mixing and sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on TC intensification, a vertical average of temperature down to a

  15. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    \ ,~ -'tc;- blank ! I ,- I i I ! f ,. I i..~--~-~*~*-------------.-.-.-.-------------r--------------------------------------~ .2.7. AP::'-!/ . 2.D (( .....--z....,... -;Ill .// -1-:...1- VVk:'.rttc4/( to' ----.J blank ", '1" . ~*.:-1 ... ., Tripp, Larry From: Sent: To: Subject: Attachments: Cone, Elaine M Thursday, April 28, 2011 9:02 AM Tripp, Larry DOL request SKMBT _ C552D11 042807460 (2).pdf larry, This request is for large amounts of data. Our approach for 16 & 17 will be to

  16. Characterization of the Upper Arkansas Basin, Chafee County,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Colorado Authors Batzle, M., Li, Y., Krahenbuhl, R., van Wijk, K., Liberty and L. Organization Colorado School of Mines and Boise State University Published Colorado...

  17. Characterization of the upper Arkansas Basin, Chaffee County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M., Krahenbuhl, R., Revel, A., Jakubowicz, H., Wood, S., van Wijk, K., Liberty and L. Organizations Colorado School of Mines, Boise State University and and Imperial...

  18. Recovery Act Weekly Video: Upper ALE Building Demolition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company demolition of 6652C Space Science Laboratory. The largest building atop Rattlesnake Mountain, the laboratory served as a nightly radar patrol center as well as a barracks. The Recovery Act funded project is helping reduce the site footprint.

  19. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy...

  20. Upper Limit on the Cosmological Gamma-ray Background (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Phys.Rev.D86:023003,2012 Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC)...

  1. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View...

  2. Upper Limit on the Cosmological Gamma-ray Background (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SLAC) Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);High Energy Physics (HEP) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO, HEPPH...

  3. Characterization of the Upper Arkansas Basin, Chaffee County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chaffee County, Colorado Authors Batzle, M., Raynolds, B., Jakubowicz, H., Collins, G., van Wijk, K., Liberty, L. and et al. Organizations Colorado School of Mines, Boise...

  4. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  5. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure...

  6. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flatten above or terminate against the A reflector. In at least one case, the 3D geometry of a B reflector can be determined from crossing 2D reflection lines, and we...

  7. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by mantle-derived melts has occurred. Authors Lee K. Steck, Clifford H. Thurber, Michael C. Fehler, William J. Lutter, Peter M. Roberts, W. Scott Baldridge, Darrik G....

  8. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Abbott et al.

    2004-03-09

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  9. Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  10. Project Reports for Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the tribe will explore the feasibility of wind development in an effort to achieve energy self-sufficiency by reducing the tribe's long-term operational costs and providing reasonable capital cost rate of returns and to reduce the tribe's carbon footprint and impact on climate change.

  11. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2014-01-09 OSTI Identifier: 1114151 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15885 Journal ID: ISSN 2041--8205; arXiv:1312.6462 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal...

  12. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2014-11-20 OSTI Identifier: 1165908 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-16151 Journal ID: ISSN 2041--8205 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource...

  13. Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples...

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. References Dick...

  15. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  16. Alcator C-Mod Upper Divertor Cryopump Quarterly Progress Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protection system upgrade (Rockfield Research, Inc.) * Lower Hybrid Stainless Steel Couplers - Detailed analysis of brazing process is now complete - New brazing fixture...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This house incorporates slab-on-grade, EPS roof, and radiant heating with an air-to-water heat pump that also preheats domestic hot water. Without counting in the solar panels, the home earns a home energy rating system (HERS) score of 37, with projected utility bills of about $740 a year. With the 6.4-kW photovoltaic power system installed on the roof, the homes HERS scores drops to -1 and utility bills for the all-electric home drop to zero. This home was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the affordable builder category.

  18. DOE Tour of Zero: The Montlake Modern by TC Legend Homes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 of 17 The home is equipped with a high-capture filtered fresh-air intake for passive makeup air; the air intake has a fan that is electronically controlled to operate when the...

  19. Low-loss, high-speed, high-{Tc} superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Uherka, K.L.

    1996-07-30

    A flywheel energy storage device is disclosed including an iron structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet. The stationary permanent magnet levitates the iron structure while the superconductor structure can stabilize and levitate the rotating iron structure. 15 figs.

  20. Materials Data on U2Si5Tc3 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-07

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Bearing design for flywheel energy storage using high-TC superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature superconductor material bearing system (38) This system (38) includes a rotor (50) having a ring permanent magnet (60), a plurality of permanent magnets (16, 20 and 70) for interacting to generate levitation forces for the system (38). This group of magnets are a push/pull bearing (75). A high temperature superconductor structure (30) interacts with the ting permanent magnet (60) to provide stabilizing forces for the system (38).

  2. Shielded high-TC BSCCO tapes or wires for high field applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Lelovic, Milan (Wheaton, IL); Eror, Nicholas G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A composite superconductor having an interior component of multiple filaments of superconducting Bi-2223 sheathed in a Ag or Ag alloy material, and a RE, TI or Hg based superconductor surrounding the interior component.

  3. Shielded high-Tc bscco tapes or wires for high field applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Lelovic, Milan (Wheaton, IL); Eror, Nicholas G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A composite superconductor having an interior component of multiple filaments of superconducting Bi-2223 sheathed in a Ag or Ag alloy material, and a RE, TI or Hg based superconductor surrounding the interior component.

  4. Low-loss, high-speed, high-{Tc} superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Uherka, K.L.

    1997-06-24

    A flywheel energy storage device is disclosed including an iron structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet. The stationary permanent magnet levitates the iron structure while the superconductor structure can stabilize the rotating iron structure. 15 figs.

  5. Compensated electron and hole pickets in an underdoped high Tc superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Neil; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Mielke, Charles H; Sebastian, Suchitra E; Goddard, P A; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Andersen, O K; Lonzarich, G G

    2010-01-01

    Important to the question of high temperature superconductivity is whether bound fermionic pairs with zero or finite momentum - exhibiting bosonic physics - are involved. Here we use angle-dependent magnetic quantum oscillation measurements in underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} to reveal two significantly differently corrugated small sections of Fermi surface, identifying them as comprising opposite carriers located at different locations of the Brillouin zone. The surprising finding that these disproportionately heavy small pockets are equal in size indicates they are prone to a finite momentum excitonic insulator instability. We discuss the possibility that reducing the doping drives YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} closer to an instability of this nature, its ultimate realization occuring at the metal-insulator quantum critical point, accompanied by a potential enhancement of superconducting transition temperatures.

  6. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV.

  8. Materials Data on Co2TcO4 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. HAB_Ecology_Letter_on_Draft_TC-WM-EIS043010.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. Irradiation of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tape for potential fusion applications: electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Gapud, Albert A. [University of South Alabama, Mobile; List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Greenwood, N T [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Alexander, J A [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Khan, A [University of South Alabama, Mobile

    2015-01-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    home has 6-in. SIP walls, a 10-in. SIP roof, and ICF foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab. A single ductless heat pump heats and cools the home,...

  12. Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as seen at the DOE EM Construction Project Review November 2010 Bechtel National, Inc. Albert A. Kruger, DOE-WED Glass Scientist John Olson, BNI Manager, Process Engineering Design...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2014: TC Legend Homes, Montlake Modern, Seattle, WA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montlake Modern Seattle, WA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) CASE STUDY The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to

  14. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Cedarwood, Bellingham, WA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cedarwood Bellingham, WA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you

  15. WP-96/TR-96 & TC-96 Power and Transmission Rate Case (rates/ratecases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Decision (WP-96 ROD) Final Studies And Documentation (WP-96-FS) Loads and Resources Revenue Requirement Segmentation Marginal Cost Analysis Wholesale Power Rate Development...

  16. Materials Data on Co2TcO4 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. DOE ZERH Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6” SIP walls and 10” SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes — Cedarwood, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This house was the Grand Winner in the Affordable Builder category of the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, and has 6-inch SIP walls, a 10-inch structural insulated panel roof, and insulating concrete forms foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab.A single ductless heat pump heats and cools the home, which also gets passive solar heating from south-facing triple-pane windows that heat a concrete slab floor plus a connected greenhouse.

  19. DOE Tour of Zero: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A greenhouse off the kitchen provides a thermal transition zone into the home, minimizing heat losses during the winter. The solar hot water heating panels are visible on the porch ...

  20. Ingersoll Rand I-R PowerWorks 70 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Category: Distributed Generation Prime Mover...